The Unz Review • An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersRussian Reaction Blog
Open Thread 124
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

One of my more successful photos even if I do say so myself.

I will be visiting Nizhny Novgorod this weekend.

 
• Tags: Open Thread 
Hide 473 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. This is the current Open Thread, where anything goes – within reason.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

  2. The chad Stalinist wedding-cake versus the virgin neoliberal skyscraper.

    • Replies: @Shortsword
    @Yevardian

    It would've been cool if USSR had kept up some construction of impressive looking buildings. Did they even build anything attractive looking after the 50s?

  3. AK,

    You are supposed to start the Open Thread on Friday….

    Sigh…. Light humor that I already used in another thread.

    PEACE 😇
     

    • Agree: mal
  4. I noticed Israel Shamir’s incredibly stupid article recently, I wonder how common his views are amongst ‘Russian’ ‘Nationalists’ these days, I notice the Saker peddles the same Islamophilic crap. On the other hand, the Pope has now just practically come out openly in favour of homosexual adoption.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Yevardian

    > Shamir
    > Russian nationalists

    LOL.

    You do realize that Shamir wants to put away ‘Russian’ ‘Nationalists’ in jail (as I have pointed out not on one occasion, quoting his own words)? Must have been quite the shocker to you, he's said so many "based" things about Jews and the Soviet Union after all...

    Russian nationalist opinion outside Israel-Sweden/Florida seems to range from total indifference to Caucasoid squabbles (e.g. Prosvirnin) to moderate pro-Armenian positions (e.g. myself, Kholmogorov, Sergey Grigorov).

    , @Dmitry
    @Yevardian

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by "nationalist"?

    When I was growing up, the word "nationalist" has to me always implied a kind of racist person, who dislikes non-slavic/non-white people, and possibly uses their face for kickboxing workout. Of course, racist people in Russia will typically hate "hachí", without distinguishing between their variants.

    But in this forum, "nationalist" has a different meaning (and perhaps this is how the word has also changed in recent years and transnationally) - more similar to "imperialist patriot".

    -

    In terms of normal political opinion in Russia. In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host). But of course, the vast majority of audience do not care at all, are neutral between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the media is generally neutral.

    On the forum, Karlin is the only pro-Armenian person I have been reading. It would interesting to see a post where he explained about his pro-Armenian orientation.

    -

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin's pro-Armenian views.

    Re-reading it now - it was an interesting discussion. Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac. Then sudden death is posting photos of Filipp Kirkorov. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/color-revolution-in-georgia

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    , @Pericles
    @Yevardian

    I get the feeling that Francis will reasonably soon be renamed Formosus II, and treated like his namesake.

    Replies: @A123

  5. Apparently there’s a lot more about to come out on the Hunter Biden laptop story:

    • LOL: Hugo Silva
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @edwardian

    Why would they wait so long? People are already voting.

  6. Interesting take on the evolution of the American White Nationalist violent militancy in the last 50 years.

    https://asiatimes.com/2020/10/white-supremacists-beat-jihadis-to-no-leader-model/

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Ano4

    A lot of these "lone extremists" are basically mentally ill people who are found by FBI operatives online and then 'encouraged' to act out so that they can be arrested.

    This was a model used against moslems in the early 2000s, but rightoid racism prevented them to see how this game could be used against mulitiple groups, so everyone ran away with dumb islamophobia back then. If you look at the background of many of the terrorists that attacked Europe in the 2014-2017 timeframe, lots had Western intelligence backgrounds. The manchester arena bomber, the nice truck driver etc. These were all mentally ill people recruited/encouraged by Western intelligence agencies, some had been used in Syria, and then came back all fucked up. It was essentially blowback.

    Some ask why moslem terrorism slowed massively in recent years. It's not that Western intelligence services suddenly got great at stopping them, it's just that they stopped these mentally ill recruitment binges from moslems. Now they are just using the same tactics against another group domestically. But rightoid racism prevents them from seeing the parallels and learning from others. That's the price you pay for a closed mind, so no sympathies from me.

  7. @Yevardian
    I noticed Israel Shamir's incredibly stupid article recently, I wonder how common his views are amongst 'Russian' 'Nationalists' these days, I notice the Saker peddles the same Islamophilic crap. On the other hand, the Pope has now just practically come out openly in favour of homosexual adoption.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Dmitry, @Pericles

    > Shamir
    > Russian nationalists

    LOL.

    You do realize that Shamir wants to put away ‘Russian’ ‘Nationalists’ in jail (as I have pointed out not on one occasion, quoting his own words)? Must have been quite the shocker to you, he’s said so many “based” things about Jews and the Soviet Union after all…

    Russian nationalist opinion outside Israel-Sweden/Florida seems to range from total indifference to Caucasoid squabbles (e.g. Prosvirnin) to moderate pro-Armenian positions (e.g. myself, Kholmogorov, Sergey Grigorov).

  8. Kremlinology & “Meddling”

    Re: https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2020/10/20/russophrenia-or-how-a-collapsing-country-runs-the-world/

    Great shots at the foolishly wrong neocon, neolib and flat out Russian hating pronouncements. Russia is a “threat” in the sense that it doesn’t live up to their expectations. Bravo Strategic Culture Foundation and Patrick Armstrong.

    ———————————

    Bolsonaro endorsing Trump:

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/10/20/brazils-bolsonaro-endorses-trumps-reelection-430301

    Not much if any outrage, serving as further evidence that the Russian election meddling claim is a hypocritical crock. Try finding a top Russian government official endorsing any US candidate. On the contrary, they’ve gone out of their way to steer clear of such.

    Once again, recall Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion, as the US mass media pretty much glosses over that, while asking Biden which ice cream flavor he likes?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Yeah, trying to pin "collusion" on Trump seems like a fruitless affair, especially after how he characterized his dealings with Russia during last night's debates:


    ""I've got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that's to guard against Russia"


    " “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”
     

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikel

  9. Putin’s like of Steven Seagal is utterly unaccountable. Not only is he a known A-hole, but was he ever in a single good movie?

    I mean I could understand it if it were Chuck Norris (even though he’s Conservative, Inc.) or Van Damme (even though he’s probably an A-hole too, and it’s been a while since he made a good movie.) I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don “the Dragon” Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal???

    I blame the relationship on the relative decline of Western martial arts movies.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @songbird

    Under Siege was a very good movie.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @songbird

    , @Yevardian
    @songbird

    Seagal's movies can sometimes fall into the 'so-bad they're almost good' (On Deadly Ground is one of the worst movies ever, the environmentalist hero blows up an offshore oil-well) category, though I can't imagine watching anything of his sober, alone or since turning turning 18.

    Well Putin seems to have pretty pedestrian tastes, there's that story of him being inspired to join the KGB after watching Щит и Мечь, apparently he's also a big fan of the classic Брат and even its markedly inferior sequel.

    , @Yevardian
    @songbird


    I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don “the Dragon” Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal
     
    Well, I've never even heard of any of them except Seagal, so that proves something I guess. I can't think of any 'classic' action actors that could at all act except Bruce Willis, really. Anyway, I don't think anyone watches, say, Escape From New York for Kurt Rusell's acting.

    Replies: @songbird

  10. @songbird
    Putin's like of Steven Seagal is utterly unaccountable. Not only is he a known A-hole, but was he ever in a single good movie?

    I mean I could understand it if it were Chuck Norris (even though he's Conservative, Inc.) or Van Damme (even though he's probably an A-hole too, and it's been a while since he made a good movie.) I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don "the Dragon" Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal???

    I blame the relationship on the relative decline of Western martial arts movies.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Yevardian, @Yevardian

    Under Siege was a very good movie.

    • Replies: @E. Harding
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Glad we agree. Usually our film tastes differ so much as to be mutually incomprehensible.

    , @songbird
    @Anatoly Karlin

    Who finances the newer Seagall movies? The Russian mob to launder money, through losses?

  11. @songbird
    Putin's like of Steven Seagal is utterly unaccountable. Not only is he a known A-hole, but was he ever in a single good movie?

    I mean I could understand it if it were Chuck Norris (even though he's Conservative, Inc.) or Van Damme (even though he's probably an A-hole too, and it's been a while since he made a good movie.) I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don "the Dragon" Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal???

    I blame the relationship on the relative decline of Western martial arts movies.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Yevardian, @Yevardian

    Seagal’s movies can sometimes fall into the ‘so-bad they’re almost good’ (On Deadly Ground is one of the worst movies ever, the environmentalist hero blows up an offshore oil-well) category, though I can’t imagine watching anything of his sober, alone or since turning turning 18.

    Well Putin seems to have pretty pedestrian tastes, there’s that story of him being inspired to join the KGB after watching Щит и Мечь, apparently he’s also a big fan of the classic Брат and even its markedly inferior sequel.

  12. @songbird
    Putin's like of Steven Seagal is utterly unaccountable. Not only is he a known A-hole, but was he ever in a single good movie?

    I mean I could understand it if it were Chuck Norris (even though he's Conservative, Inc.) or Van Damme (even though he's probably an A-hole too, and it's been a while since he made a good movie.) I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don "the Dragon" Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal???

    I blame the relationship on the relative decline of Western martial arts movies.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Yevardian, @Yevardian

    I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don “the Dragon” Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal

    Well, I’ve never even heard of any of them except Seagal, so that proves something I guess. I can’t think of any ‘classic’ action actors that could at all act except Bruce Willis, really. Anyway, I don’t think anyone watches, say, Escape From New York for Kurt Rusell’s acting.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Yevardian

    Wilson was a kickboxing champ. Rothrock was actually popular in HK (she was a star there), partly because of her Western looks.

    As Dmitry would say, America had a "bourgeoisie" martial arts subculture in the '80s and '90s which was possibly unique outside of Asia. There were martial arts magazines like "Black Belt Magazine" They came with posters kids would hang on their walls. There were countless direct-to-VHS movies. There were celebrity chains of martial arts studios. Little kids would get into heated arguments at school over what Asian country had the best fighting techniques.

    Replies: @Mikhail

  13. @Anatoly Karlin
    @songbird

    Under Siege was a very good movie.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @songbird

    Glad we agree. Usually our film tastes differ so much as to be mutually incomprehensible.

  14. @Yevardian
    The chad Stalinist wedding-cake versus the virgin neoliberal skyscraper.

    Replies: @Shortsword

    It would’ve been cool if USSR had kept up some construction of impressive looking buildings. Did they even build anything attractive looking after the 50s?

  15. @Yevardian
    I noticed Israel Shamir's incredibly stupid article recently, I wonder how common his views are amongst 'Russian' 'Nationalists' these days, I notice the Saker peddles the same Islamophilic crap. On the other hand, the Pope has now just practically come out openly in favour of homosexual adoption.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Dmitry, @Pericles

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by “nationalist”?

    When I was growing up, the word “nationalist” has to me always implied a kind of racist person, who dislikes non-slavic/non-white people, and possibly uses their face for kickboxing workout. Of course, racist people in Russia will typically hate “hachí”, without distinguishing between their variants.

    But in this forum, “nationalist” has a different meaning (and perhaps this is how the word has also changed in recent years and transnationally) – more similar to “imperialist patriot”.

    In terms of normal political opinion in Russia. In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host). But of course, the vast majority of audience do not care at all, are neutral between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the media is generally neutral.

    On the forum, Karlin is the only pro-Armenian person I have been reading. It would interesting to see a post where he explained about his pro-Armenian orientation.

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin’s pro-Armenian views.

    Re-reading it now – it was an interesting discussion. Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac. Then sudden death is posting photos of Filipp Kirkorov. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/color-revolution-in-georgia

    • Replies: @Yevardian
    @Dmitry


    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by “nationalist”?
     
    More or less, yes. It's rather blatant hypocrisy from him considering how involved Israel is in this whole conflict. Although it doesn't really matter, both him and 'Saker' have no influence, both almost exclusively write for an Anglophone audience that barely knows anything about Russia.

    Well Saker paints himself as Russian nationalist (lol), Shamir doesn't, although their views are almost identical these days. At least Shamir can be entertaining, Saker is the personification of an armchair general without a shred of humour or self-awareness.


    In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host).
     
    Well, a broken clock is right at least once a day. Like, Navalny is right about the ruinous scale of government corruption, ironically his unpopularity outside of his core-audience probably allows people to dismiss it where they wouldn't otherwise.

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin’s pro-Armenian views.
     
    As I've repeatedly re-iterated, I don't expect Russians to have any special affection for Armenia, but simply that a Azeri-Turkish victory would be deeply harmful to Russia's long-term strategic interests. Islam and Turkish presence is continuing to grow in Russia and doesn't look to be changing soon.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @Dmitry
    @Dmitry


    In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia,
     
    On basis, we could call like "Echo of Moscow derangement syndrome"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVcce5C-Pnk

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Dmitry


    Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac
     
    Another reason why the oppression of Gerard is illogical, harmful and frankly immoral.
  16. @Dmitry
    @Yevardian

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by "nationalist"?

    When I was growing up, the word "nationalist" has to me always implied a kind of racist person, who dislikes non-slavic/non-white people, and possibly uses their face for kickboxing workout. Of course, racist people in Russia will typically hate "hachí", without distinguishing between their variants.

    But in this forum, "nationalist" has a different meaning (and perhaps this is how the word has also changed in recent years and transnationally) - more similar to "imperialist patriot".

    -

    In terms of normal political opinion in Russia. In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host). But of course, the vast majority of audience do not care at all, are neutral between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the media is generally neutral.

    On the forum, Karlin is the only pro-Armenian person I have been reading. It would interesting to see a post where he explained about his pro-Armenian orientation.

    -

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin's pro-Armenian views.

    Re-reading it now - it was an interesting discussion. Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac. Then sudden death is posting photos of Filipp Kirkorov. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/color-revolution-in-georgia

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by “nationalist”?

    More or less, yes. It’s rather blatant hypocrisy from him considering how involved Israel is in this whole conflict. Although it doesn’t really matter, both him and ‘Saker’ have no influence, both almost exclusively write for an Anglophone audience that barely knows anything about Russia.

    Well Saker paints himself as Russian nationalist (lol), Shamir doesn’t, although their views are almost identical these days. At least Shamir can be entertaining, Saker is the personification of an armchair general without a shred of humour or self-awareness.

    In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host).

    Well, a broken clock is right at least once a day. Like, Navalny is right about the ruinous scale of government corruption, ironically his unpopularity outside of his core-audience probably allows people to dismiss it where they wouldn’t otherwise.

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin’s pro-Armenian views.

    As I’ve repeatedly re-iterated, I don’t expect Russians to have any special affection for Armenia, but simply that a Azeri-Turkish victory would be deeply harmful to Russia’s long-term strategic interests. Islam and Turkish presence is continuing to grow in Russia and doesn’t look to be changing soon.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Yevardian


    ‘Saker’ have no influence, both almost exclusively write for an Anglophone audience
     
    Saker is Swiss blogger living in America. From his YouTube, I guess his views are mainly about Islam? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVTo5rXDCxw.

    Shamir is an eccentric columnist from Russian newspapers. In Russia, it seems he has been banned from publishing much recently, I guess because he started writing anti-Israel content (which is against the general newspapers' positions). Well he just writes on the RT website now and keep him away from the Israel topic https://russian.rt.com/opinion/blog/israel-shamir

    Before he was writing for "Komsomolskaya pravda".
    https://www.spb.kp.ru/daily/author/816198/


    At least Shamir can be entertaining
     
    Yeah he seems to be writing everything while intoxicated with LSD - I read a few articles by him, and felt like I have taken some strange psychedelic drugs, and was reading about some parallel universe. But I respect that he comes down out of his "highs" to write to us, and answered my comment when I wrote something on his blog.

    Also remember when Admiral Martyanov used to write here and have endless arguments with Karlin?

  17. @Dmitry
    @Yevardian

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by "nationalist"?

    When I was growing up, the word "nationalist" has to me always implied a kind of racist person, who dislikes non-slavic/non-white people, and possibly uses their face for kickboxing workout. Of course, racist people in Russia will typically hate "hachí", without distinguishing between their variants.

    But in this forum, "nationalist" has a different meaning (and perhaps this is how the word has also changed in recent years and transnationally) - more similar to "imperialist patriot".

    -

    In terms of normal political opinion in Russia. In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host). But of course, the vast majority of audience do not care at all, are neutral between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the media is generally neutral.

    On the forum, Karlin is the only pro-Armenian person I have been reading. It would interesting to see a post where he explained about his pro-Armenian orientation.

    -

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin's pro-Armenian views.

    Re-reading it now - it was an interesting discussion. Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac. Then sudden death is posting photos of Filipp Kirkorov. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/color-revolution-in-georgia

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia,

    On basis, we could call like “Echo of Moscow derangement syndrome”

  18. @Yevardian
    @Dmitry


    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by “nationalist”?
     
    More or less, yes. It's rather blatant hypocrisy from him considering how involved Israel is in this whole conflict. Although it doesn't really matter, both him and 'Saker' have no influence, both almost exclusively write for an Anglophone audience that barely knows anything about Russia.

    Well Saker paints himself as Russian nationalist (lol), Shamir doesn't, although their views are almost identical these days. At least Shamir can be entertaining, Saker is the personification of an armchair general without a shred of humour or self-awareness.


    In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host).
     
    Well, a broken clock is right at least once a day. Like, Navalny is right about the ruinous scale of government corruption, ironically his unpopularity outside of his core-audience probably allows people to dismiss it where they wouldn't otherwise.

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin’s pro-Armenian views.
     
    As I've repeatedly re-iterated, I don't expect Russians to have any special affection for Armenia, but simply that a Azeri-Turkish victory would be deeply harmful to Russia's long-term strategic interests. Islam and Turkish presence is continuing to grow in Russia and doesn't look to be changing soon.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    ‘Saker’ have no influence, both almost exclusively write for an Anglophone audience

    Saker is Swiss blogger living in America. From his YouTube, I guess his views are mainly about Islam? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVTo5rXDCxw.

    Shamir is an eccentric columnist from Russian newspapers. In Russia, it seems he has been banned from publishing much recently, I guess because he started writing anti-Israel content (which is against the general newspapers’ positions). Well he just writes on the RT website now and keep him away from the Israel topic https://russian.rt.com/opinion/blog/israel-shamir

    Before he was writing for “Komsomolskaya pravda”.
    https://www.spb.kp.ru/daily/author/816198/

    At least Shamir can be entertaining

    Yeah he seems to be writing everything while intoxicated with LSD – I read a few articles by him, and felt like I have taken some strange psychedelic drugs, and was reading about some parallel universe. But I respect that he comes down out of his “highs” to write to us, and answered my comment when I wrote something on his blog.

    Also remember when Admiral Martyanov used to write here and have endless arguments with Karlin?

  19. @Yevardian
    @songbird


    I could even understand it if it was relative C-listers like Don “the Dragon” Wilson, Cynthia Rothrock, or Ernie Reyes, Jr. But Stephen Seagal
     
    Well, I've never even heard of any of them except Seagal, so that proves something I guess. I can't think of any 'classic' action actors that could at all act except Bruce Willis, really. Anyway, I don't think anyone watches, say, Escape From New York for Kurt Rusell's acting.

    Replies: @songbird

    Wilson was a kickboxing champ. Rothrock was actually popular in HK (she was a star there), partly because of her Western looks.

    As Dmitry would say, America had a “bourgeoisie” martial arts subculture in the ’80s and ’90s which was possibly unique outside of Asia. There were martial arts magazines like “Black Belt Magazine” They came with posters kids would hang on their walls. There were countless direct-to-VHS movies. There were celebrity chains of martial arts studios. Little kids would get into heated arguments at school over what Asian country had the best fighting techniques.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @songbird

    Going back to the 1960s with Bruce Lee, leading to the weekly ABC TV series Kung Fu in the 1970s.

    I enjoyed this not too distant release:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_of_the_Dragon

    Not sure how historically accurate it is.

    Replies: @songbird

  20. @Anatoly Karlin
    @songbird

    Under Siege was a very good movie.

    Replies: @E. Harding, @songbird

    Who finances the newer Seagall movies? The Russian mob to launder money, through losses?

  21. @Dmitry
    @Yevardian

    Are you talking about his views of Armenia? And do you mean by "nationalist"?

    When I was growing up, the word "nationalist" has to me always implied a kind of racist person, who dislikes non-slavic/non-white people, and possibly uses their face for kickboxing workout. Of course, racist people in Russia will typically hate "hachí", without distinguishing between their variants.

    But in this forum, "nationalist" has a different meaning (and perhaps this is how the word has also changed in recent years and transnationally) - more similar to "imperialist patriot".

    -

    In terms of normal political opinion in Russia. In the media, liberals are supporting Armenia, as are one or two kremlinbots like Solovyov (a television host). But of course, the vast majority of audience do not care at all, are neutral between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the media is generally neutral.

    On the forum, Karlin is the only pro-Armenian person I have been reading. It would interesting to see a post where he explained about his pro-Armenian orientation.

    -

    I remember a forum thread last year where we discussed about Georgia and Armenia, and there was no indication of Karlin's pro-Armenian views.

    Re-reading it now - it was an interesting discussion. Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac. Then sudden death is posting photos of Filipp Kirkorov. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/color-revolution-in-georgia

    Replies: @Yevardian, @Dmitry, @Thulean Friend

    Melanf was warning the forum against brown women, while Gerard was recommending Armenian cognac

    Another reason why the oppression of Gerard is illogical, harmful and frankly immoral.

  22. @Ano4
    Interesting take on the evolution of the American White Nationalist violent militancy in the last 50 years.

    https://asiatimes.com/2020/10/white-supremacists-beat-jihadis-to-no-leader-model/

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    A lot of these “lone extremists” are basically mentally ill people who are found by FBI operatives online and then ‘encouraged’ to act out so that they can be arrested.

    This was a model used against moslems in the early 2000s, but rightoid racism prevented them to see how this game could be used against mulitiple groups, so everyone ran away with dumb islamophobia back then. If you look at the background of many of the terrorists that attacked Europe in the 2014-2017 timeframe, lots had Western intelligence backgrounds. The manchester arena bomber, the nice truck driver etc. These were all mentally ill people recruited/encouraged by Western intelligence agencies, some had been used in Syria, and then came back all fucked up. It was essentially blowback.

    Some ask why moslem terrorism slowed massively in recent years. It’s not that Western intelligence services suddenly got great at stopping them, it’s just that they stopped these mentally ill recruitment binges from moslems. Now they are just using the same tactics against another group domestically. But rightoid racism prevents them from seeing the parallels and learning from others. That’s the price you pay for a closed mind, so no sympathies from me.

    • Agree: Ano4, EldnahYm
  23. @songbird
    @Yevardian

    Wilson was a kickboxing champ. Rothrock was actually popular in HK (she was a star there), partly because of her Western looks.

    As Dmitry would say, America had a "bourgeoisie" martial arts subculture in the '80s and '90s which was possibly unique outside of Asia. There were martial arts magazines like "Black Belt Magazine" They came with posters kids would hang on their walls. There were countless direct-to-VHS movies. There were celebrity chains of martial arts studios. Little kids would get into heated arguments at school over what Asian country had the best fighting techniques.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Going back to the 1960s with Bruce Lee, leading to the weekly ABC TV series Kung Fu in the 1970s.

    I enjoyed this not too distant release:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_of_the_Dragon

    Not sure how historically accurate it is.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mikhail

    Yes, I think it was related to American troops being in Japan and Korea. Norris started his training in SK. Possibly also the small population of citizen East Asians. And the presence of Hollywood, which fed people's ambitions to take risks and finance their own movies, when VHS came along - some were quite terrible.

    And I forgot the tournaments. I think America's scale helped a lot. Pay-per-view made the UFC possible in the '90s. I don't think it would have worked financially anywhere else.

    Last martial arts movie I enjoyed made chronologically was "The Raid". Not Western unless you count the director. I didn't like the sequel. Someone recommended "Man of Tai Chi" to me. It has Keenu Reeves in it, so it is partly Western. It was okay, but pretty derivative.

  24. The recent 2020 election in Bolivia is a victory for humanity. The blatant 2019 coup – supported by many US “liberals” posing as concerned humanitarians to justify Western imperialism – removed democratically elected Evo Morales.

    Now his party (MAS) stormed back to power. Bolivia has one of the highest lithium deposits in the world, and Elon Musk wants it. He openly supported the coup.

    The right-wing puppets in Bolivia were geared towards only two constituents: the upper-middle class in Bolivia and Washington elites. Yet danger is not gone even if they were temporarily removed in the recent election.

    Washington is more subtle than most other operators, so they know it isn’t smart to once again blatantly remove MAS. I expect a shift in tactics (buying up local media, NGOs etc) to push a soft coup, to slowly delegitimise the government and then do a color revolution instead. If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump’s blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump’s hamfisted approach.

    When people speak about Latin America, I find it remarkable how little attention is paid to imperialist meddling by the US.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend

    I literally agree with everything in your comment besides this:


    If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump’s blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump’s hamfisted approach.

     

    Yes, Bosnia 1995, Serbia 1999, Iraq 2003, Libya 2011, etc ...

    Quite sophisticated huh?

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    , @LondonBob
    @Thulean Friend

    Democracy has been a disaster for Latin America, much of the educated class is now in Miami, I can only see Latin America declining further. Militarised police states run by ethnic Europeans and Near Easterners worked better.

    Out for Justice is a great Seagal film.

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Thulean Friend

    If only the Jesuits had never been expelled from Paraguay

  25. Continuing from Karabakh thread||

    https://www.instagram.com/p/B9EugqSF2hv/

    2 1/2 strikes of Singhs:

    1st strike surprise
    1/2 strike Shock
    2nd strike Quick Dispersal

    Rinse Repeat.

    If their armies take to flight, do not take it as an actual flight. It is a war tactic of theirs. Beware, beware of them for a second time. They turn back and set fire even to water – Jangnamah – Qazi Nur Muhammad (Court Poet of Ahmed Shah Durrani)

    ਤਊਖਾਲਸੈਉੱਤਰਦਯੋ।।ਰਾਜਮੰਗਯੋਕਬਕਿਸਨੈਦਯੋ।।
    ਤੁਰਕਨਔਸਿੰਘਨਕਯਾਮੇਲ।।ਬਰੂਦਅਗਨਕੋਜਿਮਹੈਖੇਲ।।

    Thus did the Khalsa reply: (to the Afghans)
    “Nobody gets sovereignty by asking.
    How can Singhs and Turks (Muslims) be friends?
    It is like a game between fire and gunpowder.

  26. @edwardian
    Apparently there's a lot more about to come out on the Hunter Biden laptop story:

    https://twitter.com/RealWayneRoot/status/1317991077266124800

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Why would they wait so long? People are already voting.

  27. @Thulean Friend
    The recent 2020 election in Bolivia is a victory for humanity. The blatant 2019 coup - supported by many US "liberals" posing as concerned humanitarians to justify Western imperialism - removed democratically elected Evo Morales.

    Now his party (MAS) stormed back to power. Bolivia has one of the highest lithium deposits in the world, and Elon Musk wants it. He openly supported the coup.

    The right-wing puppets in Bolivia were geared towards only two constituents: the upper-middle class in Bolivia and Washington elites. Yet danger is not gone even if they were temporarily removed in the recent election.

    Washington is more subtle than most other operators, so they know it isn't smart to once again blatantly remove MAS. I expect a shift in tactics (buying up local media, NGOs etc) to push a soft coup, to slowly delegitimise the government and then do a color revolution instead. If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump's blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump's hamfisted approach.

    When people speak about Latin America, I find it remarkable how little attention is paid to imperialist meddling by the US.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous, @LondonBob, @Kent Nationalist

    I literally agree with everything in your comment besides this:

    If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump’s blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump’s hamfisted approach.

    Yes, Bosnia 1995, Serbia 1999, Iraq 2003, Libya 2011, etc …

    Quite sophisticated huh?

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    Bosnia 1995
     
    My bad, I meant the NATO aggression against Republika Srpska in 1995 that killed over 1,000 Serbs (both civilians and military) despite earlier proto aggressions against Srpska in 1994.

    This is important to clarify because Bosnia and Herzegovina is not a real country but a US protectorate-semi-Islamic State occupation of Serb land forced upon Serbs with the Treaty of Dayton (which had some favorable terms for Serbs, but nearly all of them have been flagrantly dishonored since 1995).

  28. @Thulean Friend
    The recent 2020 election in Bolivia is a victory for humanity. The blatant 2019 coup - supported by many US "liberals" posing as concerned humanitarians to justify Western imperialism - removed democratically elected Evo Morales.

    Now his party (MAS) stormed back to power. Bolivia has one of the highest lithium deposits in the world, and Elon Musk wants it. He openly supported the coup.

    The right-wing puppets in Bolivia were geared towards only two constituents: the upper-middle class in Bolivia and Washington elites. Yet danger is not gone even if they were temporarily removed in the recent election.

    Washington is more subtle than most other operators, so they know it isn't smart to once again blatantly remove MAS. I expect a shift in tactics (buying up local media, NGOs etc) to push a soft coup, to slowly delegitimise the government and then do a color revolution instead. If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump's blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump's hamfisted approach.

    When people speak about Latin America, I find it remarkable how little attention is paid to imperialist meddling by the US.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous, @LondonBob, @Kent Nationalist

    Democracy has been a disaster for Latin America, much of the educated class is now in Miami, I can only see Latin America declining further. Militarised police states run by ethnic Europeans and Near Easterners worked better.

    Out for Justice is a great Seagal film.

  29. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend

    I literally agree with everything in your comment besides this:


    If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump’s blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump’s hamfisted approach.

     

    Yes, Bosnia 1995, Serbia 1999, Iraq 2003, Libya 2011, etc ...

    Quite sophisticated huh?

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Bosnia 1995

    My bad, I meant the NATO aggression against Republika Srpska in 1995 that killed over 1,000 Serbs (both civilians and military) despite earlier proto aggressions against Srpska in 1994.

    This is important to clarify because Bosnia and Herzegovina is not a real country but a US protectorate-semi-Islamic State occupation of Serb land forced upon Serbs with the Treaty of Dayton (which had some favorable terms for Serbs, but nearly all of them have been flagrantly dishonored since 1995).

  30. I’m retiring.

    Pope’s stance on same-sex unions an important step for Catholic Church

    • Troll: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @sher singh

    I am trying to understand whether the young woman in the picture is a Dravidian or an African American mulatto.

    Is she someone we should know something about?

    Care to explain?

    BTW, I agree with you about Pope's stance on homosexual couples. The Gay lobby is supposedly strong in Vatican.

    Replies: @anonymous coward

  31. @sher singh
    I'm retiring.

    Pope's stance on same-sex unions an important step for Catholic Church
     
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/551662870455386115/769076847287599134/Ek3-O8AW0AAIxaR.png?width=533&height=664

    Replies: @Ano4

    I am trying to understand whether the young woman in the picture is a Dravidian or an African American mulatto.

    Is she someone we should know something about?

    Care to explain?

    BTW, I agree with you about Pope’s stance on homosexual couples. The Gay lobby is supposedly strong in Vatican.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @Ano4

    The hair seems natural and is not nappy, so not African.

  32. An interesting map of West Eurasian (that would be Indo-European) and East Eurasian (Sino Tibetan or Mongolian) admixture in ancient burials in Central Asia.

    Taken from this publication:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318897882_The_separate_origins_of_the_Tocharians_and_the_Yuezhi_Results_from_recent_advances_in_archaeology_and_genetics

    [MORE]

    Given what we recently learned about the genetic makeup of the elite Hun burials, I think the overall trend towards the formation of Central Asian Turk populations becomes clearer.

    For the Chionite (Xionite) Hun genetics read here:

    https://indo-european.eu/2020/08/xiongnu-ancestry-connects-huns-avars-to-scytho-siberians/

    Basically it appears that Xiongnu ended-up speaking some Altaic language, while their Hephtalite Spenta Huna (White Huns) cousins ended up speaking an ancient form of Dardic (i.e. Indo-Iranian).

    I suppose that despite this marked difference in language, the genetic makeup of both populations was more or less similar with perhaps more Uralic Y haplogroup N in the Xiongnu.

    Recently, an haplogroup N subclade mainly present in Central Asia and Volga Turks has been described.

    https://indo-european.eu/2019/04/n1c-l392-associated-with-expanding-turkic-lineages-in-siberia/

    I came to think that the people carrying this Y haplogroup might be the descendants of the earliest Turkic language speaking populations.

    Which brings me to the “Scandinavian” Y haplogroup N, perhaps it was not so Indo-European after all. Might it have been an offshoot of a similar Siberian population, which ended up speaking Ugro-finnic languages and then Old Norse through admixture with local populations?

    Also Y haplogroup N is found among ancient Hungarian burials.

    Given that ancient Rus Rurikid lineage is mainly haplogroup N, that they seem to have initially called their princes Khagan, that they used Tamga style signs to identify their clans and that early Moslem travelers on the Volga described early Rus as “belonging to Turks “, could it be that basically Y haplogroup N elite warrior clans spread all the way from Siberia and influenced such a large territory from modern day Scandinavia and Central Europe to Xinjiang?

    Also, all that Old Norse sagas mythology about the Aesir conquering the Vanir takes an interesting new twist. Perhaps Norse Seidr shamanism was a surviving
    remnant of some Siberian tradition?

    Especially given that:

    https://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2019/04/on-association-between-uralic.html

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Ano4

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Ano4, @songbird, @Daniel Chieh

  33. @Ano4
    @sher singh

    I am trying to understand whether the young woman in the picture is a Dravidian or an African American mulatto.

    Is she someone we should know something about?

    Care to explain?

    BTW, I agree with you about Pope's stance on homosexual couples. The Gay lobby is supposedly strong in Vatican.

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    The hair seems natural and is not nappy, so not African.

    • Agree: Ano4
  34. @Thulean Friend
    The recent 2020 election in Bolivia is a victory for humanity. The blatant 2019 coup - supported by many US "liberals" posing as concerned humanitarians to justify Western imperialism - removed democratically elected Evo Morales.

    Now his party (MAS) stormed back to power. Bolivia has one of the highest lithium deposits in the world, and Elon Musk wants it. He openly supported the coup.

    The right-wing puppets in Bolivia were geared towards only two constituents: the upper-middle class in Bolivia and Washington elites. Yet danger is not gone even if they were temporarily removed in the recent election.

    Washington is more subtle than most other operators, so they know it isn't smart to once again blatantly remove MAS. I expect a shift in tactics (buying up local media, NGOs etc) to push a soft coup, to slowly delegitimise the government and then do a color revolution instead. If Biden wins, these more sophisticated tactics rather than Trump's blatant removal of Morales will likely succeed as liberal imperialists are more sophisticated than Trump's hamfisted approach.

    When people speak about Latin America, I find it remarkable how little attention is paid to imperialist meddling by the US.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous, @LondonBob, @Kent Nationalist

    If only the Jesuits had never been expelled from Paraguay

  35. For the IQ explains everything crowd here, how do people explain that Episcopalians do not dominate the US social elite, instead of Jews, considering that Jews actually have a lower IQ than Episcopalians, and Episcopalians outnumber Jews in the US by a factor of 15 to 1, so shouldn’t dominate Episcopalians dominate the US elite, like they used to before WW2, instead of Jews?

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Znzn

    It’s closer to 5 than 15; but otherwise I agree.

  36. 4240053

    Are you gay?

    Nope. But thanks for your interest in my sexual orientation.

    So who’s the girl?

    • Replies: @Gerard.Gerard
    @Ano4

    2 completely unrelated, decent people (me and Singh) getting the identical impression that you are a fake, pompous sexual deviant.

    Coincidence? I think not.

    Your a nasty individual, a very bad person. Who pays you? The Albanians? Sicilian mafia?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

  37. From Azerbaijan, spot the odd flag out.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The idea that Muslims absolutely detest Jews is a bit of civ nat "counter Jihad" myth I think. Their beef with Jews/Zionists is in a very specific sense over Palestine, and even that seems to be waning to a certain extent what with countries like the UAE and Bahrain normalising relations with Israel and possibly even more Muslim countries to follow shortly.

    The fact of the matter is Muslims hate Christians much more than Jews, with Jews their hate is really just over that one Palestine issue, but their hate of Christians is culturally and historically ingrained. It seems to me that Muslims and Jews are perfectly happy to collaborate with each other geo-politically, especially against Christians. They also collaborate with each other against the native people in white countries too.

    Replies: @songbird, @Not Raul, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  38. @Mikhail
    @songbird

    Going back to the 1960s with Bruce Lee, leading to the weekly ABC TV series Kung Fu in the 1970s.

    I enjoyed this not too distant release:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birth_of_the_Dragon

    Not sure how historically accurate it is.

    Replies: @songbird

    Yes, I think it was related to American troops being in Japan and Korea. Norris started his training in SK. Possibly also the small population of citizen East Asians. And the presence of Hollywood, which fed people’s ambitions to take risks and finance their own movies, when VHS came along – some were quite terrible.

    And I forgot the tournaments. I think America’s scale helped a lot. Pay-per-view made the UFC possible in the ’90s. I don’t think it would have worked financially anywhere else.

    Last martial arts movie I enjoyed made chronologically was “The Raid”. Not Western unless you count the director. I didn’t like the sequel. Someone recommended “Man of Tai Chi” to me. It has Keenu Reeves in it, so it is partly Western. It was okay, but pretty derivative.

  39. @Mikhail
    Kremlinology & "Meddling"

    Re: https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2020/10/20/russophrenia-or-how-a-collapsing-country-runs-the-world/

    Great shots at the foolishly wrong neocon, neolib and flat out Russian hating pronouncements. Russia is a "threat" in the sense that it doesn't live up to their expectations. Bravo Strategic Culture Foundation and Patrick Armstrong.

    ---------------------------------

    Bolsonaro endorsing Trump:

    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/10/20/brazils-bolsonaro-endorses-trumps-reelection-430301

    Not much if any outrage, serving as further evidence that the Russian election meddling claim is a hypocritical crock. Try finding a top Russian government official endorsing any US candidate. On the contrary, they've gone out of their way to steer clear of such.

    Once again, recall Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion, as the US mass media pretty much glosses over that, while asking Biden which ice cream flavor he likes?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Yeah, trying to pin “collusion” on Trump seems like a fruitless affair, especially after how he characterized his dealings with Russia during last night’s debates:

    “”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    ” “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    For many, that moderator is an easy to convince hack - no pun intended. Clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type, downplaying the idea of giving the benefit of doubt to a perceived adversary and seeking a diplomatic route.

    Biden went unchallenged on the rehashed lie that the Russian government paid a bounty to kill US forces in Afghanistan - something that NBC reported on as lacking credibility by top US military brass.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Mikel
    @Mr. Hack


    ”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”
     

    Yes, he also mentioned the incessant sanctions but forgot to add the attacks in Syria and the withdrawal from the arms treaties.

    In general, the 2020 Trump has nothing to do with the 2016 Trump. Let's remember that he ran (and won) on a platform of building a wall with Mexico, deporting all illegal immigrants, preventing the entry of Muslims into the US, ending foreign wars, improving relations with Russia and disengaging from US military commitments in Asia and Europe.

    For those who voted for him based on this platform, there is basically zero left to vote for in November.

    To be fair, it will be extremely amusing to watch the meltdown of all MSM talking heads, celebs, academics and big-tech bosses if Trump happens to win again. I won't be able to avoid having a good laugh. But perhaps the best thing that could happen to Trumpism is the defeat of Trump in 2020. He showed that a platform like that is still a winning combination in the US and, after some disastrous years with Harris/Biden/AOC, we might get a more articulate and clear-minded personality with a similar, more focused agenda who will actually try to implement it seriously. Tucker Carlson or even Kayleigh McEnany could be much better Trumpists than Trump.

    Replies: @AP

  40. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    From Azerbaijan, spot the odd flag out.

    https://i.ibb.co/5M6RhRd/Ek-Tt-E4-LU4-AA4-JV5.png

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    The idea that Muslims absolutely detest Jews is a bit of civ nat “counter Jihad” myth I think. Their beef with Jews/Zionists is in a very specific sense over Palestine, and even that seems to be waning to a certain extent what with countries like the UAE and Bahrain normalising relations with Israel and possibly even more Muslim countries to follow shortly.

    The fact of the matter is Muslims hate Christians much more than Jews, with Jews their hate is really just over that one Palestine issue, but their hate of Christians is culturally and historically ingrained. It seems to me that Muslims and Jews are perfectly happy to collaborate with each other geo-politically, especially against Christians. They also collaborate with each other against the native people in white countries too.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @songbird
    @Europe Europa

    Bernie Sanders was quite popular with Muslims (though he billed his parents as Polish), and Jews I know were very pleased about this support.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @Not Raul
    @Europe Europa

    Good point. Muslims and Jews cooperated to massacre Christians in the Ottoman Empire.

    , @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Europe Europa

    True, I think both also share a lot of similarities such as ritual slaughter of meat, prohibition of pork consumption and male circumcision, the Muslim and Jewish lobbies often work together in this regard. The much more powerful Jewish lobbies often use Muslims as a first line of defence.

    The philosemitic counter-jihad types also run into a problem when they talk of banning halal because then the Muslims retort "well then you have to ban kosher too" which is a fair point and discrimination or quasi-discrimination against Jews elicits a very strong reaction in almost all Europeans of all political convictions bar a small minority on the very fringes of the right.

    If I recall correctly, it was the Jews who opened the gates of Toledo to Muslim invaders, Jews have also historically enjoyed a far better lifestyle under Islamic rule compared to Christian rule (the recent antagonism is entirely due to Palestine as you say, Jews enjoyed a great life in Arab countries before the establishment of Israel)

  41. @Europe Europa
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The idea that Muslims absolutely detest Jews is a bit of civ nat "counter Jihad" myth I think. Their beef with Jews/Zionists is in a very specific sense over Palestine, and even that seems to be waning to a certain extent what with countries like the UAE and Bahrain normalising relations with Israel and possibly even more Muslim countries to follow shortly.

    The fact of the matter is Muslims hate Christians much more than Jews, with Jews their hate is really just over that one Palestine issue, but their hate of Christians is culturally and historically ingrained. It seems to me that Muslims and Jews are perfectly happy to collaborate with each other geo-politically, especially against Christians. They also collaborate with each other against the native people in white countries too.

    Replies: @songbird, @Not Raul, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Bernie Sanders was quite popular with Muslims (though he billed his parents as Polish), and Jews I know were very pleased about this support.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @songbird

    Bernie never hid the fact that he’s Jewish.

    Replies: @songbird

  42. @Ano4
    An interesting map of West Eurasian (that would be Indo-European) and East Eurasian (Sino Tibetan or Mongolian) admixture in ancient burials in Central Asia.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ryan_Wei/publication/318897882/figure/fig2/AS:[email protected]/Components-of-East-or-West-Eurasian-heritage-in-ancient-populations-in-Xinjiang-and-its.png

    Taken from this publication:

    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318897882_The_separate_origins_of_the_Tocharians_and_the_Yuezhi_Results_from_recent_advances_in_archaeology_and_genetics

    Given what we recently learned about the genetic makeup of the elite Hun burials, I think the overall trend towards the formation of Central Asian Turk populations becomes clearer.

    For the Chionite (Xionite) Hun genetics read here:

    https://indo-european.eu/2020/08/xiongnu-ancestry-connects-huns-avars-to-scytho-siberians/

    Basically it appears that Xiongnu ended-up speaking some Altaic language, while their Hephtalite Spenta Huna (White Huns) cousins ended up speaking an ancient form of Dardic (i.e. Indo-Iranian).

    I suppose that despite this marked difference in language, the genetic makeup of both populations was more or less similar with perhaps more Uralic Y haplogroup N in the Xiongnu.

    Recently, an haplogroup N subclade mainly present in Central Asia and Volga Turks has been described.

    https://indo-european.eu/2019/04/n1c-l392-associated-with-expanding-turkic-lineages-in-siberia/

    I came to think that the people carrying this Y haplogroup might be the descendants of the earliest Turkic language speaking populations.

    Which brings me to the "Scandinavian" Y haplogroup N, perhaps it was not so Indo-European after all. Might it have been an offshoot of a similar Siberian population, which ended up speaking Ugro-finnic languages and then Old Norse through admixture with local populations?

    Also Y haplogroup N is found among ancient Hungarian burials.

    Given that ancient Rus Rurikid lineage is mainly haplogroup N, that they seem to have initially called their princes Khagan, that they used Tamga style signs to identify their clans and that early Moslem travelers on the Volga described early Rus as "belonging to Turks ", could it be that basically Y haplogroup N elite warrior clans spread all the way from Siberia and influenced such a large territory from modern day Scandinavia and Central Europe to Xinjiang?

    Also, all that Old Norse sagas mythology about the Aesir conquering the Vanir takes an interesting new twist. Perhaps Norse Seidr shamanism was a surviving
    remnant of some Siberian tradition?

    Especially given that:

    https://eurogenes.blogspot.com/2019/04/on-association-between-uralic.html

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    • Disagree: AltanBakshi, Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Europe Europa

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQsJRpzD8nY9hqvM5OhE7qRud40dj3dQkHOJg&usqp.jpg

    , @Ano4
    @Europe Europa

    Well yeah Afansaievo and Andronovo cultures were certainly White. There was a progressive admixture between these ethnic groups and the Mongoloid/Altaic ones and it ended-up producing Scythians and then after the Hun/Xiongnu domination the population there mainly became Turkic speaking.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @songbird
    @Europe Europa

    Central Asia has always been a kind of leakage area of West and East. Just look at Denisova Cave in the Altai mountains which was inhabited at various times by Neanderthals and Denisovans.

    The ancient Chinese were quite surprised to discover civilization in the Tarim Basin. It was certainly not a Chinese offshoot. For a while, there were walled roads connecting the two civilizations. Regardless of the question "who was there first?", China's ability to assert dominance is the main determinant of its borders.

    I, for one, do not covet the region as it is filled with Muslims, and I believe the sand particles cause lung cancer.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Europe Europa

    Chinese history has always noted the present of Turkic people, note Tang statues or mentions in the War of Heavenly Horses. They were really quite sparse all things considered though.

    Replies: @Lars Porsena, @Kent Nationalist

  43. Something I find odd is that Spain on one level is very left wing, was one of the earliest countries in Europe to legalise gay marriage and is known among gays as being a very “gay friendly” country, and is also known for having liberal drug and prostitution laws.

    Yet at the same time Spain is thought of as a very Catholic, very conservative and traditional country. No one thinks Spain and thinks “sodomite land”. I would imagine most people basically think of Spain as a Catholic country with nice weather, rich traditions as well as very civilised.

    I guess what I’m saying is that it seems Spain is an example of a country where extremely liberal/left values and trad con values can exist side by side completely harmoniously with no apparent “cultural war” that exists in most other Western countries.

    I would guess that most people would say that the UK and Germany are degenerate sodomite countries far more so than Spain, despite the fact that in many respects those countries’ laws are less liberal and permissive than Spain.

    • Disagree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @another anon
    @Europe Europa


    Something I find odd is that Spain on one level is very left wing, was one of the earliest countries in Europe to legalise gay marriage and is known among gays as being a very “gay friendly” country, and is also known for having liberal drug and prostitution laws.

    Yet at the same time Spain is thought of as a very Catholic, very conservative and traditional country. No one thinks Spain and thinks “sodomite land”. I would imagine most people basically think of Spain as a Catholic country with nice weather, rich traditions as well as very civilised.
     
    Yes, it is popularly perceived.

    Popular views about foreign countries is usually about 40-50 years ago out of date. Look at the American boomers who still believe that Russia is Communist country, because this was what they were taught during childhood.
    The same effects is here - today's Spain is as Catholic as is today's Russia Soviet.

    See here similar view of American visitor

    https://dormin.org/2020/08/09/notes-on-spain/


    The view on the left (based on the lefties I talked to), is that Franco and his supporters got away with what they did. Spain was ruled by a dictator for 30 years, tens of thousands of people were killed, and yet when Franco died, there were no tribunals or exiles or even cancellations. Instead, much of the bureaucracy of Franco’s government simply merged with the democratic government. Worse yet, the main Spanish conservative party was built by Francoists and is still run by their children. These people and their at least semi-fascist ideology never paid the price for what they inflicted on Spain.


    On the other side, my totally outsider’s perspective is that Franco and the nationalists decisively lost on the cultural battlefield. Just as (almost) nobody in America looks back fondly on the pre-civil rights days, almost nobody in Spain seems to pine for Francoism. As an example, the Reina Sophia Museum, Spain’s second most famous museum behind the Prado, has a very pro-Republican bend in its art exhibition, and IIRC, the museum even flew Republican flags on its exterior when I visited. Such flags were also hung in balconies and windows throughout the cities. In Madrid, I even stumbled upon a Republican rally where people called for the end of the monarchy and the imprisonment of the remnants of Franco’s supporters.
    , @anonymous coward
    @Europe Europa


    No one thinks Spain and thinks “sodomite land”.
     
    You're nuts. Spain is probably the gayest country in the world. (A stunning achievement considering that the (((USA))) exists.)
  44. Taking an analogy from aboriculture, and thinking of American elms and chestnuts which were severely damaged by blight, caused by globalism, I wonder if it would be possible to breed poz-resistance into different European nationalities, or into new hybrid nationalities, seeking to preserve the good characteristics – the stately shade of the elms, or the tasty nuts and beautiful lumber of the chestnut tree.

    Like a breeding program that sought out short serotonin transporter allele people. I wonder how far that one gene would get you, if you segregated people with it in order to try to limit betrayal and facilitate cultural production.

    I mean, wouldn’t it be theoretically easy to breed “Sweden, no” Swedes and then encourage them to segregate into a high fertility culture, within Sweden. I think it would take 3-4 genes max – much easier than many would suppose. Provided segregation was possible, such an area would easily monopolize tourist dollars.

  45. Is it not ironic that the people and bloggers here decry the social ills brought forth by liberalism in Western society, and yet their only solution seems to be…………..more liberalism?

  46. Russian Navy ships accompanying Iranian tankers bound for Syria

    H.I. Sutton – USNI News
    22 Oct 2020, 18:38 GMT+10

    https://www.dublinnews.com/news/266759051/russian-navy-ships-accompanying-iranian-tankers-bound-for-syria

  47. Hopefully Trump will win

  48. Has anyone changed their mind about Joe Biden’s touching kids being sexual, after the new allegations of what is on Hunter’s laptop? The apple does fall far from the tree.

    I don’t mean to say that it is 100% sexual in every case – and I’m not sure he ever broke the law in that sense – but I mean that he may have cast his net a bit wider to make it slightly less obvious, like how gameshow host Richard Dawson would kiss grandmothers, so that he could kiss 12 year old daughters.

  49. @Europe Europa
    @Ano4

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Ano4, @songbird, @Daniel Chieh

    • LOL: Ano4, Thulean Friend
  50. @Europe Europa
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The idea that Muslims absolutely detest Jews is a bit of civ nat "counter Jihad" myth I think. Their beef with Jews/Zionists is in a very specific sense over Palestine, and even that seems to be waning to a certain extent what with countries like the UAE and Bahrain normalising relations with Israel and possibly even more Muslim countries to follow shortly.

    The fact of the matter is Muslims hate Christians much more than Jews, with Jews their hate is really just over that one Palestine issue, but their hate of Christians is culturally and historically ingrained. It seems to me that Muslims and Jews are perfectly happy to collaborate with each other geo-politically, especially against Christians. They also collaborate with each other against the native people in white countries too.

    Replies: @songbird, @Not Raul, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Good point. Muslims and Jews cooperated to massacre Christians in the Ottoman Empire.

  51. @Znzn
    For the IQ explains everything crowd here, how do people explain that Episcopalians do not dominate the US social elite, instead of Jews, considering that Jews actually have a lower IQ than Episcopalians, and Episcopalians outnumber Jews in the US by a factor of 15 to 1, so shouldn't dominate Episcopalians dominate the US elite, like they used to before WW2, instead of Jews?

    Replies: @Not Raul

    It’s closer to 5 than 15; but otherwise I agree.

  52. @songbird
    @Europe Europa

    Bernie Sanders was quite popular with Muslims (though he billed his parents as Polish), and Jews I know were very pleased about this support.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Bernie never hid the fact that he’s Jewish.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Not Raul

    Well, he speaks with a Brooklyn accent, and I'm sure he was asked about it and didn't deny it, though he probably downplayed his identification a bit. But the fact is I do recall a commercial spot where he said his parents were "Polish-Americans" or "born in Poland" or something - seems implicitly dishonest, even though the latter is technically correct.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Not Raul, @Not Raul

  53. @Europe Europa
    Something I find odd is that Spain on one level is very left wing, was one of the earliest countries in Europe to legalise gay marriage and is known among gays as being a very "gay friendly" country, and is also known for having liberal drug and prostitution laws.

    Yet at the same time Spain is thought of as a very Catholic, very conservative and traditional country. No one thinks Spain and thinks "sodomite land". I would imagine most people basically think of Spain as a Catholic country with nice weather, rich traditions as well as very civilised.

    I guess what I'm saying is that it seems Spain is an example of a country where extremely liberal/left values and trad con values can exist side by side completely harmoniously with no apparent "cultural war" that exists in most other Western countries.

    I would guess that most people would say that the UK and Germany are degenerate sodomite countries far more so than Spain, despite the fact that in many respects those countries' laws are less liberal and permissive than Spain.

    Replies: @another anon, @anonymous coward

    Something I find odd is that Spain on one level is very left wing, was one of the earliest countries in Europe to legalise gay marriage and is known among gays as being a very “gay friendly” country, and is also known for having liberal drug and prostitution laws.

    Yet at the same time Spain is thought of as a very Catholic, very conservative and traditional country. No one thinks Spain and thinks “sodomite land”. I would imagine most people basically think of Spain as a Catholic country with nice weather, rich traditions as well as very civilised.

    Yes, it is popularly perceived.

    Popular views about foreign countries is usually about 40-50 years ago out of date. Look at the American boomers who still believe that Russia is Communist country, because this was what they were taught during childhood.
    The same effects is here – today’s Spain is as Catholic as is today’s Russia Soviet.

    See here similar view of American visitor

    https://dormin.org/2020/08/09/notes-on-spain/


    The view on the left (based on the lefties I talked to), is that Franco and his supporters got away with what they did. Spain was ruled by a dictator for 30 years, tens of thousands of people were killed, and yet when Franco died, there were no tribunals or exiles or even cancellations. Instead, much of the bureaucracy of Franco’s government simply merged with the democratic government. Worse yet, the main Spanish conservative party was built by Francoists and is still run by their children. These people and their at least semi-fascist ideology never paid the price for what they inflicted on Spain.

    On the other side, my totally outsider’s perspective is that Franco and the nationalists decisively lost on the cultural battlefield. Just as (almost) nobody in America looks back fondly on the pre-civil rights days, almost nobody in Spain seems to pine for Francoism. As an example, the Reina Sophia Museum, Spain’s second most famous museum behind the Prado, has a very pro-Republican bend in its art exhibition, and IIRC, the museum even flew Republican flags on its exterior when I visited. Such flags were also hung in balconies and windows throughout the cities. In Madrid, I even stumbled upon a Republican rally where people called for the end of the monarchy and the imprisonment of the remnants of Franco’s supporters.

    • Agree: Mikel
  54. @Europe Europa
    @Ano4

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Ano4, @songbird, @Daniel Chieh

    Well yeah Afansaievo and Andronovo cultures were certainly White. There was a progressive admixture between these ethnic groups and the Mongoloid/Altaic ones and it ended-up producing Scythians and then after the Hun/Xiongnu domination the population there mainly became Turkic speaking.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    None of the self created Scythian images that I've seen seem to incorporate any Mongoloid features?
    In fact most depictions look very much like the Vikings to the north. The bottom gold relief looks Slavic and could pass for the Ukrainian Symon Petliura's death mask. :-)

    https://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/news-photo/vessel-with-relief-of-scythians-greek-middlethird-quarter-news-photo/564034175

    https://drakenberg.weebly.com/uploads/6/7/4/7/6747442/9106132.jpg?279

    Replies: @Ano4

  55. @Europe Europa
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    The idea that Muslims absolutely detest Jews is a bit of civ nat "counter Jihad" myth I think. Their beef with Jews/Zionists is in a very specific sense over Palestine, and even that seems to be waning to a certain extent what with countries like the UAE and Bahrain normalising relations with Israel and possibly even more Muslim countries to follow shortly.

    The fact of the matter is Muslims hate Christians much more than Jews, with Jews their hate is really just over that one Palestine issue, but their hate of Christians is culturally and historically ingrained. It seems to me that Muslims and Jews are perfectly happy to collaborate with each other geo-politically, especially against Christians. They also collaborate with each other against the native people in white countries too.

    Replies: @songbird, @Not Raul, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    True, I think both also share a lot of similarities such as ritual slaughter of meat, prohibition of pork consumption and male circumcision, the Muslim and Jewish lobbies often work together in this regard. The much more powerful Jewish lobbies often use Muslims as a first line of defence.

    The philosemitic counter-jihad types also run into a problem when they talk of banning halal because then the Muslims retort “well then you have to ban kosher too” which is a fair point and discrimination or quasi-discrimination against Jews elicits a very strong reaction in almost all Europeans of all political convictions bar a small minority on the very fringes of the right.

    If I recall correctly, it was the Jews who opened the gates of Toledo to Muslim invaders, Jews have also historically enjoyed a far better lifestyle under Islamic rule compared to Christian rule (the recent antagonism is entirely due to Palestine as you say, Jews enjoyed a great life in Arab countries before the establishment of Israel)

  56. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Yeah, trying to pin "collusion" on Trump seems like a fruitless affair, especially after how he characterized his dealings with Russia during last night's debates:


    ""I've got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that's to guard against Russia"


    " “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”
     

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikel

    For many, that moderator is an easy to convince hack – no pun intended. Clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type, downplaying the idea of giving the benefit of doubt to a perceived adversary and seeking a diplomatic route.

    Biden went unchallenged on the rehashed lie that the Russian government paid a bounty to kill US forces in Afghanistan – something that NBC reported on as lacking credibility by top US military brass.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Kristen Welker is "clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type"?

    Only in the world of an "Independent Foreign Policy Analyst". :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

  57. @Not Raul
    @songbird

    Bernie never hid the fact that he’s Jewish.

    Replies: @songbird

    Well, he speaks with a Brooklyn accent, and I’m sure he was asked about it and didn’t deny it, though he probably downplayed his identification a bit. But the fact is I do recall a commercial spot where he said his parents were “Polish-Americans” or “born in Poland” or something – seems implicitly dishonest, even though the latter is technically correct.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @songbird

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

    https://youtu.be/i7r5FINbFLM

    , @Not Raul
    @songbird

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

    https://youtu.be/i7r5FINbFLM

    , @Not Raul
    @songbird

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

    https://youtu.be/i7r5FINbFLM

  58. @Europe Europa
    @Ano4

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Ano4, @songbird, @Daniel Chieh

    Central Asia has always been a kind of leakage area of West and East. Just look at Denisova Cave in the Altai mountains which was inhabited at various times by Neanderthals and Denisovans.

    The ancient Chinese were quite surprised to discover civilization in the Tarim Basin. It was certainly not a Chinese offshoot. For a while, there were walled roads connecting the two civilizations. Regardless of the question “who was there first?”, China’s ability to assert dominance is the main determinant of its borders.

    I, for one, do not covet the region as it is filled with Muslims, and I believe the sand particles cause lung cancer.

  59. @Europe Europa
    @Ano4

    The Tarim Basin mummies prove that white presence in that region is very ancient and certainly predates Mongoloid presence there. It seems to me that the Chinese government have been very uncomfortable about those mummies since their discovery and in latter years have started actively suppressing research into Tocharian history and genetics in the region, probably related to their increasing crackdown in Xinjiang.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Ano4, @songbird, @Daniel Chieh

    Chinese history has always noted the present of Turkic people, note Tang statues or mentions in the War of Heavenly Horses. They were really quite sparse all things considered though.

    • Replies: @Lars Porsena
    @Daniel Chieh

    Probably not Turkic though. Although certainly there were Turkic people there throughout thousands of years, as well as Indo-Iranian, and probably both in greater numbers and over long time scales, Tocharian seems to be something else. It's kind of a mystery though. Linguistically speaking it is an extremely ancient IE split that probably split long before most of the other IE languages even differentiated. And unlike Iranian, Turkic isn't even an IE language.

    Thing that stands out to me is, the mummies, besides having tall stature, big noses, pale skin and red and blond hair, had plaid tartan pants. Possibly closer to Celtic than Turkic.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OB8eeVd7R_M

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Daniel Chieh


    the War of Heavenly Horses
     
    They were Greeks not Turks

    Replies: @Ano4, @Daniel Chieh

  60. @Daniel Chieh
    @Europe Europa

    Chinese history has always noted the present of Turkic people, note Tang statues or mentions in the War of Heavenly Horses. They were really quite sparse all things considered though.

    Replies: @Lars Porsena, @Kent Nationalist

    Probably not Turkic though. Although certainly there were Turkic people there throughout thousands of years, as well as Indo-Iranian, and probably both in greater numbers and over long time scales, Tocharian seems to be something else. It’s kind of a mystery though. Linguistically speaking it is an extremely ancient IE split that probably split long before most of the other IE languages even differentiated. And unlike Iranian, Turkic isn’t even an IE language.

    Thing that stands out to me is, the mummies, besides having tall stature, big noses, pale skin and red and blond hair, had plaid tartan pants. Possibly closer to Celtic than Turkic.

  61. @Daniel Chieh
    @Europe Europa

    Chinese history has always noted the present of Turkic people, note Tang statues or mentions in the War of Heavenly Horses. They were really quite sparse all things considered though.

    Replies: @Lars Porsena, @Kent Nationalist

    the War of Heavenly Horses

    They were Greeks not Turks

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Kent Nationalist

    Greco-Bactrian. Hellenistic Scythians.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Kent Nationalist

    Yes, but the dynastic armies encountered the Tarim Basin people along the way and defeated them in 102 BC. Their combined encounters led to the first defeat.


    While crossing the Tarim Basin and the Taklamakan Desert (of modern Xinjiang), Li's army was forced to attack the nearby oasis states because they refused to provide them with supplies. Sometimes they were unable to overcome the oasis states. If the siege lasted for more than a few days, the army moved on without any supplies. Due to these numerous petty conflicts, the army became exhausted and was reduced to starvation after their supplies ran out. By the time they neared Dayuan, Li had already lost too much manpower to continue the campaign.
     
    Their surrender in the subsequent expedition helped lead to the creation of the Silk Road as Tang standards and systems were standardized across.

    Facing a determined Han expedition army, most of the Western Regions states along the Hexi Corridor simply surrendered without a fight upon seeing the overwhelming display of power. The only state that put up any resistance was Luntai, for which Li had its populace massacred
     
    A lot of what we know about them is due to Chinese paper being used by the oasis states to record their official events; some of this paper was used to wrap grave goods, keeping the official notices on them.
  62. There were Indo-Europeans living in Tarim Basin, Gansu, and even Southernmost Mongolia long before the Turks. The Wusun and the Ordos culture, actually Turkic people came relatively late from the area of Yenisey and Altay mountains, the Mongolic people inhabited before them Mongolia, known as Donghu and Wuhuan in ancient Chinese chronicles. No one knows what language or languages Xiongnu and Huns spoke, but there are many competing theories.

    But these Indo-Europeans didnt exactly look like modern “whites” and had some Asian admixture. Red hair was more common in ancient times because of the distances and relative isolation between the populations. My mother and grandmother claim that there are red haired Mongols, although I have never seen, but I have one cousin who looks completely Asian but has natural hazelbrown hair. One my Asian great grandfather had grey eyes, but I think that Mongols, Buryats, Oirats and Altays have some ancient Indo-European admixture. Of course Im not sure, but their physiognomy varies greatly, some look very Tungusic, some almost like Kornilov, some like Chinese or Korean, who by the way look somewhat different from each other.

    • Agree: Ano4, Blinky Bill
  63. @Yevardian
    I noticed Israel Shamir's incredibly stupid article recently, I wonder how common his views are amongst 'Russian' 'Nationalists' these days, I notice the Saker peddles the same Islamophilic crap. On the other hand, the Pope has now just practically come out openly in favour of homosexual adoption.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Dmitry, @Pericles

    I get the feeling that Francis will reasonably soon be renamed Formosus II, and treated like his namesake.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Pericles


    I get the feeling that Francis will reasonably soon be renamed Formosus II, and treated like his namesake.
     
    Better yet....

    Pope Vesuvius, for catastrophically blowing up the Catholic Church and everything else nearby. Future prediction...

    On the 20th Day of the 20th Month (∆) of the 20th Year of the 20th Century (∆∆) it came to pass. From the Vatican did Pope Vesuvius spew forth a cloud of a toxic fumes and saccharine rhetoric that mercilessly suffocated all exposed.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (∆) Does anyone think we are going to escape 2020 after December 31? Nope. It will be the 1st Day of 13th Month of 2020. So it is foretold in the Necrotelicomnicon.

    https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Necrotelicomnicon

    (∆∆) Those who pointed out that it was the 21st Century were promptly stoned for being overly literal, or possibly literate.

  64. @Pericles
    @Yevardian

    I get the feeling that Francis will reasonably soon be renamed Formosus II, and treated like his namesake.

    Replies: @A123

    I get the feeling that Francis will reasonably soon be renamed Formosus II, and treated like his namesake.

    Better yet….

    Pope Vesuvius, for catastrophically blowing up the Catholic Church and everything else nearby. Future prediction…

    On the 20th Day of the 20th Month (∆) of the 20th Year of the 20th Century (∆∆) it came to pass. From the Vatican did Pope Vesuvius spew forth a cloud of a toxic fumes and saccharine rhetoric that mercilessly suffocated all exposed.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (∆) Does anyone think we are going to escape 2020 after December 31? Nope. It will be the 1st Day of 13th Month of 2020. So it is foretold in the Necrotelicomnicon.

    https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Necrotelicomnicon

    (∆∆) Those who pointed out that it was the 21st Century were promptly stoned for being overly literal, or possibly literate.

  65. @Kent Nationalist
    @Daniel Chieh


    the War of Heavenly Horses
     
    They were Greeks not Turks

    Replies: @Ano4, @Daniel Chieh

    Greco-Bactrian. Hellenistic Scythians.

  66. White Nationalists trying to claim every light skinned ethnos in EurAsia is v cringe||
    Look, first of all, all white women bigger than stick thin belong to Jatts||
    Beyond that, on what linguistic, cultural or theological basis are you claiming kinship?

    You’ve been Christian for 2000 years, and your idea of a unitary, authoritarian state comes from the Catholic church.
    Fact is, you’re more alien on a personal level to your ancestors than they are to Andamanese.

    [MORE]

    Pagan Euro Nats, sure they get an esteemed place among the Aryas for playing the same role as Vibhishan against you Rakshashas||

    If you’re going to do ancestor worship, then do it properly and whole-heartedly.
    This we wuzzing is just small dick energy,

    Also if you’re asking me the ethnic origin of a bitch instead of responding WB or WNB

    YOU ARE GAY!!

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    • LOL: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @sher singh

    WNB

    I let the ebonic beauties to your kind attention. They're not my type.

    BTW aree you wearing one of these funky turbans ?

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Hw0OcbYcvyA/hqdefault.jpg

    Probably doesn't help with the White ladies, does it?

    😄

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  67. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Yeah, trying to pin "collusion" on Trump seems like a fruitless affair, especially after how he characterized his dealings with Russia during last night's debates:


    ""I've got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that's to guard against Russia"


    " “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”
     

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikel

    ”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”

    Yes, he also mentioned the incessant sanctions but forgot to add the attacks in Syria and the withdrawal from the arms treaties.

    In general, the 2020 Trump has nothing to do with the 2016 Trump. Let’s remember that he ran (and won) on a platform of building a wall with Mexico, deporting all illegal immigrants, preventing the entry of Muslims into the US, ending foreign wars, improving relations with Russia and disengaging from US military commitments in Asia and Europe.

    For those who voted for him based on this platform, there is basically zero left to vote for in November.

    To be fair, it will be extremely amusing to watch the meltdown of all MSM talking heads, celebs, academics and big-tech bosses if Trump happens to win again. I won’t be able to avoid having a good laugh. But perhaps the best thing that could happen to Trumpism is the defeat of Trump in 2020. He showed that a platform like that is still a winning combination in the US and, after some disastrous years with Harris/Biden/AOC, we might get a more articulate and clear-minded personality with a similar, more focused agenda who will actually try to implement it seriously. Tucker Carlson or even Kayleigh McEnany could be much better Trumpists than Trump.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mikel


    ”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”

    Yes, he also mentioned the incessant sanctions but forgot to add the attacks in Syria and the withdrawal from the arms treaties.
     

    Trump also forgot to add that he derailed the Nordsteam2 pipeline whose beginning occurred under Obama's watch. The delay has probably added a few billion dollars to Ukraine's budget.

    For those who voted for him based on this platform, there is basically zero left to vote for in November.
     
    No.

    What Trump did is not permanent. All can, and most will, be undone if he loses. Packing the Supreme Court will undo the effect on the judicial system.

    Trump losing would involve the rescinding of executive orders - ban of people coming in from dangerous Muslim countries, and banning the teaching of evil Critical Race Theory in federal settings.

    Trump has also started examining and pushing back against this brainwashing in schools. I would expect this to start bearing fruit in a year or two if he wins, lawsuits are already in the pipeline. This will be stopped if Trump loses.

    If Puerto Rico and Washington DC are granted statehood, the Senate may be lost for a long time (automatic 4 Democratic Senate seats). I'm not sure how feasible that is , I've read that in the case of DC it may require a constitutional amendment. But there is the possibility.

    The Wall he partially built probably won't be torn down, but immigration will be opened up.


    To be fair, it will be extremely amusing to watch the meltdown of all MSM talking heads, celebs, academics and big-tech bosses if Trump happens to win again.
     
    I agree with this part.
  68. @Mikel
    @Mr. Hack


    ”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”
     

    Yes, he also mentioned the incessant sanctions but forgot to add the attacks in Syria and the withdrawal from the arms treaties.

    In general, the 2020 Trump has nothing to do with the 2016 Trump. Let's remember that he ran (and won) on a platform of building a wall with Mexico, deporting all illegal immigrants, preventing the entry of Muslims into the US, ending foreign wars, improving relations with Russia and disengaging from US military commitments in Asia and Europe.

    For those who voted for him based on this platform, there is basically zero left to vote for in November.

    To be fair, it will be extremely amusing to watch the meltdown of all MSM talking heads, celebs, academics and big-tech bosses if Trump happens to win again. I won't be able to avoid having a good laugh. But perhaps the best thing that could happen to Trumpism is the defeat of Trump in 2020. He showed that a platform like that is still a winning combination in the US and, after some disastrous years with Harris/Biden/AOC, we might get a more articulate and clear-minded personality with a similar, more focused agenda who will actually try to implement it seriously. Tucker Carlson or even Kayleigh McEnany could be much better Trumpists than Trump.

    Replies: @AP

    ”I’ve got the Nato countries to put up an extra $130 billion going to $420 billion a year, that’s to guard against Russia”

    “I sold, while he was selling pillows and sheets, I sold tank busters to Ukraine. There has been nobody tougher on Russia than Donald Trump,”

    Yes, he also mentioned the incessant sanctions but forgot to add the attacks in Syria and the withdrawal from the arms treaties.

    Trump also forgot to add that he derailed the Nordsteam2 pipeline whose beginning occurred under Obama’s watch. The delay has probably added a few billion dollars to Ukraine’s budget.

    For those who voted for him based on this platform, there is basically zero left to vote for in November.

    No.

    What Trump did is not permanent. All can, and most will, be undone if he loses. Packing the Supreme Court will undo the effect on the judicial system.

    Trump losing would involve the rescinding of executive orders – ban of people coming in from dangerous Muslim countries, and banning the teaching of evil Critical Race Theory in federal settings.

    Trump has also started examining and pushing back against this brainwashing in schools. I would expect this to start bearing fruit in a year or two if he wins, lawsuits are already in the pipeline. This will be stopped if Trump loses.

    If Puerto Rico and Washington DC are granted statehood, the Senate may be lost for a long time (automatic 4 Democratic Senate seats). I’m not sure how feasible that is , I’ve read that in the case of DC it may require a constitutional amendment. But there is the possibility.

    The Wall he partially built probably won’t be torn down, but immigration will be opened up.

    To be fair, it will be extremely amusing to watch the meltdown of all MSM talking heads, celebs, academics and big-tech bosses if Trump happens to win again.

    I agree with this part.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  69. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    For many, that moderator is an easy to convince hack - no pun intended. Clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type, downplaying the idea of giving the benefit of doubt to a perceived adversary and seeking a diplomatic route.

    Biden went unchallenged on the rehashed lie that the Russian government paid a bounty to kill US forces in Afghanistan - something that NBC reported on as lacking credibility by top US military brass.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Kristen Welker is “clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type”?

    Only in the world of an “Independent Foreign Policy Analyst”. 🙂

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Just found this:

    https://twitter.com/MaxBlumenthal/status/1319454852548841472

    Honored to be in such good company.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  70. @Ano4
    @Europe Europa

    Well yeah Afansaievo and Andronovo cultures were certainly White. There was a progressive admixture between these ethnic groups and the Mongoloid/Altaic ones and it ended-up producing Scythians and then after the Hun/Xiongnu domination the population there mainly became Turkic speaking.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    None of the self created Scythian images that I’ve seen seem to incorporate any Mongoloid features?
    In fact most depictions look very much like the Vikings to the north. The bottom gold relief looks Slavic and could pass for the Ukrainian Symon Petliura’s death mask. 🙂

    https://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/news-photo/vessel-with-relief-of-scythians-greek-middlethird-quarter-news-photo/564034175

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    This funerary mask looks like my cousin's face.Of course it is en European phenotype, but the Scythians controlled an immense territory from modern day Ukraine to modern day India and Mongolia. They varied greatly according to the territory. The Siberian Scythians ended up thoroughly admixed with Mongoloids. The Turks appeared on the territory that has been settled by Scythians for a thousand years. We witness a progressive change of phenotype on the Dunhuang frescoes. Y haplogroups of the Uyghurs are around 30% descended from Afansaievo people, 30% from Andronovo people and 30% Eastern Eurasian (Okunevo, proto-Han, other?). The Kirgiz are descended from Tagarian culture in which burial masks we see a progress change towards the Asian phenotype. They are around 50% of Scythian Y haplogroup R1a.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  71. @songbird
    @Not Raul

    Well, he speaks with a Brooklyn accent, and I'm sure he was asked about it and didn't deny it, though he probably downplayed his identification a bit. But the fact is I do recall a commercial spot where he said his parents were "Polish-Americans" or "born in Poland" or something - seems implicitly dishonest, even though the latter is technically correct.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Not Raul, @Not Raul

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

  72. @songbird
    @Not Raul

    Well, he speaks with a Brooklyn accent, and I'm sure he was asked about it and didn't deny it, though he probably downplayed his identification a bit. But the fact is I do recall a commercial spot where he said his parents were "Polish-Americans" or "born in Poland" or something - seems implicitly dishonest, even though the latter is technically correct.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Not Raul, @Not Raul

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

  73. @songbird
    @Not Raul

    Well, he speaks with a Brooklyn accent, and I'm sure he was asked about it and didn't deny it, though he probably downplayed his identification a bit. But the fact is I do recall a commercial spot where he said his parents were "Polish-Americans" or "born in Poland" or something - seems implicitly dishonest, even though the latter is technically correct.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Not Raul, @Not Raul

    Plenty of Jews speak with a Brooklyn accent or a Bronx accent.

    Bernie is very open about being Jewish.

  74. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    None of the self created Scythian images that I've seen seem to incorporate any Mongoloid features?
    In fact most depictions look very much like the Vikings to the north. The bottom gold relief looks Slavic and could pass for the Ukrainian Symon Petliura's death mask. :-)

    https://www.gettyimages.ie/detail/news-photo/vessel-with-relief-of-scythians-greek-middlethird-quarter-news-photo/564034175

    https://drakenberg.weebly.com/uploads/6/7/4/7/6747442/9106132.jpg?279

    Replies: @Ano4

    This funerary mask looks like my cousin’s face.Of course it is en European phenotype, but the Scythians controlled an immense territory from modern day Ukraine to modern day India and Mongolia. They varied greatly according to the territory. The Siberian Scythians ended up thoroughly admixed with Mongoloids. The Turks appeared on the territory that has been settled by Scythians for a thousand years. We witness a progressive change of phenotype on the Dunhuang frescoes. Y haplogroups of the Uyghurs are around 30% descended from Afansaievo people, 30% from Andronovo people and 30% Eastern Eurasian (Okunevo, proto-Han, other?). The Kirgiz are descended from Tagarian culture in which burial masks we see a progress change towards the Asian phenotype. They are around 50% of Scythian Y haplogroup R1a.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    From what I've read about the Scythians, the ruling clique was known as the "Royal Scythians" and probably mostly included one tribal affiliation, most likely of a European phenotype that are commonly depicted on the lavish golden drinking vessels and funerary masks, etc. The larger territories that were under their control undoubtedly included large numbers of members of other more Asiatic tribes. This would not be unlike other nomadic movements and their inclusion of a core central organizing group or tribe. I'd include the movement and consolidation of the Mongols, Turks,
    Hungarians and even the Rus to a smaller extent in similar processes.

    Replies: @sher singh, @Ano4

  75. @sher singh

    White Nationalists trying to claim every light skinned ethnos in EurAsia is v cringe||
    Look, first of all, all white women bigger than stick thin belong to Jatts||
    Beyond that, on what linguistic, cultural or theological basis are you claiming kinship?
     

    You've been Christian for 2000 years, and your idea of a unitary, authoritarian state comes from the Catholic church.
    Fact is, you're more alien on a personal level to your ancestors than they are to Andamanese.
     

    Pagan Euro Nats, sure they get an esteemed place among the Aryas for playing the same role as Vibhishan against you Rakshashas||

    If you're going to do ancestor worship, then do it properly and whole-heartedly.
    This we wuzzing is just small dick energy,

    Also if you're asking me the ethnic origin of a bitch instead of responding WB or WNB

    YOU ARE GAY!!

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    Replies: @Ano4

    WNB

    I let the ebonic beauties to your kind attention. They’re not my type.

    BTW aree you wearing one of these funky turbans ?

    Probably doesn’t help with the White ladies, does it?

    😄

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Ano4


    Probably doesn’t help with the White ladies
     
    Is that what you think?
    , @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Ano4

    It probably adds much height to Punjabi manlets, who seem to have shrunk over the past couple of decades for some reason.

    Pictured: Chad Sikhs towering over a virgin wehraboo. Nowadays it is a much sorrier tale from the perspective of Harjeet.

    https://i.ibb.co/9mxGv1K/gj-Wu0-As2-HKpy6zmuu-Zix3pwxod-G0ie2k7-Hmym-DWlw.jpg

    Replies: @Ano4

  76. @Kent Nationalist
    @Daniel Chieh


    the War of Heavenly Horses
     
    They were Greeks not Turks

    Replies: @Ano4, @Daniel Chieh

    Yes, but the dynastic armies encountered the Tarim Basin people along the way and defeated them in 102 BC. Their combined encounters led to the first defeat.

    While crossing the Tarim Basin and the Taklamakan Desert (of modern Xinjiang), Li’s army was forced to attack the nearby oasis states because they refused to provide them with supplies. Sometimes they were unable to overcome the oasis states. If the siege lasted for more than a few days, the army moved on without any supplies. Due to these numerous petty conflicts, the army became exhausted and was reduced to starvation after their supplies ran out. By the time they neared Dayuan, Li had already lost too much manpower to continue the campaign.

    Their surrender in the subsequent expedition helped lead to the creation of the Silk Road as Tang standards and systems were standardized across.

    Facing a determined Han expedition army, most of the Western Regions states along the Hexi Corridor simply surrendered without a fight upon seeing the overwhelming display of power. The only state that put up any resistance was Luntai, for which Li had its populace massacred

    A lot of what we know about them is due to Chinese paper being used by the oasis states to record their official events; some of this paper was used to wrap grave goods, keeping the official notices on them.

    • Thanks: Kent Nationalist
  77. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Kristen Welker is "clearly a foreign policy military industrial complex type"?

    Only in the world of an "Independent Foreign Policy Analyst". :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Just found this:

    Honored to be in such good company.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    What "company" do you have in mind?

    Replies: @Mikhail

  78. @Ano4
    @sher singh

    WNB

    I let the ebonic beauties to your kind attention. They're not my type.

    BTW aree you wearing one of these funky turbans ?

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Hw0OcbYcvyA/hqdefault.jpg

    Probably doesn't help with the White ladies, does it?

    😄

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Probably doesn’t help with the White ladies

    Is that what you think?

    • LOL: Ano4
  79. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    This funerary mask looks like my cousin's face.Of course it is en European phenotype, but the Scythians controlled an immense territory from modern day Ukraine to modern day India and Mongolia. They varied greatly according to the territory. The Siberian Scythians ended up thoroughly admixed with Mongoloids. The Turks appeared on the territory that has been settled by Scythians for a thousand years. We witness a progressive change of phenotype on the Dunhuang frescoes. Y haplogroups of the Uyghurs are around 30% descended from Afansaievo people, 30% from Andronovo people and 30% Eastern Eurasian (Okunevo, proto-Han, other?). The Kirgiz are descended from Tagarian culture in which burial masks we see a progress change towards the Asian phenotype. They are around 50% of Scythian Y haplogroup R1a.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    From what I’ve read about the Scythians, the ruling clique was known as the “Royal Scythians” and probably mostly included one tribal affiliation, most likely of a European phenotype that are commonly depicted on the lavish golden drinking vessels and funerary masks, etc. The larger territories that were under their control undoubtedly included large numbers of members of other more Asiatic tribes. This would not be unlike other nomadic movements and their inclusion of a core central organizing group or tribe. I’d include the movement and consolidation of the Mongols, Turks,
    Hungarians and even the Rus to a smaller extent in similar processes.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Mr. Hack


    “Royal Scythians”
     
    lol, all 36 Royal Gotras are now in Punjab.
    I know you guys won't stop we wuzzing but christians have no place/need for ancestor worship.

    You have Noah & Ham, in VR 3D :joy:
    , @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    I believe that most people are not aware of the extent and the duration of the Scythian cultural phenomenon in Eurasia.

    Unlike other Steppe Empires, the Scythian cultural phenomenon lasted for a very long time. The European Scythians, known to ancient Greeks, are just a fraction of what Scythians represented in both area and time.

    Basically, one could talk about proto Scythian ethnic groups as early as the demise of Tripolyan civilization and still find Scythians as late as the Indo-Scythian kingdoms. This means an era of around 3000 years. In fact, when we say Indo-Iranian, we could as well say Scythian.

    The Scythians had a lasting impact on a very large part of Eurasia both in space and time.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  80. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Just found this:

    https://twitter.com/MaxBlumenthal/status/1319454852548841472

    Honored to be in such good company.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    What “company” do you have in mind?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Folks who provide insight like the below:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfmiCfg3uX0

    Not that I've to agree with everything said. Well worth watching in full.

  81. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    What "company" do you have in mind?

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Folks who provide insight like the below:

    Not that I’ve to agree with everything said. Well worth watching in full.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  82. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    From what I've read about the Scythians, the ruling clique was known as the "Royal Scythians" and probably mostly included one tribal affiliation, most likely of a European phenotype that are commonly depicted on the lavish golden drinking vessels and funerary masks, etc. The larger territories that were under their control undoubtedly included large numbers of members of other more Asiatic tribes. This would not be unlike other nomadic movements and their inclusion of a core central organizing group or tribe. I'd include the movement and consolidation of the Mongols, Turks,
    Hungarians and even the Rus to a smaller extent in similar processes.

    Replies: @sher singh, @Ano4

    “Royal Scythians”

    lol, all 36 Royal Gotras are now in Punjab.
    I know you guys won’t stop we wuzzing but christians have no place/need for ancestor worship.

    You have Noah & Ham, in VR 3D :joy:

    • LOL: Ano4
  83. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    From what I've read about the Scythians, the ruling clique was known as the "Royal Scythians" and probably mostly included one tribal affiliation, most likely of a European phenotype that are commonly depicted on the lavish golden drinking vessels and funerary masks, etc. The larger territories that were under their control undoubtedly included large numbers of members of other more Asiatic tribes. This would not be unlike other nomadic movements and their inclusion of a core central organizing group or tribe. I'd include the movement and consolidation of the Mongols, Turks,
    Hungarians and even the Rus to a smaller extent in similar processes.

    Replies: @sher singh, @Ano4

    I believe that most people are not aware of the extent and the duration of the Scythian cultural phenomenon in Eurasia.

    Unlike other Steppe Empires, the Scythian cultural phenomenon lasted for a very long time. The European Scythians, known to ancient Greeks, are just a fraction of what Scythians represented in both area and time.

    Basically, one could talk about proto Scythian ethnic groups as early as the demise of Tripolyan civilization and still find Scythians as late as the Indo-Scythian kingdoms. This means an era of around 3000 years. In fact, when we say Indo-Iranian, we could as well say Scythian.

    The Scythians had a lasting impact on a very large part of Eurasia both in space and time.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    For me exonym Scythian means just those Shakas who lived near the coasts of the Black Sea, then there are Iazyges, who were Indo Iranian people living in the area of the modern day Hungary and Transylvania and were closely connected with the ancient Scythians.

    The Buddha himself was very probably descended from the Indo-Iranian Sakas and even his clans name Shakya means Scythian/Shaka in Sanskrit. As I have once mentioned before here, the Shakyas shared more cultural similarities with the Sakas of the steppes than with the Puranic or Vedic Indians. The Stupa or Kurgan as a burial place for a great king, the belief that fire is sacred and purifying, the immense respect for the horse, horse was for them an animal above other animals. Shakyas worshipped the Sun and the Fire, and they believed that they as descentants ofthe Sun belong to the Solar race, Suryavansha. Then they had other embarrassing Indo-Iranian traditions, like marrying with cousins, so that their divine blood would not be defiled, which was common among Iranian royalty. Although it was done only when they couldnt find brides of suitable pedigree. But for Vedic Indiands such marriages were a horrible transgression. There were also many other traditions shared by the Shakyas and Shakas. The tradition of the Shakyas tells that they came to foothills of Himalayas 5 or 6 generations before the time of the Buddhas father Suddhodana. Their reason for migrating was quite funny from the modern day perspective, the Buddha tells that they wanted to uphold the purity of their lineage. Also Shakyas had only a one caste, the caste of warriors, all Shakyas were warriors like the Scythians of the steppe and they thought that the warrior caste is superior to Brahmins or priestly caste.

    In Mahayana we always call the historical Buddha Gautama by the name Shakyamuni, the Sage of the Shakyans!

    Replies: @sher singh, @AltanBakshi, @Ano4

  84. The French seem like utter morons, they invite millions of Muslims to live in their country, and then go out of their way to antagonise them with anti-Muslim cartoons in an attempt to force them to be secular, left wing, pro-multikulti French citizens, with disastrous consequences.

    Most of the “Je Suis Charlie” types are pro-mass immigration, but they believe that they can force secular republican French values on the Muslims, they believe they can bend the Muslims to their will if they keep forcing these anti-Muslim cartoons on them.

    In Britain those Charlie Hebdo cartoons would never have been allowed in the first place, what these left wing “Je Suis Charlie” types do would be considered racist here and prosecuted.

    The reality is when you live amongst people who are much more warlike and fanatical than you are, you are best not to deliberately antagonise them regardless of what ever idealised secular republican “values” you believe in.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @Europe Europa

    Liberalism rots your brain

  85. @Ano4
    @sher singh

    WNB

    I let the ebonic beauties to your kind attention. They're not my type.

    BTW aree you wearing one of these funky turbans ?

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Hw0OcbYcvyA/hqdefault.jpg

    Probably doesn't help with the White ladies, does it?

    😄

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    It probably adds much height to Punjabi manlets, who seem to have shrunk over the past couple of decades for some reason.

    Pictured: Chad Sikhs towering over a virgin wehraboo. Nowadays it is a much sorrier tale from the perspective of Harjeet.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    OTOH this Wehrmacht Soldat might have been a midget. Regardless, I am pretty sure that he was in the commanding position.

    Replies: @sher singh

  86. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Ano4

    It probably adds much height to Punjabi manlets, who seem to have shrunk over the past couple of decades for some reason.

    Pictured: Chad Sikhs towering over a virgin wehraboo. Nowadays it is a much sorrier tale from the perspective of Harjeet.

    https://i.ibb.co/9mxGv1K/gj-Wu0-As2-HKpy6zmuu-Zix3pwxod-G0ie2k7-Hmym-DWlw.jpg

    Replies: @Ano4

    OTOH this Wehrmacht Soldat might have been a midget. Regardless, I am pretty sure that he was in the commanding position.

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @Ano4


    pretty sure he was in the commanding position.
     
    How tides turn..

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769537064730755082/unknown.png

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/551662870455386115/769340154150125628/IMG_20201023_191830.jpg?width=332&height=665

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769538232860803072/IMG_20200926_1635052.jpg?width=699&height=664

    At least the boot on ur neck is well polished..

    The most popular leader among young people and women by a wide margin is a Singh.
    Last PM of India Singh.

    Must suck to be an old white (christcuck) dude, watching ur young people idolize a literal Saracen||
    Why shouldn't they?
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769539443786776586/unknown.png?width=1209&height=664

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769540049724375050/unknown.png

    Replies: @Ano4, @songbird

  87. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    I believe that most people are not aware of the extent and the duration of the Scythian cultural phenomenon in Eurasia.

    Unlike other Steppe Empires, the Scythian cultural phenomenon lasted for a very long time. The European Scythians, known to ancient Greeks, are just a fraction of what Scythians represented in both area and time.

    Basically, one could talk about proto Scythian ethnic groups as early as the demise of Tripolyan civilization and still find Scythians as late as the Indo-Scythian kingdoms. This means an era of around 3000 years. In fact, when we say Indo-Iranian, we could as well say Scythian.

    The Scythians had a lasting impact on a very large part of Eurasia both in space and time.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    For me exonym Scythian means just those Shakas who lived near the coasts of the Black Sea, then there are Iazyges, who were Indo Iranian people living in the area of the modern day Hungary and Transylvania and were closely connected with the ancient Scythians.

    The Buddha himself was very probably descended from the Indo-Iranian Sakas and even his clans name Shakya means Scythian/Shaka in Sanskrit. As I have once mentioned before here, the Shakyas shared more cultural similarities with the Sakas of the steppes than with the Puranic or Vedic Indians. The Stupa or Kurgan as a burial place for a great king, the belief that fire is sacred and purifying, the immense respect for the horse, horse was for them an animal above other animals. Shakyas worshipped the Sun and the Fire, and they believed that they as descentants ofthe Sun belong to the Solar race, Suryavansha. Then they had other embarrassing Indo-Iranian traditions, like marrying with cousins, so that their divine blood would not be defiled, which was common among Iranian royalty. Although it was done only when they couldnt find brides of suitable pedigree. But for Vedic Indiands such marriages were a horrible transgression. There were also many other traditions shared by the Shakyas and Shakas. The tradition of the Shakyas tells that they came to foothills of Himalayas 5 or 6 generations before the time of the Buddhas father Suddhodana. Their reason for migrating was quite funny from the modern day perspective, the Buddha tells that they wanted to uphold the purity of their lineage. Also Shakyas had only a one caste, the caste of warriors, all Shakyas were warriors like the Scythians of the steppe and they thought that the warrior caste is superior to Brahmins or priestly caste.

    In Mahayana we always call the historical Buddha Gautama by the name Shakyamuni, the Sage of the Shakyans!

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi

    It just means Jatt, who are Sikh, so join the Khalsa||

    And no Bhenchoding the Ganas of Rudra (Jats) don't do that!

    http://yugaparivartan.com/2016/07/29/how-to-revive-the-hindu-kshatriya-spirit/


    The obvious next step is to dedicate yourself to the Kshatriya tradition under the great Khalsa Panth.
     
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769541655094624256/unknown.png
    , @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    I should have written just Iranian or Iranic and not Indo Iranian.

    , @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    I was aware of the Gautama's descent from a Scythian clan. BTW his description as being blue eyed and having a "golden hued" skin color also matches the Scythian phenotype of the earliest times. This phenotype changed progressively through acculturation with BAMAC, Davidian and Siberian populations. Ar the end of the day we got Scythian Y Y haplogroup R1a Z93 widely distributed among different Central Asian populations. In Europe it is mainly present among the Tatars. Slavs are not descended from Scythians.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

  88. @Ano4
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    OTOH this Wehrmacht Soldat might have been a midget. Regardless, I am pretty sure that he was in the commanding position.

    Replies: @sher singh

    pretty sure he was in the commanding position.

    How tides turn..

    At least the boot on ur neck is well polished..

    The most popular leader among young people and women by a wide margin is a Singh.
    Last PM of India Singh.

    Must suck to be an old white (christcuck) dude, watching ur young people idolize a literal Saracen||
    Why shouldn’t they?

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @sher singh

    I don't have anymore LOLs left in stock for your comments, but please keep on posting, your exaltation is entertaining.

    😆

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    , @songbird
    @sher singh

    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)

    But seriously, contra expectations, Sikhs seem like the most pozzed of Indians in the West (including Muslims.) I would almost posit that it has something to do with their costumes - that for signaling value, they are akin to the skin of blacks, causing multicultists to promote them, flatter them, and generally pander to them, just as the Church of Scientology treats celebrities. But the problem with this theory is that many have dropped the old customs. Perhaps, it is better explained by HBD.

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  89. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    For me exonym Scythian means just those Shakas who lived near the coasts of the Black Sea, then there are Iazyges, who were Indo Iranian people living in the area of the modern day Hungary and Transylvania and were closely connected with the ancient Scythians.

    The Buddha himself was very probably descended from the Indo-Iranian Sakas and even his clans name Shakya means Scythian/Shaka in Sanskrit. As I have once mentioned before here, the Shakyas shared more cultural similarities with the Sakas of the steppes than with the Puranic or Vedic Indians. The Stupa or Kurgan as a burial place for a great king, the belief that fire is sacred and purifying, the immense respect for the horse, horse was for them an animal above other animals. Shakyas worshipped the Sun and the Fire, and they believed that they as descentants ofthe Sun belong to the Solar race, Suryavansha. Then they had other embarrassing Indo-Iranian traditions, like marrying with cousins, so that their divine blood would not be defiled, which was common among Iranian royalty. Although it was done only when they couldnt find brides of suitable pedigree. But for Vedic Indiands such marriages were a horrible transgression. There were also many other traditions shared by the Shakyas and Shakas. The tradition of the Shakyas tells that they came to foothills of Himalayas 5 or 6 generations before the time of the Buddhas father Suddhodana. Their reason for migrating was quite funny from the modern day perspective, the Buddha tells that they wanted to uphold the purity of their lineage. Also Shakyas had only a one caste, the caste of warriors, all Shakyas were warriors like the Scythians of the steppe and they thought that the warrior caste is superior to Brahmins or priestly caste.

    In Mahayana we always call the historical Buddha Gautama by the name Shakyamuni, the Sage of the Shakyans!

    Replies: @sher singh, @AltanBakshi, @Ano4

    It just means Jatt, who are Sikh, so join the Khalsa||

    And no Bhenchoding the Ganas of Rudra (Jats) don’t do that!

    http://yugaparivartan.com/2016/07/29/how-to-revive-the-hindu-kshatriya-spirit/

    The obvious next step is to dedicate yourself to the Kshatriya tradition under the great Khalsa Panth.

  90. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    For me exonym Scythian means just those Shakas who lived near the coasts of the Black Sea, then there are Iazyges, who were Indo Iranian people living in the area of the modern day Hungary and Transylvania and were closely connected with the ancient Scythians.

    The Buddha himself was very probably descended from the Indo-Iranian Sakas and even his clans name Shakya means Scythian/Shaka in Sanskrit. As I have once mentioned before here, the Shakyas shared more cultural similarities with the Sakas of the steppes than with the Puranic or Vedic Indians. The Stupa or Kurgan as a burial place for a great king, the belief that fire is sacred and purifying, the immense respect for the horse, horse was for them an animal above other animals. Shakyas worshipped the Sun and the Fire, and they believed that they as descentants ofthe Sun belong to the Solar race, Suryavansha. Then they had other embarrassing Indo-Iranian traditions, like marrying with cousins, so that their divine blood would not be defiled, which was common among Iranian royalty. Although it was done only when they couldnt find brides of suitable pedigree. But for Vedic Indiands such marriages were a horrible transgression. There were also many other traditions shared by the Shakyas and Shakas. The tradition of the Shakyas tells that they came to foothills of Himalayas 5 or 6 generations before the time of the Buddhas father Suddhodana. Their reason for migrating was quite funny from the modern day perspective, the Buddha tells that they wanted to uphold the purity of their lineage. Also Shakyas had only a one caste, the caste of warriors, all Shakyas were warriors like the Scythians of the steppe and they thought that the warrior caste is superior to Brahmins or priestly caste.

    In Mahayana we always call the historical Buddha Gautama by the name Shakyamuni, the Sage of the Shakyans!

    Replies: @sher singh, @AltanBakshi, @Ano4

    I should have written just Iranian or Iranic and not Indo Iranian.

  91. @sher singh
    @Ano4


    pretty sure he was in the commanding position.
     
    How tides turn..

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769537064730755082/unknown.png

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/551662870455386115/769340154150125628/IMG_20201023_191830.jpg?width=332&height=665

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769538232860803072/IMG_20200926_1635052.jpg?width=699&height=664

    At least the boot on ur neck is well polished..

    The most popular leader among young people and women by a wide margin is a Singh.
    Last PM of India Singh.

    Must suck to be an old white (christcuck) dude, watching ur young people idolize a literal Saracen||
    Why shouldn't they?
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769539443786776586/unknown.png?width=1209&height=664

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769540049724375050/unknown.png

    Replies: @Ano4, @songbird

    I don’t have anymore LOLs left in stock for your comments, but please keep on posting, your exaltation is entertaining.

    😆

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @Ano4


    U trying to end up like this?
     
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769556600196300860/unknown.png?width=710&height=664

    I'm not sure what kind of holy foreskin cult encourages you to find malice in another's bliss
    You don't strike me as v. manly||

    Replies: @Ano4, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  92. @Ano4
    @sher singh

    I don't have anymore LOLs left in stock for your comments, but please keep on posting, your exaltation is entertaining.

    😆

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    U trying to end up like this?

    I’m not sure what kind of holy foreskin cult encourages you to find malice in another’s bliss
    You don’t strike me as v. manly||

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Jatt Singh

    Buddy, you probably had too much of that ganja. Your intense herbal intake is clearly affecting your judgement. Drink some water, have some sleep...

    😆

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    , @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Jatt Singh



    https://m.hindustantimes.com/rf/image_size_800x600/HT/p2/2016/06/06/Pictures/25-years-of-operation-bluestar_9d3a0c14-2bb8-11e6-ae51-029221314c47.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-L06znGk32Aw/U5VQFDsD0GI/AAAAAAAAAEo/VbOCW97INWc/s1600/article-2554897-1B4F275400000578-589_964x964.jpg

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BsQrvtss8OQ/UvStes9gRSI/AAAAAAAAQkM/TF2BHwy6jMU/s1600/operation-blue-star-1984-rare-photos+(29).jpg

    Replies: @sher singh, @Kent Nationalist

  93. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    For me exonym Scythian means just those Shakas who lived near the coasts of the Black Sea, then there are Iazyges, who were Indo Iranian people living in the area of the modern day Hungary and Transylvania and were closely connected with the ancient Scythians.

    The Buddha himself was very probably descended from the Indo-Iranian Sakas and even his clans name Shakya means Scythian/Shaka in Sanskrit. As I have once mentioned before here, the Shakyas shared more cultural similarities with the Sakas of the steppes than with the Puranic or Vedic Indians. The Stupa or Kurgan as a burial place for a great king, the belief that fire is sacred and purifying, the immense respect for the horse, horse was for them an animal above other animals. Shakyas worshipped the Sun and the Fire, and they believed that they as descentants ofthe Sun belong to the Solar race, Suryavansha. Then they had other embarrassing Indo-Iranian traditions, like marrying with cousins, so that their divine blood would not be defiled, which was common among Iranian royalty. Although it was done only when they couldnt find brides of suitable pedigree. But for Vedic Indiands such marriages were a horrible transgression. There were also many other traditions shared by the Shakyas and Shakas. The tradition of the Shakyas tells that they came to foothills of Himalayas 5 or 6 generations before the time of the Buddhas father Suddhodana. Their reason for migrating was quite funny from the modern day perspective, the Buddha tells that they wanted to uphold the purity of their lineage. Also Shakyas had only a one caste, the caste of warriors, all Shakyas were warriors like the Scythians of the steppe and they thought that the warrior caste is superior to Brahmins or priestly caste.

    In Mahayana we always call the historical Buddha Gautama by the name Shakyamuni, the Sage of the Shakyans!

    Replies: @sher singh, @AltanBakshi, @Ano4

    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan. BTW his description as being blue eyed and having a “golden hued” skin color also matches the Scythian phenotype of the earliest times. This phenotype changed progressively through acculturation with BAMAC, Davidian and Siberian populations. Ar the end of the day we got Scythian Y Y haplogroup R1a Z93 widely distributed among different Central Asian populations. In Europe it is mainly present among the Tatars. Slavs are not descended from Scythians.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Ano4


    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan
     
    Yes, on this basis some weird Ukrainian ridnoviry were claiming that Buddha was a Ukrainian. One of them (Sylenko) lived in India for a time and compiled a Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    Replies: @sher singh, @Mr. Hack, @Ano4

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4


    Slavs are not descended from Scythians.
     
    If you consider the Sarmatians as a closely related and cultural offshoot of the overall Scythian world including an Iranian outer veneer, then there was certainly a lot of intermixture between the two groups. Before the Slavs started to make a name for themselves by constructing their own huge Slavic Empire known as Rus, they were closely allied with the Sarmatians.

    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG/220px-0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Ano4

  94. @Jatt Singh
    @Ano4


    U trying to end up like this?
     
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769556600196300860/unknown.png?width=710&height=664

    I'm not sure what kind of holy foreskin cult encourages you to find malice in another's bliss
    You don't strike me as v. manly||

    Replies: @Ano4, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Buddy, you probably had too much of that ganja. Your intense herbal intake is clearly affecting your judgement. Drink some water, have some sleep…

    😆

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @Ano4

    I know a phuddu when I see one

    You're trying to disparage the Khalsa out of a sense of hatred and insecurity

    I don't have much else to say to you I've never met an anti Sikh person who was spiritually serene

  95. @Europe Europa
    The French seem like utter morons, they invite millions of Muslims to live in their country, and then go out of their way to antagonise them with anti-Muslim cartoons in an attempt to force them to be secular, left wing, pro-multikulti French citizens, with disastrous consequences.

    Most of the "Je Suis Charlie" types are pro-mass immigration, but they believe that they can force secular republican French values on the Muslims, they believe they can bend the Muslims to their will if they keep forcing these anti-Muslim cartoons on them.

    In Britain those Charlie Hebdo cartoons would never have been allowed in the first place, what these left wing "Je Suis Charlie" types do would be considered racist here and prosecuted.

    The reality is when you live amongst people who are much more warlike and fanatical than you are, you are best not to deliberately antagonise them regardless of what ever idealised secular republican "values" you believe in.

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

    Liberalism rots your brain

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  96. @Ano4
    @Jatt Singh

    Buddy, you probably had too much of that ganja. Your intense herbal intake is clearly affecting your judgement. Drink some water, have some sleep...

    😆

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    I know a phuddu when I see one

    You’re trying to disparage the Khalsa out of a sense of hatred and insecurity

    I don’t have much else to say to you I’ve never met an anti Sikh person who was spiritually serene

  97. @sher singh
    @Ano4


    pretty sure he was in the commanding position.
     
    How tides turn..

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769537064730755082/unknown.png

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/551662870455386115/769340154150125628/IMG_20201023_191830.jpg?width=332&height=665

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769538232860803072/IMG_20200926_1635052.jpg?width=699&height=664

    At least the boot on ur neck is well polished..

    The most popular leader among young people and women by a wide margin is a Singh.
    Last PM of India Singh.

    Must suck to be an old white (christcuck) dude, watching ur young people idolize a literal Saracen||
    Why shouldn't they?
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769539443786776586/unknown.png?width=1209&height=664

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769540049724375050/unknown.png

    Replies: @Ano4, @songbird

    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)

    But seriously, contra expectations, Sikhs seem like the most pozzed of Indians in the West (including Muslims.) I would almost posit that it has something to do with their costumes – that for signaling value, they are akin to the skin of blacks, causing multicultists to promote them, flatter them, and generally pander to them, just as the Church of Scientology treats celebrities. But the problem with this theory is that many have dropped the old customs. Perhaps, it is better explained by HBD.

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @songbird


    I repeat myself.)
     
    Why should we pander to you when you've never done us any favors?
    Since when have white nationalists ever helped themselves let alone any allies?

    What possible reason could we have to help you, and what common interest can you conceive of?
    You taking being powerful as being pozzed, or paying lip service to liberalism while carrying a sword.

    I think you believe in this delusional reality where "rational" minorities accept white supremacy and flatter you and your devilish critiques.

    Let's be honest, being racist is incompatible with being Christian, and the Pagan Europeans are on our side anyway.

    many have dropped the old customs.
     
    Many more have come back to them, those political leaders they're Canadian born..
    , @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @songbird


    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)
     
    It is now a competition between the Chinese and the Sikhs to see who can take over Canada first, will Canada become part of of the Chinese Co-prosperity Sphere or will it become part of Greater Khalistan?

    https://www.680news.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/sites/2/2019/04/CTCN_WEB_PIC_KHALSA_DAY_2019APR28-.jpg

    https://globalpunjabtv.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/sikhsoldiers-660x330.png



    Sikhs have support in the halls of power from Justin Singh Trudeau

    https://images.thestar.com/fX7k3sE_EOCa9lxyXs-UeDSkT0I=/1200x821/smart/filters:cb(1555184309982)/https://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/politics/federal/2019/04/13/trudeau-to-visit-gurdwara-after-government-removes-reference-to-sikh-extremism/trudeaugurdwara13.jpg

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

  98. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    I was aware of the Gautama's descent from a Scythian clan. BTW his description as being blue eyed and having a "golden hued" skin color also matches the Scythian phenotype of the earliest times. This phenotype changed progressively through acculturation with BAMAC, Davidian and Siberian populations. Ar the end of the day we got Scythian Y Y haplogroup R1a Z93 widely distributed among different Central Asian populations. In Europe it is mainly present among the Tatars. Slavs are not descended from Scythians.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan

    Yes, on this basis some weird Ukrainian ridnoviry were claiming that Buddha was a Ukrainian. One of them (Sylenko) lived in India for a time and compiled a Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @AP

    With the comment section now having Intra-Slavic, Turko-Armenian and Wignat-Sikh flame wars it is a huge upgrade||

    How are you doing?

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an erudite and charismatic religious leader that counted among his followers not only the lost Ukrainian hippie generation of the 1970's, but also various movers and shakers within the larger Ukrainian community, of which the most famous was perhaps Viktor Yushenko's wife's family the Chumachenkos from Chicago. I also remember seeing photos of Sylenko along with no other than the first patriarch of the Ukrainian Kyiv patriarch church, Mstyslav, graciously entertaining him within his home drinking tea and smoking cigarettes (Mstyslav could never, it seems, quit his lifelong addiction).

    Back in the 70's when the Ridna Vira really took off, several houses of worship were constructed in North America for the ever enlarging new (old) faith. Even in Minneapolis, rumors' were riff of several prominent Ukrainian artists/intellectuals that left the environs of the traditional Ukrainian churches in favor of this more "nationalistic" church. As you can see from this photo, they were building their temples for the long term, don't know how they're doing today?

    https://i2.wp.com/romaninukraine.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Ukraine-National-Faith.png

    Replies: @AP

    , @Ano4
    @AP

    The Slavs have not much to do with Scythians, those who are mostly related to Scythians on genetic level in Russia are Volga Tatars and indigenous people of Altai mountains.

    Nevertheless, Sanskrit speakers find learning Slavic languages easy as there are hundreds of cognate roots between Sanskrit and Slavonic lexicons. There was a strong Indology school in Russia since the early XXth century and I believe that the earliest Russian-Sanskrit dictionary was composed before the WWI.



    Russian Sanskrit dictionaries and lexicons are found online, but even without a dictionary a Slavic language speaker can sometimes guess the meaning of Sanskrit sentences.

    An example is the Prajnaparamita Mantra:

    Gate, gate, paragate, Bodhi, Svaha!

    If one knows that gat' is a way through a marsh or swamp in Russian, that get' means go away in Ukrainian, that the prefix para is cognate to Slavic prefix pere and the Bodhi is of a cognate root to Slavic bud', then one can guess the meaning of the mantra.

    Also, if one knows that the Sanskrit prefix pra is cognate to Slavic prefix pro, that jnana is of a root cognate to the Russian znanye and that in Russian parom is the boat/ferry used to cross a river, one easily figures out the meaning of Prajnaparamita.

    Therefore producing an Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary must have been an easy endeavor.

    This being said, the Neopagans everywhere are mainly LARPers, although I do not see any problem with reviving the folklore and what is left of pre-Christian mythology of any European culture.

    But since the fall of Retra and Arkona, the Balto-Slavic Paganism is dead and buried. BTW in Tocharian ratre means red which is coherent with the Wendish temples being described by contemporary witnesses as entirely painted in red color on their outside.

    Speaking of colors: I have read somewhere (can't recall where exactly) that in Old Tokharian blue was esyn' (East Slavonic sin'), while the founding dynasty of the first Turkish empire was the Ashina Turks, with their Empire being called Gökturk or Blue Turk Empire (Gök being Blue or Heavenly in Old Turkic). Also Asana in Tokharian means worthy/noble (compare with Russian sanovnyi or Ukrainian shanovnyi). So basically the early Turks might well have been directly related to Tokharians through their ruling elites.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6kt%C3%BCrks

    https://penzev.livejournal.com/234433.html

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A2%D0%BE%D1%85%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8B

    The Tokharian were composed of two related ethnic groups: the Kucanne (Kushans) and the A'rsi.

    A-Rrsi... Sounds curiously cognate to Rus'.

    But that's another interesting story...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Philip Owen

  99. @songbird
    @sher singh

    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)

    But seriously, contra expectations, Sikhs seem like the most pozzed of Indians in the West (including Muslims.) I would almost posit that it has something to do with their costumes - that for signaling value, they are akin to the skin of blacks, causing multicultists to promote them, flatter them, and generally pander to them, just as the Church of Scientology treats celebrities. But the problem with this theory is that many have dropped the old customs. Perhaps, it is better explained by HBD.

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    I repeat myself.)

    Why should we pander to you when you’ve never done us any favors?
    Since when have white nationalists ever helped themselves let alone any allies?

    What possible reason could we have to help you, and what common interest can you conceive of?
    You taking being powerful as being pozzed, or paying lip service to liberalism while carrying a sword.

    I think you believe in this delusional reality where “rational” minorities accept white supremacy and flatter you and your devilish critiques.

    Let’s be honest, being racist is incompatible with being Christian, and the Pagan Europeans are on our side anyway.

    many have dropped the old customs.

    Many more have come back to them, those political leaders they’re Canadian born..

  100. @Jatt Singh
    @Ano4


    U trying to end up like this?
     
    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769556600196300860/unknown.png?width=710&height=664

    I'm not sure what kind of holy foreskin cult encourages you to find malice in another's bliss
    You don't strike me as v. manly||

    Replies: @Ano4, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769564870646431744/BhaiSukhaJinda_Vaidya1.png

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769564994915270687/0a14339b08db57627f8ebe453b8c09a2.png


    The official casualty figures for the army were 83 dead and 249 injured; however, Rajiv Gandhi disclosed in September of 1984 that 700 soldiers were killed.
     
    Singhs were hitting targets all the way in Romania.
    Would you like to be next?

    We speak of defending the weak, punishing the wicked.
    You cheer on the massacres of the innocent & slaughter of the defenceless.

    Is it any wonder you find no ears in your home, and no banners sympathetic?
    What will write on your tomb, that a great man lived here?

    No, that this one had the spirit of a Rakshas but none of the vigour||
    , @Kent Nationalist
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Sikhs cucked by Hindus/Muslims once again

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

  101. @AP
    @Ano4


    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan
     
    Yes, on this basis some weird Ukrainian ridnoviry were claiming that Buddha was a Ukrainian. One of them (Sylenko) lived in India for a time and compiled a Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    Replies: @sher singh, @Mr. Hack, @Ano4

    With the comment section now having Intra-Slavic, Turko-Armenian and Wignat-Sikh flame wars it is a huge upgrade||

    How are you doing?

  102. @songbird
    @sher singh

    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)

    But seriously, contra expectations, Sikhs seem like the most pozzed of Indians in the West (including Muslims.) I would almost posit that it has something to do with their costumes - that for signaling value, they are akin to the skin of blacks, causing multicultists to promote them, flatter them, and generally pander to them, just as the Church of Scientology treats celebrities. But the problem with this theory is that many have dropped the old customs. Perhaps, it is better explained by HBD.

    Replies: @sher singh, @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)

    It is now a competition between the Chinese and the Sikhs to see who can take over Canada first, will Canada become part of of the Chinese Co-prosperity Sphere or will it become part of Greater Khalistan?

    [MORE]

    Sikhs have support in the halls of power from Justin Singh Trudeau

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769566701171638273/unknown.png?width=767&height=664

    You are blind in your lust for power, that you think the Singhs wish to do anything but serve others||

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

  103. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Jatt Singh



    https://m.hindustantimes.com/rf/image_size_800x600/HT/p2/2016/06/06/Pictures/25-years-of-operation-bluestar_9d3a0c14-2bb8-11e6-ae51-029221314c47.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-L06znGk32Aw/U5VQFDsD0GI/AAAAAAAAAEo/VbOCW97INWc/s1600/article-2554897-1B4F275400000578-589_964x964.jpg

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BsQrvtss8OQ/UvStes9gRSI/AAAAAAAAQkM/TF2BHwy6jMU/s1600/operation-blue-star-1984-rare-photos+(29).jpg

    Replies: @sher singh, @Kent Nationalist

    The official casualty figures for the army were 83 dead and 249 injured; however, Rajiv Gandhi disclosed in September of 1984 that 700 soldiers were killed.

    Singhs were hitting targets all the way in Romania.
    Would you like to be next?

    We speak of defending the weak, punishing the wicked.
    You cheer on the massacres of the innocent & slaughter of the defenceless.

    Is it any wonder you find no ears in your home, and no banners sympathetic?
    What will write on your tomb, that a great man lived here?

    No, that this one had the spirit of a Rakshas but none of the vigour||

    • Agree: songbird
  104. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Jatt Singh



    https://m.hindustantimes.com/rf/image_size_800x600/HT/p2/2016/06/06/Pictures/25-years-of-operation-bluestar_9d3a0c14-2bb8-11e6-ae51-029221314c47.jpg

    https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-L06znGk32Aw/U5VQFDsD0GI/AAAAAAAAAEo/VbOCW97INWc/s1600/article-2554897-1B4F275400000578-589_964x964.jpg

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BsQrvtss8OQ/UvStes9gRSI/AAAAAAAAQkM/TF2BHwy6jMU/s1600/operation-blue-star-1984-rare-photos+(29).jpg

    Replies: @sher singh, @Kent Nationalist

    Sikhs cucked by Hindus/Muslims once again

    • LOL: sher singh
    • Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @Kent Nationalist

    Greater Khalistan's London cell couldn't even finish the job. Sad.

  105. @The Spirit of Enoch Powell
    @songbird


    Now is probably the best time to invade Canada, since the Canadian army has a higher proportion of trannies than the general pop and is stacked with gays and Sikhs (but I repeat myself.)
     
    It is now a competition between the Chinese and the Sikhs to see who can take over Canada first, will Canada become part of of the Chinese Co-prosperity Sphere or will it become part of Greater Khalistan?

    https://www.680news.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/sites/2/2019/04/CTCN_WEB_PIC_KHALSA_DAY_2019APR28-.jpg

    https://globalpunjabtv.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/sikhsoldiers-660x330.png



    Sikhs have support in the halls of power from Justin Singh Trudeau

    https://images.thestar.com/fX7k3sE_EOCa9lxyXs-UeDSkT0I=/1200x821/smart/filters:cb(1555184309982)/https://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/politics/federal/2019/04/13/trudeau-to-visit-gurdwara-after-government-removes-reference-to-sikh-extremism/trudeaugurdwara13.jpg

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    You are blind in your lust for power, that you think the Singhs wish to do anything but serve others||

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

  106. @Kent Nationalist
    @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Sikhs cucked by Hindus/Muslims once again

    Replies: @The Spirit of Enoch Powell

    Greater Khalistan’s London cell couldn’t even finish the job. Sad.

  107. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    I was aware of the Gautama's descent from a Scythian clan. BTW his description as being blue eyed and having a "golden hued" skin color also matches the Scythian phenotype of the earliest times. This phenotype changed progressively through acculturation with BAMAC, Davidian and Siberian populations. Ar the end of the day we got Scythian Y Y haplogroup R1a Z93 widely distributed among different Central Asian populations. In Europe it is mainly present among the Tatars. Slavs are not descended from Scythians.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    Slavs are not descended from Scythians.

    If you consider the Sarmatians as a closely related and cultural offshoot of the overall Scythian world including an Iranian outer veneer, then there was certainly a lot of intermixture between the two groups. Before the Slavs started to make a name for themselves by constructing their own huge Slavic Empire known as Rus, they were closely allied with the Sarmatians.

    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @Mr. Hack


    their own huge Slavic Empire
     
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319125593439559680?s=20

    You have a different Maryada।।

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319124560583733248?s=20

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Philip Owen

    , @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Sarmatians are not related to Slavs.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

  108. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4


    Slavs are not descended from Scythians.
     
    If you consider the Sarmatians as a closely related and cultural offshoot of the overall Scythian world including an Iranian outer veneer, then there was certainly a lot of intermixture between the two groups. Before the Slavs started to make a name for themselves by constructing their own huge Slavic Empire known as Rus, they were closely allied with the Sarmatians.

    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG/220px-0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Ano4

    their own huge Slavic Empire

    You have a different Maryada।।

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @Jatt Singh

    Above all ties, is Maryada.

    , @Philip Owen
    @Jatt Singh

    March = boundary

  109. @AP
    @Ano4


    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan
     
    Yes, on this basis some weird Ukrainian ridnoviry were claiming that Buddha was a Ukrainian. One of them (Sylenko) lived in India for a time and compiled a Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    Replies: @sher singh, @Mr. Hack, @Ano4

    Lev Sylenko was an erudite and charismatic religious leader that counted among his followers not only the lost Ukrainian hippie generation of the 1970’s, but also various movers and shakers within the larger Ukrainian community, of which the most famous was perhaps Viktor Yushenko’s wife’s family the Chumachenkos from Chicago. I also remember seeing photos of Sylenko along with no other than the first patriarch of the Ukrainian Kyiv patriarch church, Mstyslav, graciously entertaining him within his home drinking tea and smoking cigarettes (Mstyslav could never, it seems, quit his lifelong addiction).

    Back in the 70’s when the Ridna Vira really took off, several houses of worship were constructed in North America for the ever enlarging new (old) faith. Even in Minneapolis, rumors’ were riff of several prominent Ukrainian artists/intellectuals that left the environs of the traditional Ukrainian churches in favor of this more “nationalistic” church. As you can see from this photo, they were building their temples for the long term, don’t know how they’re doing today?

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    He was a buddy of one of my grandparents, I think from their days at a DP camp in Germany after the war. His patriotism was admired but his ideas judged as rather strange and not taken seriously, we are Christians after all. I came across some of his writings and at my request he gave me some Ukrainian-Sanskrit stuff when I was curious about it in my teens, but I did not pursue anything further.

    He would be cancelled nowadays:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    It identifies the Trypillian culture (3000–5000 BCE) as "Oryana" or "Orania", assumed to having been the epicentre of the Indo-Europeans or Aryans (whom the book calls Oryans, evoking a connection with the Ukrainian word for plowing, oraty;[1] cf. the same cognation in Latin, arare). According to the book, the white racial type and consequently European civilisation first developed along the banks of the Dnieper, and ancient Oryans-Ukrainians are credited as the initiators of the philosophy later written down in the Vedas, developed as the Oryans migrated in different directions including the north of the Indian subcontinent.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  110. @Jatt Singh
    @Mr. Hack


    their own huge Slavic Empire
     
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319125593439559680?s=20

    You have a different Maryada।।

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319124560583733248?s=20

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Philip Owen

    Above all ties, is Maryada.

  111. It seems to me that British imperialism was always much too soft, despite the continual whining of Indians, Chinese, Irish, etc, who blame the British for all their problems.

    Look at South America, that’s how colonialism is done. The original native cultures were all but wiped out and they are now nothing but a reflection of the colonialists/conquistadors.

    Britain in contrast more or less totally failed to have any meaningful and long lasting cultural and demographic impact on its colonies. I suppose some might cite North America and Australia as counter examples, but I don’t think those really count because the natives there were few in number and also primitive, not really a “civilisation” per se. They are almost 100% settler states, little to no assimilation of the natives has taken place.

    That’s why I find it bizarre when Indians and Irish whine about the “brutal” Brits, because if Britain really were so brutal would those countries/civilisations even exist any more in the way pre-Colombian civilisations in Latin America no longer exist in any meaningful way? You could say the same about the way the Japanese wiped out the Ainu for that matter.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Europe Europa

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    Replies: @Matra, @EldnahYm

    , @EldnahYm
    @Europe Europa

    The natives in all of those Spanish territories suffered heavily from disease, just like in North America. That is the difference. Not Spanish brutality. Africa and Eurasia already had disease exposure, so they were not so vulnerable to imported diseases. Most sub-Saharan Africa due to the climate and the presence of other great apes was difficult for Europeans to survive in without modern medicine. So the Europeans had little demographic impact, except in the far south of South Africa where the climate is more moderate(even this impact looks to be muted over time). It turns out disease is a major determinant of history.

    Demographically speaking, Spanish/Portugese colonialism was much less total than that of the Anglos. This is because the Anglo migrations had large numbers of men and women, whereas the Spaniards were mostly men who mixed with local women. As a result, there is much more native ancestry in Mexico, Central America, and South American than there is in north America, or for that matter Australia or New Zealand.

    There is plenty of native culture in Peru or Bolivia for example, much more so than anywhere in North America.

    Whining from minorities only continues because Anglos listen to/support it. If the incentives were removed, Indians, Chinese, and even the Irish would shut up. The Irish in particular have nothing to whine about, the English have been excessively nice to them. Promoting overseas invasions and assassinations of royal family usually leads to massacres, but the English can't be bothered. The Indians owe most of what they have to the English. The Chinese, who whine the least, actually have an air tight case that English intervention has caused them nothing but harm.

  112. Wasnt Sarmatian just a later name for the Scythians of Ukraine and Southern Russia? I wouldnt think it strange if many of them were later assimilated by the Slavs, but there are still the Ossetians/Alans who are at least linguistically direct descentants of Sarmatians.

    Although I have lost some goodwill towards Sher Singh/Jatt Arya, I still wouldnt laugh too much. Sikhs survived 700-800 years of being under Muslim rule, they ferociously and untiringly broke the Muslim power in India by constantly revolting against the Mughals in the very heartlands of the Islamic power in India. Lets see in what kind of condition Britbongs will be after 10 generations of Sadiq Khans. I would be very surprised if some Englishmen in future would develop an unified and martial ethnoreligious group identity. Yes Sikhs have some problems, but they are pretty okay for people who have survived much longer under Islam than Serbs or Greeks, and didnt fall in dhimmitude like the Copts of Egypt.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    No, Sarmatians were not Scythians. All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b and the Sarmatian and Scythian languages were probably not mutually intelligible. Although both were Indo-European. Sarmatians are directly descended from Yamnaya. I believe that they become Bashkirs under Turkic influence.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AP

    , @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi


    goodwill
     
    goodwill?

    "The man of Dharma makes an end of every foe."
     
    I don't notice you criticizing the glory they ascribe to senseless slaughter of civilians or the insults levied at the Turban of MahaKal||

    You're compromised, you have no Maryada either||

    In the Treta, Sri Ram is Maryada Puroshottam
    In the Age of Kali it is Khalsa||

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769715780790517770/Sher_3.png?width=678&height=664

    Replies: @Ano4

  113. @AP
    @Ano4


    I was aware of the Gautama’s descent from a Scythian clan
     
    Yes, on this basis some weird Ukrainian ridnoviry were claiming that Buddha was a Ukrainian. One of them (Sylenko) lived in India for a time and compiled a Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    Replies: @sher singh, @Mr. Hack, @Ano4

    The Slavs have not much to do with Scythians, those who are mostly related to Scythians on genetic level in Russia are Volga Tatars and indigenous people of Altai mountains.

    Nevertheless, Sanskrit speakers find learning Slavic languages easy as there are hundreds of cognate roots between Sanskrit and Slavonic lexicons. There was a strong Indology school in Russia since the early XXth century and I believe that the earliest Russian-Sanskrit dictionary was composed before the WWI.

    [MORE]

    Russian Sanskrit dictionaries and lexicons are found online, but even without a dictionary a Slavic language speaker can sometimes guess the meaning of Sanskrit sentences.

    An example is the Prajnaparamita Mantra:

    Gate, gate, paragate, Bodhi, Svaha!

    If one knows that gat‘ is a way through a marsh or swamp in Russian, that get’ means go away in Ukrainian, that the prefix para is cognate to Slavic prefix pere and the Bodhi is of a cognate root to Slavic bud’, then one can guess the meaning of the mantra.

    Also, if one knows that the Sanskrit prefix pra is cognate to Slavic prefix pro, that jnana is of a root cognate to the Russian znanye and that in Russian parom is the boat/ferry used to cross a river, one easily figures out the meaning of Prajnaparamita.

    Therefore producing an Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary must have been an easy endeavor.

    This being said, the Neopagans everywhere are mainly LARPers, although I do not see any problem with reviving the folklore and what is left of pre-Christian mythology of any European culture.

    But since the fall of Retra and Arkona, the Balto-Slavic Paganism is dead and buried. BTW in Tocharian ratre means red which is coherent with the Wendish temples being described by contemporary witnesses as entirely painted in red color on their outside.

    Speaking of colors: I have read somewhere (can’t recall where exactly) that in Old Tokharian blue was esyn’ (East Slavonic sin’), while the founding dynasty of the first Turkish empire was the Ashina Turks, with their Empire being called Gökturk or Blue Turk Empire (Gök being Blue or Heavenly in Old Turkic). Also Asana in Tokharian means worthy/noble (compare with Russian sanovnyi or Ukrainian shanovnyi). So basically the early Turks might well have been directly related to Tokharians through their ruling elites.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6kt%C3%BCrks

    https://penzev.livejournal.com/234433.html

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A2%D0%BE%D1%85%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8B

    The Tokharian were composed of two related ethnic groups: the Kucanne (Kushans) and the A’rsi.

    A-Rrsi… Sounds curiously cognate to Rus’.

    But that’s another interesting story…

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I believe that there are thousands of cognate words between Slavic and Sanskrit. I cant read Sanskrit, but I know surprisingly many Sanskrit terms relating philosophy and religion, and I do often read Sanskrit Dharanis or Mantras and all the time I do recognize cognates that I did not notice before. Like Dana, which means giving and generosity, clearly its cognate of Дать.

    Lets return to the question of the origin of the Sarmatians. Closest language to modern Ossetian is small Yaghnobi language in Tajikistan, Yaghnobi is believed to be the descentant of the Sogdian language. You probably know that Sogdia was the ancient name for the Fergana valley and surrounding areas. I am not sure, but I think that ancient Sogdians were Sakas or closely connected with them.

    Buddhas people the Shakyas, sometimes used word Kanhe towards dark skinned people, kanhe means black devil. Shakyas seemed to be very proud, elitist and maybe even xenophobic? I could give more examples, but I fear tarnishing the reputation of Dharma by silly off topic facts. Especially nowadays....

    Replies: @Ano4

    , @Philip Owen
    @Ano4

    And FWIW Yat meant gate or water passage in Mercian English. Symonds Yat, a village name along the river Wye in Herefordshire is an example. It controled the main route through rapids.

    -gate such as Meiklgate (Big Street) means street in Northern English dialects influenced by Danish. My favourite is Gallowgate in Durham City.

    Replies: @Ano4

  114. @AltanBakshi
    Wasnt Sarmatian just a later name for the Scythians of Ukraine and Southern Russia? I wouldnt think it strange if many of them were later assimilated by the Slavs, but there are still the Ossetians/Alans who are at least linguistically direct descentants of Sarmatians.


    Although I have lost some goodwill towards Sher Singh/Jatt Arya, I still wouldnt laugh too much. Sikhs survived 700-800 years of being under Muslim rule, they ferociously and untiringly broke the Muslim power in India by constantly revolting against the Mughals in the very heartlands of the Islamic power in India. Lets see in what kind of condition Britbongs will be after 10 generations of Sadiq Khans. I would be very surprised if some Englishmen in future would develop an unified and martial ethnoreligious group identity. Yes Sikhs have some problems, but they are pretty okay for people who have survived much longer under Islam than Serbs or Greeks, and didnt fall in dhimmitude like the Copts of Egypt.

    Replies: @Ano4, @sher singh

    No, Sarmatians were not Scythians. All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b and the Sarmatian and Scythian languages were probably not mutually intelligible. Although both were Indo-European. Sarmatians are directly descended from Yamnaya. I believe that they become Bashkirs under Turkic influence.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Really? This is news to me? Where they were hidden then during the Classical era of Greek civilization? Not in Central Asia, because Achaemenid Persians and Greeks thought that Sakas of Kazakhstan were related to Scythians of the Black sea.

    Replies: @Ano4

    , @AP
    @Ano4


    All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b
     
    Yes, but not only:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians#Genetics

    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746,

    In a study conducted in 2014 by Gennady Afanasiev, Dmitry Korobov and Irina Reshetova from the Institute of Archaeology Russian Academy of Sciences, DNA was extracted from bone fragments found in 7 out of 10 Alanic burials on the Don River. Four of them turned out to belong to yDNA Haplogroup G2 and six of them possessed mtDNA haplogroup I.[37]

    In 2015, the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow conducted research on various Sarmato-Alan and Saltovo-Mayaki culture Kurgan burials. In these analyses, the two Alan samples from the 4th to 6th century AD turned out to belong to yDNA haplogroups G2a-P15 and R1a-z94, while two of the three Sarmatian samples from the 2nd to 3rd century AD were found to belong to yDNA haplogroup J1-M267 while one belonged to R1a

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

  115. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4


    Slavs are not descended from Scythians.
     
    If you consider the Sarmatians as a closely related and cultural offshoot of the overall Scythian world including an Iranian outer veneer, then there was certainly a lot of intermixture between the two groups. Before the Slavs started to make a name for themselves by constructing their own huge Slavic Empire known as Rus, they were closely allied with the Sarmatians.

    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe
     
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f2/0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG/220px-0_Sarcophage_-_Soumission_des_sarmates_-_Museo_Pio-Clementino_%282%29_%28cropped%29.JPG
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Ano4

    Sarmatians are not related to Slavs.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Ano4

    Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be, I defer to your expertise here), but I thought that Antes were partially descended from Sarmatians.

    Replies: @Ano4

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    As I pointed out above:


    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe*
     
    See footnotes 51, 52 & 53
    ps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    Certainly, if the Sarmatian presence seems to have been assimilated within the large East Slavic world, they must have added something to the genetic DNA structure of the Slavic inhabitants of this area?

    Also, I've been hunting to obtain a book written by a Ukrainian historian, Oleksandr Pali, entitled "The Key to the History of Ukraine" where its main thesis is that there was indeed a large Slavic/Sarmatian coalition within Ukraine in early historic times. I haven't been able to locate this book and would be very interested in finding it?

  116. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    No, Sarmatians were not Scythians. All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b and the Sarmatian and Scythian languages were probably not mutually intelligible. Although both were Indo-European. Sarmatians are directly descended from Yamnaya. I believe that they become Bashkirs under Turkic influence.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AP

    Really? This is news to me? Where they were hidden then during the Classical era of Greek civilization? Not in Central Asia, because Achaemenid Persians and Greeks thought that Sakas of Kazakhstan were related to Scythians of the Black sea.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    Ural and Southern Siberia. The oldest remains of Sarmatian (Savromat) culture are found there. They were really a kind of relictual Yamnaya / Afanasievo population who wrestled back the power from the Andronovo Scythians after being allied with them. And you are right Alans were a subtype of Sarmatians who intermixed with sedentary Caucasus populations to become Ossetian.

  117. @Europe Europa
    It seems to me that British imperialism was always much too soft, despite the continual whining of Indians, Chinese, Irish, etc, who blame the British for all their problems.

    Look at South America, that's how colonialism is done. The original native cultures were all but wiped out and they are now nothing but a reflection of the colonialists/conquistadors.

    Britain in contrast more or less totally failed to have any meaningful and long lasting cultural and demographic impact on its colonies. I suppose some might cite North America and Australia as counter examples, but I don't think those really count because the natives there were few in number and also primitive, not really a "civilisation" per se. They are almost 100% settler states, little to no assimilation of the natives has taken place.

    That's why I find it bizarre when Indians and Irish whine about the "brutal" Brits, because if Britain really were so brutal would those countries/civilisations even exist any more in the way pre-Colombian civilisations in Latin America no longer exist in any meaningful way? You could say the same about the way the Japanese wiped out the Ainu for that matter.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @EldnahYm

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    • Replies: @Matra
    @Europe Europa

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    English language hegemony, yes, but unlike the British Empire the American Empire is almost exclusively promoting subversion and deracination both at home and abroad, rather than promoting anything that could be historically recognised as Anglo culture. The rulers of the American Empire will not be spreading the English language so that the world can read Shakespeare in the original language. No, they will be spreading English to more easily inform the world, in English, that they should be burning Shakespeare's books due to racism and anti-Semitism.

    , @EldnahYm
    @Europe Europa


    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.
     
    I don't agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.

    Replies: @A123

  118. @Europe Europa
    Something I find odd is that Spain on one level is very left wing, was one of the earliest countries in Europe to legalise gay marriage and is known among gays as being a very "gay friendly" country, and is also known for having liberal drug and prostitution laws.

    Yet at the same time Spain is thought of as a very Catholic, very conservative and traditional country. No one thinks Spain and thinks "sodomite land". I would imagine most people basically think of Spain as a Catholic country with nice weather, rich traditions as well as very civilised.

    I guess what I'm saying is that it seems Spain is an example of a country where extremely liberal/left values and trad con values can exist side by side completely harmoniously with no apparent "cultural war" that exists in most other Western countries.

    I would guess that most people would say that the UK and Germany are degenerate sodomite countries far more so than Spain, despite the fact that in many respects those countries' laws are less liberal and permissive than Spain.

    Replies: @another anon, @anonymous coward

    No one thinks Spain and thinks “sodomite land”.

    You’re nuts. Spain is probably the gayest country in the world. (A stunning achievement considering that the (((USA))) exists.)

  119. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Really? This is news to me? Where they were hidden then during the Classical era of Greek civilization? Not in Central Asia, because Achaemenid Persians and Greeks thought that Sakas of Kazakhstan were related to Scythians of the Black sea.

    Replies: @Ano4

    Ural and Southern Siberia. The oldest remains of Sarmatian (Savromat) culture are found there. They were really a kind of relictual Yamnaya / Afanasievo population who wrestled back the power from the Andronovo Scythians after being allied with them. And you are right Alans were a subtype of Sarmatians who intermixed with sedentary Caucasus populations to become Ossetian.

  120. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an erudite and charismatic religious leader that counted among his followers not only the lost Ukrainian hippie generation of the 1970's, but also various movers and shakers within the larger Ukrainian community, of which the most famous was perhaps Viktor Yushenko's wife's family the Chumachenkos from Chicago. I also remember seeing photos of Sylenko along with no other than the first patriarch of the Ukrainian Kyiv patriarch church, Mstyslav, graciously entertaining him within his home drinking tea and smoking cigarettes (Mstyslav could never, it seems, quit his lifelong addiction).

    Back in the 70's when the Ridna Vira really took off, several houses of worship were constructed in North America for the ever enlarging new (old) faith. Even in Minneapolis, rumors' were riff of several prominent Ukrainian artists/intellectuals that left the environs of the traditional Ukrainian churches in favor of this more "nationalistic" church. As you can see from this photo, they were building their temples for the long term, don't know how they're doing today?

    https://i2.wp.com/romaninukraine.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Ukraine-National-Faith.png

    Replies: @AP

    He was a buddy of one of my grandparents, I think from their days at a DP camp in Germany after the war. His patriotism was admired but his ideas judged as rather strange and not taken seriously, we are Christians after all. I came across some of his writings and at my request he gave me some Ukrainian-Sanskrit stuff when I was curious about it in my teens, but I did not pursue anything further.

    He would be cancelled nowadays:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    It identifies the Trypillian culture (3000–5000 BCE) as “Oryana” or “Orania”, assumed to having been the epicentre of the Indo-Europeans or Aryans (whom the book calls Oryans, evoking a connection with the Ukrainian word for plowing, oraty;[1] cf. the same cognation in Latin, arare). According to the book, the white racial type and consequently European civilisation first developed along the banks of the Dnieper, and ancient Oryans-Ukrainians are credited as the initiators of the philosophy later written down in the Vedas, developed as the Oryans migrated in different directions including the north of the Indian subcontinent.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called "Tropical Cantata". I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97

    https://oligarh.net/f/image/1%2816%29.jpg

    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikhail, @Kent Nationalist, @AP

  121. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Sarmatians are not related to Slavs.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be, I defer to your expertise here), but I thought that Antes were partially descended from Sarmatians.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AP

    Antes were the indigenous Balto-Slavic population. Sarmatians were related to Alans. Alans have nothing in common with Slavs.

  122. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    No, Sarmatians were not Scythians. All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b and the Sarmatian and Scythian languages were probably not mutually intelligible. Although both were Indo-European. Sarmatians are directly descended from Yamnaya. I believe that they become Bashkirs under Turkic influence.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AP

    All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b

    Yes, but not only:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians#Genetics

    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746,

    In a study conducted in 2014 by Gennady Afanasiev, Dmitry Korobov and Irina Reshetova from the Institute of Archaeology Russian Academy of Sciences, DNA was extracted from bone fragments found in 7 out of 10 Alanic burials on the Don River. Four of them turned out to belong to yDNA Haplogroup G2 and six of them possessed mtDNA haplogroup I.[37]

    In 2015, the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow conducted research on various Sarmato-Alan and Saltovo-Mayaki culture Kurgan burials. In these analyses, the two Alan samples from the 4th to 6th century AD turned out to belong to yDNA haplogroups G2a-P15 and R1a-z94, while two of the three Sarmatian samples from the 2nd to 3rd century AD were found to belong to yDNA haplogroup J1-M267 while one belonged to R1a

    • Thanks: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AP


    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]
     
    This is what I was referring to. The early Savromat in the Urals and Southern Siberia seem more related to haplogroup R1b populations.

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746
     

    I was not aware of these more recent studies although I was aware of a gradual admixture of Alans with the Balkanic and Caucasus populations (Y haplogroups E, G and J2).

    So basically you and Altan Bakshi are right, it is quite possible that that the Sarmatians / Alans and Scythians fused after the Sarmatian domination was established.

    Thanks for correcting me. I will need to have an update on the subject.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    So, when you put the findings of these various studies together, what conclusions do you come up with?

  123. @Ano4
    @AP

    The Slavs have not much to do with Scythians, those who are mostly related to Scythians on genetic level in Russia are Volga Tatars and indigenous people of Altai mountains.

    Nevertheless, Sanskrit speakers find learning Slavic languages easy as there are hundreds of cognate roots between Sanskrit and Slavonic lexicons. There was a strong Indology school in Russia since the early XXth century and I believe that the earliest Russian-Sanskrit dictionary was composed before the WWI.



    Russian Sanskrit dictionaries and lexicons are found online, but even without a dictionary a Slavic language speaker can sometimes guess the meaning of Sanskrit sentences.

    An example is the Prajnaparamita Mantra:

    Gate, gate, paragate, Bodhi, Svaha!

    If one knows that gat' is a way through a marsh or swamp in Russian, that get' means go away in Ukrainian, that the prefix para is cognate to Slavic prefix pere and the Bodhi is of a cognate root to Slavic bud', then one can guess the meaning of the mantra.

    Also, if one knows that the Sanskrit prefix pra is cognate to Slavic prefix pro, that jnana is of a root cognate to the Russian znanye and that in Russian parom is the boat/ferry used to cross a river, one easily figures out the meaning of Prajnaparamita.

    Therefore producing an Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary must have been an easy endeavor.

    This being said, the Neopagans everywhere are mainly LARPers, although I do not see any problem with reviving the folklore and what is left of pre-Christian mythology of any European culture.

    But since the fall of Retra and Arkona, the Balto-Slavic Paganism is dead and buried. BTW in Tocharian ratre means red which is coherent with the Wendish temples being described by contemporary witnesses as entirely painted in red color on their outside.

    Speaking of colors: I have read somewhere (can't recall where exactly) that in Old Tokharian blue was esyn' (East Slavonic sin'), while the founding dynasty of the first Turkish empire was the Ashina Turks, with their Empire being called Gökturk or Blue Turk Empire (Gök being Blue or Heavenly in Old Turkic). Also Asana in Tokharian means worthy/noble (compare with Russian sanovnyi or Ukrainian shanovnyi). So basically the early Turks might well have been directly related to Tokharians through their ruling elites.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6kt%C3%BCrks

    https://penzev.livejournal.com/234433.html

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A2%D0%BE%D1%85%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8B

    The Tokharian were composed of two related ethnic groups: the Kucanne (Kushans) and the A'rsi.

    A-Rrsi... Sounds curiously cognate to Rus'.

    But that's another interesting story...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Philip Owen

    I believe that there are thousands of cognate words between Slavic and Sanskrit. I cant read Sanskrit, but I know surprisingly many Sanskrit terms relating philosophy and religion, and I do often read Sanskrit Dharanis or Mantras and all the time I do recognize cognates that I did not notice before. Like Dana, which means giving and generosity, clearly its cognate of Дать.

    Lets return to the question of the origin of the Sarmatians. Closest language to modern Ossetian is small Yaghnobi language in Tajikistan, Yaghnobi is believed to be the descentant of the Sogdian language. You probably know that Sogdia was the ancient name for the Fergana valley and surrounding areas. I am not sure, but I think that ancient Sogdians were Sakas or closely connected with them.

    Buddhas people the Shakyas, sometimes used word Kanhe towards dark skinned people, kanhe means black devil. Shakyas seemed to be very proud, elitist and maybe even xenophobic? I could give more examples, but I fear tarnishing the reputation of Dharma by silly off topic facts. Especially nowadays….

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    Speaking of the Dharma. Scythians / Shakya / Saka also used to drink in cups made of the skulls of their enemies.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapala

    Later, Pechenegs made a skull cup of the head of prince Svyatoslav demonstrating the continuity in the cultural trends of the Great Steppe people...

    🙂

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  124. @Europe Europa
    @Europe Europa

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    Replies: @Matra, @EldnahYm

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    English language hegemony, yes, but unlike the British Empire the American Empire is almost exclusively promoting subversion and deracination both at home and abroad, rather than promoting anything that could be historically recognised as Anglo culture. The rulers of the American Empire will not be spreading the English language so that the world can read Shakespeare in the original language. No, they will be spreading English to more easily inform the world, in English, that they should be burning Shakespeare’s books due to racism and anti-Semitism.

  125. @AP
    @Ano4

    Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be, I defer to your expertise here), but I thought that Antes were partially descended from Sarmatians.

    Replies: @Ano4

    Antes were the indigenous Balto-Slavic population. Sarmatians were related to Alans. Alans have nothing in common with Slavs.

  126. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    He was a buddy of one of my grandparents, I think from their days at a DP camp in Germany after the war. His patriotism was admired but his ideas judged as rather strange and not taken seriously, we are Christians after all. I came across some of his writings and at my request he gave me some Ukrainian-Sanskrit stuff when I was curious about it in my teens, but I did not pursue anything further.

    He would be cancelled nowadays:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_Ukrainian_National_Faith

    It identifies the Trypillian culture (3000–5000 BCE) as "Oryana" or "Orania", assumed to having been the epicentre of the Indo-Europeans or Aryans (whom the book calls Oryans, evoking a connection with the Ukrainian word for plowing, oraty;[1] cf. the same cognation in Latin, arare). According to the book, the white racial type and consequently European civilisation first developed along the banks of the Dnieper, and ancient Oryans-Ukrainians are credited as the initiators of the philosophy later written down in the Vedas, developed as the Oryans migrated in different directions including the north of the Indian subcontinent.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called “Tropical Cantata”. I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97


    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Well that explains a lot.

    Although around the same time the so-called Русская Партия in the KGB also played with the revival of Slavic mythology and promoted early Slavs as a heroic and proud people as opposed to degenerate Byzantines and devious and aggressive Khazars.

    See Valentin Ivanov's Русь изначальная.

    https://www.litmir.me/bd/?b=12756&p=1

    A book I truly enjoyed reading

    Possibly also the paintings by Konstantin Vassiliyev a very talented surrealist painter who has met an untimely death (some say that he was killed).

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/105_tNK95b9.jpg

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/109_x3C2sAk.jpg

    https://www.wikiart.org/en/konstantin-vasilyev

    I regret that this trend was not the one that had the upper hand during the Perestroika...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

    , @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    In line with her stated views.

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Mr. Hack

    RUNvirist and also CIA agent, it checks out.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Are you sure that is her? I don't think people of that generation had tattoos (look at the girl's raised hand) and the guy in the back doesn't like like he is from the late 70s/early 80s. It looks like a recent picture of other people.

    That having been said, now I recall that Sylenko did emphasize Jews doing bad deeds in Ukraine and how bad it was for Ukrainians to abandon their own Gods in order to follow a Jewish Messiah.

    I found this about Katherine Yushchenko growing up in a Dazhboh-worshipping family (in Russian):

    https://kp.ua/politics/51447-ekateryna-yuschenko-vyrosla-v-seme-pryverzhentsev-dazhboha

    I don't think she stayed though. One of my kids went to a summer camp with one of her kids and there was no mention of paganism.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

  127. @AP
    @Ano4


    All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b
     
    Yes, but not only:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians#Genetics

    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746,

    In a study conducted in 2014 by Gennady Afanasiev, Dmitry Korobov and Irina Reshetova from the Institute of Archaeology Russian Academy of Sciences, DNA was extracted from bone fragments found in 7 out of 10 Alanic burials on the Don River. Four of them turned out to belong to yDNA Haplogroup G2 and six of them possessed mtDNA haplogroup I.[37]

    In 2015, the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow conducted research on various Sarmato-Alan and Saltovo-Mayaki culture Kurgan burials. In these analyses, the two Alan samples from the 4th to 6th century AD turned out to belong to yDNA haplogroups G2a-P15 and R1a-z94, while two of the three Sarmatian samples from the 2nd to 3rd century AD were found to belong to yDNA haplogroup J1-M267 while one belonged to R1a

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]

    This is what I was referring to. The early Savromat in the Urals and Southern Siberia seem more related to haplogroup R1b populations.

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746

    I was not aware of these more recent studies although I was aware of a gradual admixture of Alans with the Balkanic and Caucasus populations (Y haplogroups E, G and J2).

    So basically you and Altan Bakshi are right, it is quite possible that that the Sarmatians / Alans and Scythians fused after the Sarmatian domination was established.

    Thanks for correcting me. I will need to have an update on the subject.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Btw the Bakshi in Mongolian language is not anyway connected to the Anatolian Turkish word Bakshi, which means garden, nor to Persian Bakshi, which means paymaster. Just to make this clear.

  128. @Europe Europa
    @Europe Europa

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    In many respects the American Empire has been far more effective and ruthless in expanding Anglo cultural hegemony than the British themselves ever were.

    Replies: @Matra, @EldnahYm

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    I don’t agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.

    • Replies: @A123
    @EldnahYm



    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.
     
    I don’t agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.
     
    Those ideas are not mutually exclusive. There is also a third leg on the stool.

    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.

    The stool does not stand in one leg. It is a confluence of many factors that make English shared, useful, and therefore enduring.

    PEACE 😇

    PEACE

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  129. @Europe Europa
    It seems to me that British imperialism was always much too soft, despite the continual whining of Indians, Chinese, Irish, etc, who blame the British for all their problems.

    Look at South America, that's how colonialism is done. The original native cultures were all but wiped out and they are now nothing but a reflection of the colonialists/conquistadors.

    Britain in contrast more or less totally failed to have any meaningful and long lasting cultural and demographic impact on its colonies. I suppose some might cite North America and Australia as counter examples, but I don't think those really count because the natives there were few in number and also primitive, not really a "civilisation" per se. They are almost 100% settler states, little to no assimilation of the natives has taken place.

    That's why I find it bizarre when Indians and Irish whine about the "brutal" Brits, because if Britain really were so brutal would those countries/civilisations even exist any more in the way pre-Colombian civilisations in Latin America no longer exist in any meaningful way? You could say the same about the way the Japanese wiped out the Ainu for that matter.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @EldnahYm

    The natives in all of those Spanish territories suffered heavily from disease, just like in North America. That is the difference. Not Spanish brutality. Africa and Eurasia already had disease exposure, so they were not so vulnerable to imported diseases. Most sub-Saharan Africa due to the climate and the presence of other great apes was difficult for Europeans to survive in without modern medicine. So the Europeans had little demographic impact, except in the far south of South Africa where the climate is more moderate(even this impact looks to be muted over time). It turns out disease is a major determinant of history.

    Demographically speaking, Spanish/Portugese colonialism was much less total than that of the Anglos. This is because the Anglo migrations had large numbers of men and women, whereas the Spaniards were mostly men who mixed with local women. As a result, there is much more native ancestry in Mexico, Central America, and South American than there is in north America, or for that matter Australia or New Zealand.

    There is plenty of native culture in Peru or Bolivia for example, much more so than anywhere in North America.

    Whining from minorities only continues because Anglos listen to/support it. If the incentives were removed, Indians, Chinese, and even the Irish would shut up. The Irish in particular have nothing to whine about, the English have been excessively nice to them. Promoting overseas invasions and assassinations of royal family usually leads to massacres, but the English can’t be bothered. The Indians owe most of what they have to the English. The Chinese, who whine the least, actually have an air tight case that English intervention has caused them nothing but harm.

  130. @Ano4
    @AP


    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]
     
    This is what I was referring to. The early Savromat in the Urals and Southern Siberia seem more related to haplogroup R1b populations.

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746
     

    I was not aware of these more recent studies although I was aware of a gradual admixture of Alans with the Balkanic and Caucasus populations (Y haplogroups E, G and J2).

    So basically you and Altan Bakshi are right, it is quite possible that that the Sarmatians / Alans and Scythians fused after the Sarmatian domination was established.

    Thanks for correcting me. I will need to have an update on the subject.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Btw the Bakshi in Mongolian language is not anyway connected to the Anatolian Turkish word Bakshi, which means garden, nor to Persian Bakshi, which means paymaster. Just to make this clear.

  131. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called "Tropical Cantata". I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97

    https://oligarh.net/f/image/1%2816%29.jpg

    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikhail, @Kent Nationalist, @AP

    Well that explains a lot.

    Although around the same time the so-called Русская Партия in the KGB also played with the revival of Slavic mythology and promoted early Slavs as a heroic and proud people as opposed to degenerate Byzantines and devious and aggressive Khazars.

    See Valentin Ivanov’s Русь изначальная.

    https://www.litmir.me/bd/?b=12756&p=1

    A book I truly enjoyed reading

    Possibly also the paintings by Konstantin Vassiliyev a very talented surrealist painter who has met an untimely death (some say that he was killed).

    https://www.wikiart.org/en/konstantin-vasilyev

    I regret that this trend was not the one that had the upper hand during the Perestroika…

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I have seen before Vasilyevs art, and in my opinion mostly tasteless kitch, his works resemble surprisingly much cheap western fantasy art during the 80s or 70s with fascist vibe or spicing.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    Indeed, Vassilliyev appears to have been a very talented painter, with his attention to detail some of his work remind me of Ukraine's current artistic phenom, Ivan Marchuk, as in this painting of Vassiliyev's:

    https://www.beautyandwisdom.ru/vaslv/repr4.JPG


    Who and why would have this artist murdered? In any event, it shows you how the world of ideas are very important (worth killing for, sometimes?).

    , @Philip Owen
    @Ano4

    Levasovites have headed down this road. Not an actual Brownshirt though.

    Replies: @Ano4

  132. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Sarmatians are not related to Slavs.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack

    As I pointed out above:

    The Sarmatians were eventually decisively assimilated (e.g. Slavicisation) and absorbed by the Proto-Slavic population of Eastern Europe*

    See footnotes 51, 52 & 53
    ps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians

    Certainly, if the Sarmatian presence seems to have been assimilated within the large East Slavic world, they must have added something to the genetic DNA structure of the Slavic inhabitants of this area?

    Also, I’ve been hunting to obtain a book written by a Ukrainian historian, Oleksandr Pali, entitled “The Key to the History of Ukraine” where its main thesis is that there was indeed a large Slavic/Sarmatian coalition within Ukraine in early historic times. I haven’t been able to locate this book and would be very interested in finding it?

  133. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Well that explains a lot.

    Although around the same time the so-called Русская Партия in the KGB also played with the revival of Slavic mythology and promoted early Slavs as a heroic and proud people as opposed to degenerate Byzantines and devious and aggressive Khazars.

    See Valentin Ivanov's Русь изначальная.

    https://www.litmir.me/bd/?b=12756&p=1

    A book I truly enjoyed reading

    Possibly also the paintings by Konstantin Vassiliyev a very talented surrealist painter who has met an untimely death (some say that he was killed).

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/105_tNK95b9.jpg

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/109_x3C2sAk.jpg

    https://www.wikiart.org/en/konstantin-vasilyev

    I regret that this trend was not the one that had the upper hand during the Perestroika...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

    I have seen before Vasilyevs art, and in my opinion mostly tasteless kitch, his works resemble surprisingly much cheap western fantasy art during the 80s or 70s with fascist vibe or spicing.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    Too melodramatic, histrionic and sentimental, just tasteless.

    Replies: @AP, @Ano4

  134. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called "Tropical Cantata". I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97

    https://oligarh.net/f/image/1%2816%29.jpg

    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikhail, @Kent Nationalist, @AP

    In line with her stated views.

  135. @EldnahYm
    @Europe Europa


    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.
     
    I don't agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.

    Replies: @A123

    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.

    I don’t agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.

    Those ideas are not mutually exclusive. There is also a third leg on the stool.

    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.

    The stool does not stand in one leg. It is a confluence of many factors that make English shared, useful, and therefore enduring.

    PEACE 😇

    PEACE

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @A123


    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.
     
    Which languages specifically and how do you know that? Do you speak any other languages or have a passing familiarity with them?

    Replies: @A123

  136. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Well that explains a lot.

    Although around the same time the so-called Русская Партия in the KGB also played with the revival of Slavic mythology and promoted early Slavs as a heroic and proud people as opposed to degenerate Byzantines and devious and aggressive Khazars.

    See Valentin Ivanov's Русь изначальная.

    https://www.litmir.me/bd/?b=12756&p=1

    A book I truly enjoyed reading

    Possibly also the paintings by Konstantin Vassiliyev a very talented surrealist painter who has met an untimely death (some say that he was killed).

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/105_tNK95b9.jpg

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/109_x3C2sAk.jpg

    https://www.wikiart.org/en/konstantin-vasilyev

    I regret that this trend was not the one that had the upper hand during the Perestroika...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

    Indeed, Vassilliyev appears to have been a very talented painter, with his attention to detail some of his work remind me of Ukraine’s current artistic phenom, Ivan Marchuk, as in this painting of Vassiliyev’s:

    Who and why would have this artist murdered? In any event, it shows you how the world of ideas are very important (worth killing for, sometimes?).

  137. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I have seen before Vasilyevs art, and in my opinion mostly tasteless kitch, his works resemble surprisingly much cheap western fantasy art during the 80s or 70s with fascist vibe or spicing.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Too melodramatic, histrionic and sentimental, just tasteless.

    • Replies: @AP
    @AltanBakshi

    I agree about the pictures Anon4 posted but the one Mr. Hack posted was better.

    Replies: @Ano4, @AltanBakshi

    , @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    He was able to create very different types of paintings.

    https://i.pinimg.com/236x/0f/f0/12/0ff0120f7a3c554e5ca0999eeec9a9a3.jpg

    https://aif-s3.aif.ru/images/010/492/a69f0204b6af44ff8ac5bb9149802b23.jpg

    He was also quite visionary sometimes:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/9b/5c/04/9b5c047e780edebc976c54a8ccec53c4.jpg

    A talented man who died young...

    Мир праху.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  138. @A123
    @EldnahYm



    I would also add that the prevalence of the English language around the world today is a result of American pop culture/media and globalisation by American multi-nations and not a direct result of British colonialism.
     
    I don’t agree. The prevalence of English in India has much to do with the British Empire.
     
    Those ideas are not mutually exclusive. There is also a third leg on the stool.

    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.

    The stool does not stand in one leg. It is a confluence of many factors that make English shared, useful, and therefore enduring.

    PEACE 😇

    PEACE

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.

    Which languages specifically and how do you know that? Do you speak any other languages or have a passing familiarity with them?

    • Replies: @A123
    @Hyperborean

    I do not have sufficient foreign language skills to personally handle non-English scientific or legal documents.

    As my knowledge is 2nd hand, I would defer to anyone with specific expertise who wants to give a more complex & deep explanation that includes other factors (e.g. culture, legal system assumptions, etc.) in addition to the language itself.
    ____

    My indirect understanding from others who have had near perpetual issues with Japanese language contracts. I cannot share the exact details. They always seem most upset about sequencing -- which party takes which action in which order. And, how to contractually interpret "in process" actions that do not have a fixed time line.

    Interestingly, some of their overseas counterparts appear to resist negotiating and writing contracts in Japanese when possible, even though it is their native language. They have seen draft pages from side documents (to them) between Japanese companies that are being commented & revised in English in by both sides.

    PEACE 😇

  139. Someone once explained the relationship between Putin and Steven Seagal to me as being based on the similarity of Judo to Aikido, but I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @songbird


    I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)
     
    Do you mean Vladislav Surkov?

    The only things that interest me in the U.S. are Tupac Shakur, Allen Ginsberg, and Jackson Pollock. I don’t need a visa to access their work. I lose nothing.
     
    Putin often plays games with his foreign counterparts so it is harder to know, but Surkov was reportedly that kind of type even as a student (pink hair and listening to Pink Floyd), so I think he is genuine. He also produces various forms of countercultural art.

    His most recent work:

    “You could almost fit a person’s entire life in a poem like this,” said Russia’s monthly literary magazine Russky Pioner (Russian Pioneer), which published Surkov’s poem in its September issue.

    Below is a rough translation of Surkov’s poem.

    I’m alone again

    I was given freedom

    Who needs cocaine

    When there’s this air?



    Take it and breathe in

    That’s it, wait for the high

    This is what paradise looks like:

    Desert freedom



    Take it and breathe it in

    With all your heart, with all your mind

    All nights all days

    All lands all stars

    And all this May

    Of all the soul’s abyss



    And don’t breathe out

    That’s it, don’t breathe
     
    https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/09/03/paradise-without-cocaine-ousted-kremlin-aide-surkov-publishes-poem-a71324

    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @songbird

  140. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called "Tropical Cantata". I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97

    https://oligarh.net/f/image/1%2816%29.jpg

    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikhail, @Kent Nationalist, @AP

    RUNvirist and also CIA agent, it checks out.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Kent Nationalist

    Don't forget that she was probably a tri-lateralst, Bilderberger, Rothschildan Illuminati/Masonic agent too totally funded by Soros. It must have been her childhood upgringing as a RUNvirist that prepared her fully for her momentous role in Ukraine's history. I feel cheated that the movement didn't really take-off much in Minneapolis. :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

  141. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    Too melodramatic, histrionic and sentimental, just tasteless.

    Replies: @AP, @Ano4

    I agree about the pictures Anon4 posted but the one Mr. Hack posted was better.

    • Agree: EldnahYm
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AP

    Appreciation of art is always subjective. We have to remember that the "official " Soviet art until the 60ies was Socialist Realism. Vassiliyev's works clearly stepped outside of the official boundaries. Vassiliev died young and did not have time to completely develop his talents. I find some of his works quite good. Anyway, he was a Surrealist painter so he did not need being realistic. I think he tried to capture the Archetypal representations of Slavic culture and Rus history. I respect him for that.

    , @AltanBakshi
    @AP

    Good, maybe Habsburg rule left you Galicians with some artistic sensibility, unlike other Rus on this site who seem to like hyperemotional and sensational propaganda masquerading as art. Just joking....

    Excuse me Ano4 archetypal representation of Slavic... what the hell, by mimicking fascist propaganda and dungeon and dragons art of the 70s? His use of colours and contrasts is like from Saddam Husseins favorite artist, dont remember the name... And no one demanded any realism from him. Wheres the surrealism by the way? Cheap fantasy art does not equal surreal art. Yes he could have been an excellent book cover artist for cheap fantasy fiction. Alphonse Mucha tried to capture the archetypes of Slavic culture, but he too failed, the man you are looking is Ivan Bilibin, his art expresses the archetypes and allegories of the Russian soul.

  142. @AP
    @AltanBakshi

    I agree about the pictures Anon4 posted but the one Mr. Hack posted was better.

    Replies: @Ano4, @AltanBakshi

    Appreciation of art is always subjective. We have to remember that the “official ” Soviet art until the 60ies was Socialist Realism. Vassiliyev’s works clearly stepped outside of the official boundaries. Vassiliev died young and did not have time to completely develop his talents. I find some of his works quite good. Anyway, he was a Surrealist painter so he did not need being realistic. I think he tried to capture the Archetypal representations of Slavic culture and Rus history. I respect him for that.

    • Agree: AP
  143. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I believe that there are thousands of cognate words between Slavic and Sanskrit. I cant read Sanskrit, but I know surprisingly many Sanskrit terms relating philosophy and religion, and I do often read Sanskrit Dharanis or Mantras and all the time I do recognize cognates that I did not notice before. Like Dana, which means giving and generosity, clearly its cognate of Дать.

    Lets return to the question of the origin of the Sarmatians. Closest language to modern Ossetian is small Yaghnobi language in Tajikistan, Yaghnobi is believed to be the descentant of the Sogdian language. You probably know that Sogdia was the ancient name for the Fergana valley and surrounding areas. I am not sure, but I think that ancient Sogdians were Sakas or closely connected with them.

    Buddhas people the Shakyas, sometimes used word Kanhe towards dark skinned people, kanhe means black devil. Shakyas seemed to be very proud, elitist and maybe even xenophobic? I could give more examples, but I fear tarnishing the reputation of Dharma by silly off topic facts. Especially nowadays....

    Replies: @Ano4

    Speaking of the Dharma. Scythians / Shakya / Saka also used to drink in cups made of the skulls of their enemies.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapala

    Later, Pechenegs made a skull cup of the head of prince Svyatoslav demonstrating the continuity in the cultural trends of the Great Steppe people…

    🙂

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Oh we still have quite an obsession with bones and burial places, many monks have Tantric musical instruments made from leg bone and Skull cups are quite common in the monasteries. Among other things.... like carved skulls or dresses made from bones... our holy relics... et cetera....


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangling

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

  144. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Lev Sylenko was an inveterate world traveler and aside from visiting several ashrams in India and Tibet, spent time in Iraq, Greece, Turkey, and had a monumental trip all throughout Mexico and Central America. He had an enormous interest in the cultures of the Aztec, Mayan and Toltaiac worlds. He even produced a documentary film about Central America called "Tropical Cantata". I found this very readable biography about his life to be quite entertaining: https://www.dazhboh.org/v?id=uchs&pg=97

    https://oligarh.net/f/image/1%2816%29.jpg

    A very young and enthusiastic RUNvirist (in Chicago?) Katheryna Yushchenko (nee Chumachenko) who later helped Lev immigrate back to Ukraine to live out his last earthly days.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikhail, @Kent Nationalist, @AP

    Are you sure that is her? I don’t think people of that generation had tattoos (look at the girl’s raised hand) and the guy in the back doesn’t like like he is from the late 70s/early 80s. It looks like a recent picture of other people.

    That having been said, now I recall that Sylenko did emphasize Jews doing bad deeds in Ukraine and how bad it was for Ukrainians to abandon their own Gods in order to follow a Jewish Messiah.

    I found this about Katherine Yushchenko growing up in a Dazhboh-worshipping family (in Russian):

    https://kp.ua/politics/51447-ekateryna-yuschenko-vyrosla-v-seme-pryverzhentsev-dazhboha

    I don’t think she stayed though. One of my kids went to a summer camp with one of her kids and there was no mention of paganism.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @AP

    Sure looks like her. Is that photo completely non-doctored? The salute and arm band really stand out.

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    I can't attest for the authenticity of the photo, but that's the way it was presented within the internet. You have a good point about the tattoo on her arm (you must have good eyesight). There's plenty of information about the Chumachenkos friendship with Sylenko that you can find on the webosphere in Ukrainian. I don't know that katherine continued in her RUNvira faith into adulthood, but she did seem to be sympathetic to Lev's condition and was instrumental in getting him back to Ukraine around 2008 after he had a debilitating stroke. Taken from the BBC:


    Учитель Силенко минулого року переніс інсульт. Лікування в США досить дороге і я звернулася в Україні до Катерини Ющенко з проханням допомогти госпіталізувати і полікувати вчителя, на що я отримала позитивну відповідь".
     
    https://www.bbc.com/staticarchive/1bc9ee4103ccf877221e4234b08842c6e8e85f51.jpghttps://www.

    https://www.bbc.com/staticarchive/1bc9ee4103ccf877221e4234b08842c6e8e85f51.jpg
    Finally, back home.

    Replies: @AP

  145. @Kent Nationalist
    @Mr. Hack

    RUNvirist and also CIA agent, it checks out.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Don’t forget that she was probably a tri-lateralst, Bilderberger, Rothschildan Illuminati/Masonic agent too totally funded by Soros. It must have been her childhood upgringing as a RUNvirist that prepared her fully for her momentous role in Ukraine’s history. I feel cheated that the movement didn’t really take-off much in Minneapolis. 🙂

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Chumachenko briefly headed the bigoted, anti-Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee, when she was in her early twenties and at a time when she said some stupidly inaccurate anti-Russian views.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  146. @AP
    @AltanBakshi

    I agree about the pictures Anon4 posted but the one Mr. Hack posted was better.

    Replies: @Ano4, @AltanBakshi

    Good, maybe Habsburg rule left you Galicians with some artistic sensibility, unlike other Rus on this site who seem to like hyperemotional and sensational propaganda masquerading as art. Just joking….

    Excuse me Ano4 archetypal representation of Slavic… what the hell, by mimicking fascist propaganda and dungeon and dragons art of the 70s? His use of colours and contrasts is like from Saddam Husseins favorite artist, dont remember the name… And no one demanded any realism from him. Wheres the surrealism by the way? Cheap fantasy art does not equal surreal art. Yes he could have been an excellent book cover artist for cheap fantasy fiction. Alphonse Mucha tried to capture the archetypes of Slavic culture, but he too failed, the man you are looking is Ivan Bilibin, his art expresses the archetypes and allegories of the Russian soul.

    • Disagree: Ano4
  147. @songbird
    Someone once explained the relationship between Putin and Steven Seagal to me as being based on the similarity of Judo to Aikido, but I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)

    Do you mean Vladislav Surkov?

    The only things that interest me in the U.S. are Tupac Shakur, Allen Ginsberg, and Jackson Pollock. I don’t need a visa to access their work. I lose nothing.

    Putin often plays games with his foreign counterparts so it is harder to know, but Surkov was reportedly that kind of type even as a student (pink hair and listening to Pink Floyd), so I think he is genuine. He also produces various forms of countercultural art.

    His most recent work:

    “You could almost fit a person’s entire life in a poem like this,” said Russia’s monthly literary magazine Russky Pioner (Russian Pioneer), which published Surkov’s poem in its September issue.

    Below is a rough translation of Surkov’s poem.

    I’m alone again

    I was given freedom

    Who needs cocaine

    When there’s this air?

    Take it and breathe in

    That’s it, wait for the high

    This is what paradise looks like:

    Desert freedom

    Take it and breathe it in

    With all your heart, with all your mind

    All nights all days

    All lands all stars

    And all this May

    Of all the soul’s abyss

    And don’t breathe out

    That’s it, don’t breathe

    https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/09/03/paradise-without-cocaine-ousted-kremlin-aide-surkov-publishes-poem-a71324

    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Hyperborean


    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.
     
    Well, it could be worse: (Zurab Tsereteli)

    https://i.imgur.com/6O4AF5j_d.webp?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium

    This was given to the US to commemorate the losses of September 11. Some thought it was a not so subtle insult. In truth, he is just a horrendous artist.

    Here are some of his more "patriotic" works:

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/atg-prod-oaas-files/hum54-15/original/d77ef79a8f54b2c222708866aa52a386.jpg

    https://previews.123rf.com/images/id1974/id19741406/id1974140600379/29814015-monument-to-the-russian-georgian-friendship-russia-moscow-sculptor-zurab-tsereteli.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/00_1423_Monument_to_Peter_I._in_Mosco.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @songbird
    @Hyperborean

    Yes. It was Dmitry who mentioned him originally, I believe. (And I believe he also likes Tupac) I thought it was a brilliant troll, but am disquieted by the poetry. Even though it is doggerel, it seems to be too much effort to be a troll. And what sort of young man ever dyes his hair pink?

    And yet it is hard for me to believe that anyone really likes Pollock.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  148. @AltanBakshi
    @AltanBakshi

    Too melodramatic, histrionic and sentimental, just tasteless.

    Replies: @AP, @Ano4

    He was able to create very different types of paintings.

    He was also quite visionary sometimes:

    A talented man who died young…

    Мир праху.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I dont like his art, but he clearly had a potential to grow and improve, I must acknowledge. Maybe his overtly sensational style was his way to react to the stagnation and greyness of late Brezhnev era?

    Replies: @Ano4

  149. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    Speaking of the Dharma. Scythians / Shakya / Saka also used to drink in cups made of the skulls of their enemies.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapala

    Later, Pechenegs made a skull cup of the head of prince Svyatoslav demonstrating the continuity in the cultural trends of the Great Steppe people...

    🙂

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Oh we still have quite an obsession with bones and burial places, many monks have Tantric musical instruments made from leg bone and Skull cups are quite common in the monasteries. Among other things…. like carved skulls or dresses made from bones… our holy relics… et cetera….

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangling

    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Obvious Demon Worship. I went to the Tantra exhibition at the British Museum and found it very unsettling.

    Replies: @another anon, @AltanBakshi

  150. @Hyperborean
    @songbird


    I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)
     
    Do you mean Vladislav Surkov?

    The only things that interest me in the U.S. are Tupac Shakur, Allen Ginsberg, and Jackson Pollock. I don’t need a visa to access their work. I lose nothing.
     
    Putin often plays games with his foreign counterparts so it is harder to know, but Surkov was reportedly that kind of type even as a student (pink hair and listening to Pink Floyd), so I think he is genuine. He also produces various forms of countercultural art.

    His most recent work:

    “You could almost fit a person’s entire life in a poem like this,” said Russia’s monthly literary magazine Russky Pioner (Russian Pioneer), which published Surkov’s poem in its September issue.

    Below is a rough translation of Surkov’s poem.

    I’m alone again

    I was given freedom

    Who needs cocaine

    When there’s this air?



    Take it and breathe in

    That’s it, wait for the high

    This is what paradise looks like:

    Desert freedom



    Take it and breathe it in

    With all your heart, with all your mind

    All nights all days

    All lands all stars

    And all this May

    Of all the soul’s abyss



    And don’t breathe out

    That’s it, don’t breathe
     
    https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/09/03/paradise-without-cocaine-ousted-kremlin-aide-surkov-publishes-poem-a71324

    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @songbird

    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.

    Well, it could be worse: (Zurab Tsereteli)

    This was given to the US to commemorate the losses of September 11. Some thought it was a not so subtle insult. In truth, he is just a horrendous artist.

    Here are some of his more “patriotic” works:

    • Agree: AP, AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it's not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art...
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). :-)

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Hyperborean

  151. @Mr. Hack
    @Kent Nationalist

    Don't forget that she was probably a tri-lateralst, Bilderberger, Rothschildan Illuminati/Masonic agent too totally funded by Soros. It must have been her childhood upgringing as a RUNvirist that prepared her fully for her momentous role in Ukraine's history. I feel cheated that the movement didn't really take-off much in Minneapolis. :-)

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Chumachenko briefly headed the bigoted, anti-Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee, when she was in her early twenties and at a time when she said some stupidly inaccurate anti-Russian views.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Curious to know just what exact "stupid and inaccurate anti-Russian views" she proposed while heading the "bigoted anti Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee"?

    Replies: @Mikhail

  152. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Are you sure that is her? I don't think people of that generation had tattoos (look at the girl's raised hand) and the guy in the back doesn't like like he is from the late 70s/early 80s. It looks like a recent picture of other people.

    That having been said, now I recall that Sylenko did emphasize Jews doing bad deeds in Ukraine and how bad it was for Ukrainians to abandon their own Gods in order to follow a Jewish Messiah.

    I found this about Katherine Yushchenko growing up in a Dazhboh-worshipping family (in Russian):

    https://kp.ua/politics/51447-ekateryna-yuschenko-vyrosla-v-seme-pryverzhentsev-dazhboha

    I don't think she stayed though. One of my kids went to a summer camp with one of her kids and there was no mention of paganism.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    Sure looks like her. Is that photo completely non-doctored? The salute and arm band really stand out.

  153. @Hyperborean
    @songbird


    I think Putin is really just trolling Americans about their lack of culture, like that Russian minister who says he likes Pollock and Dr. Dre (or some other rapper.)
     
    Do you mean Vladislav Surkov?

    The only things that interest me in the U.S. are Tupac Shakur, Allen Ginsberg, and Jackson Pollock. I don’t need a visa to access their work. I lose nothing.
     
    Putin often plays games with his foreign counterparts so it is harder to know, but Surkov was reportedly that kind of type even as a student (pink hair and listening to Pink Floyd), so I think he is genuine. He also produces various forms of countercultural art.

    His most recent work:

    “You could almost fit a person’s entire life in a poem like this,” said Russia’s monthly literary magazine Russky Pioner (Russian Pioneer), which published Surkov’s poem in its September issue.

    Below is a rough translation of Surkov’s poem.

    I’m alone again

    I was given freedom

    Who needs cocaine

    When there’s this air?



    Take it and breathe in

    That’s it, wait for the high

    This is what paradise looks like:

    Desert freedom



    Take it and breathe it in

    With all your heart, with all your mind

    All nights all days

    All lands all stars

    And all this May

    Of all the soul’s abyss



    And don’t breathe out

    That’s it, don’t breathe
     
    https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2020/09/03/paradise-without-cocaine-ousted-kremlin-aide-surkov-publishes-poem-a71324

    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @songbird

    Yes. It was Dmitry who mentioned him originally, I believe. (And I believe he also likes Tupac) I thought it was a brilliant troll, but am disquieted by the poetry. Even though it is doggerel, it seems to be too much effort to be a troll. And what sort of young man ever dyes his hair pink?

    And yet it is hard for me to believe that anyone really likes Pollock.

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @songbird


    I thought it was a brilliant troll, but am disquieted by the poetry. Even though it is doggerel, it seems to be too much effort to be a troll.
     
    He is also known for Rock song lyrics and dingy novellas.

    Close to Zero is the tale of a Russian publisher operating in a murky political system featuring paid-off media, corrupt officials, dubious politicians and law enforcement agencies on the take.

    The short novel was published last month and passed unnoticed until yesterday [2009], when a newspaper reported that its author was none other than the Kremlin's chief political strategist Vladislav Surkov, writing under a pseudonym.

    [...]

    In the novel, which advertised itself as gangster fiction, the main character Yegor Samokhodov orders a poet to write verse in the name of the regional governor to make the official look clever and win an award. Samokhodov, a publisher who does a sideline in political public relations, then tries to bribe a female journalist at an opposition newspaper to "correct" stories about damage to children's health from a toxic chemical factory owned by the governor's relative.

    Fact or fiction?

    The events portrayed are everyday fare in Russia, where local media sometimes take money in return for favourable coverage and those in power believe they can bribe or bully their way to victory in almost any situation.

    A source at the Russky Pioner magazine which published the novella confirmed that the story was Mr Surkov's work. "Yes, it was him," the source said on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.

    [...]

    Andrey Kolesnikov, the editor-in-chief of Russky Pioner and also Russia's best-known political correspondent, said he had decided to publish the work because of its artistic quality, despite not knowing who wrote it.

    "I received the text by email with a request from the author that he was interested in my opinion," he said. "I really liked the novel. I am convinced it is a work of quality ... for the author, it was an act of self-discovery".

    In one revealing part of the story, the opposition journalist Nikita Mariyevna tells Samokhodov she hates those in power – a "greasy crowd" of governors, deputies, ministers, security service officials and police. But the book's hero replies: "It's not those in power you hate, but life". He goes on to explain that unfairness, the use of force and stagnation are just part of life and urges her to live with this rather than try to destroy it.

     

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/did-kremlin-political-chief-really-write-murky-gangster-novel-1771881.html
  154. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    He was able to create very different types of paintings.

    https://i.pinimg.com/236x/0f/f0/12/0ff0120f7a3c554e5ca0999eeec9a9a3.jpg

    https://aif-s3.aif.ru/images/010/492/a69f0204b6af44ff8ac5bb9149802b23.jpg

    He was also quite visionary sometimes:

    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/9b/5c/04/9b5c047e780edebc976c54a8ccec53c4.jpg

    A talented man who died young...

    Мир праху.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    I dont like his art, but he clearly had a potential to grow and improve, I must acknowledge. Maybe his overtly sensational style was his way to react to the stagnation and greyness of late Brezhnev era?

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi

    I am pretty sure that he died before completely developing his art. And you are probably correct that the Volkish and kitsch overtones in his works were a kind of provocation against the norms of the Zastoy period.

    That was the time when you had to walk the line as an artist. Vassiliyev didn't and some say that he paid it with his life. The conspiracy theory is that he was killed on the orders of the "Cosmopolitan" or "Globalist" fraction of the Soviet Deep State. A similar story is told about the death of Igor Talkov.

    Whether it is true or not is hard to tell, but Vassyliev died just at the moment when he started being known around USSR.

    Anyway, for those who are not aware of the fact that Soviet Deep State also had its Globalists (not internationalists, but Club of Rome affiliated people):

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9C%D0%B5%D0%B6%D0%B4%D1%83%D0%BD%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B4%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9_%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B8%D1%82%D1%83%D1%82_%D0%BF%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B4%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D1%81%D0%B8%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%BC%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B0%D0%BB%D0%B8%D0%B7%D0%B0

    And a more conspiratorial take:

    https://hi-in.facebook.com/ZambekMalhsag/posts/%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9-%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B8%D1%82%D1%83%D1%82-%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%B3%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%B7%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9-%D1%81%D1%88%D0%B0-%D0%B8-%D0%BA%D0%B3%D0%B1-%D1%81%D1%81%D1%81%D1%80-%D0%B4%D0%BB%D1%8F-%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B7%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B1%D0%BE%D1%82%D0%BA%D0%B8-%D1%82%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%84%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%86%D0%B8%D0%B8-%D1%81%D1%81%D1%81%D1%80/2225044937513847/

  155. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Are you sure that is her? I don't think people of that generation had tattoos (look at the girl's raised hand) and the guy in the back doesn't like like he is from the late 70s/early 80s. It looks like a recent picture of other people.

    That having been said, now I recall that Sylenko did emphasize Jews doing bad deeds in Ukraine and how bad it was for Ukrainians to abandon their own Gods in order to follow a Jewish Messiah.

    I found this about Katherine Yushchenko growing up in a Dazhboh-worshipping family (in Russian):

    https://kp.ua/politics/51447-ekateryna-yuschenko-vyrosla-v-seme-pryverzhentsev-dazhboha

    I don't think she stayed though. One of my kids went to a summer camp with one of her kids and there was no mention of paganism.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack

    I can’t attest for the authenticity of the photo, but that’s the way it was presented within the internet. You have a good point about the tattoo on her arm (you must have good eyesight). There’s plenty of information about the Chumachenkos friendship with Sylenko that you can find on the webosphere in Ukrainian. I don’t know that katherine continued in her RUNvira faith into adulthood, but she did seem to be sympathetic to Lev’s condition and was instrumental in getting him back to Ukraine around 2008 after he had a debilitating stroke. Taken from the BBC:

    Учитель Силенко минулого року переніс інсульт. Лікування в США досить дороге і я звернулася в Україні до Катерини Ющенко з проханням допомогти госпіталізувати і полікувати вчителя, на що я отримала позитивну відповідь”.

    https://www.bbc.com/staticarchive/1bc9ee4103ccf877221e4234b08842c6e8e85f51.jpghttps://www.
    Finally, back home.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack


    I can’t attest for the authenticity of the photo, but that’s the way it was presented within the internet.
     
    Image search on google shows it's almost always posted on anti-Ukrainian Russian nationalist websites. So a fake.

    The tattoo is an easy giveaway. No way some white middle-class girl in the late 1970s would have her lower arm covered in tattoos (or, indeed, have any tattoos). It's a double-giveaway: tattoos in that location are often used to cover up wrist-cutting. Wrist-cutting wasn't as popular among young people in the late 1970s as it is now.

    The hair, glasses, clothes on the people also don't match the late 1970s era at all.
  156. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Oh we still have quite an obsession with bones and burial places, many monks have Tantric musical instruments made from leg bone and Skull cups are quite common in the monasteries. Among other things.... like carved skulls or dresses made from bones... our holy relics... et cetera....


    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kangling

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

    Obvious Demon Worship. I went to the Tantra exhibition at the British Museum and found it very unsettling.

    • Replies: @another anon
    @Kent Nationalist

    Art and architecture made of human skulls and bones was common in Christianity too, as symbol of humility and mortality of all flesh.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/Sedlec-Ossuary.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capela_dos_Ossos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedlec_Ossuary

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_della_Concezione_dei_Cappuccini

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skull_Chapel

    Feel free to whip up your Jack Chick cartoon collection and start another subthread why Catholic church is satanic, anything is better than the never ending Ukrainian, Balkan or Caucasian debates :-)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Kent Nationalist

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh you were serious, I thought that you were just joking last time when you replied to me that I shouldnt try to communicate with demons.

    Its very wrong of British Museum to even hold such exhibitions, of course they seem demonic when taken out of their context. I dont know what you have seen, Buddhist secret practices or so called path of Hidden Mantra and Hindu Tantra is a huge topic with thousands of traditions and lineages. If you are just shocked from bones, then its your problem, whats wrong with bones?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Kent Nationalist, @Dmitry

  157. @Hyperborean
    @Hyperborean


    To be honest, he reminds me somewhat of Dmitry. Both Russian part-Jews and having the similar far-too-serious interpretations of and taste for degenerate modern American art and life.
     
    Well, it could be worse: (Zurab Tsereteli)

    https://i.imgur.com/6O4AF5j_d.webp?maxwidth=640&shape=thumb&fidelity=medium

    This was given to the US to commemorate the losses of September 11. Some thought it was a not so subtle insult. In truth, he is just a horrendous artist.

    Here are some of his more "patriotic" works:

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/atg-prod-oaas-files/hum54-15/original/d77ef79a8f54b2c222708866aa52a386.jpg

    https://previews.123rf.com/images/id1974/id19741406/id1974140600379/29814015-monument-to-the-russian-georgian-friendship-russia-moscow-sculptor-zurab-tsereteli.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/00_1423_Monument_to_Peter_I._in_Mosco.jpg

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it’s not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art…
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). 🙂

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    There are many masterpieces of modern art, like art of Francis Bacon, but what evolution there is in kitsch? I think that many Baroque Catholic artists were too melodramatic and emotional, but at least they mastered the highly emotionally charged style.

    , @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it’s not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art…
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). 🙂
     
    I cannot be a reactionary, I tolerate the Eiffel Tower. (But truly, I am slowly improving, there used to be a time when I used to feel pained at impressionism and art déco.)

    More seriously, it depends on the art form. I went to a Natalia Goncharova exhibition in London once and while I had ambivalent feelings concerning her paintings I liked her costume ideas.

    So with literature and poetry I am fine with more modern styles. In film-making and music modern and experimental styles are also acceptable. I haven't seen enough opera performances to evaluate them. For architecture, Art Nouveau and before is fine, Art Déco feels borderline and usually comes later is either dull or insulting. In theatre I prefer a more old-fashioned style.

    As for paintings and sculptures, while I don't usually visit modern art museums, when I do I always feel vindicated in my previous dismissive position given that it is either low quality, political propaganda or occasionally something which is beautiful but leaves me feeling very bizarre, like the mental equivalent of gazing into the kaleidoscopic reflection of a golden bathroom.

    For less high-brow material like comics, I am rather partial to the styles of mangas, manhuas, manhwas and Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées. From my superficial perspective older American ones are fine though present ones are lacklustre.

    Though when I evaluate the quality of the artists I also evaluate them differently depending on what brow-level they wish to be seen as. If a nice paperback cover is more beautiful than something being sold at an auction house then I will conclude that there is some wrong with the auction house and the buyers there.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard.Gerard

  158. @songbird
    @Hyperborean

    Yes. It was Dmitry who mentioned him originally, I believe. (And I believe he also likes Tupac) I thought it was a brilliant troll, but am disquieted by the poetry. Even though it is doggerel, it seems to be too much effort to be a troll. And what sort of young man ever dyes his hair pink?

    And yet it is hard for me to believe that anyone really likes Pollock.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    I thought it was a brilliant troll, but am disquieted by the poetry. Even though it is doggerel, it seems to be too much effort to be a troll.

    He is also known for Rock song lyrics and dingy novellas.

    Close to Zero is the tale of a Russian publisher operating in a murky political system featuring paid-off media, corrupt officials, dubious politicians and law enforcement agencies on the take.

    The short novel was published last month and passed unnoticed until yesterday [2009], when a newspaper reported that its author was none other than the Kremlin’s chief political strategist Vladislav Surkov, writing under a pseudonym.

    […]

    In the novel, which advertised itself as gangster fiction, the main character Yegor Samokhodov orders a poet to write verse in the name of the regional governor to make the official look clever and win an award. Samokhodov, a publisher who does a sideline in political public relations, then tries to bribe a female journalist at an opposition newspaper to “correct” stories about damage to children’s health from a toxic chemical factory owned by the governor’s relative.

    Fact or fiction?

    The events portrayed are everyday fare in Russia, where local media sometimes take money in return for favourable coverage and those in power believe they can bribe or bully their way to victory in almost any situation.

    A source at the Russky Pioner magazine which published the novella confirmed that the story was Mr Surkov’s work. “Yes, it was him,” the source said on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.

    […]

    Andrey Kolesnikov, the editor-in-chief of Russky Pioner and also Russia’s best-known political correspondent, said he had decided to publish the work because of its artistic quality, despite not knowing who wrote it.

    “I received the text by email with a request from the author that he was interested in my opinion,” he said. “I really liked the novel. I am convinced it is a work of quality … for the author, it was an act of self-discovery”.

    In one revealing part of the story, the opposition journalist Nikita Mariyevna tells Samokhodov she hates those in power – a “greasy crowd” of governors, deputies, ministers, security service officials and police. But the book’s hero replies: “It’s not those in power you hate, but life”. He goes on to explain that unfairness, the use of force and stagnation are just part of life and urges her to live with this rather than try to destroy it.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/did-kremlin-political-chief-really-write-murky-gangster-novel-1771881.html

    • LOL: songbird
  159. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    I dont like his art, but he clearly had a potential to grow and improve, I must acknowledge. Maybe his overtly sensational style was his way to react to the stagnation and greyness of late Brezhnev era?

    Replies: @Ano4

    I am pretty sure that he died before completely developing his art. And you are probably correct that the Volkish and kitsch overtones in his works were a kind of provocation against the norms of the Zastoy period.

    That was the time when you had to walk the line as an artist. Vassiliyev didn’t and some say that he paid it with his life. The conspiracy theory is that he was killed on the orders of the “Cosmopolitan” or “Globalist” fraction of the Soviet Deep State. A similar story is told about the death of Igor Talkov.

    Whether it is true or not is hard to tell, but Vassyliev died just at the moment when he started being known around USSR.

    Anyway, for those who are not aware of the fact that Soviet Deep State also had its Globalists (not internationalists, but Club of Rome affiliated people):

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9C%D0%B5%D0%B6%D0%B4%D1%83%D0%BD%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%B4%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9_%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B8%D1%82%D1%83%D1%82_%D0%BF%D1%80%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%B4%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D1%81%D0%B8%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%BC%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%B3%D0%BE_%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B0%D0%BB%D0%B8%D0%B7%D0%B0

    And a more conspiratorial take:

    https://hi-in.facebook.com/ZambekMalhsag/posts/%D0%B2%D0%B5%D0%BD%D1%81%D0%BA%D0%B8%D0%B9-%D0%B8%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B8%D1%82%D1%83%D1%82-%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%B3%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%B8%D0%B7%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9-%D1%81%D1%88%D0%B0-%D0%B8-%D0%BA%D0%B3%D0%B1-%D1%81%D1%81%D1%81%D1%80-%D0%B4%D0%BB%D1%8F-%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B7%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B1%D0%BE%D1%82%D0%BA%D0%B8-%D1%82%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%BD%D1%81%D1%84%D0%BE%D1%80%D0%BC%D0%B0%D1%86%D0%B8%D0%B8-%D1%81%D1%81%D1%81%D1%80/2225044937513847/

  160. @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it's not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art...
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). :-)

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Hyperborean

    There are many masterpieces of modern art, like art of Francis Bacon, but what evolution there is in kitsch? I think that many Baroque Catholic artists were too melodramatic and emotional, but at least they mastered the highly emotionally charged style.

  161. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Obvious Demon Worship. I went to the Tantra exhibition at the British Museum and found it very unsettling.

    Replies: @another anon, @AltanBakshi

    Art and architecture made of human skulls and bones was common in Christianity too, as symbol of humility and mortality of all flesh.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capela_dos_Ossos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedlec_Ossuary

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_della_Concezione_dei_Cappuccini

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skull_Chapel

    Feel free to whip up your Jack Chick cartoon collection and start another subthread why Catholic church is satanic, anything is better than the never ending Ukrainian, Balkan or Caucasian debates 🙂

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @another anon

    I agree that the Balkan and Caucasian debates are totally out of place here, but haven't you heard that Ukrainians are in fact really "Little Russians" and therefore deserve a place at the table here, at a "Russian blog"? :-)

    Chandeliers and gothic arches made of human bones via Roman Catholicism is much trendier!

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @another anon

    Catholics don't worship these. Actually, the objects made directly from skulls were the least disturbing part.

  162. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Obvious Demon Worship. I went to the Tantra exhibition at the British Museum and found it very unsettling.

    Replies: @another anon, @AltanBakshi

    Oh you were serious, I thought that you were just joking last time when you replied to me that I shouldnt try to communicate with demons.

    Its very wrong of British Museum to even hold such exhibitions, of course they seem demonic when taken out of their context. I dont know what you have seen, Buddhist secret practices or so called path of Hidden Mantra and Hindu Tantra is a huge topic with thousands of traditions and lineages. If you are just shocked from bones, then its your problem, whats wrong with bones?

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    whats wrong with bones
     
    Bones make a great bouillon. You can also make a fertilizing biomass if you have enough bones. That would probably take millions of them. You can make glue...



    Speaking of demons, Bodhidhama wrote that demons have the power of manifestation. But the locus they manifest from/into is our own Buddha Nature. That is of course a Cittamatra take on the whole "entity problem".

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Where is the 'context' where giving prayers and offerings to a statue of a demon with a man's severed head drinking from a skull cup is not demon worship?


    Actually it's just a metaphor
     
    Tantric Episcopalianism

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi

    Bones remind us of death, and what reminds of death brings a feeling of the uncanny and ominous, and revulsion. Ask any children if they want to be all night in a cemetery. Or sleep in a bed of someone who has died? There is a natural feeling of spiritual fear.

    Sinister emotion which surrounds everything to do with death (even the image of the coffin is macabre), is in a sense of discord between our internal feeling of immortality, and the powerless and transitory reality of the life of our friends, family and ourselves.

    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, - and the human skull is a traditional memento mori - is probably healthy for us, especially now, where much of our culture (especially the high level of organization in society which separates dead and dying people into hospitals) has become like the father of the Buddha, who tried to shield his son from knowledge of sickness and death .

    Part of spiritual quality of Gothic cathedrals - the fact they have dead bodies buried into the floor.

    And the depictions of "Danse Macabre" was to remind people to remember the transitoriness and superficiality of their life, and think of something more eternal than their trivial worries of the day.

    https://i.imgur.com/GaS8N5J.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

  163. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Chumachenko briefly headed the bigoted, anti-Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee, when she was in her early twenties and at a time when she said some stupidly inaccurate anti-Russian views.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Curious to know just what exact “stupid and inaccurate anti-Russian views” she proposed while heading the “bigoted anti Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee”?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don't get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @TheTotallyAnonymous, @Philip Owen

  164. @another anon
    @Kent Nationalist

    Art and architecture made of human skulls and bones was common in Christianity too, as symbol of humility and mortality of all flesh.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/Sedlec-Ossuary.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capela_dos_Ossos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedlec_Ossuary

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_della_Concezione_dei_Cappuccini

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skull_Chapel

    Feel free to whip up your Jack Chick cartoon collection and start another subthread why Catholic church is satanic, anything is better than the never ending Ukrainian, Balkan or Caucasian debates :-)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Kent Nationalist

    I agree that the Balkan and Caucasian debates are totally out of place here, but haven’t you heard that Ukrainians are in fact really “Little Russians” and therefore deserve a place at the table here, at a “Russian blog”? 🙂

    Chandeliers and gothic arches made of human bones via Roman Catholicism is much trendier!

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    Orthodox monks also gather human skulls.

    https://orthochristian.com/104973.html

    https://travelmaven.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83476d41669e201156f954eec970c-pi


    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3b/Prodromos-9.jpg
    "What I am, you will be, too. What you are, I've been myself" is written in skull.

  165. @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it's not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art...
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). :-)

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Hyperborean

    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it’s not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art…
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). 🙂

    I cannot be a reactionary, I tolerate the Eiffel Tower. (But truly, I am slowly improving, there used to be a time when I used to feel pained at impressionism and art déco.)

    More seriously, it depends on the art form. I went to a Natalia Goncharova exhibition in London once and while I had ambivalent feelings concerning her paintings I liked her costume ideas.

    So with literature and poetry I am fine with more modern styles. In film-making and music modern and experimental styles are also acceptable. I haven’t seen enough opera performances to evaluate them. For architecture, Art Nouveau and before is fine, Art Déco feels borderline and usually comes later is either dull or insulting. In theatre I prefer a more old-fashioned style.

    As for paintings and sculptures, while I don’t usually visit modern art museums, when I do I always feel vindicated in my previous dismissive position given that it is either low quality, political propaganda or occasionally something which is beautiful but leaves me feeling very bizarre, like the mental equivalent of gazing into the kaleidoscopic reflection of a golden bathroom.

    For less high-brow material like comics, I am rather partial to the styles of mangas, manhuas, manhwas and Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées. From my superficial perspective older American ones are fine though present ones are lacklustre.

    Though when I evaluate the quality of the artists I also evaluate them differently depending on what brow-level they wish to be seen as. If a nice paperback cover is more beautiful than something being sold at an auction house then I will conclude that there is some wrong with the auction house and the buyers there.

    • Thanks: Gerard.Gerard
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    I appreciate your stance and ability to clearly articulate your preferences. As you point out, some modern art is accessible and interesting, and other is not. I too find a lot of the "way out" avant guard like what Pollock represents in painting or Sun Rae does to jazz music to be too grating to enjoy.

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela, @Hyperborean

    , @Gerard.Gerard
    @Hyperborean

    Surely you're a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?

    Obviously as part of Paris landscape, the Eiffel Tower is spectacular and beautiful at a distance , but up close it is extremely ugly, I would not want to live less than 5km away from it.... the great US skyscrapers from late 1910's - 1940's remain aesthetic from close or long distance.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l'escargot by Matisse..... is an extreme cretin?

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  166. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Well that explains a lot.

    Although around the same time the so-called Русская Партия in the KGB also played with the revival of Slavic mythology and promoted early Slavs as a heroic and proud people as opposed to degenerate Byzantines and devious and aggressive Khazars.

    See Valentin Ivanov's Русь изначальная.

    https://www.litmir.me/bd/?b=12756&p=1

    A book I truly enjoyed reading

    Possibly also the paintings by Konstantin Vassiliyev a very talented surrealist painter who has met an untimely death (some say that he was killed).

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/105_tNK95b9.jpg

    https://24smi.org/public/media/resize/800x-/2018/10/25/109_x3C2sAk.jpg

    https://www.wikiart.org/en/konstantin-vasilyev

    I regret that this trend was not the one that had the upper hand during the Perestroika...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

    Levasovites have headed down this road. Not an actual Brownshirt though.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Philip Owen

    A lot of crazy ideas were in the air after the Perestroika.

    But even before that, from 1975 to 1985, there were also some unorthodox thinking among Soviet Nomenklatura and Deep State. It is impossible now to reconstruct exactly all the conflicting trends and tendencies, but I believe there were at the very least a kind of cosmist/transhumanist trend, a globalist social-democrate and a (pseudo)nationalist and somewhat traditionalist trends all competing for the domination of the narrative.

    The "globalists" won, but they had to share the power with organized crime and the siloviki (criminalized Deep State). I am not sure everything worked as intended. Just like in 1917. Russian affairs never work as intended.

  167. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    I can't attest for the authenticity of the photo, but that's the way it was presented within the internet. You have a good point about the tattoo on her arm (you must have good eyesight). There's plenty of information about the Chumachenkos friendship with Sylenko that you can find on the webosphere in Ukrainian. I don't know that katherine continued in her RUNvira faith into adulthood, but she did seem to be sympathetic to Lev's condition and was instrumental in getting him back to Ukraine around 2008 after he had a debilitating stroke. Taken from the BBC:


    Учитель Силенко минулого року переніс інсульт. Лікування в США досить дороге і я звернулася в Україні до Катерини Ющенко з проханням допомогти госпіталізувати і полікувати вчителя, на що я отримала позитивну відповідь".
     
    https://www.bbc.com/staticarchive/1bc9ee4103ccf877221e4234b08842c6e8e85f51.jpghttps://www.

    https://www.bbc.com/staticarchive/1bc9ee4103ccf877221e4234b08842c6e8e85f51.jpg
    Finally, back home.

    Replies: @AP

    I can’t attest for the authenticity of the photo, but that’s the way it was presented within the internet.

    Image search on google shows it’s almost always posted on anti-Ukrainian Russian nationalist websites. So a fake.

    The tattoo is an easy giveaway. No way some white middle-class girl in the late 1970s would have her lower arm covered in tattoos (or, indeed, have any tattoos). It’s a double-giveaway: tattoos in that location are often used to cover up wrist-cutting. Wrist-cutting wasn’t as popular among young people in the late 1970s as it is now.

    The hair, glasses, clothes on the people also don’t match the late 1970s era at all.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
  168. @Ano4
    @AP

    The Slavs have not much to do with Scythians, those who are mostly related to Scythians on genetic level in Russia are Volga Tatars and indigenous people of Altai mountains.

    Nevertheless, Sanskrit speakers find learning Slavic languages easy as there are hundreds of cognate roots between Sanskrit and Slavonic lexicons. There was a strong Indology school in Russia since the early XXth century and I believe that the earliest Russian-Sanskrit dictionary was composed before the WWI.



    Russian Sanskrit dictionaries and lexicons are found online, but even without a dictionary a Slavic language speaker can sometimes guess the meaning of Sanskrit sentences.

    An example is the Prajnaparamita Mantra:

    Gate, gate, paragate, Bodhi, Svaha!

    If one knows that gat' is a way through a marsh or swamp in Russian, that get' means go away in Ukrainian, that the prefix para is cognate to Slavic prefix pere and the Bodhi is of a cognate root to Slavic bud', then one can guess the meaning of the mantra.

    Also, if one knows that the Sanskrit prefix pra is cognate to Slavic prefix pro, that jnana is of a root cognate to the Russian znanye and that in Russian parom is the boat/ferry used to cross a river, one easily figures out the meaning of Prajnaparamita.

    Therefore producing an Ukrainian-Sanskrit dictionary must have been an easy endeavor.

    This being said, the Neopagans everywhere are mainly LARPers, although I do not see any problem with reviving the folklore and what is left of pre-Christian mythology of any European culture.

    But since the fall of Retra and Arkona, the Balto-Slavic Paganism is dead and buried. BTW in Tocharian ratre means red which is coherent with the Wendish temples being described by contemporary witnesses as entirely painted in red color on their outside.

    Speaking of colors: I have read somewhere (can't recall where exactly) that in Old Tokharian blue was esyn' (East Slavonic sin'), while the founding dynasty of the first Turkish empire was the Ashina Turks, with their Empire being called Gökturk or Blue Turk Empire (Gök being Blue or Heavenly in Old Turkic). Also Asana in Tokharian means worthy/noble (compare with Russian sanovnyi or Ukrainian shanovnyi). So basically the early Turks might well have been directly related to Tokharians through their ruling elites.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6kt%C3%BCrks

    https://penzev.livejournal.com/234433.html

    https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A2%D0%BE%D1%85%D0%B0%D1%80%D1%8B

    The Tokharian were composed of two related ethnic groups: the Kucanne (Kushans) and the A'rsi.

    A-Rrsi... Sounds curiously cognate to Rus'.

    But that's another interesting story...

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Philip Owen

    And FWIW Yat meant gate or water passage in Mercian English. Symonds Yat, a village name along the river Wye in Herefordshire is an example. It controled the main route through rapids.

    -gate such as Meiklgate (Big Street) means street in Northern English dialects influenced by Danish. My favourite is Gallowgate in Durham City.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Philip Owen

    Now that you mention it a gate is a passage, a door, which is also connected on the semiotic level.

    Anyway, the last time (if ever) most Europeans spoke mutually intelligible dialects was probably at the end of the Unetice culture period. It was probably the last time they also had a common religious tradition. Sad that they didn't have a script then.

    I sometimes think that someone should use a bioinformatics type of approach to compare different Indo-European and Indo-Iranian languages and deduce their LUCA. Perhaps reconstruct the language.

    OTOH, what for? Not sure that much people are truly interested at finding out what languages their ancestors have spoken.

  169. @Jatt Singh
    @Mr. Hack


    their own huge Slavic Empire
     
    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319125593439559680?s=20

    You have a different Maryada।।

    https://twitter.com/Parikramah/status/1319124560583733248?s=20

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Philip Owen

    March = boundary

  170. @AltanBakshi
    Wasnt Sarmatian just a later name for the Scythians of Ukraine and Southern Russia? I wouldnt think it strange if many of them were later assimilated by the Slavs, but there are still the Ossetians/Alans who are at least linguistically direct descentants of Sarmatians.


    Although I have lost some goodwill towards Sher Singh/Jatt Arya, I still wouldnt laugh too much. Sikhs survived 700-800 years of being under Muslim rule, they ferociously and untiringly broke the Muslim power in India by constantly revolting against the Mughals in the very heartlands of the Islamic power in India. Lets see in what kind of condition Britbongs will be after 10 generations of Sadiq Khans. I would be very surprised if some Englishmen in future would develop an unified and martial ethnoreligious group identity. Yes Sikhs have some problems, but they are pretty okay for people who have survived much longer under Islam than Serbs or Greeks, and didnt fall in dhimmitude like the Copts of Egypt.

    Replies: @Ano4, @sher singh

    goodwill

    goodwill?

    “The man of Dharma makes an end of every foe.”

    I don’t notice you criticizing the glory they ascribe to senseless slaughter of civilians or the insults levied at the Turban of MahaKal||

    You’re compromised, you have no Maryada either||

    In the Treta, Sri Ram is Maryada Puroshottam
    In the Age of Kali it is Khalsa||

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @sher singh

    After the pot, crack?
    (Pun intended)

    🙂

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

  171. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    Curious to know just what exact "stupid and inaccurate anti-Russian views" she proposed while heading the "bigoted anti Russian pro-Bandera, Captive Nations Committee"?

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don’t get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    As AP points out, the photo was most likely a fake. That she and her family had certain ties to Lev Sylenko and the RUNvira movement is not malarkey.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    That Chumachenko's biggest crime while working for the Captive Nations Committee was conflating communism with Russia doesn't really shock me, for she was involved during the height of the cold war. She certainly wasn't unique here with her views, as most Western pundits held similar positions.

    Sure, we can step step back today and point out some inconsistencies in this blanket approach, but overall I don't think that she wa too far off. It's unfortunate but true, that Russia was the first big prize for the Bolsheviks to win, before this cancer spread to other countries.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Mikhail


    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day.
     
    The problem is that non-Russians mostly don't care about the anti-Communist struggle of some Russians during the 20th century, especially considering that it's a matter of history of "Russia" now. There's no way in hell Western/Liberal/Soros NGO's are going to be sympathetic to the plight, wellbeing and cause of ethnic Russians (regardless of how "anti-Communist/Soviet" they may be), both past and present.

    A better approach is to emphasize some of the most horrific episodes of The Russian Genocide in the 20th century done by the Communists (Jews, Latvians, etc.) during the Russian Civil War.

    These include the horrific starvation, freezing to death and drowning under the ice of massive columns and convoys of ethnic Russians that as part of the White Army fled from Communists:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Siberian_Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starving_March

    An uncomfortable fact about the Russian Civil War you would do well to accept instead of awkwardly whine about is that the international/western forces that supposedly helped the White Army were not genuine friends of the Russian White Army (especially obvious by UK royal family refusing to host Romanovs). Have you ever asked yourself why these "allies" never seriously supplied the White Army with arms, munitions and supplies (despite UK still bothered to use chemical weapons on ethnic Russians far north near Arkhangelsk and Komi) even though when the White Army captured Kazan it had access to most of the Russian Empire's treasury?

    Truth hurts.

    Nobody of serious importance is going to truly start to like Russia in the West. Fortunately, that doesn't matter for Russians because Russia is large and strong enough to be able to shrug things like sanctions off (not entirely cost free though) and capable of successfully, cost-effectively fight serious wars and wage prolonged geo-political struggle against stronger enemies (although Russia could improve its diplomacy and efforts to maintain influence among smaller countries).

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @Philip Owen
    @Mikhail

    The failed emancipation of the serfs left a large part of the rural population living in communes. Accepting Bolshevism was not so difficult.

  172. @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it’s not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art…
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). 🙂
     
    I cannot be a reactionary, I tolerate the Eiffel Tower. (But truly, I am slowly improving, there used to be a time when I used to feel pained at impressionism and art déco.)

    More seriously, it depends on the art form. I went to a Natalia Goncharova exhibition in London once and while I had ambivalent feelings concerning her paintings I liked her costume ideas.

    So with literature and poetry I am fine with more modern styles. In film-making and music modern and experimental styles are also acceptable. I haven't seen enough opera performances to evaluate them. For architecture, Art Nouveau and before is fine, Art Déco feels borderline and usually comes later is either dull or insulting. In theatre I prefer a more old-fashioned style.

    As for paintings and sculptures, while I don't usually visit modern art museums, when I do I always feel vindicated in my previous dismissive position given that it is either low quality, political propaganda or occasionally something which is beautiful but leaves me feeling very bizarre, like the mental equivalent of gazing into the kaleidoscopic reflection of a golden bathroom.

    For less high-brow material like comics, I am rather partial to the styles of mangas, manhuas, manhwas and Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées. From my superficial perspective older American ones are fine though present ones are lacklustre.

    Though when I evaluate the quality of the artists I also evaluate them differently depending on what brow-level they wish to be seen as. If a nice paperback cover is more beautiful than something being sold at an auction house then I will conclude that there is some wrong with the auction house and the buyers there.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard.Gerard

    I appreciate your stance and ability to clearly articulate your preferences. As you point out, some modern art is accessible and interesting, and other is not. I too find a lot of the “way out” avant guard like what Pollock represents in painting or Sun Rae does to jazz music to be too grating to enjoy.

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.

    • Replies: @Gerard-Mandela
    @Mr. Hack


    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist,
     
    Interesting. I know and like his music.......possibly Herbie Hancock is at the same level in "cutting edge" and creativity? Maybe the main creativity for Hancock comes from him on the keyboard but for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with.

    Though I have to say much of modern jazz is not for me....of the modern performers I prefer stuff that has much simpler goals - the intelligent and skillful reworking on jazz standards by somebody as Diana Krall is more to my liking.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Mr. Hack

    , @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.
     
    I checked some Youtube clips of him, my cursory impression of his piano works is that he seems interesting, thank you.
  173. @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi


    goodwill
     
    goodwill?

    "The man of Dharma makes an end of every foe."
     
    I don't notice you criticizing the glory they ascribe to senseless slaughter of civilians or the insults levied at the Turban of MahaKal||

    You're compromised, you have no Maryada either||

    In the Treta, Sri Ram is Maryada Puroshottam
    In the Age of Kali it is Khalsa||

    https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/640459736919048202/769715780790517770/Sher_3.png?width=678&height=664

    Replies: @Ano4

    After the pot, crack?
    (Pun intended)

    🙂

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @Ano4

    Are you FAS?

  174. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don't get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @TheTotallyAnonymous, @Philip Owen

    As AP points out, the photo was most likely a fake. That she and her family had certain ties to Lev Sylenko and the RUNvira movement is not malarkey.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    My immediate impression of that photo likely being a fake as well.

  175. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don't get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @TheTotallyAnonymous, @Philip Owen

    That Chumachenko’s biggest crime while working for the Captive Nations Committee was conflating communism with Russia doesn’t really shock me, for she was involved during the height of the cold war. She certainly wasn’t unique here with her views, as most Western pundits held similar positions.

    Sure, we can step step back today and point out some inconsistencies in this blanket approach, but overall I don’t think that she wa too far off. It’s unfortunate but true, that Russia was the first big prize for the Bolsheviks to win, before this cancer spread to other countries.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Going back awhile, I've made it point tell neocon anti-Russian leaning folks (often but not only Jews) that blaming Russians for Communism isn't so far removed from the Judeo-Bolshevism emphasis.

    Nazism couldn't have succeeded to the degree it did without many non-Germans. Ditto Communism not being a Russian monopoly. Some Western based/articulated ideals meshed, with someone (Lenin), who wasn't a Russian patriot.

  176. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    As AP points out, the photo was most likely a fake. That she and her family had certain ties to Lev Sylenko and the RUNvira movement is not malarkey.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    My immediate impression of that photo likely being a fake as well.

  177. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    That Chumachenko's biggest crime while working for the Captive Nations Committee was conflating communism with Russia doesn't really shock me, for she was involved during the height of the cold war. She certainly wasn't unique here with her views, as most Western pundits held similar positions.

    Sure, we can step step back today and point out some inconsistencies in this blanket approach, but overall I don't think that she wa too far off. It's unfortunate but true, that Russia was the first big prize for the Bolsheviks to win, before this cancer spread to other countries.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Going back awhile, I’ve made it point tell neocon anti-Russian leaning folks (often but not only Jews) that blaming Russians for Communism isn’t so far removed from the Judeo-Bolshevism emphasis.

    Nazism couldn’t have succeeded to the degree it did without many non-Germans. Ditto Communism not being a Russian monopoly. Some Western based/articulated ideals meshed, with someone (Lenin), who wasn’t a Russian patriot.

  178. @Philip Owen
    @Ano4

    And FWIW Yat meant gate or water passage in Mercian English. Symonds Yat, a village name along the river Wye in Herefordshire is an example. It controled the main route through rapids.

    -gate such as Meiklgate (Big Street) means street in Northern English dialects influenced by Danish. My favourite is Gallowgate in Durham City.

    Replies: @Ano4

    Now that you mention it a gate is a passage, a door, which is also connected on the semiotic level.

    Anyway, the last time (if ever) most Europeans spoke mutually intelligible dialects was probably at the end of the Unetice culture period. It was probably the last time they also had a common religious tradition. Sad that they didn’t have a script then.

    I sometimes think that someone should use a bioinformatics type of approach to compare different Indo-European and Indo-Iranian languages and deduce their LUCA. Perhaps reconstruct the language.

    OTOH, what for? Not sure that much people are truly interested at finding out what languages their ancestors have spoken.

  179. @Philip Owen
    @Ano4

    Levasovites have headed down this road. Not an actual Brownshirt though.

    Replies: @Ano4

    A lot of crazy ideas were in the air after the Perestroika.

    But even before that, from 1975 to 1985, there were also some unorthodox thinking among Soviet Nomenklatura and Deep State. It is impossible now to reconstruct exactly all the conflicting trends and tendencies, but I believe there were at the very least a kind of cosmist/transhumanist trend, a globalist social-democrate and a (pseudo)nationalist and somewhat traditionalist trends all competing for the domination of the narrative.

    The “globalists” won, but they had to share the power with organized crime and the siloviki (criminalized Deep State). I am not sure everything worked as intended. Just like in 1917. Russian affairs never work as intended.

  180. @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh you were serious, I thought that you were just joking last time when you replied to me that I shouldnt try to communicate with demons.

    Its very wrong of British Museum to even hold such exhibitions, of course they seem demonic when taken out of their context. I dont know what you have seen, Buddhist secret practices or so called path of Hidden Mantra and Hindu Tantra is a huge topic with thousands of traditions and lineages. If you are just shocked from bones, then its your problem, whats wrong with bones?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Kent Nationalist, @Dmitry

    whats wrong with bones

    Bones make a great bouillon. You can also make a fertilizing biomass if you have enough bones. That would probably take millions of them. You can make glue…

    [MORE]

    Speaking of demons, Bodhidhama wrote that demons have the power of manifestation. But the locus they manifest from/into is our own Buddha Nature. That is of course a Cittamatra take on the whole “entity problem”.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Demons in Buddhism? Its much more complicated than that. There are quite many kinds of malevolent or possibly malevolent beings in Dharma. There are 4 different types of Maras, then there are many different kind of evil spirits, ghosts and hell beings, although some masters say that the hellbeings are just a manifestation of ones mind in hell. Because otherwise how that kind of beings can ever gain enough good karma and get out from hell.

    What exactly did Bodhidharma say concerning demons? Maybe translator just used word demon and not Mara, Rakshasa, Picasa etc? I have noticed that Buddhist masters mostly use precise and clear language, but often western languages lack equivalent words and translator chooses to use just some common western terms. This problem is especially prevalent with comparatively old translations of Buddhist texts from the 60s and before. But it seems to me that Bodhidharma was talking about the Devaputra Mara, for he resides in the "Heaven of Those Who Have the Power of Emanations over Others."


    Catvāri māra:
    The four external and internal hindrances or obstacles to our spiritual progress. They are: 1) the mara of the (contaminated) aggregates (Skt: skhandha-mara); 2) the mara of delusions (Skt: klesha-mara); 3) the mara of the Lord of Death (Skt: mrityu-mara); and 4) the mara of the deva's son (Skt: devaputra-mara), the demon of desire and temptation.
    https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras

     

    We believe in Buddhism that the Kama or Kamadeva of Hinduism is the "Mara the son of the god," devaputra-mara. The same being who challenged the Buddha before his awakening. Kama is by the way Krishnas son! Some gods can be extremely dangerous, more even than malevolent spirits.


    Kent nationalist is partially right with his "dont try to communicate with the demons." Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit. In this we share the Orthodox view of prelest, spiritual delusion, sober and calm mind is better than one which is is agitated and sees grand visions of Buddhas everywhere.

    Replies: @Agathoklis, @Ano4

  181. @Hyperborean
    @A123


    While scientific and legal English come across as a bit stilted versus conversational English, you can write things that are 100% precise and unambiguous. Some languages, especially in Asia, have almost insurmountable hurdles to this type of precision.
     
    Which languages specifically and how do you know that? Do you speak any other languages or have a passing familiarity with them?

    Replies: @A123

    I do not have sufficient foreign language skills to personally handle non-English scientific or legal documents.

    As my knowledge is 2nd hand, I would defer to anyone with specific expertise who wants to give a more complex & deep explanation that includes other factors (e.g. culture, legal system assumptions, etc.) in addition to the language itself.
    ____

    My indirect understanding from others who have had near perpetual issues with Japanese language contracts. I cannot share the exact details. They always seem most upset about sequencing — which party takes which action in which order. And, how to contractually interpret “in process” actions that do not have a fixed time line.

    Interestingly, some of their overseas counterparts appear to resist negotiating and writing contracts in Japanese when possible, even though it is their native language. They have seen draft pages from side documents (to them) between Japanese companies that are being commented & revised in English in by both sides.

    PEACE 😇

  182. Samantha Power’s husband:

    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions. This fact based observation explains why Twitter has done nothing against Evelyn Farkas and Tammy Duckworth for tweeting facts as lies, as detailed by yours truly.

    These points are a respectful counter to the likes of Aaron Mate, Noam Chomsky and Ray McGovern, who believe that Trump is bad enough to vote for Biden. Does McGovern really expect Biden to suddenly drop the foreign policy sources that the latter has favored, on top of the Biden-Harris flip flopping on several key domestic issues?

    Jim Dore is great in assessing such matters:

    https://www.youtube.com/user/TYTComedy

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Mikhail

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cass_Sunstein#Early_life_and_education

    Sunstein = I don't think I need to explain further.

    There you go. That explains why Cass Sunstein is so obsessed with "cognitive infiltration" and mind control over the masses.


    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions.

     

    As for Samantha Power, Biden better not win because this bitch is going to be in power and as a hysteric believer in "Bosnian Genocide" and "Srebrenica Genocide" future prospects will look bleak for Serbs and Republika Srpska.

    In general, if Biden wins a whole bunch of other officials bad for Serbs and enemies of Serbs from the 1990's will stack key US policy positions and they will make types like John Bolton and Mike Pompeo be sorely missed.

    Serbs will be in very, VERY serious trouble if Biden wins (His newly released Kosovo and Bosnia declarations are direct plans of attack on Serbs). The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Mikhail

  183. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    whats wrong with bones
     
    Bones make a great bouillon. You can also make a fertilizing biomass if you have enough bones. That would probably take millions of them. You can make glue...



    Speaking of demons, Bodhidhama wrote that demons have the power of manifestation. But the locus they manifest from/into is our own Buddha Nature. That is of course a Cittamatra take on the whole "entity problem".

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Demons in Buddhism? Its much more complicated than that. There are quite many kinds of malevolent or possibly malevolent beings in Dharma. There are 4 different types of Maras, then there are many different kind of evil spirits, ghosts and hell beings, although some masters say that the hellbeings are just a manifestation of ones mind in hell. Because otherwise how that kind of beings can ever gain enough good karma and get out from hell.

    What exactly did Bodhidharma say concerning demons? Maybe translator just used word demon and not Mara, Rakshasa, Picasa etc? I have noticed that Buddhist masters mostly use precise and clear language, but often western languages lack equivalent words and translator chooses to use just some common western terms. This problem is especially prevalent with comparatively old translations of Buddhist texts from the 60s and before. But it seems to me that Bodhidharma was talking about the Devaputra Mara, for he resides in the “Heaven of Those Who Have the Power of Emanations over Others.”

    Catvāri māra:
    The four external and internal hindrances or obstacles to our spiritual progress. They are: 1) the mara of the (contaminated) aggregates (Skt: skhandha-mara); 2) the mara of delusions (Skt: klesha-mara); 3) the mara of the Lord of Death (Skt: mrityu-mara); and 4) the mara of the deva’s son (Skt: devaputra-mara), the demon of desire and temptation.
    https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras

    We believe in Buddhism that the Kama or Kamadeva of Hinduism is the “Mara the son of the god,” devaputra-mara. The same being who challenged the Buddha before his awakening. Kama is by the way Krishnas son! Some gods can be extremely dangerous, more even than malevolent spirits.

    Kent nationalist is partially right with his “dont try to communicate with the demons.” Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit. In this we share the Orthodox view of prelest, spiritual delusion, sober and calm mind is better than one which is is agitated and sees grand visions of Buddhas everywhere.

    • Replies: @Agathoklis
    @AltanBakshi

    If you are not East Asian or perhaps Indian, why waste your time with Buddhism?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AltanBakshi

    , @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit
     
    That was exactly the context in which Bodhidhama warned his student about the manifestation of demons.



    Bodhidhama:
    The sutras say, "All appearances are illusions." They have bo fixed existence, no constant form. They're impermanent. Don't cling to appearances, and you'll be of one mind with the Buddha. The sutras say, "That which is free of all form is the Buddha."

    Student:
    But why shouldn't we worship buddhas and bodhisattvas?


    Bodhidhama:
    Devils and demons posses the power of manifestation. They can create the appearance of bodhisattvas in all sorts of guises. The buddha is your own mind. Don't misdirect your worship.


    This is basically Cittamatra.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  184. @AP
    @Ano4


    All Sarmatian burials produce haplogroup R1b
     
    Yes, but not only:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarmatians#Genetics

    A genetic study published in Nature Communications in March 2017 examined several Sarmatian individuals buried in Pokrovka, Russia (southwest of the Ural Mountains) between the 5th century BC and the 2nd century BC. The sample of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1b1a2a2. This was the dominant lineage among males of the earlier Yamnaya culture.[29]

    A genetic study published in Nature in May 2018 examined the remains of twelve Sarmatians buried between 400 BC and 400 AD.[32] The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1, I2b, R (two samples) and R1.[33]

    A genetic study published in Science Advances in October 2018 examined the remains of five Sarmatians buried between 55 AD and 320 AD. The three samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup R1a1a and R1b1a2a2 (two samples),

    A genetic study published in Current Biology in July 2019 examined the remains of nine Sarmatians. The five samples of Y-DNA extracted belonged to haplogroup Q1c-L332, R1a1e-CTS1123, R1a-Z645 (two samples) and E2b1-PF6746,

    In a study conducted in 2014 by Gennady Afanasiev, Dmitry Korobov and Irina Reshetova from the Institute of Archaeology Russian Academy of Sciences, DNA was extracted from bone fragments found in 7 out of 10 Alanic burials on the Don River. Four of them turned out to belong to yDNA Haplogroup G2 and six of them possessed mtDNA haplogroup I.[37]

    In 2015, the Institute of Archaeology in Moscow conducted research on various Sarmato-Alan and Saltovo-Mayaki culture Kurgan burials. In these analyses, the two Alan samples from the 4th to 6th century AD turned out to belong to yDNA haplogroups G2a-P15 and R1a-z94, while two of the three Sarmatian samples from the 2nd to 3rd century AD were found to belong to yDNA haplogroup J1-M267 while one belonged to R1a

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

    So, when you put the findings of these various studies together, what conclusions do you come up with?

  185. I am very grateful to you AP and Mr Hack, because before you two I really had what one can call as a Great Russian or Neo Soviet attitude towards the Ukrainian nation and I thought that all Ukrainian nationalists are just far right nutjobs. Instead you have made a good case for an independent Ukrainian nation even though your logic is sometimes not for my liking or too far fetched in my opion, mainly my problem nowadays is your strong emphasis on historical differences between Ukrainian and Russian nations, when in my opinion those differences have been relatively small in comparison to other great European nation states who all had feudal and decentralized origins, with many different regional cultures, dialects or languages, and even had extreme religious sectarian conflicts, like France, Germany and UK. But the question is off course extremely subjective. Still I must say now that thanks to you two I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline….. and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles. I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception? I dont know Mr. Hacks opinion, he never seems to write anything about the question of Donbass.

    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic? I understand if its too personal question and you dont want to answer, people can be good without religion, if they havd a good ethical framework and morals, but I believe that self improvement is much harder without religion, after all individual must then depend on himself, and I do believe that only exceptional individuals are capable of that.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    The question of Donbas is kind of a sticky one for me. When the violence there first occurred, I was up in arms about it all. After all, the region was first populated by Ukrainian settlers, and even today Ukrainians make-up most of the population. The Russian and pro-Russian settlers have mostly crossed over into the area from Russia over a long period of time, especially during Soviet times. I've known Ukrainians from Donbas that are very much in favor of staying put within Ukraine. But, as they say, "it is what it is", and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his "Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine" theory, I've become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death. In reality, I would like to see it brought back, but what a high price to do so. It's way too late for any meaningful plebiscite on the issue. :-(

    Replies: @AP

    , @AP
    @AltanBakshi


    I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline
     
    A reasonable position. If I were Russian I would opt want Ukraine to join NATO either. However recent events have pushed Ukrainians into wanting to join. Ideally Ukraine would have a strong deterrent on its own, without NATO.

    and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles.
     
    This has been my position for a long time. Donbas has provided coal and hard currency for Ukraine, but has been toxic politically and culturally. It isn't worth keeping it.

    I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception?
     
    Most do, out of a sense of outrage that Russia helped remove "our" territory. But this is a short-sighted and stupid idea. Why add millions of voters who are hostile or indifferent to the Ukrainian idea to the Ukrainian state? What good comes of that? Why does Ukraine need that? They will be miserable and troublesome, and the rest of Ukraine will suffer with their presence. Without Donbas there would never have been a Yanukovich presidency in the first place.

    Also, there is a mistaken belief by any Russians that a person from Ukraine who considers themselves a Ukrainian (rather than a Russian) is a Ukrainian nationalist by definition. I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.



    Without being a nationalist, I do appreciate my forefathers' traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia.

    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic?
     
    Yes, I do, but it seems sort of profane to share such details of personal faith. I do pray and until COVID I attended church weekly. Our services are like Orthodox ones, liturgy is song by both choir and parishioners, there is incense, candles, etc. which I think heighten the connection. I find it harder to pray in Roman Catholic churches, they seem more sterile to me. But I also feel it in nature.

    I try to be Christlike in my behavior towards others but of course fall short as do we all. There is a competitive, video-game quality in on-line squabbles and relationships which is okay, but I am gentler IRL.

    In my family there was a tradition since the 17th century of the oldest son being a priest (our family were priests, merchants, and military officers). This was broken when we came to America after World War II, otherwise my uncle would have been the 16th. My great-grandfather and all the way down the line were priests with noble background (which meant that they didn't worry about persecution or trouble from Poles):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Ukrainian_clergy

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

  186. @Ano4
    @sher singh

    After the pot, crack?
    (Pun intended)

    🙂

    Replies: @Jatt Singh

    Are you FAS?

  187. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Demons in Buddhism? Its much more complicated than that. There are quite many kinds of malevolent or possibly malevolent beings in Dharma. There are 4 different types of Maras, then there are many different kind of evil spirits, ghosts and hell beings, although some masters say that the hellbeings are just a manifestation of ones mind in hell. Because otherwise how that kind of beings can ever gain enough good karma and get out from hell.

    What exactly did Bodhidharma say concerning demons? Maybe translator just used word demon and not Mara, Rakshasa, Picasa etc? I have noticed that Buddhist masters mostly use precise and clear language, but often western languages lack equivalent words and translator chooses to use just some common western terms. This problem is especially prevalent with comparatively old translations of Buddhist texts from the 60s and before. But it seems to me that Bodhidharma was talking about the Devaputra Mara, for he resides in the "Heaven of Those Who Have the Power of Emanations over Others."


    Catvāri māra:
    The four external and internal hindrances or obstacles to our spiritual progress. They are: 1) the mara of the (contaminated) aggregates (Skt: skhandha-mara); 2) the mara of delusions (Skt: klesha-mara); 3) the mara of the Lord of Death (Skt: mrityu-mara); and 4) the mara of the deva's son (Skt: devaputra-mara), the demon of desire and temptation.
    https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras

     

    We believe in Buddhism that the Kama or Kamadeva of Hinduism is the "Mara the son of the god," devaputra-mara. The same being who challenged the Buddha before his awakening. Kama is by the way Krishnas son! Some gods can be extremely dangerous, more even than malevolent spirits.


    Kent nationalist is partially right with his "dont try to communicate with the demons." Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit. In this we share the Orthodox view of prelest, spiritual delusion, sober and calm mind is better than one which is is agitated and sees grand visions of Buddhas everywhere.

    Replies: @Agathoklis, @Ano4

    If you are not East Asian or perhaps Indian, why waste your time with Buddhism?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Agathoklis

    But I am an Asian on my mother's side and I have Buddhist ancestors at least from the 18th century. Probably even before that time.

    Still all serious converts are welcome to Dharma. Its not an ethnic club.

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Agathoklis

    Or did I misunderstood your question, maybe you asked what Buddhism can give to non Asians? That ultimately depends on a person, but for those who take Buddhism seriously it will open door to liberation from all suffering, in other words it offers salvation, pretty basic stuff with religions, isnt it?

    In my youth I was more of a cultural Buddhist, in those times I had no respect for Christianity, none at all. It was only after I got really interested in Buddhism, that I started to truly appreciate Christianity. From my fathers side my ancestors were Lutheran, but at least from the 1950s no one from that side of family have taken religion or Christianity seriously. Without Buddhism I probably would think that Christianity is just a meaningless and possibly dangerous relict of the past. But thanks to the Dharma I have now thought for a long time that only a (metaphorically) blind man cant see the therapeutic or healing truth of Lord Christ.

  188. @Mr. Hack
    @another anon

    I agree that the Balkan and Caucasian debates are totally out of place here, but haven't you heard that Ukrainians are in fact really "Little Russians" and therefore deserve a place at the table here, at a "Russian blog"? :-)

    Chandeliers and gothic arches made of human bones via Roman Catholicism is much trendier!

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Orthodox monks also gather human skulls.

    https://orthochristian.com/104973.html

    https://travelmaven.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83476d41669e201156f954eec970c-pi


    “What I am, you will be, too. What you are, I’ve been myself” is written in skull.

  189. @Agathoklis
    @AltanBakshi

    If you are not East Asian or perhaps Indian, why waste your time with Buddhism?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AltanBakshi

    But I am an Asian on my mother’s side and I have Buddhist ancestors at least from the 18th century. Probably even before that time.

    Still all serious converts are welcome to Dharma. Its not an ethnic club.

  190. @Agathoklis
    @AltanBakshi

    If you are not East Asian or perhaps Indian, why waste your time with Buddhism?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @AltanBakshi

    Or did I misunderstood your question, maybe you asked what Buddhism can give to non Asians? That ultimately depends on a person, but for those who take Buddhism seriously it will open door to liberation from all suffering, in other words it offers salvation, pretty basic stuff with religions, isnt it?

    In my youth I was more of a cultural Buddhist, in those times I had no respect for Christianity, none at all. It was only after I got really interested in Buddhism, that I started to truly appreciate Christianity. From my fathers side my ancestors were Lutheran, but at least from the 1950s no one from that side of family have taken religion or Christianity seriously. Without Buddhism I probably would think that Christianity is just a meaningless and possibly dangerous relict of the past. But thanks to the Dharma I have now thought for a long time that only a (metaphorically) blind man cant see the therapeutic or healing truth of Lord Christ.

  191. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    Demons in Buddhism? Its much more complicated than that. There are quite many kinds of malevolent or possibly malevolent beings in Dharma. There are 4 different types of Maras, then there are many different kind of evil spirits, ghosts and hell beings, although some masters say that the hellbeings are just a manifestation of ones mind in hell. Because otherwise how that kind of beings can ever gain enough good karma and get out from hell.

    What exactly did Bodhidharma say concerning demons? Maybe translator just used word demon and not Mara, Rakshasa, Picasa etc? I have noticed that Buddhist masters mostly use precise and clear language, but often western languages lack equivalent words and translator chooses to use just some common western terms. This problem is especially prevalent with comparatively old translations of Buddhist texts from the 60s and before. But it seems to me that Bodhidharma was talking about the Devaputra Mara, for he resides in the "Heaven of Those Who Have the Power of Emanations over Others."


    Catvāri māra:
    The four external and internal hindrances or obstacles to our spiritual progress. They are: 1) the mara of the (contaminated) aggregates (Skt: skhandha-mara); 2) the mara of delusions (Skt: klesha-mara); 3) the mara of the Lord of Death (Skt: mrityu-mara); and 4) the mara of the deva's son (Skt: devaputra-mara), the demon of desire and temptation.
    https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/samsara-nirvana/demonic-forces-the-four-maras

     

    We believe in Buddhism that the Kama or Kamadeva of Hinduism is the "Mara the son of the god," devaputra-mara. The same being who challenged the Buddha before his awakening. Kama is by the way Krishnas son! Some gods can be extremely dangerous, more even than malevolent spirits.


    Kent nationalist is partially right with his "dont try to communicate with the demons." Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit. In this we share the Orthodox view of prelest, spiritual delusion, sober and calm mind is better than one which is is agitated and sees grand visions of Buddhas everywhere.

    Replies: @Agathoklis, @Ano4

    Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit

    That was exactly the context in which Bodhidhama warned his student about the manifestation of demons.

    [MORE]

    Bodhidhama:
    The sutras say, “All appearances are illusions.” They have bo fixed existence, no constant form. They’re impermanent. Don’t cling to appearances, and you’ll be of one mind with the Buddha. The sutras say, “That which is free of all form is the Buddha.”

    Student:
    But why shouldn’t we worship buddhas and bodhisattvas?

    Bodhidhama:
    Devils and demons posses the power of manifestation. They can create the appearance of bodhisattvas in all sorts of guises. The buddha is your own mind. Don’t misdirect your worship.

    This is basically Cittamatra.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    All schools agree that ones mind is the Buddha or has potential to be the Buddha, Chittamatras differ from the shravaka schools because they dont hold dharmas as ultimately real but that they are manifestations of ones mindstream, Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.

    Madhyamika school which I follow does not make such statements. I dont know how well translated is your citation, especially if its from Chinese to Japanese and then to English, and the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China. Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping. Where repetition and tradition is more important than genuine understanding of Buddhas teachings and applying those teachings in real life.

    Replies: @Ano4

  192. @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh you were serious, I thought that you were just joking last time when you replied to me that I shouldnt try to communicate with demons.

    Its very wrong of British Museum to even hold such exhibitions, of course they seem demonic when taken out of their context. I dont know what you have seen, Buddhist secret practices or so called path of Hidden Mantra and Hindu Tantra is a huge topic with thousands of traditions and lineages. If you are just shocked from bones, then its your problem, whats wrong with bones?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Kent Nationalist, @Dmitry

    Where is the ‘context’ where giving prayers and offerings to a statue of a demon with a man’s severed head drinking from a skull cup is not demon worship?

    Actually it’s just a metaphor

    Tantric Episcopalianism

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    So Agnus Dei should be taken literally? I cant take seriously people who worship a lamb god. Or if its not a lamb then but son of man whose blood you drink and flesh you eat, you sick demon worshippers. At least we dont practice cannibalism!

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

  193. @another anon
    @Kent Nationalist

    Art and architecture made of human skulls and bones was common in Christianity too, as symbol of humility and mortality of all flesh.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2d/Sedlec-Ossuary.jpg

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capela_dos_Ossos

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedlec_Ossuary

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Maria_della_Concezione_dei_Cappuccini

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skull_Chapel

    Feel free to whip up your Jack Chick cartoon collection and start another subthread why Catholic church is satanic, anything is better than the never ending Ukrainian, Balkan or Caucasian debates :-)

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Kent Nationalist

    Catholics don’t worship these. Actually, the objects made directly from skulls were the least disturbing part.

  194. @Ano4

    Are you gay?
     
    Nope. But thanks for your interest in my sexual orientation.

    So who's the girl?

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

    2 completely unrelated, decent people (me and Singh) getting the identical impression that you are a fake, pompous sexual deviant.

    Coincidence? I think not.

    Your a nasty individual, a very bad person. Who pays you? The Albanians? Sicilian mafia?

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Gerard.Gerard


    decent people (me and Singh)
     
    I think you fit together well. Why don't you marry him?

    🙂
    , @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard.Gerard

    Seriously, why do you persist in pestering Anon4? He's made it obvious here that he's a family man and enjoys his family outings. His brand of Russian nationalism seems like the most intelligent form that I've seen expressed here. What's your beef with him, Geraldina, not enough sheet music to keep you busy on the piano? :-)

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/nintchdbpict000323924155.jpg?w=620

    Geraldina preparing for her upcoming piano tour in Viet Nam.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Gerard.Gerard

  195. @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    Sometimes you guys seem rather stiff to me in your appreciation of more modernist trends in Art. If it’s not a renaissance masterpiece, it immediately gets relegated to the second hand heap of art…
    Art has always evolved, one should try to learn to appreciate at least some of the modernist trends (says one who rarely has anything positive to say about modernist filmmaking). 🙂
     
    I cannot be a reactionary, I tolerate the Eiffel Tower. (But truly, I am slowly improving, there used to be a time when I used to feel pained at impressionism and art déco.)

    More seriously, it depends on the art form. I went to a Natalia Goncharova exhibition in London once and while I had ambivalent feelings concerning her paintings I liked her costume ideas.

    So with literature and poetry I am fine with more modern styles. In film-making and music modern and experimental styles are also acceptable. I haven't seen enough opera performances to evaluate them. For architecture, Art Nouveau and before is fine, Art Déco feels borderline and usually comes later is either dull or insulting. In theatre I prefer a more old-fashioned style.

    As for paintings and sculptures, while I don't usually visit modern art museums, when I do I always feel vindicated in my previous dismissive position given that it is either low quality, political propaganda or occasionally something which is beautiful but leaves me feeling very bizarre, like the mental equivalent of gazing into the kaleidoscopic reflection of a golden bathroom.

    For less high-brow material like comics, I am rather partial to the styles of mangas, manhuas, manhwas and Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées. From my superficial perspective older American ones are fine though present ones are lacklustre.

    Though when I evaluate the quality of the artists I also evaluate them differently depending on what brow-level they wish to be seen as. If a nice paperback cover is more beautiful than something being sold at an auction house then I will conclude that there is some wrong with the auction house and the buyers there.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard.Gerard

    Surely you’re a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?

    Obviously as part of Paris landscape, the Eiffel Tower is spectacular and beautiful at a distance , but up close it is extremely ugly, I would not want to live less than 5km away from it…. the great US skyscrapers from late 1910’s – 1940’s remain aesthetic from close or long distance.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l’escargot by Matisse….. is an extreme cretin?

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Gerard.Gerard


    Surely you’re a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?
     
    There are beautiful Soviet-era artworks, but I tend to see them as offsprings of Neoclassicism.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l’escargot by Matisse….. is an extreme cretin?
     
    I have a low opinion of it, but it would be prudent to tone down your vehement insults in general, it is part of why Karlin bans you.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

  196. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Ano4

    2 completely unrelated, decent people (me and Singh) getting the identical impression that you are a fake, pompous sexual deviant.

    Coincidence? I think not.

    Your a nasty individual, a very bad person. Who pays you? The Albanians? Sicilian mafia?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

    decent people (me and Singh)

    I think you fit together well. Why don’t you marry him?

    🙂

  197. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Ano4

    2 completely unrelated, decent people (me and Singh) getting the identical impression that you are a fake, pompous sexual deviant.

    Coincidence? I think not.

    Your a nasty individual, a very bad person. Who pays you? The Albanians? Sicilian mafia?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mr. Hack

    Seriously, why do you persist in pestering Anon4? He’s made it obvious here that he’s a family man and enjoys his family outings. His brand of Russian nationalism seems like the most intelligent form that I’ve seen expressed here. What’s your beef with him, Geraldina, not enough sheet music to keep you busy on the piano? 🙂

    Geraldina preparing for her upcoming piano tour in Viet Nam.

    • LOL: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    I think our friend here is a Putler- worshipping Sovok. And he/she/it dislikes my take on Soviet history and post-Communist Russia's predicament.

    I can understand this. My opinions are not subtle at all: Revolution was bad, Perestroika was worse and Putin is not the Great Statesman a lot of people imagined. Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs. Russian people deserve better. Russians have suffered enough and should have a good and peaceful living in their homeland. If that means giving up on geopolitical ambitions of the ruling elites, so be it, and the sooner the better.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

    , @Gerard.Gerard
    @Mr. Hack

    Magnificent wit with the Liberace reference, I would have been proud to do the same type of joke ( I probably have)

    I don't know about this Israeli - Vietnamese creep Ano4's family but I do know that:


    His brand of Russian nationalism seems the most intelligent form I've seen expressed here.
     
    Even by your standards Mr Hack, that is a staggeringly idiotic statement.

    He is as much a Russian nationalist...... as I am a 16th century Zulu spear.

    He is an obvious liberast who hates Russia and likes covering his ass in the most twisted way possible.
    Even someone as foolish as you must realise if this creeps "nationalism" is acceptable to somebody like you.... then obviously it is because it is not Russian nationalism you dummy.
    That you or anybody can't even differentiate if he is into Russian nationalism or Russian ethnonstionalism is an indictment of the duplicitous,ass-covering game this animal Ano4 wants to play.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard, @Mr. Hack

  198. @AltanBakshi
    I am very grateful to you AP and Mr Hack, because before you two I really had what one can call as a Great Russian or Neo Soviet attitude towards the Ukrainian nation and I thought that all Ukrainian nationalists are just far right nutjobs. Instead you have made a good case for an independent Ukrainian nation even though your logic is sometimes not for my liking or too far fetched in my opion, mainly my problem nowadays is your strong emphasis on historical differences between Ukrainian and Russian nations, when in my opinion those differences have been relatively small in comparison to other great European nation states who all had feudal and decentralized origins, with many different regional cultures, dialects or languages, and even had extreme religious sectarian conflicts, like France, Germany and UK. But the question is off course extremely subjective. Still I must say now that thanks to you two I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline..... and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles. I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception? I dont know Mr. Hacks opinion, he never seems to write anything about the question of Donbass.


    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic? I understand if its too personal question and you dont want to answer, people can be good without religion, if they havd a good ethical framework and morals, but I believe that self improvement is much harder without religion, after all individual must then depend on himself, and I do believe that only exceptional individuals are capable of that.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP

    The question of Donbas is kind of a sticky one for me. When the violence there first occurred, I was up in arms about it all. After all, the region was first populated by Ukrainian settlers, and even today Ukrainians make-up most of the population. The Russian and pro-Russian settlers have mostly crossed over into the area from Russia over a long period of time, especially during Soviet times. I’ve known Ukrainians from Donbas that are very much in favor of staying put within Ukraine. But, as they say, “it is what it is”, and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his “Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine” theory, I’ve become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death. In reality, I would like to see it brought back, but what a high price to do so. It’s way too late for any meaningful plebiscite on the issue. 🙁

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack


    But, as they say, “it is what it is”, and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his “Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine” theory, I’ve become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death.
     
    Just to be clear, I wish no suffering upon the people of Donbas. Their suffering is mostly self-inflicted but I hope they find a good path out of their Sovok existence. It didn't happen through Ukraine, let it happen through Russia.

    Also, gangrenous appendage is probably more accurate than cancerous.

    There are and have been Ukrainian patriots from Donbas but they are outnumbered, like Russian nationalists in Kiev. Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  199. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don't get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @TheTotallyAnonymous, @Philip Owen

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day.

    The problem is that non-Russians mostly don’t care about the anti-Communist struggle of some Russians during the 20th century, especially considering that it’s a matter of history of “Russia” now. There’s no way in hell Western/Liberal/Soros NGO’s are going to be sympathetic to the plight, wellbeing and cause of ethnic Russians (regardless of how “anti-Communist/Soviet” they may be), both past and present.

    A better approach is to emphasize some of the most horrific episodes of The Russian Genocide in the 20th century done by the Communists (Jews, Latvians, etc.) during the Russian Civil War.

    These include the horrific starvation, freezing to death and drowning under the ice of massive columns and convoys of ethnic Russians that as part of the White Army fled from Communists:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Siberian_Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starving_March

    An uncomfortable fact about the Russian Civil War you would do well to accept instead of awkwardly whine about is that the international/western forces that supposedly helped the White Army were not genuine friends of the Russian White Army (especially obvious by UK royal family refusing to host Romanovs). Have you ever asked yourself why these “allies” never seriously supplied the White Army with arms, munitions and supplies (despite UK still bothered to use chemical weapons on ethnic Russians far north near Arkhangelsk and Komi) even though when the White Army captured Kazan it had access to most of the Russian Empire’s treasury?

    Truth hurts.

    Nobody of serious importance is going to truly start to like Russia in the West. Fortunately, that doesn’t matter for Russians because Russia is large and strong enough to be able to shrug things like sanctions off (not entirely cost free though) and capable of successfully, cost-effectively fight serious wars and wage prolonged geo-political struggle against stronger enemies (although Russia could improve its diplomacy and efforts to maintain influence among smaller countries).

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    Have you ever asked yourself why these “allies” never seriously supplied the White Army with arms, munitions and supplies (despite UK still bothered to use chemical weapons on ethnic Russians far north near Arkhangelsk and Komi) even though when the White Army captured Kazan it had access to most of the Russian Empire’s treasury?
     
    I most certainly know why and have explained in some detail.

    On another point, I don't awkwardly whine. Rather, provide the specifics.

  200. @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard.Gerard

    Seriously, why do you persist in pestering Anon4? He's made it obvious here that he's a family man and enjoys his family outings. His brand of Russian nationalism seems like the most intelligent form that I've seen expressed here. What's your beef with him, Geraldina, not enough sheet music to keep you busy on the piano? :-)

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/nintchdbpict000323924155.jpg?w=620

    Geraldina preparing for her upcoming piano tour in Viet Nam.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Gerard.Gerard

    I think our friend here is a Putler- worshipping Sovok. And he/she/it dislikes my take on Soviet history and post-Communist Russia’s predicament.

    I can understand this. My opinions are not subtle at all: Revolution was bad, Perestroika was worse and Putin is not the Great Statesman a lot of people imagined. Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs. Russian people deserve better. Russians have suffered enough and should have a good and peaceful living in their homeland. If that means giving up on geopolitical ambitions of the ruling elites, so be it, and the sooner the better.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Gerard.Gerard
    @Ano4


    Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs
     
    If you decide to ignore the 10s or 100s of 1000s of arrests and imprisonments of siloviki that have occurred in the last few years, deliberately decide to not follow their trials just so that you can scream "human rights abuse" or then schizophrenically conflate fighting corruption now with mid-late 1930's "Stalinism"..... then of course your BS is "true" you cretin!

    In reality corruption is being fought democratically and successfully in Russia with extremely high power MVD, FSB, SKR etc. guys being arrested every week (from everywhere, including ethnic republics) . This is different to Banderastan where the only Ukrainian official imprisoned for corruption was....
    Paul Manafort, LOL.

    If you can at least dismiss the noticeably much less corruption from traffic police, in hospitals etc occurring because of development of technology with the recording equipment on everyone's phones ( I would not because I believe it is because of democratic, structural evolution of Russian society initiated by intelligent decisions of authorities)..... then you have no excuse like that to use for the high-powered people arrested in Russia by own law enforcement agencies that they work for.

    That is serious work, not the fake, ultimate failure judging from secondary effects, of that imbecile Saakashvili "fighting corruption" in Gruzia, which effectively followed the principle of PR and :

    The best way to get rid of antisemitism it to kill all Jews
     
    in his idiotic firing of everybody.

    Cosmopolitan, mainly Jewish, oligarchs are a western creation/tool in Russia you dimwit. Putin fought, with huge political risk and longterm repurcussions, 3 of the worst and most internationally powerful oligarchs and won.... as did the revenues for the government budget and savings. Subsequent creation by side effect of alot of smaller local oligarchs, particularly in ethnic republics was normal , they are fighting against now.... and was significantly better for Russians than small number of Jewish cosmopolitan oligarchs controlling and stealing from the country.

    BTW fool, how many state companies in Russia can you say are managed badly and become less professional ? Our postal service is approximately 5 million times better than compared to 10 years ago. Most russians will say that Federal government and top regional government work well for them.... further down they are trying to make perform better.

    Russians have suffered enough and deserve better
     
    LOL clown, WTF is "suffering" now? Economy is succeeding or failing now based on democratic merit.....not because of "corruption" or "dictatorship", that is why our social indicators like crime and health and use of services etc are so much better now.

    Replies: @Ano4

  201. @Mikhail
    Samantha Power’s husband:

    https://twitter.com/MaxBlumenthal/status/1320189328103006208

    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions. This fact based observation explains why Twitter has done nothing against Evelyn Farkas and Tammy Duckworth for tweeting facts as lies, as detailed by yours truly.

    These points are a respectful counter to the likes of Aaron Mate, Noam Chomsky and Ray McGovern, who believe that Trump is bad enough to vote for Biden. Does McGovern really expect Biden to suddenly drop the foreign policy sources that the latter has favored, on top of the Biden-Harris flip flopping on several key domestic issues?

    Jim Dore is great in assessing such matters:

    https://www.youtube.com/user/TYTComedy

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cass_Sunstein#Early_life_and_education

    Sunstein = I don’t think I need to explain further.

    There you go. That explains why Cass Sunstein is so obsessed with “cognitive infiltration” and mind control over the masses.

    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions.

    As for Samantha Power, Biden better not win because this bitch is going to be in power and as a hysteric believer in “Bosnian Genocide” and “Srebrenica Genocide” future prospects will look bleak for Serbs and Republika Srpska.

    In general, if Biden wins a whole bunch of other officials bad for Serbs and enemies of Serbs from the 1990’s will stack key US policy positions and they will make types like John Bolton and Mike Pompeo be sorely missed.

    Serbs will be in very, VERY serious trouble if Biden wins (His newly released Kosovo and Bosnia declarations are direct plans of attack on Serbs). The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.
     
    This is an implicit admission that Serbia's reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests. As I've maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia's protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    , @Mikhail
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    If Power's hubby was a WASP, it wouldn't change my opinion of his views.

    On your other point, tack on Susan Rice, Evelyn Farkas, Michael Carpenter and Michael McFaul. Antony Blinken is someone who I sense knows better, but has the establishment in mind, relative to what he wants.

  202. @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard.Gerard

    Seriously, why do you persist in pestering Anon4? He's made it obvious here that he's a family man and enjoys his family outings. His brand of Russian nationalism seems like the most intelligent form that I've seen expressed here. What's your beef with him, Geraldina, not enough sheet music to keep you busy on the piano? :-)

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/nintchdbpict000323924155.jpg?w=620

    Geraldina preparing for her upcoming piano tour in Viet Nam.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Gerard.Gerard

    Magnificent wit with the Liberace reference, I would have been proud to do the same type of joke ( I probably have)

    I don’t know about this Israeli – Vietnamese creep Ano4’s family but I do know that:

    His brand of Russian nationalism seems the most intelligent form I’ve seen expressed here.

    Even by your standards Mr Hack, that is a staggeringly idiotic statement.

    He is as much a Russian nationalist…… as I am a 16th century Zulu spear.

    He is an obvious liberast who hates Russia and likes covering his ass in the most twisted way possible.
    Even someone as foolish as you must realise if this creeps “nationalism” is acceptable to somebody like you…. then obviously it is because it is not Russian nationalism you dummy.
    That you or anybody can’t even differentiate if he is into Russian nationalism or Russian ethnonstionalism is an indictment of the duplicitous,ass-covering game this animal Ano4 wants to play.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Gerard.Gerard
    @Gerard.Gerard

    Ethnonationalism

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard.Gerard

    He is steadfast in his dislike of liberasts and distrust of "cosmopolitanism", just read his latest comment #201. My reference to Vietnam was in response to one of your own, where you extolled the virtues of high brow culture on display over there (or something to that effect). Perhaps, Vietnam could be a bridge of rapprochement for you two, as you both seem to have an interest in its culture? :-)

  203. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Mr. Hack

    Magnificent wit with the Liberace reference, I would have been proud to do the same type of joke ( I probably have)

    I don't know about this Israeli - Vietnamese creep Ano4's family but I do know that:


    His brand of Russian nationalism seems the most intelligent form I've seen expressed here.
     
    Even by your standards Mr Hack, that is a staggeringly idiotic statement.

    He is as much a Russian nationalist...... as I am a 16th century Zulu spear.

    He is an obvious liberast who hates Russia and likes covering his ass in the most twisted way possible.
    Even someone as foolish as you must realise if this creeps "nationalism" is acceptable to somebody like you.... then obviously it is because it is not Russian nationalism you dummy.
    That you or anybody can't even differentiate if he is into Russian nationalism or Russian ethnonstionalism is an indictment of the duplicitous,ass-covering game this animal Ano4 wants to play.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard, @Mr. Hack

    Ethnonationalism

  204. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Mr. Hack

    Magnificent wit with the Liberace reference, I would have been proud to do the same type of joke ( I probably have)

    I don't know about this Israeli - Vietnamese creep Ano4's family but I do know that:


    His brand of Russian nationalism seems the most intelligent form I've seen expressed here.
     
    Even by your standards Mr Hack, that is a staggeringly idiotic statement.

    He is as much a Russian nationalist...... as I am a 16th century Zulu spear.

    He is an obvious liberast who hates Russia and likes covering his ass in the most twisted way possible.
    Even someone as foolish as you must realise if this creeps "nationalism" is acceptable to somebody like you.... then obviously it is because it is not Russian nationalism you dummy.
    That you or anybody can't even differentiate if he is into Russian nationalism or Russian ethnonstionalism is an indictment of the duplicitous,ass-covering game this animal Ano4 wants to play.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard, @Mr. Hack

    He is steadfast in his dislike of liberasts and distrust of “cosmopolitanism”, just read his latest comment #201. My reference to Vietnam was in response to one of your own, where you extolled the virtues of high brow culture on display over there (or something to that effect). Perhaps, Vietnam could be a bridge of rapprochement for you two, as you both seem to have an interest in its culture? 🙂

  205. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Hyperborean

    Surely you're a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?

    Obviously as part of Paris landscape, the Eiffel Tower is spectacular and beautiful at a distance , but up close it is extremely ugly, I would not want to live less than 5km away from it.... the great US skyscrapers from late 1910's - 1940's remain aesthetic from close or long distance.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l'escargot by Matisse..... is an extreme cretin?

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    Surely you’re a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?

    There are beautiful Soviet-era artworks, but I tend to see them as offsprings of Neoclassicism.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l’escargot by Matisse….. is an extreme cretin?

    I have a low opinion of it, but it would be prudent to tone down your vehement insults in general, it is part of why Karlin bans you.

    • Replies: @Gerard.Gerard
    @Hyperborean

    Sorry, can't do it. I have temporarily declared for myself eternal immunity from moderation, just like in certain states there is immunity from prosecution

  206. @AltanBakshi
    I am very grateful to you AP and Mr Hack, because before you two I really had what one can call as a Great Russian or Neo Soviet attitude towards the Ukrainian nation and I thought that all Ukrainian nationalists are just far right nutjobs. Instead you have made a good case for an independent Ukrainian nation even though your logic is sometimes not for my liking or too far fetched in my opion, mainly my problem nowadays is your strong emphasis on historical differences between Ukrainian and Russian nations, when in my opinion those differences have been relatively small in comparison to other great European nation states who all had feudal and decentralized origins, with many different regional cultures, dialects or languages, and even had extreme religious sectarian conflicts, like France, Germany and UK. But the question is off course extremely subjective. Still I must say now that thanks to you two I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline..... and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles. I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception? I dont know Mr. Hacks opinion, he never seems to write anything about the question of Donbass.


    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic? I understand if its too personal question and you dont want to answer, people can be good without religion, if they havd a good ethical framework and morals, but I believe that self improvement is much harder without religion, after all individual must then depend on himself, and I do believe that only exceptional individuals are capable of that.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP

    I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline

    A reasonable position. If I were Russian I would opt want Ukraine to join NATO either. However recent events have pushed Ukrainians into wanting to join. Ideally Ukraine would have a strong deterrent on its own, without NATO.

    and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles.

    This has been my position for a long time. Donbas has provided coal and hard currency for Ukraine, but has been toxic politically and culturally. It isn’t worth keeping it.

    I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception?

    Most do, out of a sense of outrage that Russia helped remove “our” territory. But this is a short-sighted and stupid idea. Why add millions of voters who are hostile or indifferent to the Ukrainian idea to the Ukrainian state? What good comes of that? Why does Ukraine need that? They will be miserable and troublesome, and the rest of Ukraine will suffer with their presence. Without Donbas there would never have been a Yanukovich presidency in the first place.

    Also, there is a mistaken belief by any Russians that a person from Ukraine who considers themselves a Ukrainian (rather than a Russian) is a Ukrainian nationalist by definition. I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.

    [MORE]

    Without being a nationalist, I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia.

    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic?

    Yes, I do, but it seems sort of profane to share such details of personal faith. I do pray and until COVID I attended church weekly. Our services are like Orthodox ones, liturgy is song by both choir and parishioners, there is incense, candles, etc. which I think heighten the connection. I find it harder to pray in Roman Catholic churches, they seem more sterile to me. But I also feel it in nature.

    I try to be Christlike in my behavior towards others but of course fall short as do we all. There is a competitive, video-game quality in on-line squabbles and relationships which is okay, but I am gentler IRL.

    In my family there was a tradition since the 17th century of the oldest son being a priest (our family were priests, merchants, and military officers). This was broken when we came to America after World War II, otherwise my uncle would have been the 16th. My great-grandfather and all the way down the line were priests with noble background (which meant that they didn’t worry about persecution or trouble from Poles):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Ukrainian_clergy

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @AP


    I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.
     
    I couldn't agree more, nationalism and classical liberalism are just less virulent and aggressive forms of modern vices. Difference between classical liberalism and progressive one is like a difference between HIV and Aids, or so I like to think. Who knows maybe in the longer run Communism will be a healthier choice than the current far left liberalism?
    , @songbird
    @AP


    But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.
     
    I'm a critic of this idea.

    The major belligerents were all multi-ethnic empires. Started with Austria-Hungary - arguably the most multicult empire in Europe. Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans - where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?

    What allowed it to spread and continue was international alliances. The UK with France and Russia. Are those England's closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French. And the case against Russia seems even stronger. Germany with the Turks! England with the Japs! These alliances seem to have been elite-driven, rather than the result of organic populism.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories. Most of these were not contiguous, but quite foreign in character, filled with completely alien peoples - land in sub-Saharan Africa, or the Middle East.

    Can we say that nationalism caused the war? On what basis? What is our control? That Europe isn't fighting a fratricidal war today? Let's not be facetious. Empires with ethnic cores are all that existed back then - it was the state of organization back then. International communism had not yet claimed Russia. We have no control. The claim that nationalism caused WWI appears to me to be unscientific and often politically-motivated.

    Can we blame it on Serb nationalism? Well, Ireland had many rebellions, but never caused an international war (though foreign troops were sometimes landed in it), so I don't think that is reasonable. Probably, no power thought that they could take Ireland and integrate it into multicultural empire, without England's okay (which they would not give.)

    How do I explain WWI? Elite dysfunction. Predicated on the political units of the day - the elite of Europe (meaning a broad spectrum of the upper classes) existed in separate, unintegrated spheres. (Even though, they had many internationalist tendencies, such as monarchs being avaricious of having new, nonwhite subjects.) They were effectively proto-globalists. Just as today (we must be parsimonious) - they had a very poor ability to forecast the future and to think about long term consequences (today: immigration). Their thinking was short-term, during a technological period, when industrialization allowed for unprecedented escalation. Indeed, one of the motivations for early Russian mobilization was that it was a less developed country than Germany and would take longer to mobilize.

    Again, to put it into today's context, now the elite are united in a common, integrated sphere - real globalization - but still pursuing a cataclysmically short-sighted policy: mass immigration. The technology of today has made escalation in immigration possible on a scale completely unthinkable in 1945 (the start of de-Nazification), just as the technology of 1914 made escalation in war possible at an unthinkable pace in 1914.

    Replies: @AP, @Europe Europa

  207. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    The question of Donbas is kind of a sticky one for me. When the violence there first occurred, I was up in arms about it all. After all, the region was first populated by Ukrainian settlers, and even today Ukrainians make-up most of the population. The Russian and pro-Russian settlers have mostly crossed over into the area from Russia over a long period of time, especially during Soviet times. I've known Ukrainians from Donbas that are very much in favor of staying put within Ukraine. But, as they say, "it is what it is", and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his "Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine" theory, I've become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death. In reality, I would like to see it brought back, but what a high price to do so. It's way too late for any meaningful plebiscite on the issue. :-(

    Replies: @AP

    But, as they say, “it is what it is”, and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his “Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine” theory, I’ve become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death.

    Just to be clear, I wish no suffering upon the people of Donbas. Their suffering is mostly self-inflicted but I hope they find a good path out of their Sovok existence. It didn’t happen through Ukraine, let it happen through Russia.

    Also, gangrenous appendage is probably more accurate than cancerous.

    There are and have been Ukrainian patriots from Donbas but they are outnumbered, like Russian nationalists in Kiev. Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP


    Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.
     
    But herein is where part of the problem lies. Donbas was originally settles by Ukrainians'. Great Russian settlement into the area occurred later. In the countryside today, Ukrainians still constitute the majority.

    Replies: @AP, @Philip Owen

  208. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Mikhail

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cass_Sunstein#Early_life_and_education

    Sunstein = I don't think I need to explain further.

    There you go. That explains why Cass Sunstein is so obsessed with "cognitive infiltration" and mind control over the masses.


    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions.

     

    As for Samantha Power, Biden better not win because this bitch is going to be in power and as a hysteric believer in "Bosnian Genocide" and "Srebrenica Genocide" future prospects will look bleak for Serbs and Republika Srpska.

    In general, if Biden wins a whole bunch of other officials bad for Serbs and enemies of Serbs from the 1990's will stack key US policy positions and they will make types like John Bolton and Mike Pompeo be sorely missed.

    Serbs will be in very, VERY serious trouble if Biden wins (His newly released Kosovo and Bosnia declarations are direct plans of attack on Serbs). The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Mikhail

    The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.

    This is an implicit admission that Serbia’s reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests. As I’ve maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia’s protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    This is an implicit admission that Serbia’s reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests.
     
    The problem here is that Serbia basically has no alternative but to rely on Russia to safeguard its most basic national interests in the face of relentless hostility by the "West" since the fall of the Berlin Wall (and throughout many episodes of past history). Russia is what ultimately blocks "Republic" of Kosovo's UN and international organization membership, supports Republika Srpska's continued existence against campaigns to eliminate it (Russia vetoed a UK-US pushed UN resolution for "Srebrenica Genocide" to become international law in 2015) and has basically been the most important contributor to the restoration of Serbia's military since 2012/2014 after domestic traitors deliberately destroyed Serbia's army from 2000-2012/2014. Also, Russia is the spiritual, cultural and emotional center around which the national consciousness and hearts and minds of many Serbs (real ones, not liberals, political Croats and crypto-Croats) revolve around (although it's unfortunately more LARPing than it ideally would be), hence why Putin's incoming visit to Serbia to consecrate the opening of the Church of St Sava in Belgrade (never would've been completed without Russian funds and other support) will be highly noteworthy and trigger the hell out of anti-Serbs and Russophobes.

    There's also China as well, which is even more helpful than Russia when it comes to strengthening Serbia's economic power, but it also helps nicely in strengthening Serbia's army and complementing Russia's political support.

    Btw, before going to Brussels to negotiate over Kosovo, Vucic often visits Putin and Xi in Moscow and Beijing for their support and personal advice to him. Before and after this Washington "agreement" he consulted with Putin several times over the phone and according to Putin this was "at Vucic's own initiative".


    As I’ve maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

     

    Really? Korenchkin and Epigon are on somewhat similar thought-waves with me. Maybe you're referring to other commenters some time ago.

    Or maybe by your description of "serb bootlickers" you just dislike the fact that Serbs are fond of Russia with good reason.


    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia’s protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.
     
    The reality is that in the Balkans the most important countries will always be the ones with military occupation and/or raw military force projection capability along with a willingness to do so, whether you like it or not. That's obviously been the USA for the past 30 years and will be for the immediate future, but it's inevitable that sooner or later other powers capable of force projection will become very relevant in the future (Turkey and Russia).

    Replies: @Dmitry

  209. @AP
    @Mr. Hack


    But, as they say, “it is what it is”, and under mostly the persuasion of AP and his “Donbas is a cancer for Ukraine” theory, I’ve become more and more open to the idea, that perhaps it should be just cut off and left to suffer its own cancerous death.
     
    Just to be clear, I wish no suffering upon the people of Donbas. Their suffering is mostly self-inflicted but I hope they find a good path out of their Sovok existence. It didn't happen through Ukraine, let it happen through Russia.

    Also, gangrenous appendage is probably more accurate than cancerous.

    There are and have been Ukrainian patriots from Donbas but they are outnumbered, like Russian nationalists in Kiev. Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.

    But herein is where part of the problem lies. Donbas was originally settles by Ukrainians’. Great Russian settlement into the area occurred later. In the countryside today, Ukrainians still constitute the majority.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Northern Donbas, which is still part of Ukraine.

    Look at the territory of the UNR in the Treat of Brest-Litovsk: notice that it didn't include most of the parts of Donbas currently not under Kiev (nor did it include Crimea):

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/UNR_2.1918_Brest-Litovsk.png

    Here is self-declared native language in Luhansk oblast:

    https://i.imgur.com/oJmM3hm.png

    Notice that the frontline (blue line) rather neatly keeps the Ukrainian parts in Ukraine and Russian parts away from it.

    So the current borders are, I think, rather correct.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    , @Philip Owen
    @Mr. Hack

    At first it was the Wild Lands with not enough surface water to supply draught animals for agriculture. Cossacks and Jews were pushed out onto this less valuable land. Some Cossacks mined coal to make poor quality iron. Then, wind pumps came and large landowners settled Little Russian peasants, not so many in the South East. Also Germans, Greeks, more Jews and other foreigners. When John Hughes arrived, he could not hire enough workers because the landlords refused to let go of those peasants wo were serfs. So he hired workers from St Petersburg and Ekatrinburg. They filled the towns but not the countryside. The independent coal companies mostly hired Russiansm even more than Hughes, so Gorlivka was Russian and White during the Civil War.

    They are the last large proleteriat in Europe. They impose solidarity on each other. The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  210. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    I think our friend here is a Putler- worshipping Sovok. And he/she/it dislikes my take on Soviet history and post-Communist Russia's predicament.

    I can understand this. My opinions are not subtle at all: Revolution was bad, Perestroika was worse and Putin is not the Great Statesman a lot of people imagined. Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs. Russian people deserve better. Russians have suffered enough and should have a good and peaceful living in their homeland. If that means giving up on geopolitical ambitions of the ruling elites, so be it, and the sooner the better.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

    Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs

    If you decide to ignore the 10s or 100s of 1000s of arrests and imprisonments of siloviki that have occurred in the last few years, deliberately decide to not follow their trials just so that you can scream “human rights abuse” or then schizophrenically conflate fighting corruption now with mid-late 1930’s “Stalinism”….. then of course your BS is “true” you cretin!

    In reality corruption is being fought democratically and successfully in Russia with extremely high power MVD, FSB, SKR etc. guys being arrested every week (from everywhere, including ethnic republics) . This is different to Banderastan where the only Ukrainian official imprisoned for corruption was….
    Paul Manafort, LOL.

    If you can at least dismiss the noticeably much less corruption from traffic police, in hospitals etc occurring because of development of technology with the recording equipment on everyone’s phones ( I would not because I believe it is because of democratic, structural evolution of Russian society initiated by intelligent decisions of authorities)….. then you have no excuse like that to use for the high-powered people arrested in Russia by own law enforcement agencies that they work for.

    That is serious work, not the fake, ultimate failure judging from secondary effects, of that imbecile Saakashvili “fighting corruption” in Gruzia, which effectively followed the principle of PR and :

    The best way to get rid of antisemitism it to kill all Jews

    in his idiotic firing of everybody.

    Cosmopolitan, mainly Jewish, oligarchs are a western creation/tool in Russia you dimwit. Putin fought, with huge political risk and longterm repurcussions, 3 of the worst and most internationally powerful oligarchs and won…. as did the revenues for the government budget and savings. Subsequent creation by side effect of alot of smaller local oligarchs, particularly in ethnic republics was normal , they are fighting against now…. and was significantly better for Russians than small number of Jewish cosmopolitan oligarchs controlling and stealing from the country.

    BTW fool, how many state companies in Russia can you say are managed badly and become less professional ? Our postal service is approximately 5 million times better than compared to 10 years ago. Most russians will say that Federal government and top regional government work well for them…. further down they are trying to make perform better.

    Russians have suffered enough and deserve better

    LOL clown, WTF is “suffering” now? Economy is succeeding or failing now based on democratic merit…..not because of “corruption” or “dictatorship”, that is why our social indicators like crime and health and use of services etc are so much better now.

    • Agree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Gerard.Gerard


    BTW fool, how many state companies in Russia can you say are managed badly and become less professional
     
    https://kapital-rus.ru/articles/article/poteri_gazproma_dostigli_35_mlrd_rublei_v_den/

    https://www.bbc.com/russian/news-54016107

    https://www.bbc.com/russian/news-50499231

    https://www.forbes.ru/newsroom/biznes/407087-rosneft-ponesla-ubytki-na-113-mlrd-rubley-v-pervoy-polovine-goda

    https://www.ng.ru/economics/2019-06-26/4_7607_gossovet.html

    https://www.rbc.ru/economics/02/04/2019/5ca1d7949a79475d1c2f6e4a

    https://www.finanz.ru/novosti/aktsii/prosto-deneg-net-minfin-zapuskaet-sekvestr-byudzheta-1029413396

    Ещё добавить, или тебе и так нормально?

    В общем всё как 1200 лет тому назад: "Земля наша велика и обильна, а порядка в ней нет."

    Хоть опять варягов приглашай...
  211. @Hyperborean
    @Gerard.Gerard


    Surely you’re a fan of the great Soviet sculptures /monuments?
     
    There are beautiful Soviet-era artworks, but I tend to see them as offsprings of Neoclassicism.

    I trust that you think as I do that anybody who gets satisfaction from viewing a nothing artwork like l’escargot by Matisse….. is an extreme cretin?
     
    I have a low opinion of it, but it would be prudent to tone down your vehement insults in general, it is part of why Karlin bans you.

    Replies: @Gerard.Gerard

    Sorry, can’t do it. I have temporarily declared for myself eternal immunity from moderation, just like in certain states there is immunity from prosecution

  212. One warning I gave to all people slamming Sweden’s approach was Wait For The Second Wave.

    I hate to say it but… I told you so:

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @Thulean Friend

    Covid is a fake and gay nothingburger.

    (I probably had it, don't care enough about this bullshit to test for antibodies.)

  213. @Mr. Hack
    @AP


    Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.
     
    But herein is where part of the problem lies. Donbas was originally settles by Ukrainians'. Great Russian settlement into the area occurred later. In the countryside today, Ukrainians still constitute the majority.

    Replies: @AP, @Philip Owen

    Northern Donbas, which is still part of Ukraine.

    Look at the territory of the UNR in the Treat of Brest-Litovsk: notice that it didn’t include most of the parts of Donbas currently not under Kiev (nor did it include Crimea):

    Here is self-declared native language in Luhansk oblast:

    Notice that the frontline (blue line) rather neatly keeps the Ukrainian parts in Ukraine and Russian parts away from it.

    So the current borders are, I think, rather correct.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Do you really think that dividing up Donbas along ethnic lines would be a good long term solution for the area? If something like this were to transpire, wouldn't it give adventurists on both sides opportunity to help "our countrymen to unite with our brothers across the border" A solution similar to the one in Ireland, although things have quieted down there for now.....

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Here's another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 - 1921) that you've presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon as Russian ethnic territories today. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Here's another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 - 1921) that you've presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon today as Russian ethnic territories. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Map_of_Ukraine_%28postcard_1919%29.jpg

    Replies: @Ano4, @AP

  214. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Mikhail


    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day.
     
    The problem is that non-Russians mostly don't care about the anti-Communist struggle of some Russians during the 20th century, especially considering that it's a matter of history of "Russia" now. There's no way in hell Western/Liberal/Soros NGO's are going to be sympathetic to the plight, wellbeing and cause of ethnic Russians (regardless of how "anti-Communist/Soviet" they may be), both past and present.

    A better approach is to emphasize some of the most horrific episodes of The Russian Genocide in the 20th century done by the Communists (Jews, Latvians, etc.) during the Russian Civil War.

    These include the horrific starvation, freezing to death and drowning under the ice of massive columns and convoys of ethnic Russians that as part of the White Army fled from Communists:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Siberian_Ice_March

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starving_March

    An uncomfortable fact about the Russian Civil War you would do well to accept instead of awkwardly whine about is that the international/western forces that supposedly helped the White Army were not genuine friends of the Russian White Army (especially obvious by UK royal family refusing to host Romanovs). Have you ever asked yourself why these "allies" never seriously supplied the White Army with arms, munitions and supplies (despite UK still bothered to use chemical weapons on ethnic Russians far north near Arkhangelsk and Komi) even though when the White Army captured Kazan it had access to most of the Russian Empire's treasury?

    Truth hurts.

    Nobody of serious importance is going to truly start to like Russia in the West. Fortunately, that doesn't matter for Russians because Russia is large and strong enough to be able to shrug things like sanctions off (not entirely cost free though) and capable of successfully, cost-effectively fight serious wars and wage prolonged geo-political struggle against stronger enemies (although Russia could improve its diplomacy and efforts to maintain influence among smaller countries).

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Have you ever asked yourself why these “allies” never seriously supplied the White Army with arms, munitions and supplies (despite UK still bothered to use chemical weapons on ethnic Russians far north near Arkhangelsk and Komi) even though when the White Army captured Kazan it had access to most of the Russian Empire’s treasury?

    I most certainly know why and have explained in some detail.

    On another point, I don’t awkwardly whine. Rather, provide the specifics.

  215. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Mikhail

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cass_Sunstein#Early_life_and_education

    Sunstein = I don't think I need to explain further.

    There you go. That explains why Cass Sunstein is so obsessed with "cognitive infiltration" and mind control over the masses.


    In line with Power aggressively seeking to unmask individuals, on the basis of her hypocritically biased notions.

     

    As for Samantha Power, Biden better not win because this bitch is going to be in power and as a hysteric believer in "Bosnian Genocide" and "Srebrenica Genocide" future prospects will look bleak for Serbs and Republika Srpska.

    In general, if Biden wins a whole bunch of other officials bad for Serbs and enemies of Serbs from the 1990's will stack key US policy positions and they will make types like John Bolton and Mike Pompeo be sorely missed.

    Serbs will be in very, VERY serious trouble if Biden wins (His newly released Kosovo and Bosnia declarations are direct plans of attack on Serbs). The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Mikhail

    If Power’s hubby was a WASP, it wouldn’t change my opinion of his views.

    On your other point, tack on Susan Rice, Evelyn Farkas, Michael Carpenter and Michael McFaul. Antony Blinken is someone who I sense knows better, but has the establishment in mind, relative to what he wants.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
  216. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    Its always a danger that when you see Buddhas or awakened beings that they are just demons in disguise, this problem is commonly acknowledged in Buddhadharma, we are taught to not to trust too much visions and apparitions, especially if we are beings lacking of merit
     
    That was exactly the context in which Bodhidhama warned his student about the manifestation of demons.



    Bodhidhama:
    The sutras say, "All appearances are illusions." They have bo fixed existence, no constant form. They're impermanent. Don't cling to appearances, and you'll be of one mind with the Buddha. The sutras say, "That which is free of all form is the Buddha."

    Student:
    But why shouldn't we worship buddhas and bodhisattvas?


    Bodhidhama:
    Devils and demons posses the power of manifestation. They can create the appearance of bodhisattvas in all sorts of guises. The buddha is your own mind. Don't misdirect your worship.


    This is basically Cittamatra.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    All schools agree that ones mind is the Buddha or has potential to be the Buddha, Chittamatras differ from the shravaka schools because they dont hold dharmas as ultimately real but that they are manifestations of ones mindstream, Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.

    Madhyamika school which I follow does not make such statements. I dont know how well translated is your citation, especially if its from Chinese to Japanese and then to English, and the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China. Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping. Where repetition and tradition is more important than genuine understanding of Buddhas teachings and applying those teachings in real life.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China.
     
    In the first text where he was mentioned, Bodhidharma was described as a "Parasika", only later has the story of him being "the son of a King from the southern India" been added.



    If we look at the historical circumstances in the fifth century AD when he supposedly travelled to China (Hephtalite Mithraist and Persian Zoroastrian persecution of the Central Asian Buddhism), the fact that he was described as a "Tripitaka master" (therefore a translator of Buddhist texts) in one of the earliest Ch'an texts found in Dunhuang and that he supposedly went back home through Tianshan mountains, we might come to the conclusion that he was most probably a Central Asian.

    Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.
     
    In the earliest Ch'an Anthology found in Dunhuang and in the Treatise of Bodhidhama translated from the Chinese by Red Pine (which I used for the citation in the comment above), Mind is the Ultimate Reality that a human consciousness mightexperience. This Mind is not personal, it is not limited by anything and it pervades the whole Universe. There is nothing beyond it. But, in the Ch'an Anthology it is also clearly stated that whatever the attempt to the objectification of this Mind, this attempt would only be a failed "vision in a dream". Therefore, to avoid their disciples falling into the solipsistic contemplation of their own consciousness, later Chinese Ch'an masters used the famous saying: "Mind is not mind, we just call it such".

    Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping.
     
    Yes, he mentioned this in his treatise: ignorant people believe that they will be liberated through painting Stupas in different colors, giving flowers and burning incense in front of the statues of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. This might increase their merit, but this will not bring them to the Awakening and Liberation. Only witnessing the true nature of the Mind will ultimately bring them to the Other Shore.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  217. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Where is the 'context' where giving prayers and offerings to a statue of a demon with a man's severed head drinking from a skull cup is not demon worship?


    Actually it's just a metaphor
     
    Tantric Episcopalianism

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    So Agnus Dei should be taken literally? I cant take seriously people who worship a lamb god. Or if its not a lamb then but son of man whose blood you drink and flesh you eat, you sick demon worshippers. At least we dont practice cannibalism!

    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/UserFiles/images/weeklynews/24-october-2020/18.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Jatt Singh, @AP, @Dmitry

  218. @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    So Agnus Dei should be taken literally? I cant take seriously people who worship a lamb god. Or if its not a lamb then but son of man whose blood you drink and flesh you eat, you sick demon worshippers. At least we dont practice cannibalism!

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh moving the goalposts, arent we? So now metaphores and allegories are okay?

    Buddhists dont worship Kali, its against Buddhism to worship or to take refuge in such beings. Whats next? Should I now accuse Christians of worshipping of Allah? Actually it would be a less far fetched analogy, Allah is after all a cognate of Hebrew El. El means Lord and Arab Christians call God by the name of Allah. Calm down you Allah worshipper.

    (I believe that Christian God and Allah are quite different, so these are just rhetorical or polemical arguments, no offence meant towards the Christianity or Islam)

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Kent Nationalist

    , @Jatt Singh
    @Kent Nationalist

    She's mother of the same Sikhs who destroyed your empire and are now pivotal in destroying your race।।

    ਤਾਂ ਸੀਸ ਕੇਸ ਰਖ ਸਿਪਾਹੀ ਕਰਨੇ । ਕਟਿ ਸ਼ਾਸ਼ਤ੍ਰ ਬੰਧਵਾਇ ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਧਰਨੇ ।
    [And the Guru remarked], Adorning [unshorn] hair on your head, you shall be warriors, fastening weapons to your waist, and adopting Singh [Tiger] in your name.

    ਮਾਤਾ ਕਾਲੀ ਦਾ ਬਾਣਾ ਨੀਲਾ ਪਹਿਰਾਵਣਾ ।
    [You shall] wear the blue dress of Mata Kali [The Dark Goddess]

    ਕਰਨਾ ਜੁਧ ਨਾਲਿ ਤੁਰਕਾਂ ਦੇ ਮਾਰਿ ਹਟਾਵਣਾ ।293।
    Conducting war with the Turks you will kill and stop [their tyranny].

    Bansāvalināmā, page 151, verse 292-293

    Aren't you a rotting pensioner whose knowledge of such things comes from Indiana Jones? Why not stick to your expertise on assembly lines and mops/toilet cleaners?

    We don't view good evil as separate as they're part of the same cosmic reality.

    Everything is will of creator.
    All are part of Hari.

    Destroying the oppressive white christian race is righteous।।

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

    , @AP
    @Kent Nationalist

    Correct, but this would seem to be a criticism of Hinduism, not Buddhism.

    Spaniards seem to have been much more successful at extinguishing demon-worshipping among the people they ruled.

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

    , @Dmitry
    @Kent Nationalist

    I assume you are trolling some of the "exotic nationalities" that post here. If you believed in demons, and were scared by such an infantile (albeit gothic) cartoon, that would be leaning towards mental illness. For a small child, or superstitious peasant grandmother in medieval times, it could be normal to be afraid of blue demons that collect human heads, but for an adult man? - symptoms of schizophrenia.

    When I was around 9 years old, I used to draw pictures of things like flying cats or walking trees. The fact I could draw these pictures, does not imply that we have to worry about flying cats and walking trees on the walk to the office. Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind's ability to recombine shapes - "human imagination".

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  219. @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    All schools agree that ones mind is the Buddha or has potential to be the Buddha, Chittamatras differ from the shravaka schools because they dont hold dharmas as ultimately real but that they are manifestations of ones mindstream, Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.

    Madhyamika school which I follow does not make such statements. I dont know how well translated is your citation, especially if its from Chinese to Japanese and then to English, and the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China. Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping. Where repetition and tradition is more important than genuine understanding of Buddhas teachings and applying those teachings in real life.

    Replies: @Ano4

    the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China.

    In the first text where he was mentioned, Bodhidharma was described as a “Parasika”, only later has the story of him being “the son of a King from the southern India” been added.

    [MORE]

    If we look at the historical circumstances in the fifth century AD when he supposedly travelled to China (Hephtalite Mithraist and Persian Zoroastrian persecution of the Central Asian Buddhism), the fact that he was described as a “Tripitaka master” (therefore a translator of Buddhist texts) in one of the earliest Ch’an texts found in Dunhuang and that he supposedly went back home through Tianshan mountains, we might come to the conclusion that he was most probably a Central Asian.

    Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.

    In the earliest Ch’an Anthology found in Dunhuang and in the Treatise of Bodhidhama translated from the Chinese by Red Pine (which I used for the citation in the comment above), Mind is the Ultimate Reality that a human consciousness mightexperience. This Mind is not personal, it is not limited by anything and it pervades the whole Universe. There is nothing beyond it. But, in the Ch’an Anthology it is also clearly stated that whatever the attempt to the objectification of this Mind, this attempt would only be a failed “vision in a dream”. Therefore, to avoid their disciples falling into the solipsistic contemplation of their own consciousness, later Chinese Ch’an masters used the famous saying: “Mind is not mind, we just call it such”.

    Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping.

    Yes, he mentioned this in his treatise: ignorant people believe that they will be liberated through painting Stupas in different colors, giving flowers and burning incense in front of the statues of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. This might increase their merit, but this will not bring them to the Awakening and Liberation. Only witnessing the true nature of the Mind will ultimately bring them to the Other Shore.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Ano4

    For some reason I always thought that Bodhidharma was from Southern India and that he travelled from India to China by sea route.

  220. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/UserFiles/images/weeklynews/24-october-2020/18.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Jatt Singh, @AP, @Dmitry

    Oh moving the goalposts, arent we? So now metaphores and allegories are okay?

    Buddhists dont worship Kali, its against Buddhism to worship or to take refuge in such beings. Whats next? Should I now accuse Christians of worshipping of Allah? Actually it would be a less far fetched analogy, Allah is after all a cognate of Hebrew El. El means Lord and Arab Christians call God by the name of Allah. Calm down you Allah worshipper.

    (I believe that Christian God and Allah are quite different, so these are just rhetorical or polemical arguments, no offence meant towards the Christianity or Islam)

    • Replies: @Jatt Singh
    @AltanBakshi

    You're a fucking Hapa showing your true colours.

    Ma Kali is form of Ma Durga wife of Lord Shiva.

    You're a fake

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    You are correct, my comment was more properly directed against Hindus. The Tibetan artworks in the exhibition were not nearly as unpleasant as the Hindu ones.

  221. Obviously just a sign of Biden’s senility, but if the Democrats seize power I hope they don’t “take care” of Biden and replace him with Harris too quickly. It would be funny if he did this kind of thing during a constitutional or diplomatic crisis.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/SteveGuest/status/1320107370312323073

  222. @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh moving the goalposts, arent we? So now metaphores and allegories are okay?

    Buddhists dont worship Kali, its against Buddhism to worship or to take refuge in such beings. Whats next? Should I now accuse Christians of worshipping of Allah? Actually it would be a less far fetched analogy, Allah is after all a cognate of Hebrew El. El means Lord and Arab Christians call God by the name of Allah. Calm down you Allah worshipper.

    (I believe that Christian God and Allah are quite different, so these are just rhetorical or polemical arguments, no offence meant towards the Christianity or Islam)

    Replies: @Jatt Singh, @Kent Nationalist

    You’re a fucking Hapa showing your true colours.

    Ma Kali is form of Ma Durga wife of Lord Shiva.

    You’re a fake

    • Troll: Ano4
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Jatt Singh

    Sad that people here think that you are representative of Sikhism, with your "death to the white race," postings you sound like a BLM activist both in steroids and meth. You probably belong to one of those strange Hindu-Sikh syncretic sects that try to install Hindu statues in the Gurudwaras. The Akaali Sikhs, the true Khalsa drove you out of their temples long time ago, or maybe you are those odd Vaishnavite Sikh hybrids. Maybe, because for you Vishnu seems to be quite important. True Siks are monotheists and never ever they worship Kali. You very well know the battle cry of Sikhs, Ek Onkar, God is one, God is supreme, a true Sikh puts his faith in thr highest god and knows that only he is the true guide and only he is infallible. Some Sikhs believe that Hindu Gods are aspects of the highest, but still in Sikhism one should never worship individual attributes or aspects of most high one separately, but worship God as an united whole.

    I think you are funny and that you give some Masala spice to the commenting section, but clearly some people take you too seriously and for them you are tarnishing the reputation of the Sikhis.

    Replies: @sher singh

  223. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/UserFiles/images/weeklynews/24-october-2020/18.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Jatt Singh, @AP, @Dmitry

    She’s mother of the same Sikhs who destroyed your empire and are now pivotal in destroying your race।।

    ਤਾਂ ਸੀਸ ਕੇਸ ਰਖ ਸਿਪਾਹੀ ਕਰਨੇ । ਕਟਿ ਸ਼ਾਸ਼ਤ੍ਰ ਬੰਧਵਾਇ ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਧਰਨੇ ।
    [And the Guru remarked], Adorning [unshorn] hair on your head, you shall be warriors, fastening weapons to your waist, and adopting Singh [Tiger] in your name.

    ਮਾਤਾ ਕਾਲੀ ਦਾ ਬਾਣਾ ਨੀਲਾ ਪਹਿਰਾਵਣਾ ।
    [You shall] wear the blue dress of Mata Kali [The Dark Goddess]

    ਕਰਨਾ ਜੁਧ ਨਾਲਿ ਤੁਰਕਾਂ ਦੇ ਮਾਰਿ ਹਟਾਵਣਾ ।293।
    Conducting war with the Turks you will kill and stop [their tyranny].

    Bansāvalināmā, page 151, verse 292-293

    Aren’t you a rotting pensioner whose knowledge of such things comes from Indiana Jones? Why not stick to your expertise on assembly lines and mops/toilet cleaners?

    We don’t view good evil as separate as they’re part of the same cosmic reality.

    Everything is will of creator.
    All are part of Hari.

    Destroying the oppressive white christian race is righteous।।

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Jatt Singh

    You Indians are absolute scum, I find it bemusing why so many whites think Sikhs and Hindus are their allies when they're utter scum like you in reality. It's fact that you Indian savages frequently murder Christians, yet most whites don't believe it they're so brainwashed about your lot.

    The British empire was far too soft on you Indian filth, if it had done the job properly you disgusting people and your vile "religions" wouldn't even exist any more, you would be like South America.

    Replies: @Ano4, @sher singh

    , @songbird
    @Jatt Singh

    What do you really have against the British?

    That they demonstrated that one Englishman, for the purposes of conquering India, is superior to about 1000 Sikhs? That they effectively conquered the whole place, and Sikhs didn't have the werewithal to hold it together, even after extensive military tutelage?

    Stop crying like a fag over unrequited love, and conquer Pakistan! BTW, if you did that, you'd still need to do a lot to equal the English! Better get started now! Sikh fertility means that time is running out! And I don't know if your mulatto children will be up to it!!! (Harris seems to be a whore, rather than a fighter.)

    Replies: @sher singh

  224. @Gerard.Gerard
    @Ano4


    Russia is under a regime of corrupt siloviki allied with cosmopolitan oligarchs
     
    If you decide to ignore the 10s or 100s of 1000s of arrests and imprisonments of siloviki that have occurred in the last few years, deliberately decide to not follow their trials just so that you can scream "human rights abuse" or then schizophrenically conflate fighting corruption now with mid-late 1930's "Stalinism"..... then of course your BS is "true" you cretin!

    In reality corruption is being fought democratically and successfully in Russia with extremely high power MVD, FSB, SKR etc. guys being arrested every week (from everywhere, including ethnic republics) . This is different to Banderastan where the only Ukrainian official imprisoned for corruption was....
    Paul Manafort, LOL.

    If you can at least dismiss the noticeably much less corruption from traffic police, in hospitals etc occurring because of development of technology with the recording equipment on everyone's phones ( I would not because I believe it is because of democratic, structural evolution of Russian society initiated by intelligent decisions of authorities)..... then you have no excuse like that to use for the high-powered people arrested in Russia by own law enforcement agencies that they work for.

    That is serious work, not the fake, ultimate failure judging from secondary effects, of that imbecile Saakashvili "fighting corruption" in Gruzia, which effectively followed the principle of PR and :

    The best way to get rid of antisemitism it to kill all Jews
     
    in his idiotic firing of everybody.

    Cosmopolitan, mainly Jewish, oligarchs are a western creation/tool in Russia you dimwit. Putin fought, with huge political risk and longterm repurcussions, 3 of the worst and most internationally powerful oligarchs and won.... as did the revenues for the government budget and savings. Subsequent creation by side effect of alot of smaller local oligarchs, particularly in ethnic republics was normal , they are fighting against now.... and was significantly better for Russians than small number of Jewish cosmopolitan oligarchs controlling and stealing from the country.

    BTW fool, how many state companies in Russia can you say are managed badly and become less professional ? Our postal service is approximately 5 million times better than compared to 10 years ago. Most russians will say that Federal government and top regional government work well for them.... further down they are trying to make perform better.

    Russians have suffered enough and deserve better
     
    LOL clown, WTF is "suffering" now? Economy is succeeding or failing now based on democratic merit.....not because of "corruption" or "dictatorship", that is why our social indicators like crime and health and use of services etc are so much better now.

    Replies: @Ano4

    BTW fool, how many state companies in Russia can you say are managed badly and become less professional

    https://kapital-rus.ru/articles/article/poteri_gazproma_dostigli_35_mlrd_rublei_v_den/

    https://www.bbc.com/russian/news-54016107

    https://www.bbc.com/russian/news-50499231

    https://www.forbes.ru/newsroom/biznes/407087-rosneft-ponesla-ubytki-na-113-mlrd-rubley-v-pervoy-polovine-goda

    https://www.ng.ru/economics/2019-06-26/4_7607_gossovet.html

    https://www.rbc.ru/economics/02/04/2019/5ca1d7949a79475d1c2f6e4a

    https://www.finanz.ru/novosti/aktsii/prosto-deneg-net-minfin-zapuskaet-sekvestr-byudzheta-1029413396

    Ещё добавить, или тебе и так нормально?

    В общем всё как 1200 лет тому назад: “Земля наша велика и обильна, а порядка в ней нет.”

    Хоть опять варягов приглашай…

  225. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/UserFiles/images/weeklynews/24-october-2020/18.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Jatt Singh, @AP, @Dmitry

    Correct, but this would seem to be a criticism of Hinduism, not Buddhism.

    Spaniards seem to have been much more successful at extinguishing demon-worshipping among the people they ruled.

    • Troll: sher singh
    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @AP

    You're right

  226. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Northern Donbas, which is still part of Ukraine.

    Look at the territory of the UNR in the Treat of Brest-Litovsk: notice that it didn't include most of the parts of Donbas currently not under Kiev (nor did it include Crimea):

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/UNR_2.1918_Brest-Litovsk.png

    Here is self-declared native language in Luhansk oblast:

    https://i.imgur.com/oJmM3hm.png

    Notice that the frontline (blue line) rather neatly keeps the Ukrainian parts in Ukraine and Russian parts away from it.

    So the current borders are, I think, rather correct.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    Do you really think that dividing up Donbas along ethnic lines would be a good long term solution for the area? If something like this were to transpire, wouldn’t it give adventurists on both sides opportunity to help “our countrymen to unite with our brothers across the border” A solution similar to the one in Ireland, although things have quieted down there for now…..

  227. Firing Line with William F. Buckley Jr.: The Warren Report: Fact or Fiction?

  228. @Thulean Friend
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    The only ways out for Serbs from their current plight are Trump victory or a US Civil War.
     
    This is an implicit admission that Serbia's reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests. As I've maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia's protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    This is an implicit admission that Serbia’s reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests.

    The problem here is that Serbia basically has no alternative but to rely on Russia to safeguard its most basic national interests in the face of relentless hostility by the “West” since the fall of the Berlin Wall (and throughout many episodes of past history). Russia is what ultimately blocks “Republic” of Kosovo’s UN and international organization membership, supports Republika Srpska’s continued existence against campaigns to eliminate it (Russia vetoed a UK-US pushed UN resolution for “Srebrenica Genocide” to become international law in 2015) and has basically been the most important contributor to the restoration of Serbia’s military since 2012/2014 after domestic traitors deliberately destroyed Serbia’s army from 2000-2012/2014. Also, Russia is the spiritual, cultural and emotional center around which the national consciousness and hearts and minds of many Serbs (real ones, not liberals, political Croats and crypto-Croats) revolve around (although it’s unfortunately more LARPing than it ideally would be), hence why Putin’s incoming visit to Serbia to consecrate the opening of the Church of St Sava in Belgrade (never would’ve been completed without Russian funds and other support) will be highly noteworthy and trigger the hell out of anti-Serbs and Russophobes.

    There’s also China as well, which is even more helpful than Russia when it comes to strengthening Serbia’s economic power, but it also helps nicely in strengthening Serbia’s army and complementing Russia’s political support.

    Btw, before going to Brussels to negotiate over Kosovo, Vucic often visits Putin and Xi in Moscow and Beijing for their support and personal advice to him. Before and after this Washington “agreement” he consulted with Putin several times over the phone and according to Putin this was “at Vucic’s own initiative”.

    As I’ve maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

    Really? Korenchkin and Epigon are on somewhat similar thought-waves with me. Maybe you’re referring to other commenters some time ago.

    Or maybe by your description of “serb bootlickers” you just dislike the fact that Serbs are fond of Russia with good reason.

    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia’s protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.

    The reality is that in the Balkans the most important countries will always be the ones with military occupation and/or raw military force projection capability along with a willingness to do so, whether you like it or not. That’s obviously been the USA for the past 30 years and will be for the immediate future, but it’s inevitable that sooner or later other powers capable of force projection will become very relevant in the future (Turkey and Russia).

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me - i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany; created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica; and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia - there won't be much knowledge about Serbia as a country. I can't remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries - I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I'm guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

  229. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Northern Donbas, which is still part of Ukraine.

    Look at the territory of the UNR in the Treat of Brest-Litovsk: notice that it didn't include most of the parts of Donbas currently not under Kiev (nor did it include Crimea):

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/UNR_2.1918_Brest-Litovsk.png

    Here is self-declared native language in Luhansk oblast:

    https://i.imgur.com/oJmM3hm.png

    Notice that the frontline (blue line) rather neatly keeps the Ukrainian parts in Ukraine and Russian parts away from it.

    So the current borders are, I think, rather correct.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    Here’s another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 – 1921) that you’ve presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon as Russian ethnic territories today. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

  230. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    Northern Donbas, which is still part of Ukraine.

    Look at the territory of the UNR in the Treat of Brest-Litovsk: notice that it didn't include most of the parts of Donbas currently not under Kiev (nor did it include Crimea):

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/UNR_2.1918_Brest-Litovsk.png

    Here is self-declared native language in Luhansk oblast:

    https://i.imgur.com/oJmM3hm.png

    Notice that the frontline (blue line) rather neatly keeps the Ukrainian parts in Ukraine and Russian parts away from it.

    So the current borders are, I think, rather correct.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack

    Here’s another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 – 1921) that you’ve presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon today as Russian ethnic territories. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Mr Hack, we are both attached to past glories of our respective Eastern Slav tribes. We value the blood and tears of "our people " and care about "our lands". In my case I have ancestors and relatives on both sides of the tribal divide (actually Polish and Ruthenian too).

    We both care, but so also did the Wendat and the Mohawk. Where are they now, how are their lands and their people faring?

    Both Ukraine and Russia are reaching a dangerous threshold in their devolution: center cannot hold. And antagonizing each other only accelerates their demise.

    That is why all these questions about who took what land from each other and how important are linguistic and cultural differences among the Eastern Slav tribes, are non-essential questions. What is essential is the fertility of Eastern Slav women, the capacity of Eastern Slav men to inseminate them and the birth of healthy Eastern Slav children.

    Demographics is destiny

    If nothing changes, in a couple of generations the part of Eurasia where Rus tribes and their ancestors lived for times immemorial, will become a sparsely populated and resources rich territory to be milked by the global TNC, both Western and Chinese. A fraction of surviving Eastern Slav population might well have a decent level of income, but they will be 3 to 5 times less numerous than they would have been if Tsarist Empire survived. After a hundred years of tribulations, a lot is lost and not much gained.

    Was it all worth it?

    I don't think so...

    Perhaps it is because many years ago I read this book:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.N.U.F.F.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Anatoly Karlin

    , @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    People can create all kinds of maps with claims but the one I posted was of the Brest-Litovsk boundary, which does correspond to ethnic boundaries.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  231. @Kent Nationalist
    @AltanBakshi

    Agnus Dei is a metaphor for something good, whatever the below represents, it is something evil.

    https://www.thetablet.co.uk/UserFiles/images/weeklynews/24-october-2020/18.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Jatt Singh, @AP, @Dmitry

    I assume you are trolling some of the “exotic nationalities” that post here. If you believed in demons, and were scared by such an infantile (albeit gothic) cartoon, that would be leaning towards mental illness. For a small child, or superstitious peasant grandmother in medieval times, it could be normal to be afraid of blue demons that collect human heads, but for an adult man? – symptoms of schizophrenia.

    When I was around 9 years old, I used to draw pictures of things like flying cats or walking trees. The fact I could draw these pictures, does not imply that we have to worry about flying cats and walking trees on the walk to the office. Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind’s ability to recombine shapes – “human imagination”.

    • Troll: Jatt Singh
    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Dmitry

    Hah our mr. edgy Atheist(?) casually diagnoses majority of historical humanity suffering from schizophrenia. Ancient Romans believed that there resided the genii or spirits in their statues depicting emperors and gods, many later Christianized Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.

    For us Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals, a way to make them to feel nearer or closer to us, anyone who has loved ones knows the feelings which will arise when one sees photos of those which we love.


    Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind’s ability to recombine shapes – “human imagination”.
     
    What else our imagi-nation is than imagined images? Quite maximalist of you to claim that our imagination has no bearing on reality? Or what did you mean? Because your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless it somehow means that all paintings are meaningless and senseless and have no power upon reality? That very much depends on particular individual and how one perceives the reality. I myself try to avoid such universalist claims.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  232. @AltanBakshi
    @Kent Nationalist

    Oh you were serious, I thought that you were just joking last time when you replied to me that I shouldnt try to communicate with demons.

    Its very wrong of British Museum to even hold such exhibitions, of course they seem demonic when taken out of their context. I dont know what you have seen, Buddhist secret practices or so called path of Hidden Mantra and Hindu Tantra is a huge topic with thousands of traditions and lineages. If you are just shocked from bones, then its your problem, whats wrong with bones?

    Replies: @Ano4, @Kent Nationalist, @Dmitry

    Bones remind us of death, and what reminds of death brings a feeling of the uncanny and ominous, and revulsion. Ask any children if they want to be all night in a cemetery. Or sleep in a bed of someone who has died? There is a natural feeling of spiritual fear.

    Sinister emotion which surrounds everything to do with death (even the image of the coffin is macabre), is in a sense of discord between our internal feeling of immortality, and the powerless and transitory reality of the life of our friends, family and ourselves.

    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, – and the human skull is a traditional memento mori – is probably healthy for us, especially now, where much of our culture (especially the high level of organization in society which separates dead and dying people into hospitals) has become like the father of the Buddha, who tried to shield his son from knowledge of sickness and death .

    Part of spiritual quality of Gothic cathedrals – the fact they have dead bodies buried into the floor.

    And the depictions of “Danse Macabre” was to remind people to remember the transitoriness and superficiality of their life, and think of something more eternal than their trivial worries of the day.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Dmitry


    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, – and the human skull is a traditional memento mori – is probably healthy for us
     
    Thats mainly the reason for all the bones and skulls. To be reminded of the mans transient nature. They are not a dominant theme of our temples nor our religion. Also traditionally holy men or priestly caste have been the caretakers of cemeteries or charnel grounds throughout the history. In most cultures at least.
    , @songbird
    @Dmitry

    I've wondered how some of these decorative accretions of skulls and bones are protected from rodents. Maybe, they have armies of cats around?

  233. @Thulean Friend
    One warning I gave to all people slamming Sweden's approach was Wait For The Second Wave.

    I hate to say it but... I told you so:

    https://i.imgur.com/JNUzT6C.png

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    Covid is a fake and gay nothingburger.

    (I probably had it, don’t care enough about this bullshit to test for antibodies.)

  234. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    This is an implicit admission that Serbia’s reliance on Russia is insufficient to safeguard its interests.
     
    The problem here is that Serbia basically has no alternative but to rely on Russia to safeguard its most basic national interests in the face of relentless hostility by the "West" since the fall of the Berlin Wall (and throughout many episodes of past history). Russia is what ultimately blocks "Republic" of Kosovo's UN and international organization membership, supports Republika Srpska's continued existence against campaigns to eliminate it (Russia vetoed a UK-US pushed UN resolution for "Srebrenica Genocide" to become international law in 2015) and has basically been the most important contributor to the restoration of Serbia's military since 2012/2014 after domestic traitors deliberately destroyed Serbia's army from 2000-2012/2014. Also, Russia is the spiritual, cultural and emotional center around which the national consciousness and hearts and minds of many Serbs (real ones, not liberals, political Croats and crypto-Croats) revolve around (although it's unfortunately more LARPing than it ideally would be), hence why Putin's incoming visit to Serbia to consecrate the opening of the Church of St Sava in Belgrade (never would've been completed without Russian funds and other support) will be highly noteworthy and trigger the hell out of anti-Serbs and Russophobes.

    There's also China as well, which is even more helpful than Russia when it comes to strengthening Serbia's economic power, but it also helps nicely in strengthening Serbia's army and complementing Russia's political support.

    Btw, before going to Brussels to negotiate over Kosovo, Vucic often visits Putin and Xi in Moscow and Beijing for their support and personal advice to him. Before and after this Washington "agreement" he consulted with Putin several times over the phone and according to Putin this was "at Vucic's own initiative".


    As I’ve maintained for a long time (and got ferocious pushback from various serb bootlickers on this blog).

     

    Really? Korenchkin and Epigon are on somewhat similar thought-waves with me. Maybe you're referring to other commenters some time ago.

    Or maybe by your description of "serb bootlickers" you just dislike the fact that Serbs are fond of Russia with good reason.


    It is true though. Russia is too weak to be Serbia’s protector, and changes in the US administration and policies have far greater impact.
     
    The reality is that in the Balkans the most important countries will always be the ones with military occupation and/or raw military force projection capability along with a willingness to do so, whether you like it or not. That's obviously been the USA for the past 30 years and will be for the immediate future, but it's inevitable that sooner or later other powers capable of force projection will become very relevant in the future (Turkey and Russia).

    Replies: @Dmitry

    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me – i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany; created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica; and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia – there won’t be much knowledge about Serbia as a country. I can’t remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries – I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I’m guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Dmitry


    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me – i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany
     
    Well yes, although the reality is that there was much more blood, sweat and tears in this then you could begin to grasp. The outcomes for Serbs and Serbia have been extremely unfavorable though in the past 100+ years, although I guess the reluctant acknowledgement of Republika Srpska's existence in the 1995 Treaty of Dayton by the USA is a sort of recent victory (limited) against Islamic Armies (although it was Croat and NATO military force on the Islamic side that caused the situation to deteriorate for Serb so much and to sign Dayton).

    Serbian society is also strongly divided between fans of Chetniks versus Partisans (there are several permutations of this friction) and nationalists versus liberals (political Croats, crypto-Croats).


    created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica
     
    Lol. I watched a bunch of Emir Kusturica's films and I've never seen one with "dancing Gypsies".

    I believe with "dancing Gypsies" you may be referring to a different, but somewhat well known, movie that was famous during SFR Yugoslavia about Gypsies:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_of_the_Gypsies

    To me it's clear that it was effectively Communist state "brotherhood and unity" of nations propaganda to make people hate Gypsies less for committing violent and petty crime against ethnic Serbs at ridiculous rates.

    At any rate, Kusturica is quite a good filmmaker. He and his ancestors are/were proudly Serbs of the Muslim Faith that had to hide but keep awareness of their Serb identity throughout centuries. Kusturica had to leave the Muslim part of Bosnia because of this and the Islamist SDA party of Alija and his son Bakir Izetbegovic thrashed his home and stole it from him so he now lives in Serbia ever since. He has since then chosen to renounce his Islamic faith and has become a moderately devout Orthodox Christian.


    and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

     

    I would say more like dumb enough.

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia – there won’t be much knowledge about Serbia as a country.

     

    That's because it seems like many non-Balkan people in the world have not fully processed the breakup of Yugoslavia and simply think Serbia = Yugoslavia (which is highly incorrect).

    I'm sure if you referred to NATO aggression against FR Yugoslavia in 1999, most Russians would immediately know what you're talking about.


    I can’t remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries – I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

     

    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia ties in the 19th century and first half of 20th century are quite strong and back then Russia was far more relevant in the Balkans then it is now.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I’m guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it's clear that Chinese are the single largest visiting tourist group to Serbia. Tourists from destinations such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Germany are mostly Serb diaspora. There are also quite a few Turkish tourists that visit as well because many of them are deeply curious about the Balkans/"Rumelia" and it's an important part of their neo-Ottoman mindset. Vucic also made an effort to improve and develop economic and other ties with Turkey so that's partly the result there.

    I wouldn't qualify anything in Serbia besides Belgrade and Novi Sad as "hipster destinations". Chinese, Turkish and Serb diaspora tourists also don't really count to me as "hipsters" either lol.


    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

     

    Well, that's up to them.

    Serbia is unfortunately a land-locked country so there's no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there are still a bunch of nice things to do in hills, mountains and things to see in Serbian towns and cities.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  235. @Dmitry
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me - i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany; created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica; and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia - there won't be much knowledge about Serbia as a country. I can't remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries - I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I'm guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me – i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany

    Well yes, although the reality is that there was much more blood, sweat and tears in this then you could begin to grasp. The outcomes for Serbs and Serbia have been extremely unfavorable though in the past 100+ years, although I guess the reluctant acknowledgement of Republika Srpska’s existence in the 1995 Treaty of Dayton by the USA is a sort of recent victory (limited) against Islamic Armies (although it was Croat and NATO military force on the Islamic side that caused the situation to deteriorate for Serb so much and to sign Dayton).

    Serbian society is also strongly divided between fans of Chetniks versus Partisans (there are several permutations of this friction) and nationalists versus liberals (political Croats, crypto-Croats).

    created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica

    Lol. I watched a bunch of Emir Kusturica’s films and I’ve never seen one with “dancing Gypsies”.

    I believe with “dancing Gypsies” you may be referring to a different, but somewhat well known, movie that was famous during SFR Yugoslavia about Gypsies:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_of_the_Gypsies

    To me it’s clear that it was effectively Communist state “brotherhood and unity” of nations propaganda to make people hate Gypsies less for committing violent and petty crime against ethnic Serbs at ridiculous rates.

    At any rate, Kusturica is quite a good filmmaker. He and his ancestors are/were proudly Serbs of the Muslim Faith that had to hide but keep awareness of their Serb identity throughout centuries. Kusturica had to leave the Muslim part of Bosnia because of this and the Islamist SDA party of Alija and his son Bakir Izetbegovic thrashed his home and stole it from him so he now lives in Serbia ever since. He has since then chosen to renounce his Islamic faith and has become a moderately devout Orthodox Christian.

    and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

    I would say more like dumb enough.

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia – there won’t be much knowledge about Serbia as a country.

    That’s because it seems like many non-Balkan people in the world have not fully processed the breakup of Yugoslavia and simply think Serbia = Yugoslavia (which is highly incorrect).

    I’m sure if you referred to NATO aggression against FR Yugoslavia in 1999, most Russians would immediately know what you’re talking about.

    I can’t remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries – I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia ties in the 19th century and first half of 20th century are quite strong and back then Russia was far more relevant in the Balkans then it is now.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I’m guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it’s clear that Chinese are the single largest visiting tourist group to Serbia. Tourists from destinations such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Germany are mostly Serb diaspora. There are also quite a few Turkish tourists that visit as well because many of them are deeply curious about the Balkans/”Rumelia” and it’s an important part of their neo-Ottoman mindset. Vucic also made an effort to improve and develop economic and other ties with Turkey so that’s partly the result there.

    I wouldn’t qualify anything in Serbia besides Belgrade and Novi Sad as “hipster destinations”. Chinese, Turkish and Serb diaspora tourists also don’t really count to me as “hipsters” either lol.

    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

    Well, that’s up to them.

    Serbia is unfortunately a land-locked country so there’s no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there are still a bunch of nice things to do in hills, mountains and things to see in Serbian towns and cities.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia

     

    Yes Vronsky goes to fight for Serbia in the end of "Anna Karenina" .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it’s clear that Chinese
     

    That's funny that Chinese tourists are already exploring the Balkans, while it seems that Japanese tourists don't go there at all. Chinese are something more adventurous in their choices, than other nationalities.

    Tourism numbers are low though for Serbia, even in normal years like 2019. There is a very low number - 64000 - of Russian tourists... (e.g. it's 24 times lower than Russian tourists in Georgia).

    Of course, from the point of view of the tourist, this is an attractive thing that the numbers are still not high - with lower numbers of tourists, Serbia must be relatively unspoilt by mass tourism, relatively "authentic" as a destination, not turned into too much "Disney land" yet.


    there’s no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there

     

    It has should develop a similar attraction as Georgia, which is now overpopular - cheap food, cheap wine, unique culture, warm summers. And I'd rather go to Serbia than Georgia, not just as Georgia was getting flooded with too many tourists.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

  236. @Jatt Singh
    @Kent Nationalist

    She's mother of the same Sikhs who destroyed your empire and are now pivotal in destroying your race।।

    ਤਾਂ ਸੀਸ ਕੇਸ ਰਖ ਸਿਪਾਹੀ ਕਰਨੇ । ਕਟਿ ਸ਼ਾਸ਼ਤ੍ਰ ਬੰਧਵਾਇ ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਧਰਨੇ ।
    [And the Guru remarked], Adorning [unshorn] hair on your head, you shall be warriors, fastening weapons to your waist, and adopting Singh [Tiger] in your name.

    ਮਾਤਾ ਕਾਲੀ ਦਾ ਬਾਣਾ ਨੀਲਾ ਪਹਿਰਾਵਣਾ ।
    [You shall] wear the blue dress of Mata Kali [The Dark Goddess]

    ਕਰਨਾ ਜੁਧ ਨਾਲਿ ਤੁਰਕਾਂ ਦੇ ਮਾਰਿ ਹਟਾਵਣਾ ।293।
    Conducting war with the Turks you will kill and stop [their tyranny].

    Bansāvalināmā, page 151, verse 292-293

    Aren't you a rotting pensioner whose knowledge of such things comes from Indiana Jones? Why not stick to your expertise on assembly lines and mops/toilet cleaners?

    We don't view good evil as separate as they're part of the same cosmic reality.

    Everything is will of creator.
    All are part of Hari.

    Destroying the oppressive white christian race is righteous।।

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

    You Indians are absolute scum, I find it bemusing why so many whites think Sikhs and Hindus are their allies when they’re utter scum like you in reality. It’s fact that you Indian savages frequently murder Christians, yet most whites don’t believe it they’re so brainwashed about your lot.

    The British empire was far too soft on you Indian filth, if it had done the job properly you disgusting people and your vile “religions” wouldn’t even exist any more, you would be like South America.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Europe Europa

    Why so serious?

    https://youtu.be/TFxmYwaz9aY

    🙂

    , @sher singh
    @Europe Europa

    Yes, because India with 100x the population of both the UK and Americas combined was ever in such a vulnerable position.

    If we frequently murdered Christian(s), then how can you still use that word in the plural sense?

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

  237. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Here's another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 - 1921) that you've presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon today as Russian ethnic territories. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Map_of_Ukraine_%28postcard_1919%29.jpg

    Replies: @Ano4, @AP

    Mr Hack, we are both attached to past glories of our respective Eastern Slav tribes. We value the blood and tears of “our people ” and care about “our lands”. In my case I have ancestors and relatives on both sides of the tribal divide (actually Polish and Ruthenian too).

    We both care, but so also did the Wendat and the Mohawk. Where are they now, how are their lands and their people faring?

    Both Ukraine and Russia are reaching a dangerous threshold in their devolution: center cannot hold. And antagonizing each other only accelerates their demise.

    That is why all these questions about who took what land from each other and how important are linguistic and cultural differences among the Eastern Slav tribes, are non-essential questions. What is essential is the fertility of Eastern Slav women, the capacity of Eastern Slav men to inseminate them and the birth of healthy Eastern Slav children.

    Demographics is destiny

    If nothing changes, in a couple of generations the part of Eurasia where Rus tribes and their ancestors lived for times immemorial, will become a sparsely populated and resources rich territory to be milked by the global TNC, both Western and Chinese. A fraction of surviving Eastern Slav population might well have a decent level of income, but they will be 3 to 5 times less numerous than they would have been if Tsarist Empire survived. After a hundred years of tribulations, a lot is lost and not much gained.

    Was it all worth it?

    I don’t think so…

    Perhaps it is because many years ago I read this book:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.N.U.F.F.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    Your lamenting for a return to the Russian Empire in the 21st century is unrealistic and at best disquieting. The general flow of world history has strongly evolved against this sort of governance. Putinism is as close a you're going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    I wouldn't worry too much about either Ukraine's or Russia's populations being eminently displaced by marauding Asians or by others anytime soon. Both countries (especially Russia) seem to have formidable militaries to protect their borders and interests. Internally, at least as far as Ukraine is concerned, the populations although not increasing satisfactorily are homogenously Slavic as the appeal of migration is not at all uncontrollable.

    It's easy enough for you, a Russian, not to worry much about such mundane topics as "linguistic and cultural matters", but for Ukrainians it's a matter of surviving intact as a nation after centuries of intense Russification. If progeny of Ukrainian descent, born on another continent, can still stick up for their own back home, imagine how intense these feelings must be at the street level in Ukraine where it's a matter of personal pride and survival. I'm quoting AP here, from a comment made above:


    I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia
     
    .

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @AltanBakshi, @Gerard.Gerard

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Ano4


    If nothing changes, in a couple of generations the part of Eurasia where Rus tribes and their ancestors lived for times immemorial, will become a sparsely populated and resources rich territory to be milked by the global TNC, both Western and Chinese.
     
    I used to think you were a more serious thinker when you first came to comment here. :|

    Replies: @Ano4

  238. @Europe Europa
    @Jatt Singh

    You Indians are absolute scum, I find it bemusing why so many whites think Sikhs and Hindus are their allies when they're utter scum like you in reality. It's fact that you Indian savages frequently murder Christians, yet most whites don't believe it they're so brainwashed about your lot.

    The British empire was far too soft on you Indian filth, if it had done the job properly you disgusting people and your vile "religions" wouldn't even exist any more, you would be like South America.

    Replies: @Ano4, @sher singh

    Why so serious?

    🙂

  239. @Europe Europa
    @Jatt Singh

    You Indians are absolute scum, I find it bemusing why so many whites think Sikhs and Hindus are their allies when they're utter scum like you in reality. It's fact that you Indian savages frequently murder Christians, yet most whites don't believe it they're so brainwashed about your lot.

    The British empire was far too soft on you Indian filth, if it had done the job properly you disgusting people and your vile "religions" wouldn't even exist any more, you would be like South America.

    Replies: @Ano4, @sher singh

    Yes, because India with 100x the population of both the UK and Americas combined was ever in such a vulnerable position.

    If we frequently murdered Christian(s), then how can you still use that word in the plural sense?

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

  240. @Dmitry
    @Kent Nationalist

    I assume you are trolling some of the "exotic nationalities" that post here. If you believed in demons, and were scared by such an infantile (albeit gothic) cartoon, that would be leaning towards mental illness. For a small child, or superstitious peasant grandmother in medieval times, it could be normal to be afraid of blue demons that collect human heads, but for an adult man? - symptoms of schizophrenia.

    When I was around 9 years old, I used to draw pictures of things like flying cats or walking trees. The fact I could draw these pictures, does not imply that we have to worry about flying cats and walking trees on the walk to the office. Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind's ability to recombine shapes - "human imagination".

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Hah our mr. edgy Atheist(?) casually diagnoses majority of historical humanity suffering from schizophrenia. Ancient Romans believed that there resided the genii or spirits in their statues depicting emperors and gods, many later Christianized Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.

    For us Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals, a way to make them to feel nearer or closer to us, anyone who has loved ones knows the feelings which will arise when one sees photos of those which we love.

    Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind’s ability to recombine shapes – “human imagination”.

    What else our imagi-nation is than imagined images? Quite maximalist of you to claim that our imagination has no bearing on reality? Or what did you mean? Because your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless it somehow means that all paintings are meaningless and senseless and have no power upon reality? That very much depends on particular individual and how one perceives the reality. I myself try to avoid such universalist claims.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi


    Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.
     
    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time - for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.

    But in the last centuries, what we have observed systematically in the world, follows the laws of physics (or should be reducible to them by bridge laws).

    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.


    Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals

     

    Sure, most would understand these cartoons are symbolic depiction of different emotions, passions and fears - states of consciousness, dreams, art, etc.

    your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless

     

    It doesn't mean that painting is meaningless and senseless. But the fact we can choose to recombine shapes (e.g. blue demon with ten hands; cat with wings; unicorns, etc) in our mind, doesn't imply that those shapes exist outside our mind. Creating such creatures, is a mental ability everyone has since childhood.

    edgy
     
    Perhaps it was "edgy" in 1740s, when Hume published "Of Miracles". "1740s kids" can remember this as a controversial view.

    I.e. That's around 280 years in the past - it's not so edgy today. Our shared reality conforms in lawlike and regular way, without need of interference by demons and fairies.

    To notice the regular and lawlike physical reality, is not to say that we have an explanation for it. A party of the mystery has been shifted onto why we have this lawlike, regular, physical reality.

    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed "miracle" of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi, @Daniel Chieh

  241. @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi

    Bones remind us of death, and what reminds of death brings a feeling of the uncanny and ominous, and revulsion. Ask any children if they want to be all night in a cemetery. Or sleep in a bed of someone who has died? There is a natural feeling of spiritual fear.

    Sinister emotion which surrounds everything to do with death (even the image of the coffin is macabre), is in a sense of discord between our internal feeling of immortality, and the powerless and transitory reality of the life of our friends, family and ourselves.

    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, - and the human skull is a traditional memento mori - is probably healthy for us, especially now, where much of our culture (especially the high level of organization in society which separates dead and dying people into hospitals) has become like the father of the Buddha, who tried to shield his son from knowledge of sickness and death .

    Part of spiritual quality of Gothic cathedrals - the fact they have dead bodies buried into the floor.

    And the depictions of "Danse Macabre" was to remind people to remember the transitoriness and superficiality of their life, and think of something more eternal than their trivial worries of the day.

    https://i.imgur.com/GaS8N5J.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, – and the human skull is a traditional memento mori – is probably healthy for us

    Thats mainly the reason for all the bones and skulls. To be reminded of the mans transient nature. They are not a dominant theme of our temples nor our religion. Also traditionally holy men or priestly caste have been the caretakers of cemeteries or charnel grounds throughout the history. In most cultures at least.

  242. @Jatt Singh
    @AltanBakshi

    You're a fucking Hapa showing your true colours.

    Ma Kali is form of Ma Durga wife of Lord Shiva.

    You're a fake

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    Sad that people here think that you are representative of Sikhism, with your “death to the white race,” postings you sound like a BLM activist both in steroids and meth. You probably belong to one of those strange Hindu-Sikh syncretic sects that try to install Hindu statues in the Gurudwaras. The Akaali Sikhs, the true Khalsa drove you out of their temples long time ago, or maybe you are those odd Vaishnavite Sikh hybrids. Maybe, because for you Vishnu seems to be quite important. True Siks are monotheists and never ever they worship Kali. You very well know the battle cry of Sikhs, Ek Onkar, God is one, God is supreme, a true Sikh puts his faith in thr highest god and knows that only he is the true guide and only he is infallible. Some Sikhs believe that Hindu Gods are aspects of the highest, but still in Sikhism one should never worship individual attributes or aspects of most high one separately, but worship God as an united whole.

    I think you are funny and that you give some Masala spice to the commenting section, but clearly some people take you too seriously and for them you are tarnishing the reputation of the Sikhis.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Troll: sher singh
    • Replies: @sher singh
    @AltanBakshi


    true Khalsa
     
    Not gonna dignify you with a proper response.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJYZaPROYQc
  243. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    Here's another map from roughly the same timeframe (revolutionary war period, 1917 - 1921) that you've presented, that was very similar to the one that I viewed for many years on Saturdays when attending Ukrainian school. It includes not only Kuban, but other areas that clearly would be looked upon today as Russian ethnic territories. I think that back in the day there were a lot of ethnic Ukrainians that also lived in these South Russian lands too (this would explain the very similar genetic structure of both groups in this area too).

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Map_of_Ukraine_%28postcard_1919%29.jpg

    Replies: @Ano4, @AP

    People can create all kinds of maps with claims but the one I posted was of the Brest-Litovsk boundary, which does correspond to ethnic boundaries.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    "People" also includes political hacks and bureaucrats. Look at how this class of "diplomats" redrew the map of the Middle East during this same general period of time? I'm not saying that the map that I presented is useful today as a blueprint for the future, I only included it to show how different perceptions effects the writing of history and the drawing of maps. The area of Kuban had at least a simple majority of Ukrainians living within, that never made the Brest-Litovsk final draft.

  244. Many westerners wrongfully think that Hinduism is an unified tradition, in actuality its just a category for different Indic religions, who share some common religious terminology. Although most Hindu sects do claim that the Vedas are definite and authoritative, in reality later Puranas, different Hindu Sutras and Tantric manuals are much more important for them.

    About 20-25% of Hindus are follower of Shaktism, they unironically believe that God is female or that the most highest absolute creative principle of reality is feminine. For those Shakti Hindus Kali is very important, but for many Hindus she is often just a depiction of destructive and chaotic female energy. We must remember that many Hindus believe that Godhead contains all differents apects of reality, the totality of existence, so by that logic its quite understandable to have a goddess like Kali among other strange gods, like gods or goddesses of pestilence, diseases, wars etc… I mean that its understandable from a pantheistic/panentheistic point of view.

    • Thanks: AP
  245. @AltanBakshi
    @Jatt Singh

    Sad that people here think that you are representative of Sikhism, with your "death to the white race," postings you sound like a BLM activist both in steroids and meth. You probably belong to one of those strange Hindu-Sikh syncretic sects that try to install Hindu statues in the Gurudwaras. The Akaali Sikhs, the true Khalsa drove you out of their temples long time ago, or maybe you are those odd Vaishnavite Sikh hybrids. Maybe, because for you Vishnu seems to be quite important. True Siks are monotheists and never ever they worship Kali. You very well know the battle cry of Sikhs, Ek Onkar, God is one, God is supreme, a true Sikh puts his faith in thr highest god and knows that only he is the true guide and only he is infallible. Some Sikhs believe that Hindu Gods are aspects of the highest, but still in Sikhism one should never worship individual attributes or aspects of most high one separately, but worship God as an united whole.

    I think you are funny and that you give some Masala spice to the commenting section, but clearly some people take you too seriously and for them you are tarnishing the reputation of the Sikhis.

    Replies: @sher singh

    true Khalsa

    Not gonna dignify you with a proper response.

  246. A Chinese expert on cold war, post cold war in the 90s.

    All the wars in eastern Europe, in North Africa, in the middle East. The ones we thought was for the benefit of Israel and Jews. Was in fact for the benefit of the dollar vs euro. The wars effectively killed off euro expansion for 3 decades now.

    Dollar vs Euro formed after both competed fiercely in gobbling up the assets of the collapsed USSR.

    That was a fascinating even with my limited Mandarin. I had to ask my local Chinese restaurant guy for help. Lol. He enjoyed it too.

  247. Congratulations, Serbia.

    I’ve long maintained that religion in places like Serbia is a superficial identity rather than serious piety. A longing for a national identity to set yourself apart from your neighbours. Deep down, the social mores are quite liberal. Even places like Albania are becoming far more open than they were 20-30 years ago.

    Same is true with Turkey, and of course the continued fertility decrease across the Arab world, the increase in women’s representation in their parliaments, higher share of women in universities etc.

    Liberalism’s long march continues unabated.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    Congratulations, Serbia.

     

    LOL.

    I'm glad that people like you so easily fall for Balkanoid PR stunts (although that was extremely bad for Serbs during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War).

    If you don't believe me, Vucic just formed a new parliament and government in Serbia hence why this is even news (just go and take a look at who occupies all the truly important and relevant ministries: men).


    I’ve long maintained that religion in places like Serbia is a superficial identity rather than serious piety. A longing for a national identity to set yourself apart from your neighbours.
     
    Sure bud.

    Tell the Serbs of Republika Srpska that religion and national identity are superficial and see the responses you get. Same for Serbs in Montenegro that are struggling to defend their church and ethnic identity, for Serbs that live in enclaves in Kosovo and Metohija under siege, persecution and terror by Albanians, for Serbs and their descendants that were remorselessly ethnically cleansed from Krajina-Slavonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo and Metohija that now live in Serbia/diaspora and etc. ...

    To universalize tell the same thing to Palestinians, Russians in Donbass, Armenians in Artsakh, etc ...


    Deep down, the social mores are quite liberal.
     
    That might have to do with those "social mores" being violently enforced by Communists/Yugoslavians/Red Croats for 45 years (literally things like imprisonment for going to Church and etc) ...

    Even places like Albania are becoming far more open than they were 20-30 years ago.

     

    At least this is one of the few upsides of the US military and EU dominance over the Balkans in the last 30 years is that Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region. It means they have no future in the long run and a Serb victory in the long run is completely possible if Serbia can survive incoming geopolitical upheavals.

    Liberalism’s long march continues unabated.

     

    You sure about that?

    Are you seriously an un-ironic believer in things like Francis Fukuyama's "End of history" triumph of Liberalism?

    Replies: @Rattus Norwegius

  248. @Jatt Singh
    @Kent Nationalist

    She's mother of the same Sikhs who destroyed your empire and are now pivotal in destroying your race।।

    ਤਾਂ ਸੀਸ ਕੇਸ ਰਖ ਸਿਪਾਹੀ ਕਰਨੇ । ਕਟਿ ਸ਼ਾਸ਼ਤ੍ਰ ਬੰਧਵਾਇ ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਧਰਨੇ ।
    [And the Guru remarked], Adorning [unshorn] hair on your head, you shall be warriors, fastening weapons to your waist, and adopting Singh [Tiger] in your name.

    ਮਾਤਾ ਕਾਲੀ ਦਾ ਬਾਣਾ ਨੀਲਾ ਪਹਿਰਾਵਣਾ ।
    [You shall] wear the blue dress of Mata Kali [The Dark Goddess]

    ਕਰਨਾ ਜੁਧ ਨਾਲਿ ਤੁਰਕਾਂ ਦੇ ਮਾਰਿ ਹਟਾਵਣਾ ।293।
    Conducting war with the Turks you will kill and stop [their tyranny].

    Bansāvalināmā, page 151, verse 292-293

    Aren't you a rotting pensioner whose knowledge of such things comes from Indiana Jones? Why not stick to your expertise on assembly lines and mops/toilet cleaners?

    We don't view good evil as separate as they're part of the same cosmic reality.

    Everything is will of creator.
    All are part of Hari.

    Destroying the oppressive white christian race is righteous।।

    ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕਾਖਾਲਸਾ।।ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂਜੀਕੀਫਤਿਹ।।

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @songbird

    What do you really have against the British?

    That they demonstrated that one Englishman, for the purposes of conquering India, is superior to about 1000 Sikhs? That they effectively conquered the whole place, and Sikhs didn’t have the werewithal to hold it together, even after extensive military tutelage?

    Stop crying like a fag over unrequited love, and conquer Pakistan! BTW, if you did that, you’d still need to do a lot to equal the English! Better get started now! Sikh fertility means that time is running out! And I don’t know if your mulatto children will be up to it!!! (Harris seems to be a whore, rather than a fighter.)

    • Replies: @sher singh
    @songbird

    You're a bad concern troll.
    This is exactly why only the language of replacement and genocide gets through to you||

    Replies: @songbird

  249. @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi

    Bones remind us of death, and what reminds of death brings a feeling of the uncanny and ominous, and revulsion. Ask any children if they want to be all night in a cemetery. Or sleep in a bed of someone who has died? There is a natural feeling of spiritual fear.

    Sinister emotion which surrounds everything to do with death (even the image of the coffin is macabre), is in a sense of discord between our internal feeling of immortality, and the powerless and transitory reality of the life of our friends, family and ourselves.

    Although to be sometimes reminded of death, - and the human skull is a traditional memento mori - is probably healthy for us, especially now, where much of our culture (especially the high level of organization in society which separates dead and dying people into hospitals) has become like the father of the Buddha, who tried to shield his son from knowledge of sickness and death .

    Part of spiritual quality of Gothic cathedrals - the fact they have dead bodies buried into the floor.

    And the depictions of "Danse Macabre" was to remind people to remember the transitoriness and superficiality of their life, and think of something more eternal than their trivial worries of the day.

    https://i.imgur.com/GaS8N5J.jpg

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    I’ve wondered how some of these decorative accretions of skulls and bones are protected from rodents. Maybe, they have armies of cats around?

  250. @songbird
    @Jatt Singh

    What do you really have against the British?

    That they demonstrated that one Englishman, for the purposes of conquering India, is superior to about 1000 Sikhs? That they effectively conquered the whole place, and Sikhs didn't have the werewithal to hold it together, even after extensive military tutelage?

    Stop crying like a fag over unrequited love, and conquer Pakistan! BTW, if you did that, you'd still need to do a lot to equal the English! Better get started now! Sikh fertility means that time is running out! And I don't know if your mulatto children will be up to it!!! (Harris seems to be a whore, rather than a fighter.)

    Replies: @sher singh

    You’re a bad concern troll.
    This is exactly why only the language of replacement and genocide gets through to you||

    • Replies: @songbird
    @sher singh

    I guess you're right: a war on the subcontinent would almost certainly cause many more Indians to flee to the West , rather than return to India to fight for their people and civilization. Will the last Sikh to flee India, please turn the lights out?

  251. @Thulean Friend
    Congratulations, Serbia.

    https://twitter.com/business/status/1320371349894930437

    I've long maintained that religion in places like Serbia is a superficial identity rather than serious piety. A longing for a national identity to set yourself apart from your neighbours. Deep down, the social mores are quite liberal. Even places like Albania are becoming far more open than they were 20-30 years ago.

    Same is true with Turkey, and of course the continued fertility decrease across the Arab world, the increase in women's representation in their parliaments, higher share of women in universities etc.

    Liberalism's long march continues unabated.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Congratulations, Serbia.

    LOL.

    I’m glad that people like you so easily fall for Balkanoid PR stunts (although that was extremely bad for Serbs during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War).

    If you don’t believe me, Vucic just formed a new parliament and government in Serbia hence why this is even news (just go and take a look at who occupies all the truly important and relevant ministries: men).

    I’ve long maintained that religion in places like Serbia is a superficial identity rather than serious piety. A longing for a national identity to set yourself apart from your neighbours.

    Sure bud.

    Tell the Serbs of Republika Srpska that religion and national identity are superficial and see the responses you get. Same for Serbs in Montenegro that are struggling to defend their church and ethnic identity, for Serbs that live in enclaves in Kosovo and Metohija under siege, persecution and terror by Albanians, for Serbs and their descendants that were remorselessly ethnically cleansed from Krajina-Slavonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo and Metohija that now live in Serbia/diaspora and etc. …

    To universalize tell the same thing to Palestinians, Russians in Donbass, Armenians in Artsakh, etc …

    Deep down, the social mores are quite liberal.

    That might have to do with those “social mores” being violently enforced by Communists/Yugoslavians/Red Croats for 45 years (literally things like imprisonment for going to Church and etc) …

    Even places like Albania are becoming far more open than they were 20-30 years ago.

    At least this is one of the few upsides of the US military and EU dominance over the Balkans in the last 30 years is that Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region. It means they have no future in the long run and a Serb victory in the long run is completely possible if Serbia can survive incoming geopolitical upheavals.

    Liberalism’s long march continues unabated.

    You sure about that?

    Are you seriously an un-ironic believer in things like Francis Fukuyama’s “End of history” triumph of Liberalism?

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Rattus Norwegius
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    "Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region."
    The Albanian demographic edge has been diminishing, but to say they are the worst performing group is to exaggerate. Besides, hypothetically if Serbs and Albanians both had a tfr of 1,6, Albanians would still have a stronger demographic profile than Serbs. Since Albanians have more demographic momentum, from past demographic, ie younger population.

    Perhaps in the future, Serbs will perform better demographically than Albanians?

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

  252. @sher singh
    @songbird

    You're a bad concern troll.
    This is exactly why only the language of replacement and genocide gets through to you||

    Replies: @songbird

    I guess you’re right: a war on the subcontinent would almost certainly cause many more Indians to flee to the West , rather than return to India to fight for their people and civilization. Will the last Sikh to flee India, please turn the lights out?

    • Agree: Jatt Singh
  253. @Ano4
    @Mr. Hack

    Mr Hack, we are both attached to past glories of our respective Eastern Slav tribes. We value the blood and tears of "our people " and care about "our lands". In my case I have ancestors and relatives on both sides of the tribal divide (actually Polish and Ruthenian too).

    We both care, but so also did the Wendat and the Mohawk. Where are they now, how are their lands and their people faring?

    Both Ukraine and Russia are reaching a dangerous threshold in their devolution: center cannot hold. And antagonizing each other only accelerates their demise.

    That is why all these questions about who took what land from each other and how important are linguistic and cultural differences among the Eastern Slav tribes, are non-essential questions. What is essential is the fertility of Eastern Slav women, the capacity of Eastern Slav men to inseminate them and the birth of healthy Eastern Slav children.

    Demographics is destiny

    If nothing changes, in a couple of generations the part of Eurasia where Rus tribes and their ancestors lived for times immemorial, will become a sparsely populated and resources rich territory to be milked by the global TNC, both Western and Chinese. A fraction of surviving Eastern Slav population might well have a decent level of income, but they will be 3 to 5 times less numerous than they would have been if Tsarist Empire survived. After a hundred years of tribulations, a lot is lost and not much gained.

    Was it all worth it?

    I don't think so...

    Perhaps it is because many years ago I read this book:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.N.U.F.F.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Anatoly Karlin

    Your lamenting for a return to the Russian Empire in the 21st century is unrealistic and at best disquieting. The general flow of world history has strongly evolved against this sort of governance. Putinism is as close a you’re going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    I wouldn’t worry too much about either Ukraine’s or Russia’s populations being eminently displaced by marauding Asians or by others anytime soon. Both countries (especially Russia) seem to have formidable militaries to protect their borders and interests. Internally, at least as far as Ukraine is concerned, the populations although not increasing satisfactorily are homogenously Slavic as the appeal of migration is not at all uncontrollable.

    It’s easy enough for you, a Russian, not to worry much about such mundane topics as “linguistic and cultural matters”, but for Ukrainians it’s a matter of surviving intact as a nation after centuries of intense Russification. If progeny of Ukrainian descent, born on another continent, can still stick up for their own back home, imagine how intense these feelings must be at the street level in Ukraine where it’s a matter of personal pride and survival. I’m quoting AP here, from a comment made above:

    I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia

    .

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    Putinism is as close a you’re going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.
     
    Whatever faults the reigning dynasty have, at least under their rule the Korean race and ethnos will last indefinitely, which is better than can be said for South Korea.

    The same goes for DDR vis-à-vis BRD as to the fate of the German ethnos.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I know I should avoid your bait but all real life Ukrainians, I have met, have been politically tired and apathetic, like "all politicians and parties are just thieves and scoundrels." Outside of far right fringe most people on the street level in Ukraine dont share your sentiments, why else the majority in Kiev, Odessa, Harkov and Dnepro continue to speak Russian. I dont claim that those people are not patriotic, not at all, but clearly they do not fear for the survival of the Ukrainian culture. If they would truly fear for it, then they would switch to Ukrainian language.
    Yes for majority of Ukrainians most important thing in life is daily economical struggle. Thats also is behind the success ofc Euromaidan, not the supposed inherent fear of the Russia. Most Ukrainians just wanted better quality of life and desired to leave their failed Soviet past behind. Often when there are successful major societal changes, its a sum of many different groups and movements, who can have very different visions and goals.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Gerard.Gerard
    @Mr. Hack

    The failed faked sh*thole state of Ukraine is going from one farce and disaster to another as the (again placebo) effect from voting in Zelensky and his Potemkin party has collapsed, recession this year going to be twice as bad as Russia's and Belarus and Armenia .... with the added shame of this toxic waste site of a state now doing an advisory referendum on allowing use of cannibis on the same piece of paper as some other far more essential issues.........

    but you want to waste time indulging in pseudo-history?

    Here is the real history.... Stalin is Ukraine, Lenin is Ukraine, Putin is messiah of Ukraine, Chernobyl is GREAT legacy of Ukraine, collectivisation is beautiful Ukraine, Chikatilo is moral conscience of modern Ukrainian state.

  254. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    Your lamenting for a return to the Russian Empire in the 21st century is unrealistic and at best disquieting. The general flow of world history has strongly evolved against this sort of governance. Putinism is as close a you're going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    I wouldn't worry too much about either Ukraine's or Russia's populations being eminently displaced by marauding Asians or by others anytime soon. Both countries (especially Russia) seem to have formidable militaries to protect their borders and interests. Internally, at least as far as Ukraine is concerned, the populations although not increasing satisfactorily are homogenously Slavic as the appeal of migration is not at all uncontrollable.

    It's easy enough for you, a Russian, not to worry much about such mundane topics as "linguistic and cultural matters", but for Ukrainians it's a matter of surviving intact as a nation after centuries of intense Russification. If progeny of Ukrainian descent, born on another continent, can still stick up for their own back home, imagine how intense these feelings must be at the street level in Ukraine where it's a matter of personal pride and survival. I'm quoting AP here, from a comment made above:


    I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia
     
    .

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @AltanBakshi, @Gerard.Gerard

    Putinism is as close a you’re going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    Whatever faults the reigning dynasty have, at least under their rule the Korean race and ethnos will last indefinitely, which is better than can be said for South Korea.

    The same goes for DDR vis-à-vis BRD as to the fate of the German ethnos.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    What's the point of an ethnos if you're trapped in a dirty, poor and backward shithole? Eventually, you will be swallowed up by more successful countries. And not necessarily militarily as much as culturally. It's not a coincidence that US culture dominates most of the world.

    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you're even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point. True independence in this world is a mirage for vast majority of peoples, including the North Koreans. Only a tiny selection of states can afford that luxury and most of them are multicultural anyway (US, India and to a significant degree Russia). China is the sole outlier.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  255. @Hyperborean
    @Mr. Hack


    Putinism is as close a you’re going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.
     
    Whatever faults the reigning dynasty have, at least under their rule the Korean race and ethnos will last indefinitely, which is better than can be said for South Korea.

    The same goes for DDR vis-à-vis BRD as to the fate of the German ethnos.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    What’s the point of an ethnos if you’re trapped in a dirty, poor and backward shithole? Eventually, you will be swallowed up by more successful countries. And not necessarily militarily as much as culturally. It’s not a coincidence that US culture dominates most of the world.

    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you’re even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point. True independence in this world is a mirage for vast majority of peoples, including the North Koreans. Only a tiny selection of states can afford that luxury and most of them are multicultural anyway (US, India and to a significant degree Russia). China is the sole outlier.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Thulean Friend


    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you’re even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point.
     
    I think it proves the opposite. Despite their geopolitical dependence on the PRC the DPRK is capable of retaining strategic autonomy and importantly despite their junior status remains ethno-racially and culturally unchanged.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  256. Chile has voted for a new constitution replacing the old Pinochet-imposed one, which made them into feudal labrats. Next year, a new constitutonal assembly will be voted in – a clean slate of people who will write the next one from scratch.

    What impressed me was the role of Chilean women, demanding (and successfully getting) a 50% women quota guarantee for next year’s constitutional assembly. By contrast, the old and oppressive constitution was purely written by manoids (typical). Liberalism’s march continues unabated.

    • Replies: @Jaakko Raipala
    @Thulean Friend

    You can't be serious. The "role" of women in these "movements" funded by American billionaires and the deep state is to be actors.

    Chile will go from a poor country to an even poorer country while it is looted by the West under the cloak of progressivism. Reforming any small, weak country under the era of the American empire since any reform will just be engineered by some American oligarch faction for its own benefit. Chileans will eventually find out that their natural resources and industries belong to American oligarchs and a small set of local collaborators.

    Of course there will be a whole bunch of propaganda about it is amazing progress for women or People of Color or whatever that a few of them will get filthy rich while selling out their country and given that people are dumb they will initially be impressed with the hope that they'll all get wealthy. When that fails to happen, people will get angry over the deception and rebel against the people who got rich out of the previous reform - but the Americans will already have invented some other recipe for "reform" and "progress" and they'll restart the cycle with a new set of opportunists and a new set of gullible masses.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    By this point in time, isn't it clear that constitutions are meaningless?

    Or, do you think progressive constitutions offer some unique advantage? A base-level of progressiveness that can be moralistically exceeded, but which will never fall short? That is, that you can guarantee a feminist society, whatever women decide to do legalistically, with their power.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Mikel
    @Thulean Friend


    Chile has voted for a new constitution
    .../...
    Liberalism’s march continues unabated.
     
    Please stop making big geopolitical inferences from whatever Chileans vote.

    I lived almost a dozen years in Chile through 3 different periods of my life and all the Chilean case demonstrates is that democracy doesn't really work very well when important decisions are made by a lower 90s-upper 80s-IQ population.

    In the past 20+ years Chileans have been alternating their presidential preferences in a manic-depressive way between only two candidates: Bachelet and Piñera. At the end of each's mandate they ended up fed up with the incumbent and elected the other one. They don't seem to know what they really want.

    Essentially, they are more or less trying to become a 1st World country but are deeply sunk in the middle-income trap and unable to accept that economic growth does not translate into a Scandinavian type of social equality. However, equality has never existed in Chile and they will never achieve it, short of another Communist experiment.

    For some curious reason, the descendants of impoverished European immigrants that arrived in Chile during the middle of the 20th Century with literally nothing after the wars now belong to the economic and academic elite of the country, much to the resentment of the Mestizo majority.

    Still, many poor but down-to-earth people continue supporting dictator Pinochet's legacy to this day. They just believe what they saw with their own eyes. Conversely, and not unlike what happens in the West, many of those fighting for "equality" are elite Euro-Chileans.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  257. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Thulean Friend


    Congratulations, Serbia.

     

    LOL.

    I'm glad that people like you so easily fall for Balkanoid PR stunts (although that was extremely bad for Serbs during the 1992-1995 Bosnian War).

    If you don't believe me, Vucic just formed a new parliament and government in Serbia hence why this is even news (just go and take a look at who occupies all the truly important and relevant ministries: men).


    I’ve long maintained that religion in places like Serbia is a superficial identity rather than serious piety. A longing for a national identity to set yourself apart from your neighbours.
     
    Sure bud.

    Tell the Serbs of Republika Srpska that religion and national identity are superficial and see the responses you get. Same for Serbs in Montenegro that are struggling to defend their church and ethnic identity, for Serbs that live in enclaves in Kosovo and Metohija under siege, persecution and terror by Albanians, for Serbs and their descendants that were remorselessly ethnically cleansed from Krajina-Slavonia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo and Metohija that now live in Serbia/diaspora and etc. ...

    To universalize tell the same thing to Palestinians, Russians in Donbass, Armenians in Artsakh, etc ...


    Deep down, the social mores are quite liberal.
     
    That might have to do with those "social mores" being violently enforced by Communists/Yugoslavians/Red Croats for 45 years (literally things like imprisonment for going to Church and etc) ...

    Even places like Albania are becoming far more open than they were 20-30 years ago.

     

    At least this is one of the few upsides of the US military and EU dominance over the Balkans in the last 30 years is that Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region. It means they have no future in the long run and a Serb victory in the long run is completely possible if Serbia can survive incoming geopolitical upheavals.

    Liberalism’s long march continues unabated.

     

    You sure about that?

    Are you seriously an un-ironic believer in things like Francis Fukuyama's "End of history" triumph of Liberalism?

    Replies: @Rattus Norwegius

    “Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region.”
    The Albanian demographic edge has been diminishing, but to say they are the worst performing group is to exaggerate. Besides, hypothetically if Serbs and Albanians both had a tfr of 1,6, Albanians would still have a stronger demographic profile than Serbs. Since Albanians have more demographic momentum, from past demographic, ie younger population.

    Perhaps in the future, Serbs will perform better demographically than Albanians?

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Rattus Norwegius


    Perhaps in the future, Serbs will perform better demographically than Albanians?

     

    Definitely.

    The potential strongly exists there on the Serb side.

    Albanians also fudge their demographic statistics to a ridiculous degree by claiming that 1.8 million people live in Kosovo (LOL). Just one of many examples.
  258. @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    What's the point of an ethnos if you're trapped in a dirty, poor and backward shithole? Eventually, you will be swallowed up by more successful countries. And not necessarily militarily as much as culturally. It's not a coincidence that US culture dominates most of the world.

    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you're even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point. True independence in this world is a mirage for vast majority of peoples, including the North Koreans. Only a tiny selection of states can afford that luxury and most of them are multicultural anyway (US, India and to a significant degree Russia). China is the sole outlier.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you’re even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point.

    I think it proves the opposite. Despite their geopolitical dependence on the PRC the DPRK is capable of retaining strategic autonomy and importantly despite their junior status remains ethno-racially and culturally unchanged.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    That is not because of their own efforts. It's simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.

    In other words, it is not despite but because of their reliance on Beijing that they can get away with it. The illusion of sovereignty is hard to shake for romantics.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  259. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Penned a piece suggesting that blaming Russia/Russians for Communism is legit on account of no strong Russian anti-Communist movement. Not true for several decades following the end of the Russian Civil War. As time progressed, the newer generations born outside Russia became prone to losing some of that zest, while often times marrying another ethnicity.

    Another matter had to do with anti-Russian/anti-Communist groups likely to be better received by folks connected with NGO type of aid. This holds true to this day. Some nasty anti-Russian/non-Russian nationalist types have found some headway in such instances (Soros included), as pro-Russian/anti-Communist stances don't get the same outside support.

    Really curious about that Chumachenko photo you posted. Were that someone of a Russian nationalist variant, in that salute pose and armband, who became the spouse of a high ranking Russian official, the Ioffes and Gessens would be going bonkers.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @TheTotallyAnonymous, @Philip Owen

    The failed emancipation of the serfs left a large part of the rural population living in communes. Accepting Bolshevism was not so difficult.

  260. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    Your lamenting for a return to the Russian Empire in the 21st century is unrealistic and at best disquieting. The general flow of world history has strongly evolved against this sort of governance. Putinism is as close a you're going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    I wouldn't worry too much about either Ukraine's or Russia's populations being eminently displaced by marauding Asians or by others anytime soon. Both countries (especially Russia) seem to have formidable militaries to protect their borders and interests. Internally, at least as far as Ukraine is concerned, the populations although not increasing satisfactorily are homogenously Slavic as the appeal of migration is not at all uncontrollable.

    It's easy enough for you, a Russian, not to worry much about such mundane topics as "linguistic and cultural matters", but for Ukrainians it's a matter of surviving intact as a nation after centuries of intense Russification. If progeny of Ukrainian descent, born on another continent, can still stick up for their own back home, imagine how intense these feelings must be at the street level in Ukraine where it's a matter of personal pride and survival. I'm quoting AP here, from a comment made above:


    I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia
     
    .

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @AltanBakshi, @Gerard.Gerard

    I know I should avoid your bait but all real life Ukrainians, I have met, have been politically tired and apathetic, like “all politicians and parties are just thieves and scoundrels.” Outside of far right fringe most people on the street level in Ukraine dont share your sentiments, why else the majority in Kiev, Odessa, Harkov and Dnepro continue to speak Russian. I dont claim that those people are not patriotic, not at all, but clearly they do not fear for the survival of the Ukrainian culture. If they would truly fear for it, then they would switch to Ukrainian language.
    Yes for majority of Ukrainians most important thing in life is daily economical struggle. Thats also is behind the success ofc Euromaidan, not the supposed inherent fear of the Russia. Most Ukrainians just wanted better quality of life and desired to leave their failed Soviet past behind. Often when there are successful major societal changes, its a sum of many different groups and movements, who can have very different visions and goals.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Plenty of people that I heard in Kyiv, from the center Podil area to outlying ones like Kurenivka, do indeed speak in Ukrainian. Have you ever been in Kyiv and heard what languages the people speak, or are you getting your information second hand? As of 2019:

    On the left of the image you can see the general answers to the question “Which language is your native language?” The results are the following:

    Central Ukraine:
    83.8% – Ukrainian
    10.1% – Both Ukrainian and Russian
    5.8% – Russian

    Every year, especially after the Crimea rip-off and war in Donbas, Ukrainian language usage has increased in Kyiv. It's only a short matter of time before the Kyivans more resemble the entire Central Ukrainian population.
    https://www.ukrainianlessons.com/language-situation/

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi

  261. @Hyperborean
    @Thulean Friend


    North Korea can only hold out for so long, if you’re even willing to be that generous. After all, they are already highly dependent on Beijing, which sort of proves my point.
     
    I think it proves the opposite. Despite their geopolitical dependence on the PRC the DPRK is capable of retaining strategic autonomy and importantly despite their junior status remains ethno-racially and culturally unchanged.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    That is not because of their own efforts. It’s simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.

    In other words, it is not despite but because of their reliance on Beijing that they can get away with it. The illusion of sovereignty is hard to shake for romantics.

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Thulean Friend


    That is not because of their own efforts. It’s simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.
     
    Assuming for the sake of the argument that this is true, if American power is weakening relative to China's then North Korea's position with regards to domestic nationalism should be improving and be less willing to cave, considering that they didn't collapse even during the worst years of the 1990s.

    Or is the expectation that China will undergo Peaceful Evolution and thereafter turn against the DPRK?

    Replies: @Astuteobservor II

  262. @Mr. Hack
    @AP


    Let them each resettle to where they belong; this has already been happening.
     
    But herein is where part of the problem lies. Donbas was originally settles by Ukrainians'. Great Russian settlement into the area occurred later. In the countryside today, Ukrainians still constitute the majority.

    Replies: @AP, @Philip Owen

    At first it was the Wild Lands with not enough surface water to supply draught animals for agriculture. Cossacks and Jews were pushed out onto this less valuable land. Some Cossacks mined coal to make poor quality iron. Then, wind pumps came and large landowners settled Little Russian peasants, not so many in the South East. Also Germans, Greeks, more Jews and other foreigners. When John Hughes arrived, he could not hire enough workers because the landlords refused to let go of those peasants wo were serfs. So he hired workers from St Petersburg and Ekatrinburg. They filled the towns but not the countryside. The independent coal companies mostly hired Russiansm even more than Hughes, so Gorlivka was Russian and White during the Civil War.

    They are the last large proleteriat in Europe. They impose solidarity on each other. The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.

    • Thanks: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Philip Owen


    The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.
     
    You know Philip, I usually truly value your input at this blog, but in this case, I think that you're way off (kindly put, a pile of BS).

    So, am I to believe that the movement that was hatched during the EuroMaidan has been silenced? Has Ms, Nuland lured them all to the US with a freshly baked batch of cookies and milk? :-)

    https://youtu.be/-nNFrvGOb9o
    Ukrainian resolve to form their own nation-state only grows stronger every year.

    Replies: @Philip Owen

  263. @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I know I should avoid your bait but all real life Ukrainians, I have met, have been politically tired and apathetic, like "all politicians and parties are just thieves and scoundrels." Outside of far right fringe most people on the street level in Ukraine dont share your sentiments, why else the majority in Kiev, Odessa, Harkov and Dnepro continue to speak Russian. I dont claim that those people are not patriotic, not at all, but clearly they do not fear for the survival of the Ukrainian culture. If they would truly fear for it, then they would switch to Ukrainian language.
    Yes for majority of Ukrainians most important thing in life is daily economical struggle. Thats also is behind the success ofc Euromaidan, not the supposed inherent fear of the Russia. Most Ukrainians just wanted better quality of life and desired to leave their failed Soviet past behind. Often when there are successful major societal changes, its a sum of many different groups and movements, who can have very different visions and goals.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Plenty of people that I heard in Kyiv, from the center Podil area to outlying ones like Kurenivka, do indeed speak in Ukrainian. Have you ever been in Kyiv and heard what languages the people speak, or are you getting your information second hand? As of 2019:

    On the left of the image you can see the general answers to the question “Which language is your native language?” The results are the following:

    Central Ukraine:
    83.8% – Ukrainian
    10.1% – Both Ukrainian and Russian
    5.8% – Russian

    Every year, especially after the Crimea rip-off and war in Donbas, Ukrainian language usage has increased in Kyiv. It’s only a short matter of time before the Kyivans more resemble the entire Central Ukrainian population.
    https://www.ukrainianlessons.com/language-situation/

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    I was in in Kiev last time in 2017. One does indeed hear Ukrainian in the streets but it is clearly a minority language there- I’d guess around 1 in 10 speakers one hears, speak Ukrainian; maybe it’s even 20%, but no more than that. Of course over 90% are capable of speaking proper Ukrainian and will usually happily do so if addressed in that language. Street signs and announcements in the metro are in Ukrainian.

    In a lot of surveys patriotic Russian-speaking Ukrainians will say that Ukrainian is their native language, they support pro-Ukrainian language policies, and they can speak Ukrainian, but with their friends they will still more likely speak Russian. Most of Kiev’s people are like this.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Mr. Hack

    I was there in 2011 and I almost never heard anyone speaking in Ukrainian. Not in restaurants, shopping malls, nightclubs etc. Bad that I didnt visit any local rynok, maybe there some peasants would have spoken in Ukrainian. But LvOv was a totally different story.

  264. @Philip Owen
    @Mr. Hack

    At first it was the Wild Lands with not enough surface water to supply draught animals for agriculture. Cossacks and Jews were pushed out onto this less valuable land. Some Cossacks mined coal to make poor quality iron. Then, wind pumps came and large landowners settled Little Russian peasants, not so many in the South East. Also Germans, Greeks, more Jews and other foreigners. When John Hughes arrived, he could not hire enough workers because the landlords refused to let go of those peasants wo were serfs. So he hired workers from St Petersburg and Ekatrinburg. They filled the towns but not the countryside. The independent coal companies mostly hired Russiansm even more than Hughes, so Gorlivka was Russian and White during the Civil War.

    They are the last large proleteriat in Europe. They impose solidarity on each other. The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.

    You know Philip, I usually truly value your input at this blog, but in this case, I think that you’re way off (kindly put, a pile of BS).

    So, am I to believe that the movement that was hatched during the EuroMaidan has been silenced? Has Ms, Nuland lured them all to the US with a freshly baked batch of cookies and milk? 🙂

    Ukrainian resolve to form their own nation-state only grows stronger every year.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    @Mr. Hack

    I am talking about those in the Donbass cities not the whole of Ukraine which has obviously consoldiated its identity.

    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.

    https://images.app.goo.gl/ktkkQYHsW2d7XVZY6

    Replies: @Hyperborean

  265. I wonder when and where this system will be first implemented?

    Will it make any real difference to the efficiency Eurasian transport networks?

  266. @Mr. Hack
    @Philip Owen


    The pro Ukrainians have left or been silenced.
     
    You know Philip, I usually truly value your input at this blog, but in this case, I think that you're way off (kindly put, a pile of BS).

    So, am I to believe that the movement that was hatched during the EuroMaidan has been silenced? Has Ms, Nuland lured them all to the US with a freshly baked batch of cookies and milk? :-)

    https://youtu.be/-nNFrvGOb9o
    Ukrainian resolve to form their own nation-state only grows stronger every year.

    Replies: @Philip Owen

    I am talking about those in the Donbass cities not the whole of Ukraine which has obviously consoldiated its identity.

    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.

    https://images.app.goo.gl/ktkkQYHsW2d7XVZY6

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Philip Owen


    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.
     
    This is a fictional Axis Victory map.

    The real Reichkommissariat Ukraine's borders were not even further east of UkSSR borders, but further west.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Reichskommissariat_Ukraine_%281942%29.svg/1280px-Reichskommissariat_Ukraine_%281942%29.svg.png

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6d/Reichskommissariat-Ukraine.jpg/1280px-Reichskommissariat-Ukraine.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Reichskommissariat_Moskowia.svg/1280px-Reichskommissariat_Moskowia.svg.png

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

  267. @Mr. Hack
    @Ano4

    Your lamenting for a return to the Russian Empire in the 21st century is unrealistic and at best disquieting. The general flow of world history has strongly evolved against this sort of governance. Putinism is as close a you're going to get to this sort of thing, are you satisfied? It could be worse, it could have been somebody as vapid as Kim Jong-un.

    I wouldn't worry too much about either Ukraine's or Russia's populations being eminently displaced by marauding Asians or by others anytime soon. Both countries (especially Russia) seem to have formidable militaries to protect their borders and interests. Internally, at least as far as Ukraine is concerned, the populations although not increasing satisfactorily are homogenously Slavic as the appeal of migration is not at all uncontrollable.

    It's easy enough for you, a Russian, not to worry much about such mundane topics as "linguistic and cultural matters", but for Ukrainians it's a matter of surviving intact as a nation after centuries of intense Russification. If progeny of Ukrainian descent, born on another continent, can still stick up for their own back home, imagine how intense these feelings must be at the street level in Ukraine where it's a matter of personal pride and survival. I'm quoting AP here, from a comment made above:


    I do appreciate my forefathers’ traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia
     
    .

    Replies: @Hyperborean, @AltanBakshi, @Gerard.Gerard

    The failed faked sh*thole state of Ukraine is going from one farce and disaster to another as the (again placebo) effect from voting in Zelensky and his Potemkin party has collapsed, recession this year going to be twice as bad as Russia’s and Belarus and Armenia …. with the added shame of this toxic waste site of a state now doing an advisory referendum on allowing use of cannibis on the same piece of paper as some other far more essential issues………

    but you want to waste time indulging in pseudo-history?

    Here is the real history…. Stalin is Ukraine, Lenin is Ukraine, Putin is messiah of Ukraine, Chernobyl is GREAT legacy of Ukraine, collectivisation is beautiful Ukraine, Chikatilo is moral conscience of modern Ukrainian state.

    • Troll: Mr. Hack
  268. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Plenty of people that I heard in Kyiv, from the center Podil area to outlying ones like Kurenivka, do indeed speak in Ukrainian. Have you ever been in Kyiv and heard what languages the people speak, or are you getting your information second hand? As of 2019:

    On the left of the image you can see the general answers to the question “Which language is your native language?” The results are the following:

    Central Ukraine:
    83.8% – Ukrainian
    10.1% – Both Ukrainian and Russian
    5.8% – Russian

    Every year, especially after the Crimea rip-off and war in Donbas, Ukrainian language usage has increased in Kyiv. It's only a short matter of time before the Kyivans more resemble the entire Central Ukrainian population.
    https://www.ukrainianlessons.com/language-situation/

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi

    I was in in Kiev last time in 2017. One does indeed hear Ukrainian in the streets but it is clearly a minority language there- I’d guess around 1 in 10 speakers one hears, speak Ukrainian; maybe it’s even 20%, but no more than that. Of course over 90% are capable of speaking proper Ukrainian and will usually happily do so if addressed in that language. Street signs and announcements in the metro are in Ukrainian.

    In a lot of surveys patriotic Russian-speaking Ukrainians will say that Ukrainian is their native language, they support pro-Ukrainian language policies, and they can speak Ukrainian, but with their friends they will still more likely speak Russian. Most of Kiev’s people are like this.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    10% to 20% is quite a spread. Perhaps, it's 30% or even more?..I agree with the bulk of your observations though. I have a first cousin that lives in Kyiv who I stay with when I'm there. She holds a good position with a Ukrainian artistic cultural organization there, and speaks to her co-workers and neighbors usually in Russian. She tries to avoid this archaic habit when I'm around. :-)

    Kyiv is a very large city, and I've only really spent time in the center and in Kurenivka (where Ukrainian is heard a lot more than Russian). I haven't been back for a few years, but would think that with the large influx of Western Ukrainians, the language preference has to be improving for the native tongue. Have you spent any time in the environs away from the Center in Kyiv?

    Replies: @AP

  269. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    People can create all kinds of maps with claims but the one I posted was of the Brest-Litovsk boundary, which does correspond to ethnic boundaries.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    “People” also includes political hacks and bureaucrats. Look at how this class of “diplomats” redrew the map of the Middle East during this same general period of time? I’m not saying that the map that I presented is useful today as a blueprint for the future, I only included it to show how different perceptions effects the writing of history and the drawing of maps. The area of Kuban had at least a simple majority of Ukrainians living within, that never made the Brest-Litovsk final draft.

  270. @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Plenty of people that I heard in Kyiv, from the center Podil area to outlying ones like Kurenivka, do indeed speak in Ukrainian. Have you ever been in Kyiv and heard what languages the people speak, or are you getting your information second hand? As of 2019:

    On the left of the image you can see the general answers to the question “Which language is your native language?” The results are the following:

    Central Ukraine:
    83.8% – Ukrainian
    10.1% – Both Ukrainian and Russian
    5.8% – Russian

    Every year, especially after the Crimea rip-off and war in Donbas, Ukrainian language usage has increased in Kyiv. It's only a short matter of time before the Kyivans more resemble the entire Central Ukrainian population.
    https://www.ukrainianlessons.com/language-situation/

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi

    I was there in 2011 and I almost never heard anyone speaking in Ukrainian. Not in restaurants, shopping malls, nightclubs etc. Bad that I didnt visit any local rynok, maybe there some peasants would have spoken in Ukrainian. But LvOv was a totally different story.

  271. @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    That is not because of their own efforts. It's simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.

    In other words, it is not despite but because of their reliance on Beijing that they can get away with it. The illusion of sovereignty is hard to shake for romantics.

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    That is not because of their own efforts. It’s simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.

    Assuming for the sake of the argument that this is true, if American power is weakening relative to China’s then North Korea’s position with regards to domestic nationalism should be improving and be less willing to cave, considering that they didn’t collapse even during the worst years of the 1990s.

    Or is the expectation that China will undergo Peaceful Evolution and thereafter turn against the DPRK?

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    @Hyperborean

    Well, he thinks DPRK is a subcolonial tributary state of China.

    That tells you everything you need to know regarding his opinion on this. Utterly worthless imo.

  272. @Philip Owen
    @Mr. Hack

    I am talking about those in the Donbass cities not the whole of Ukraine which has obviously consoldiated its identity.

    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.

    https://images.app.goo.gl/ktkkQYHsW2d7XVZY6

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.

    This is a fictional Axis Victory map.

    The real Reichkommissariat Ukraine’s borders were not even further east of UkSSR borders, but further west.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    Your maps here are 100% accurate. Thanks for sharing them with us.

    , @Philip Owen
    @Hyperborean

    I know but even today there are Little Russian speaking villages in western Saratov. I have been to two. The 1891 census map shows the whole of the western part of Saratov as Little Russian and the centre as a mix of Little Russian and German. Really, there were Ukrainians across the whole Black Earth. Muscovites belong to the forest! :-)

  273. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    I was in in Kiev last time in 2017. One does indeed hear Ukrainian in the streets but it is clearly a minority language there- I’d guess around 1 in 10 speakers one hears, speak Ukrainian; maybe it’s even 20%, but no more than that. Of course over 90% are capable of speaking proper Ukrainian and will usually happily do so if addressed in that language. Street signs and announcements in the metro are in Ukrainian.

    In a lot of surveys patriotic Russian-speaking Ukrainians will say that Ukrainian is their native language, they support pro-Ukrainian language policies, and they can speak Ukrainian, but with their friends they will still more likely speak Russian. Most of Kiev’s people are like this.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    10% to 20% is quite a spread. Perhaps, it’s 30% or even more?..I agree with the bulk of your observations though. I have a first cousin that lives in Kyiv who I stay with when I’m there. She holds a good position with a Ukrainian artistic cultural organization there, and speaks to her co-workers and neighbors usually in Russian. She tries to avoid this archaic habit when I’m around. 🙂

    Kyiv is a very large city, and I’ve only really spent time in the center and in Kurenivka (where Ukrainian is heard a lot more than Russian). I haven’t been back for a few years, but would think that with the large influx of Western Ukrainians, the language preference has to be improving for the native tongue. Have you spent any time in the environs away from the Center in Kyiv?

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    I stay with a cousin on the edge of the urban part of the city. She came there from a neighboring oblast and speaks Ukrainian; her husband is a native of the city and spoke Russian but switched over after marrying her. Both are patriots and I guess they decided if anyone is going to change it will be the Russian-speaking one.

    Most people who move to Kiev do not do so from the West but from neighboring central Ukrainian oblasts. Westerners are probably matched by easterners.

    10% to 20% Ukrainian-language usage is more realistic than 30%; no way 1 in 3 of the people one hears in the city speaks Ukrainian naturally.

    I haven’t visited nightclubs in Kiev. But walking the streets one does hear Ukrainian occasionally. I had a taxi driver who was speaking Ukrainian on his phone while driving. People bringing food into the city to markets speak Ukrainian. Etc. IUkrainian speech is uncommon, but definitely present in the city.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  274. @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    10% to 20% is quite a spread. Perhaps, it's 30% or even more?..I agree with the bulk of your observations though. I have a first cousin that lives in Kyiv who I stay with when I'm there. She holds a good position with a Ukrainian artistic cultural organization there, and speaks to her co-workers and neighbors usually in Russian. She tries to avoid this archaic habit when I'm around. :-)

    Kyiv is a very large city, and I've only really spent time in the center and in Kurenivka (where Ukrainian is heard a lot more than Russian). I haven't been back for a few years, but would think that with the large influx of Western Ukrainians, the language preference has to be improving for the native tongue. Have you spent any time in the environs away from the Center in Kyiv?

    Replies: @AP

    I stay with a cousin on the edge of the urban part of the city. She came there from a neighboring oblast and speaks Ukrainian; her husband is a native of the city and spoke Russian but switched over after marrying her. Both are patriots and I guess they decided if anyone is going to change it will be the Russian-speaking one.

    Most people who move to Kiev do not do so from the West but from neighboring central Ukrainian oblasts. Westerners are probably matched by easterners.

    10% to 20% Ukrainian-language usage is more realistic than 30%; no way 1 in 3 of the people one hears in the city speaks Ukrainian naturally.

    I haven’t visited nightclubs in Kiev. But walking the streets one does hear Ukrainian occasionally. I had a taxi driver who was speaking Ukrainian on his phone while driving. People bringing food into the city to markets speak Ukrainian. Etc. IUkrainian speech is uncommon, but definitely present in the city.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AP

    I'm unable to find any concrete data regarding Kyiv's language usage and patterns. Since you've been back more recently that I, I'll defer to your better judgement.

  275. @AP
    @AltanBakshi


    I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline
     
    A reasonable position. If I were Russian I would opt want Ukraine to join NATO either. However recent events have pushed Ukrainians into wanting to join. Ideally Ukraine would have a strong deterrent on its own, without NATO.

    and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles.
     
    This has been my position for a long time. Donbas has provided coal and hard currency for Ukraine, but has been toxic politically and culturally. It isn't worth keeping it.

    I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception?
     
    Most do, out of a sense of outrage that Russia helped remove "our" territory. But this is a short-sighted and stupid idea. Why add millions of voters who are hostile or indifferent to the Ukrainian idea to the Ukrainian state? What good comes of that? Why does Ukraine need that? They will be miserable and troublesome, and the rest of Ukraine will suffer with their presence. Without Donbas there would never have been a Yanukovich presidency in the first place.

    Also, there is a mistaken belief by any Russians that a person from Ukraine who considers themselves a Ukrainian (rather than a Russian) is a Ukrainian nationalist by definition. I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.



    Without being a nationalist, I do appreciate my forefathers' traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia.

    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic?
     
    Yes, I do, but it seems sort of profane to share such details of personal faith. I do pray and until COVID I attended church weekly. Our services are like Orthodox ones, liturgy is song by both choir and parishioners, there is incense, candles, etc. which I think heighten the connection. I find it harder to pray in Roman Catholic churches, they seem more sterile to me. But I also feel it in nature.

    I try to be Christlike in my behavior towards others but of course fall short as do we all. There is a competitive, video-game quality in on-line squabbles and relationships which is okay, but I am gentler IRL.

    In my family there was a tradition since the 17th century of the oldest son being a priest (our family were priests, merchants, and military officers). This was broken when we came to America after World War II, otherwise my uncle would have been the 16th. My great-grandfather and all the way down the line were priests with noble background (which meant that they didn't worry about persecution or trouble from Poles):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Ukrainian_clergy

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.

    I couldn’t agree more, nationalism and classical liberalism are just less virulent and aggressive forms of modern vices. Difference between classical liberalism and progressive one is like a difference between HIV and Aids, or so I like to think. Who knows maybe in the longer run Communism will be a healthier choice than the current far left liberalism?

  276. @Ano4
    @AltanBakshi


    the guy who spoke those things was an Indian man over a thousand years ago in China.
     
    In the first text where he was mentioned, Bodhidharma was described as a "Parasika", only later has the story of him being "the son of a King from the southern India" been added.



    If we look at the historical circumstances in the fifth century AD when he supposedly travelled to China (Hephtalite Mithraist and Persian Zoroastrian persecution of the Central Asian Buddhism), the fact that he was described as a "Tripitaka master" (therefore a translator of Buddhist texts) in one of the earliest Ch'an texts found in Dunhuang and that he supposedly went back home through Tianshan mountains, we might come to the conclusion that he was most probably a Central Asian.

    Chittamatras believe that everything is mind, not in solipsistic way, but that all things exist only in relation to mind and mental faculties. For Chittamatras mind is ultimately real.
     
    In the earliest Ch'an Anthology found in Dunhuang and in the Treatise of Bodhidhama translated from the Chinese by Red Pine (which I used for the citation in the comment above), Mind is the Ultimate Reality that a human consciousness mightexperience. This Mind is not personal, it is not limited by anything and it pervades the whole Universe. There is nothing beyond it. But, in the Ch'an Anthology it is also clearly stated that whatever the attempt to the objectification of this Mind, this attempt would only be a failed "vision in a dream". Therefore, to avoid their disciples falling into the solipsistic contemplation of their own consciousness, later Chinese Ch'an masters used the famous saying: "Mind is not mind, we just call it such".

    Maybe Bodhidharma didnt spoke against worshipping of Buddhas but against superstitious and mechanic idol worshipping.
     
    Yes, he mentioned this in his treatise: ignorant people believe that they will be liberated through painting Stupas in different colors, giving flowers and burning incense in front of the statues of Buddhas and Bodhisattvas. This might increase their merit, but this will not bring them to the Awakening and Liberation. Only witnessing the true nature of the Mind will ultimately bring them to the Other Shore.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

    For some reason I always thought that Bodhidharma was from Southern India and that he travelled from India to China by sea route.

  277. @AltanBakshi
    @Dmitry

    Hah our mr. edgy Atheist(?) casually diagnoses majority of historical humanity suffering from schizophrenia. Ancient Romans believed that there resided the genii or spirits in their statues depicting emperors and gods, many later Christianized Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.

    For us Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals, a way to make them to feel nearer or closer to us, anyone who has loved ones knows the feelings which will arise when one sees photos of those which we love.


    Such cartoons are not evidence of real things, but of the mind’s ability to recombine shapes – “human imagination”.
     
    What else our imagi-nation is than imagined images? Quite maximalist of you to claim that our imagination has no bearing on reality? Or what did you mean? Because your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless it somehow means that all paintings are meaningless and senseless and have no power upon reality? That very much depends on particular individual and how one perceives the reality. I myself try to avoid such universalist claims.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.

    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time – for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.

    But in the last centuries, what we have observed systematically in the world, follows the laws of physics (or should be reducible to them by bridge laws).

    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.

    Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals

    Sure, most would understand these cartoons are symbolic depiction of different emotions, passions and fears – states of consciousness, dreams, art, etc.

    your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless

    It doesn’t mean that painting is meaningless and senseless. But the fact we can choose to recombine shapes (e.g. blue demon with ten hands; cat with wings; unicorns, etc) in our mind, doesn’t imply that those shapes exist outside our mind. Creating such creatures, is a mental ability everyone has since childhood.

    edgy

    Perhaps it was “edgy” in 1740s, when Hume published “Of Miracles”. “1740s kids” can remember this as a controversial view.

    I.e. That’s around 280 years in the past – it’s not so edgy today. Our shared reality conforms in lawlike and regular way, without need of interference by demons and fairies.

    To notice the regular and lawlike physical reality, is not to say that we have an explanation for it. A party of the mystery has been shifted onto why we have this lawlike, regular, physical reality.

    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed “miracle” of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself

    • Troll: sher singh
    • Replies: @AP
    @Dmitry


    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time – for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.
     
    Such pride in one's naivety.

    Of course demons exist.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/07/01/as-a-psychiatrist-i-diagnose-mental-illness-and-sometimes-demonic-possession/

    However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.
     
    Hubris is the belief that reality is limited to the systematic observations of advanced apes and particularly by laws derived from them by their advanced ape brains and that everything in that reality must be contained within those laws. The scientific method is merely a great tool (the best one we know of now) to enable us to manipulate the physical world. You think too much of it.

    One of my favorite passages by Musil, who knew something of science:



    Science smiling into its beard, or first full-dress encounter with Evil

    A few words must now be said about a smile, a masculine smile at that, with a beard attached to it, whereby the general activity of smiling in one’s sleeve was transposed into the masculine one of smiling into one’s beard. It was the smiling of the men of science and learning who had accepted Diotima’s invitation and were listening to the celebrated men of the arts. Although they smiled, it must on no account whatever be believed that they did so ironically. On the contrary, it was their way of expressing homage and incompetence, a matter that has already been mentioned. But one must not let oneself be deceived by that either. It was true enough where their conscious mind was concerned; yet in their subconscious—to make use of this customary word—or, to put it more exactly, in the sum total of their being, they were people in whom a propensity to Evil crackled like the fire under a cauldron.

    Now that, of course, looks like a paradoxical remark, and any professor at a university, if it were made in his presence, would presumably retort that he simply serves the cause of truth and progress and has no other concerns: for that is his professional ideology. But all professional ideologies are high-minded. Hunters, for instance, would not dream of calling themselves the butchers of the woods; they prefer to call themselves the real friends of animals and Nature, just as business men uphold the principle of fair profit, and the god that thieves also take for their own is the business men’s god, that distinguished promotor of international concord, Mercury. So not much importance need be attached to the way an activity is mirrored in the consciousness of those who practise it.

    If one asks oneself in an unprejudiced way how science came to have its present-day aspect (which is in itself important, since after all it dominates us, not even an illiterate being safe from it, because he learns to live together with countless things that are born of science) one gets a quite different picture. According to credible traditions it was in the sixteenth century, an age of very intense spiritual emotions, that people gradually ceased trying, as they had been trying all through two thousand years of religious and philosophic speculation, to penetrate into the secrets of Nature, and instead contented themselves, in a way that can only be called superficial, with investigations of its surface. The great Galileo, who is always the first to be mentioned in this connection, did away with the problem, for instance, of the intrinsic reasons why Nature abhors a vacuum, so that it will cause a falling body to enter into and occupy space after space until it finally comes to rest on solid ground, and contented himself with a much more general observation: he simply established the speed at which such a body falls, what course it takes, what time it takes, and what its rate of acceleration is. The Catholic Church made a grave mistake in threatening this man with death and forcing him to recant, instead of exterminating him without more ado. For from his way of looking at things, and that of those whose outlook was similar, there sprang—in almost no time at all, if one applies historical measurements—railway time-tables, factory machines, physiological psychology, and the moral ruin of the present age, against which the Church no longer stands a chance. It probably made this mistake from an excess of shrewdness, for Galileo was, after all, not only the discoverer of the law of gravitation and of the earth’s motion, but also an inventor in whom, as one would put it today, high finance took an interest; and he was, besides, not the only one at that time seized by the new spirit. On the contrary, the historical reports show that the matter-offactness that inspired him spread and raged like an infection. And however disconcerting it may sound today to speak of anyone’s being inspired with matter-of-factness, when we think we have too much of it already, at that time the awakening out of metaphysics to clear-cut scrutiny of things must, to judge by all the evidence, have been an out-and-out intoxication, a very fire of matter-of-factness!

    But if one asks oneself why humanity took it into its head to change in this manner, the answer is that all it was doing was what every sensible child does when it has tried to walk too soon: it sat down on the ground, making the contact with a dependable and not really dignified part of the body, in other words, precisely the part on which one does sit. And the remarkable thing is that the earth has shown itself uncommonly susceptible, and since that contact took place has let inventions, conveniences and discoveries be wormed out of it in downright miraculous quantities.

    After such a history one might think, and not quite without justification, it was the miracle of the Anti-Christ that we find ourselves in the midst of now. For the ‘contact’ simile that has just been used is to be interpreted with reference not only to the dependability of the part of the body that is involved, but also to its aspect of the unseemly and taboo. The point is, before intellectual man discovered his delight in facts, the only people who had such a delight were warriors, hunters and merchants, that is to say, the people whose nature it was to be cunning and violent. In the struggle for existence there are no philosophical sentimentalities, but only the wish to kill off one’s opponent by the shortest and most practical method. There everyone is a positivist. Nor would it be a virtue, in commerce, to let oneself be taken in instead of putting one’s trust in solid facts, profit being in the last resort a psychological vanquishing of one’s opponent, arising out of the particular circumstances. However, if one investigates what qualities it is that lead to discoveries, what one finds is freedom from traditional scruples and inhibitions, courage, as much initiative as destructive spirit, the exclusion of moral considerations, patient bargaining for the smallest advantage, dogged endurance on the way to the goal, if necessary, and a veneration for measure and number amounting to the most acute mistrust of all uncertainty; in other words, one sees nothing but the old hunter’s, soldier’s and merchant’s vices, simply transposed into intellectual terms and re-interpreted as virtues. And though by this means they are raised above the urge for personal and comparatively vulgar advantage, yet the element of primal Evil, as it might be called, is something they do not lose even in undergoing this trans formation. It is apparently indestructible and eternal, or at least as eternal as everything humanly sublime, since it consists in nothing less, nothing other, than the pleasure of tripping that sublimity up and watching it fall flat on its face. Who does not know the malicious temptation—when contemplating a beautifully glazed vase, all voluptuous curves— that lies in the thought that one could smash it to smithereens with a single blow of one’s stick? Intensified into the heroically bitter realisation that one cannot rely on anything in life except what is clinched and riveted, it is a basic emotion enclosed within the soberness of science, and even if, for reasons of respect, one does not want to call it the Devil, the fact remains that it brings with it a faint whiff of brimstone.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @AltanBakshi
    @Dmitry

    Theres nothing edgy in Scientific Materialism, but to claim that majority of historical humanity suffered schizophrenia, thats quite edgy. Or do you claim that it wasnt common for people to proscribe magical properties to their idols or fetishes? Many people still do so outside of first world countries.


    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.
     
    We deny the existence of soul, there is nothing separate, fixed or having its own essence in nature by our reasoning.

    As I have stated before, most Buddhists dont believe that mental factors, matter or energy will ever perish, they just change form, as we deny permanence of phenomena so do we deny the possible permanent annihilation of phenomena. All changes, nothing disappears.

    You are probably the first one in my life who takes "ten handed" beings literally

    https://previews.123rf.com/images/dymov/dymov1611/dymov161100027/68692877-with-thousand-arms-a-bodkhisattva-of-an-avalokiteshvara-the-statue-made-of-bronze-.jpg

    Here is the Thousand armed Avalokiteshvara, he also has eyes in his every hand. Now do we take this depiction literally? Hell No! Avalokiteshvaras hands symbolises his immense compassion, that he will strive to help every being by every possible way, eyes in hands symbolises that his actions are always vigilant and conscious, that he sees the suffering of all beings and understands the chains of causality which have led being to a such suffering state of existence. That he always sees the best ways to help beings. Now do we claim that Avalokiteshvara is his own independent being? Of course not! By meditating on him and his good qualities, by giving respect to those immensely good attributes of his we try to awaken our own compassion, our own mirror like nature that reflects everything in universe. In other words depends on a Buddhist, you can take him more literally (especially if you are a poor farmer or a nomad, but even they dont take literally his depictions) or you can take him as a meditational deity, a goal to attain. By doing Avalokiteshvara practices and by meditating on him, we can gradually change ourselves to resemble him. But taking him absolutely or very literally and thinking that somewhere there is a guy with thousand hands and eyes is just silly!

    Same with the third eye, no learned Buddhist takes it literally, it just means that our mind also has a way to see and discern things.


    The question of different possible realities? This only good argument that you have. Yes I have no first hand knowledge about them. I simply put my trust in Buddha, everything that he has told amd taught oncerning the nature of mundane existence and nature of our mind has been personally true for me, so I have myself seen and experienced his wisdom regarding those before mentioned things, I simply believe him to be a trustworthy person. He taught that there are causes and conditions for our current state of existence, and if there are such causes and conditions they can be discerned and analyzed. Changed and transformed, bychanging them we change ourselves and the reality. Its simple as that. Actually there are very well done instructions how one can themselves perceive those other states or modes of existence, but one needs years of practice for that.


    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed “miracle” of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself
     
    Maybe unstable universes are not very good for sustaining life? Simple as that. I dont understand why you bring miracles to this discussion? There is nothing miraculous in the Buddhas power, he is an object of mind for us, his power does not manifest miraculously, but by our own deeds and thoughts.

    Replies: @Mikel

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Dmitry

    You are quite behind on your scientific knowledge.

  278. @AP
    @AltanBakshi


    I now understand better the reasons and motivations of Ukrainians desire for an independent nation and I am not anymore categorically against the independent Ukraine. Still no to Nato, thats the redline
     
    A reasonable position. If I were Russian I would opt want Ukraine to join NATO either. However recent events have pushed Ukrainians into wanting to join. Ideally Ukraine would have a strong deterrent on its own, without NATO.

    and shouldnt Ukraine just give up on Donbass, those people have suffered enough, its not even a gift to Russia, repairing everything there is going to take trillions of rubles.
     
    This has been my position for a long time. Donbas has provided coal and hard currency for Ukraine, but has been toxic politically and culturally. It isn't worth keeping it.

    I have understood that most or all Ukrainian nationalists want to keep Donbass, and that you AP are an exception?
     
    Most do, out of a sense of outrage that Russia helped remove "our" territory. But this is a short-sighted and stupid idea. Why add millions of voters who are hostile or indifferent to the Ukrainian idea to the Ukrainian state? What good comes of that? Why does Ukraine need that? They will be miserable and troublesome, and the rest of Ukraine will suffer with their presence. Without Donbas there would never have been a Yanukovich presidency in the first place.

    Also, there is a mistaken belief by any Russians that a person from Ukraine who considers themselves a Ukrainian (rather than a Russian) is a Ukrainian nationalist by definition. I consider nationalism, like other modern idolatries, to be an evil. It is not as bad as Communism because it is older and somewhat more rooted in tradition, but it is still bad. In a conflict between nationalists and Communists I will choose the nationalists. But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.



    Without being a nationalist, I do appreciate my forefathers' traditions, language, and culture and would not want them to be snuffed out, I support their development. With respect to Ukraine vs. Russia, I would not want the unique culture and traditions of Little Russia/Ukraine to disappear and be snuffed out, like that of Novgorod, and for there to only exist Muscovy/Great Russia.

    By the way AP, if I can ask, do you really believe in Christ, like Christ as saviour and stuff, because you seem quite silent on that, except just expressing that you are an Uniate Catholic?
     
    Yes, I do, but it seems sort of profane to share such details of personal faith. I do pray and until COVID I attended church weekly. Our services are like Orthodox ones, liturgy is song by both choir and parishioners, there is incense, candles, etc. which I think heighten the connection. I find it harder to pray in Roman Catholic churches, they seem more sterile to me. But I also feel it in nature.

    I try to be Christlike in my behavior towards others but of course fall short as do we all. There is a competitive, video-game quality in on-line squabbles and relationships which is okay, but I am gentler IRL.

    In my family there was a tradition since the 17th century of the oldest son being a priest (our family were priests, merchants, and military officers). This was broken when we came to America after World War II, otherwise my uncle would have been the 16th. My great-grandfather and all the way down the line were priests with noble background (which meant that they didn't worry about persecution or trouble from Poles):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Ukrainian_clergy

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @songbird

    But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.

    I’m a critic of this idea.

    [MORE]

    The major belligerents were all multi-ethnic empires. Started with Austria-Hungary – arguably the most multicult empire in Europe. Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans – where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?

    What allowed it to spread and continue was international alliances. The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French. And the case against Russia seems even stronger. Germany with the Turks! England with the Japs! These alliances seem to have been elite-driven, rather than the result of organic populism.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories. Most of these were not contiguous, but quite foreign in character, filled with completely alien peoples – land in sub-Saharan Africa, or the Middle East.

    Can we say that nationalism caused the war? On what basis? What is our control? That Europe isn’t fighting a fratricidal war today? Let’s not be facetious. Empires with ethnic cores are all that existed back then – it was the state of organization back then. International communism had not yet claimed Russia. We have no control. The claim that nationalism caused WWI appears to me to be unscientific and often politically-motivated.

    Can we blame it on Serb nationalism? Well, Ireland had many rebellions, but never caused an international war (though foreign troops were sometimes landed in it), so I don’t think that is reasonable. Probably, no power thought that they could take Ireland and integrate it into multicultural empire, without England’s okay (which they would not give.)

    How do I explain WWI? Elite dysfunction. Predicated on the political units of the day – the elite of Europe (meaning a broad spectrum of the upper classes) existed in separate, unintegrated spheres. (Even though, they had many internationalist tendencies, such as monarchs being avaricious of having new, nonwhite subjects.) They were effectively proto-globalists. Just as today (we must be parsimonious) – they had a very poor ability to forecast the future and to think about long term consequences (today: immigration). Their thinking was short-term, during a technological period, when industrialization allowed for unprecedented escalation. Indeed, one of the motivations for early Russian mobilization was that it was a less developed country than Germany and would take longer to mobilize.

    Again, to put it into today’s context, now the elite are united in a common, integrated sphere – real globalization – but still pursuing a cataclysmically short-sighted policy: mass immigration. The technology of today has made escalation in immigration possible on a scale completely unthinkable in 1945 (the start of de-Nazification), just as the technology of 1914 made escalation in war possible at an unthinkable pace in 1914.

    • Agree: TheTotallyAnonymous
    • Replies: @AP
    @songbird


    Started with Austria-Hungary – arguably the most multicult empire in Europe.
     
    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity (nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism, less ugly than what came later such as Communism, Nazism, or modern hedonism-consumerism only because it is older than those) whom the nationalists sought to destroy. The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

    Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans – where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?
     
    These Africans and Indians are irrelevant because they are not the ones who chose war. The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism. The monarchs (neither Willie and Nicky wanted world war) were powerless, they were swept along.

    The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French.
     
    Russia went to war out of nationalism using pan-Slavism, France out of nationalist resentment towards Germany for the lost war and territories, Germany out of its own nationalism, etc.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories.
     
    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations. They will die and kill for the sake of their nations. Since I'm pasting beloved passages here is a great one from Celine:



    It’s the philosophers . . . another point to look out for while we’re at it … who first started giving the people ideas . . , when all they’d known up until then was the catechism! They began, so they proclaimed, to educate the people . . . Ah! What truths they had to reveal! Beautiful! brilliant! unprecedented truths! And the people were dazzled! That’s it! they said. That’s the stuff! Let’s go and die for it! The people are always dying to die! That’s the way they are! ‘Long live Diderot!’ they yelled. And ‘Long live Voltaire!’ ….And long live everybody! Those guys at least don’t let the beloved people molder in ignorance and fetishism! They show the people the roads of Freedom! Emancipation! Things went fast after that! First teach everybody to read the papers! That’s the way to salvation! Hurry hurry! No more illiterates! We don’t need them anymore! Nothing but citizen-soldiers! Who vote! Who read! And who fight! And who march! And send kisses from the front! In no time the people were good and ripe! The enthusiasm of the liberated has to be good for something, doesn’t it? Danton wasn’t eloquent for the hell of it. With a few phrases, so rousing that we can still hear them today, he had the people mobilized before you could say fiddlesticks! That was when the first battalions of emancipated maniacs marched off! … the first voting, flagmatic suckers that Dumouriez led away to get themselves drilled full of holes in Flanders!… The free-gratis soldier . . . was something really new … So new that when Goethe arrived in Valmy… he was flabbergasted. At the sight of those ragged, impassioned cohorts, who had come of their own free will to get themselves disemboweled by the King of Prussia in defense of a patriotic fiction no one had ever heard of, Goethe realized that he still had much to learn. This day,’ he declaimed grandiloquently as befitted the habits of his genius, ‘marks the beginning of a new era!’ He could say that again! The system proved successful . . . pretty soon they were mass-producing heroes, and in the end, the system was so well perfected that they cost practically nothing. Everyone was delighted. Bismarck, the two Napoleons, Barrès, Elsa the Horsewoman. The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes. In olden times the fanatical fashion was: ‘Long live Jesus! Burn the heretics!’ . . . But heretics, after all, were few and voluntary . . . Whereas today vast hordes of men are fired with aim and purpose by cries of: ‘Hang the limp turnips! The juiceless lemons! The innocent readers! By the millions, eyes right!’ … Let whole legions of them perish, turn into smidgens, bleed, smolder in acid—and all that to make the Patrie more beloved, more fair, and more joyful! ”

    Replies: @songbird, @TheTotallyAnonymous

    , @Europe Europa
    @songbird


    What allowed it to spread and continue was international alliances. The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French.
     
    England is a bit of a mystery ethnically, some claim the English are basically completely Anglo-Saxon/Germanic with a bit of Norman admixture, while I've seen other studies that claim most of the English are indigenous to Britain and the basic ethnic makeup of England has not changed for 8,000 years, and the Anglo-Saxons just imposed their culture and language on the indigenous British.

    There's similar disagreement on the English language too, some claim it shows no evidence of Celtic influence whatsoever, while others claim it shows clear evidence of being based on a Celtic substratum, especially grammatically.

    Replies: @AP, @songbird

  279. @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    I appreciate your stance and ability to clearly articulate your preferences. As you point out, some modern art is accessible and interesting, and other is not. I too find a lot of the "way out" avant guard like what Pollock represents in painting or Sun Rae does to jazz music to be too grating to enjoy.

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela, @Hyperborean

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist,

    Interesting. I know and like his music…….possibly Herbie Hancock is at the same level in “cutting edge” and creativity? Maybe the main creativity for Hancock comes from him on the keyboard but for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with.

    Though I have to say much of modern jazz is not for me….of the modern performers I prefer stuff that has much simpler goals – the intelligent and skillful reworking on jazz standards by somebody as Diana Krall is more to my liking.

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Gerard-Mandela

    I think Hancock's playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles' second great quintet - before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.

    For example, he would just play only right hand, and making stepwise shapes on different scales - "time no changes".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cobdJpv3Ynk


    Corea it is

     

    Have you tried his album "Solo Piano: Portraits"?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the "father of jazz", and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn't quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tVuClh03bk

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard-Mandela

    Chick & Herbie both rose together through the ranks and spent good quality time working with Miles Davis. Both were hugely influential in the "fusion" movement. I like them both very much, but because, as you so cogently put it "for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with" that he truly excels and I'd have to give a slight nod to Corea for overall importance and impact. I especially like Corea's work within the Latin jazz segment of the genre too.

    It's good to see that you seem to have at least part of your head screwed on correctly! :-)

  280. @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Dmitry


    From the little I see about Serbia, it seems somehow attractive to me – i.e. people who lazily defeated Islamic armies; partisans against Nazi Germany
     
    Well yes, although the reality is that there was much more blood, sweat and tears in this then you could begin to grasp. The outcomes for Serbs and Serbia have been extremely unfavorable though in the past 100+ years, although I guess the reluctant acknowledgement of Republika Srpska's existence in the 1995 Treaty of Dayton by the USA is a sort of recent victory (limited) against Islamic Armies (although it was Croat and NATO military force on the Islamic side that caused the situation to deteriorate for Serb so much and to sign Dayton).

    Serbian society is also strongly divided between fans of Chetniks versus Partisans (there are several permutations of this friction) and nationalists versus liberals (political Croats, crypto-Croats).


    created films with dancing gypsies like Emir Kusturica
     
    Lol. I watched a bunch of Emir Kusturica's films and I've never seen one with "dancing Gypsies".

    I believe with "dancing Gypsies" you may be referring to a different, but somewhat well known, movie that was famous during SFR Yugoslavia about Gypsies:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_of_the_Gypsies

    To me it's clear that it was effectively Communist state "brotherhood and unity" of nations propaganda to make people hate Gypsies less for committing violent and petty crime against ethnic Serbs at ridiculous rates.

    At any rate, Kusturica is quite a good filmmaker. He and his ancestors are/were proudly Serbs of the Muslim Faith that had to hide but keep awareness of their Serb identity throughout centuries. Kusturica had to leave the Muslim part of Bosnia because of this and the Islamist SDA party of Alija and his son Bakir Izetbegovic thrashed his home and stole it from him so he now lives in Serbia ever since. He has since then chosen to renounce his Islamic faith and has become a moderately devout Orthodox Christian.


    and were crazy enough to build New Belgrade (which now looks like ancient shipwrecks from the future).

     

    I would say more like dumb enough.

    In terms of 21st century educated people in Russia – there won’t be much knowledge about Serbia as a country.

     

    That's because it seems like many non-Balkan people in the world have not fully processed the breakup of Yugoslavia and simply think Serbia = Yugoslavia (which is highly incorrect).

    I'm sure if you referred to NATO aggression against FR Yugoslavia in 1999, most Russians would immediately know what you're talking about.


    I can’t remember learning about Serbia at school (perhaps through reading Tolstoy). And we had hours of history class about many other countries – I remember even a class about 17th century Netherlands.

     

    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia ties in the 19th century and first half of 20th century are quite strong and back then Russia was far more relevant in the Balkans then it is now.

    But Serbia started to become fashionable with tourists from Russia. I wonder what kind of Russian (or other nationality) tourists are now arriving in Serbia? I’m guessing it will be a kind of hipster destination.

     

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it's clear that Chinese are the single largest visiting tourist group to Serbia. Tourists from destinations such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Germany are mostly Serb diaspora. There are also quite a few Turkish tourists that visit as well because many of them are deeply curious about the Balkans/"Rumelia" and it's an important part of their neo-Ottoman mindset. Vucic also made an effort to improve and develop economic and other ties with Turkey so that's partly the result there.

    I wouldn't qualify anything in Serbia besides Belgrade and Novi Sad as "hipster destinations". Chinese, Turkish and Serb diaspora tourists also don't really count to me as "hipsters" either lol.


    My parents visited Bulgaria for a vacation last year and seemed to like it. Perhaps they will want to visit Serbia as a next vacation into the Balkans.

     

    Well, that's up to them.

    Serbia is unfortunately a land-locked country so there's no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there are still a bunch of nice things to do in hills, mountains and things to see in Serbian towns and cities.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia

    Yes Vronsky goes to fight for Serbia in the end of “Anna Karenina” .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it’s clear that Chinese

    That’s funny that Chinese tourists are already exploring the Balkans, while it seems that Japanese tourists don’t go there at all. Chinese are something more adventurous in their choices, than other nationalities.

    Tourism numbers are low though for Serbia, even in normal years like 2019. There is a very low number – 64000 – of Russian tourists… (e.g. it’s 24 times lower than Russian tourists in Georgia).

    Of course, from the point of view of the tourist, this is an attractive thing that the numbers are still not high – with lower numbers of tourists, Serbia must be relatively unspoilt by mass tourism, relatively “authentic” as a destination, not turned into too much “Disney land” yet.

    there’s no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there

    It has should develop a similar attraction as Georgia, which is now overpopular – cheap food, cheap wine, unique culture, warm summers. And I’d rather go to Serbia than Georgia, not just as Georgia was getting flooded with too many tourists.

    • Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @Dmitry

    You seem to be some sort of tourism expert. I'm clearly not.

    I think a part of the reason why Serbia has low tourism numbers is, apart from the fact that it's landlocked, it also has a "bad" or "pariah" country reputation because of the wars of the 1990's and breakup of Yugoslavia.

    Although many Serbs are a bunch of cucks that are desperate not to be judged and disliked by foreigners (pretending not to be Serbs, saying they're something else besides Serbs or complementary or just giving up being Serbs all together etc.) because of garbage like "Srebrenica Genocide", "Bosnian Genocide", "Kosovo oppression" etc. I think this is sort of a good thing personally because income from tourism is overrated (especially now with lockdowns and corona).

  281. AP says:
    @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi


    Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.
     
    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time - for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.

    But in the last centuries, what we have observed systematically in the world, follows the laws of physics (or should be reducible to them by bridge laws).

    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.


    Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals

     

    Sure, most would understand these cartoons are symbolic depiction of different emotions, passions and fears - states of consciousness, dreams, art, etc.

    your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless

     

    It doesn't mean that painting is meaningless and senseless. But the fact we can choose to recombine shapes (e.g. blue demon with ten hands; cat with wings; unicorns, etc) in our mind, doesn't imply that those shapes exist outside our mind. Creating such creatures, is a mental ability everyone has since childhood.

    edgy
     
    Perhaps it was "edgy" in 1740s, when Hume published "Of Miracles". "1740s kids" can remember this as a controversial view.

    I.e. That's around 280 years in the past - it's not so edgy today. Our shared reality conforms in lawlike and regular way, without need of interference by demons and fairies.

    To notice the regular and lawlike physical reality, is not to say that we have an explanation for it. A party of the mystery has been shifted onto why we have this lawlike, regular, physical reality.

    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed "miracle" of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi, @Daniel Chieh

    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time – for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.

    Such pride in one’s naivety.

    Of course demons exist.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/07/01/as-a-psychiatrist-i-diagnose-mental-illness-and-sometimes-demonic-possession/

    However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.

    Hubris is the belief that reality is limited to the systematic observations of advanced apes and particularly by laws derived from them by their advanced ape brains and that everything in that reality must be contained within those laws. The scientific method is merely a great tool (the best one we know of now) to enable us to manipulate the physical world. You think too much of it.

    One of my favorite passages by Musil, who knew something of science:

    [MORE]

    Science smiling into its beard, or first full-dress encounter with Evil

    A few words must now be said about a smile, a masculine smile at that, with a beard attached to it, whereby the general activity of smiling in one’s sleeve was transposed into the masculine one of smiling into one’s beard. It was the smiling of the men of science and learning who had accepted Diotima’s invitation and were listening to the celebrated men of the arts. Although they smiled, it must on no account whatever be believed that they did so ironically. On the contrary, it was their way of expressing homage and incompetence, a matter that has already been mentioned. But one must not let oneself be deceived by that either. It was true enough where their conscious mind was concerned; yet in their subconscious—to make use of this customary word—or, to put it more exactly, in the sum total of their being, they were people in whom a propensity to Evil crackled like the fire under a cauldron.

    Now that, of course, looks like a paradoxical remark, and any professor at a university, if it were made in his presence, would presumably retort that he simply serves the cause of truth and progress and has no other concerns: for that is his professional ideology. But all professional ideologies are high-minded. Hunters, for instance, would not dream of calling themselves the butchers of the woods; they prefer to call themselves the real friends of animals and Nature, just as business men uphold the principle of fair profit, and the god that thieves also take for their own is the business men’s god, that distinguished promotor of international concord, Mercury. So not much importance need be attached to the way an activity is mirrored in the consciousness of those who practise it.

    If one asks oneself in an unprejudiced way how science came to have its present-day aspect (which is in itself important, since after all it dominates us, not even an illiterate being safe from it, because he learns to live together with countless things that are born of science) one gets a quite different picture. According to credible traditions it was in the sixteenth century, an age of very intense spiritual emotions, that people gradually ceased trying, as they had been trying all through two thousand years of religious and philosophic speculation, to penetrate into the secrets of Nature, and instead contented themselves, in a way that can only be called superficial, with investigations of its surface. The great Galileo, who is always the first to be mentioned in this connection, did away with the problem, for instance, of the intrinsic reasons why Nature abhors a vacuum, so that it will cause a falling body to enter into and occupy space after space until it finally comes to rest on solid ground, and contented himself with a much more general observation: he simply established the speed at which such a body falls, what course it takes, what time it takes, and what its rate of acceleration is. The Catholic Church made a grave mistake in threatening this man with death and forcing him to recant, instead of exterminating him without more ado. For from his way of looking at things, and that of those whose outlook was similar, there sprang—in almost no time at all, if one applies historical measurements—railway time-tables, factory machines, physiological psychology, and the moral ruin of the present age, against which the Church no longer stands a chance. It probably made this mistake from an excess of shrewdness, for Galileo was, after all, not only the discoverer of the law of gravitation and of the earth’s motion, but also an inventor in whom, as one would put it today, high finance took an interest; and he was, besides, not the only one at that time seized by the new spirit. On the contrary, the historical reports show that the matter-offactness that inspired him spread and raged like an infection. And however disconcerting it may sound today to speak of anyone’s being inspired with matter-of-factness, when we think we have too much of it already, at that time the awakening out of metaphysics to clear-cut scrutiny of things must, to judge by all the evidence, have been an out-and-out intoxication, a very fire of matter-of-factness!

    But if one asks oneself why humanity took it into its head to change in this manner, the answer is that all it was doing was what every sensible child does when it has tried to walk too soon: it sat down on the ground, making the contact with a dependable and not really dignified part of the body, in other words, precisely the part on which one does sit. And the remarkable thing is that the earth has shown itself uncommonly susceptible, and since that contact took place has let inventions, conveniences and discoveries be wormed out of it in downright miraculous quantities.

    After such a history one might think, and not quite without justification, it was the miracle of the Anti-Christ that we find ourselves in the midst of now. For the ‘contact’ simile that has just been used is to be interpreted with reference not only to the dependability of the part of the body that is involved, but also to its aspect of the unseemly and taboo. The point is, before intellectual man discovered his delight in facts, the only people who had such a delight were warriors, hunters and merchants, that is to say, the people whose nature it was to be cunning and violent. In the struggle for existence there are no philosophical sentimentalities, but only the wish to kill off one’s opponent by the shortest and most practical method. There everyone is a positivist. Nor would it be a virtue, in commerce, to let oneself be taken in instead of putting one’s trust in solid facts, profit being in the last resort a psychological vanquishing of one’s opponent, arising out of the particular circumstances. However, if one investigates what qualities it is that lead to discoveries, what one finds is freedom from traditional scruples and inhibitions, courage, as much initiative as destructive spirit, the exclusion of moral considerations, patient bargaining for the smallest advantage, dogged endurance on the way to the goal, if necessary, and a veneration for measure and number amounting to the most acute mistrust of all uncertainty; in other words, one sees nothing but the old hunter’s, soldier’s and merchant’s vices, simply transposed into intellectual terms and re-interpreted as virtues. And though by this means they are raised above the urge for personal and comparatively vulgar advantage, yet the element of primal Evil, as it might be called, is something they do not lose even in undergoing this trans formation. It is apparently indestructible and eternal, or at least as eternal as everything humanly sublime, since it consists in nothing less, nothing other, than the pleasure of tripping that sublimity up and watching it fall flat on its face. Who does not know the malicious temptation—when contemplating a beautifully glazed vase, all voluptuous curves— that lies in the thought that one could smash it to smithereens with a single blow of one’s stick? Intensified into the heroically bitter realisation that one cannot rely on anything in life except what is clinched and riveted, it is a basic emotion enclosed within the soberness of science, and even if, for reasons of respect, one does not want to call it the Devil, the fact remains that it brings with it a faint whiff of brimstone.

    • Agree: Ano4, Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @AP

    Sometimes I forgot what an eccentric, "psychiatric hospital" atmosphere we have in this forum (not intending this in a rude or judgemental way) - i.e. to encounter adult men writing about their belief in demons.

    Of course, this is part of the reason it is interesting to talk to you people - I have never met anyone with who believes in demons in real life, and would not likely ever meet them in my daily life. What are your views about Atlantis?

    Replies: @Ano4, @AP

  282. @Gerard-Mandela
    @Mr. Hack


    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist,
     
    Interesting. I know and like his music.......possibly Herbie Hancock is at the same level in "cutting edge" and creativity? Maybe the main creativity for Hancock comes from him on the keyboard but for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with.

    Though I have to say much of modern jazz is not for me....of the modern performers I prefer stuff that has much simpler goals - the intelligent and skillful reworking on jazz standards by somebody as Diana Krall is more to my liking.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Mr. Hack

    I think Hancock’s playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles’ second great quintet – before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.

    For example, he would just play only right hand, and making stepwise shapes on different scales – “time no changes”.

    Corea it is

    Have you tried his album “Solo Piano: Portraits”?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the “father of jazz”, and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn’t quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs

    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Dmitry

    Of course I thoroughly enjoy Hanchock's input to the great second Miles Davis quintet. With his first flirtations with electronic music (Mwandishi, Crossings) and later with his two masterpieces "Headhunters" and "Thrust" is where he really laid the foundation for much of what followed (lots and lots of great stuff). Have you listened to the last two albums that I've mentioned?

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @Gerard-Mandela
    @Dmitry


    I think Hancock’s playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles’ second great quintet – before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.
     
    100% agree. I'm reluctant to make similar (but different context) criticism of the genius Oscar Peterson - because anything he did in the 50s ,60s 70s and probably still in the last decade of his life I would pay big money to see ........but I would remark that I also think his playing in the 50's and early 60's to be his best musically - even though in the further decades his playing may classify to most people as achieving total technical perfection

    Have you tried his album “Solo Piano: Portraits”?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the “father of jazz”, and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn’t quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).
     
    No I have not, but many thanks for the link. I will listen to it.

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs
     
    Ironic, because the last composition of Corea's that I listened to on Youtube was Stevie Wonder's live version of "Spain". Brilliant .....and with solos from about 20 different instruments!

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  283. @songbird
    @AP


    But nationalism gave Europe the fratricidal first world war.
     
    I'm a critic of this idea.

    The major belligerents were all multi-ethnic empires. Started with Austria-Hungary - arguably the most multicult empire in Europe. Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans - where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?

    What allowed it to spread and continue was international alliances. The UK with France and Russia. Are those England's closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French. And the case against Russia seems even stronger. Germany with the Turks! England with the Japs! These alliances seem to have been elite-driven, rather than the result of organic populism.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories. Most of these were not contiguous, but quite foreign in character, filled with completely alien peoples - land in sub-Saharan Africa, or the Middle East.

    Can we say that nationalism caused the war? On what basis? What is our control? That Europe isn't fighting a fratricidal war today? Let's not be facetious. Empires with ethnic cores are all that existed back then - it was the state of organization back then. International communism had not yet claimed Russia. We have no control. The claim that nationalism caused WWI appears to me to be unscientific and often politically-motivated.

    Can we blame it on Serb nationalism? Well, Ireland had many rebellions, but never caused an international war (though foreign troops were sometimes landed in it), so I don't think that is reasonable. Probably, no power thought that they could take Ireland and integrate it into multicultural empire, without England's okay (which they would not give.)

    How do I explain WWI? Elite dysfunction. Predicated on the political units of the day - the elite of Europe (meaning a broad spectrum of the upper classes) existed in separate, unintegrated spheres. (Even though, they had many internationalist tendencies, such as monarchs being avaricious of having new, nonwhite subjects.) They were effectively proto-globalists. Just as today (we must be parsimonious) - they had a very poor ability to forecast the future and to think about long term consequences (today: immigration). Their thinking was short-term, during a technological period, when industrialization allowed for unprecedented escalation. Indeed, one of the motivations for early Russian mobilization was that it was a less developed country than Germany and would take longer to mobilize.

    Again, to put it into today's context, now the elite are united in a common, integrated sphere - real globalization - but still pursuing a cataclysmically short-sighted policy: mass immigration. The technology of today has made escalation in immigration possible on a scale completely unthinkable in 1945 (the start of de-Nazification), just as the technology of 1914 made escalation in war possible at an unthinkable pace in 1914.

    Replies: @AP, @Europe Europa

    Started with Austria-Hungary – arguably the most multicult empire in Europe.

    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity (nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism, less ugly than what came later such as Communism, Nazism, or modern hedonism-consumerism only because it is older than those) whom the nationalists sought to destroy. The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

    Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans – where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?

    These Africans and Indians are irrelevant because they are not the ones who chose war. The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism. The monarchs (neither Willie and Nicky wanted world war) were powerless, they were swept along.

    The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French.

    Russia went to war out of nationalism using pan-Slavism, France out of nationalist resentment towards Germany for the lost war and territories, Germany out of its own nationalism, etc.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories.

    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations. They will die and kill for the sake of their nations. Since I’m pasting beloved passages here is a great one from Celine:

    [MORE]

    It’s the philosophers . . . another point to look out for while we’re at it … who first started giving the people ideas . . , when all they’d known up until then was the catechism! They began, so they proclaimed, to educate the people . . . Ah! What truths they had to reveal! Beautiful! brilliant! unprecedented truths! And the people were dazzled! That’s it! they said. That’s the stuff! Let’s go and die for it! The people are always dying to die! That’s the way they are! ‘Long live Diderot!’ they yelled. And ‘Long live Voltaire!’ ….And long live everybody! Those guys at least don’t let the beloved people molder in ignorance and fetishism! They show the people the roads of Freedom! Emancipation! Things went fast after that! First teach everybody to read the papers! That’s the way to salvation! Hurry hurry! No more illiterates! We don’t need them anymore! Nothing but citizen-soldiers! Who vote! Who read! And who fight! And who march! And send kisses from the front! In no time the people were good and ripe! The enthusiasm of the liberated has to be good for something, doesn’t it? Danton wasn’t eloquent for the hell of it. With a few phrases, so rousing that we can still hear them today, he had the people mobilized before you could say fiddlesticks! That was when the first battalions of emancipated maniacs marched off! … the first voting, flagmatic suckers that Dumouriez led away to get themselves drilled full of holes in Flanders!… The free-gratis soldier . . . was something really new … So new that when Goethe arrived in Valmy… he was flabbergasted. At the sight of those ragged, impassioned cohorts, who had come of their own free will to get themselves disemboweled by the King of Prussia in defense of a patriotic fiction no one had ever heard of, Goethe realized that he still had much to learn. This day,’ he declaimed grandiloquently as befitted the habits of his genius, ‘marks the beginning of a new era!’ He could say that again! The system proved successful . . . pretty soon they were mass-producing heroes, and in the end, the system was so well perfected that they cost practically nothing. Everyone was delighted. Bismarck, the two Napoleons, Barrès, Elsa the Horsewoman. The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes. In olden times the fanatical fashion was: ‘Long live Jesus! Burn the heretics!’ . . . But heretics, after all, were few and voluntary . . . Whereas today vast hordes of men are fired with aim and purpose by cries of: ‘Hang the limp turnips! The juiceless lemons! The innocent readers! By the millions, eyes right!’ … Let whole legions of them perish, turn into smidgens, bleed, smolder in acid—and all that to make the Patrie more beloved, more fair, and more joyful! ”

    • Replies: @songbird
    @AP


    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations.
     
    Based on the comparative sizes, populations, and locations of the territory that changed hands, it would seemingly be more accurate to say that imperialists want their empires to grow at the expense of other empires.

    Anyway, the foreign minister of Austria approached Wilson's government in 1917, before the US entered, with an offer of status quo ante as the basis for peace negotiations. And the US did not acquire any new territories. Perhaps, territorial acquisition was just a post hoc justification for the war.

    The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism.
     
    The newspapers were censored and full of propaganda. They were elite-driven.

    The European continental powers had conscript armies. Trench warfare would have been impossible without them. Strictly speaking, many of the men in these armies did not chose war. Those in France had their terms of service extended, even before the war began. Deserters were executed as an example to others.

    In the case of Britain, they had a relatively small volunteer army. By 1916, even with drawing volunteers from overseas territories, and even with the most vile propaganda, and even though they were not bearing the brunt of the fighting, they found the model was unsustainable. In the US, Wilson asked for the Army to increase to a force of one million. But by six weeks after war was declared, only 73,000 men had volunteered for service.

    The end of the war was forced by the mutiny of enlisted men in the German navy and army. They chose peace. It was not the elite.

    Replies: @AP

    , @TheTotallyAnonymous
    @AP


    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity

     

    Half-truth.

    It was an empire based on the property rights or "crown lands" of the Habsburg Dynasty on different nations and territories. It was also a Roman Catholic and oligarchic tyranny that only had any legitimacy among its subject peoples' during most of its existence because it stood in the way of the Ottoman Empire's penetration into Europe and conquest of lands in East-Central Europe/Balkans. The weaker and less threatening the Ottoman Empire became, the less legitimacy the Habsburg Empire had to exist in the eyes of most of its subjects.

    One of the few good things about the outcome of WW1, despite the wasted opportunity and epic fail by Serbs post-WW1, is that it is permanently gone and it will never make the first system of mass concentration camps in Europe, for Serbs, ever again (an untold story of horror, suffering, terror and crimes against Serbs that is mostly unknown in the world, even among many Serbs).


    nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism

     

    Wrong.

    Nations, ethnic groups (ethno-religious as well), and nationalism existed way before the 20th century. You would do well to read a bit to educate yourself about the obvious common sense nature of this.

    Although I guess this doesn't exist in your "Ukrainian" worldview because you would have to cope with the fact that there was no such thing as Ukrainians before the 20th century and that Ukrainians are in fact really just Russians of the Roman Catholic Faith that are in deep denial about it.


    The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

     

    Before you write bullshit like this again, you should educate yourself about the basic facts of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, who Gavrilo Princip and Young Bosnia really were and what they believed in, the facts of Serbia's May 1903 coup (it was Serbia's internal affair of liberals and freemasons taking power, had nothing to do with an anti-Habsburg nature), Serbia's internal and geopolitical situation from 1903-1914 and etc.

    https://www.amazon.com.au/Folly-Malice-Habsburg-Empire-Balkans-ebook/dp/B07K4QB7MG

    All your bullshit about the Habsburgs is thoroughly debunked in this book. It's so worthwhile I'd even recommend it to Karlin to understand a few things about Serbia (one among a few other books).

    Replies: @AP

  284. @Gerard-Mandela
    @Mr. Hack


    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist,
     
    Interesting. I know and like his music.......possibly Herbie Hancock is at the same level in "cutting edge" and creativity? Maybe the main creativity for Hancock comes from him on the keyboard but for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with.

    Though I have to say much of modern jazz is not for me....of the modern performers I prefer stuff that has much simpler goals - the intelligent and skillful reworking on jazz standards by somebody as Diana Krall is more to my liking.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Mr. Hack

    Chick & Herbie both rose together through the ranks and spent good quality time working with Miles Davis. Both were hugely influential in the “fusion” movement. I like them both very much, but because, as you so cogently put it “for Corea it is through the interactions of a wider variety of instruments /musicians in whatever size group he is playing with” that he truly excels and I’d have to give a slight nod to Corea for overall importance and impact. I especially like Corea’s work within the Latin jazz segment of the genre too.

    It’s good to see that you seem to have at least part of your head screwed on correctly! 🙂

    • Thanks: Gerard-Mandela
  285. @Hyperborean
    @Philip Owen


    Here is another map of Greater Ukraine. The Germans, who knew the area, obviously saw a larger area of Litle Russian settlement than we have today.
     
    This is a fictional Axis Victory map.

    The real Reichkommissariat Ukraine's borders were not even further east of UkSSR borders, but further west.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c8/Reichskommissariat_Ukraine_%281942%29.svg/1280px-Reichskommissariat_Ukraine_%281942%29.svg.png

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6d/Reichskommissariat-Ukraine.jpg/1280px-Reichskommissariat-Ukraine.jpg

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Reichskommissariat_Moskowia.svg/1280px-Reichskommissariat_Moskowia.svg.png

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Philip Owen

    Your maps here are 100% accurate. Thanks for sharing them with us.

  286. @Dmitry
    @Gerard-Mandela

    I think Hancock's playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles' second great quintet - before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.

    For example, he would just play only right hand, and making stepwise shapes on different scales - "time no changes".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cobdJpv3Ynk


    Corea it is

     

    Have you tried his album "Solo Piano: Portraits"?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the "father of jazz", and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn't quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tVuClh03bk

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    Of course I thoroughly enjoy Hanchock’s input to the great second Miles Davis quintet. With his first flirtations with electronic music (Mwandishi, Crossings) and later with his two masterpieces “Headhunters” and “Thrust” is where he really laid the foundation for much of what followed (lots and lots of great stuff). Have you listened to the last two albums that I’ve mentioned?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Mr. Hack

    I've heard some of this, but I'm not such a fan of it. I've enjoyed (when in certain mood) his improvisations in Miles Davis "Second Great Quintet". His rapport with Tony Williams, large amount of space, and the very formal timekeeping combined with increasing "freedom" of harmonies.

    -

    I liked his playing in "My Funny Valentine" live album from 1964, when he's walking a line between traditionalism.

    His solo is from 10:00 - he's playing like a more harmonically experimental version of Wynton Kelly. At the end he goes back to playing "locked hands" of the 1950s.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQrz-e1EUrs

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  287. @Dmitry
    @Gerard-Mandela

    I think Hancock's playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles' second great quintet - before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.

    For example, he would just play only right hand, and making stepwise shapes on different scales - "time no changes".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cobdJpv3Ynk


    Corea it is

     

    Have you tried his album "Solo Piano: Portraits"?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the "father of jazz", and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn't quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tVuClh03bk

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    I think Hancock’s playing more interesting in the 1960s, on the acoustic piano in Miles’ second great quintet – before he went unfortunately to the electronic synthesizers.

    100% agree. I’m reluctant to make similar (but different context) criticism of the genius Oscar Peterson – because anything he did in the 50s ,60s 70s and probably still in the last decade of his life I would pay big money to see ……..but I would remark that I also think his playing in the 50’s and early 60’s to be his best musically – even though in the further decades his playing may classify to most people as achieving total technical perfection

    Have you tried his album “Solo Piano: Portraits”?

    In this album, he presents a talk about how Scriabin is the “father of jazz”, and creates some jazz piano improvisation based on Scriabin, which doesn’t quite sound good for me (he starts sounding like Bill Evans half way through the Scriabin).

    No I have not, but many thanks for the link. I will listen to it.

    Although I thought the more successful improvisations were ones like this based on Stevie Wonder songs

    Ironic, because the last composition of Corea’s that I listened to on Youtube was Stevie Wonder’s live version of “Spain”. Brilliant …..and with solos from about 20 different instruments!

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard-Mandela

    I'm incredibly thin in my library of jazz CD's with respect to Oscar Peterson. No good reason, as I loved listening to him as a kid. You'd have to be a millionaire to buy up his whole backlog of albums, as he was so very prodigious in his output. I'm listening to this right now through Spotify, a compilation that many consider to be among his very, very best. You got any favorites that you might recommend?

    https://audiophilestyle.com/uploads/monthly_2013_07/oscar-peterson-exclusively-for-my-friends-.jpg.68c9ca61b4a5066219841919ba66dec6.jpg

    Replies: @Dmitry

  288. @AP
    @Mr. Hack

    I stay with a cousin on the edge of the urban part of the city. She came there from a neighboring oblast and speaks Ukrainian; her husband is a native of the city and spoke Russian but switched over after marrying her. Both are patriots and I guess they decided if anyone is going to change it will be the Russian-speaking one.

    Most people who move to Kiev do not do so from the West but from neighboring central Ukrainian oblasts. Westerners are probably matched by easterners.

    10% to 20% Ukrainian-language usage is more realistic than 30%; no way 1 in 3 of the people one hears in the city speaks Ukrainian naturally.

    I haven’t visited nightclubs in Kiev. But walking the streets one does hear Ukrainian occasionally. I had a taxi driver who was speaking Ukrainian on his phone while driving. People bringing food into the city to markets speak Ukrainian. Etc. IUkrainian speech is uncommon, but definitely present in the city.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I’m unable to find any concrete data regarding Kyiv’s language usage and patterns. Since you’ve been back more recently that I, I’ll defer to your better judgement.

  289. @AP
    @songbird


    Started with Austria-Hungary – arguably the most multicult empire in Europe.
     
    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity (nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism, less ugly than what came later such as Communism, Nazism, or modern hedonism-consumerism only because it is older than those) whom the nationalists sought to destroy. The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

    Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans – where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?
     
    These Africans and Indians are irrelevant because they are not the ones who chose war. The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism. The monarchs (neither Willie and Nicky wanted world war) were powerless, they were swept along.

    The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French.
     
    Russia went to war out of nationalism using pan-Slavism, France out of nationalist resentment towards Germany for the lost war and territories, Germany out of its own nationalism, etc.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories.
     
    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations. They will die and kill for the sake of their nations. Since I'm pasting beloved passages here is a great one from Celine:



    It’s the philosophers . . . another point to look out for while we’re at it … who first started giving the people ideas . . , when all they’d known up until then was the catechism! They began, so they proclaimed, to educate the people . . . Ah! What truths they had to reveal! Beautiful! brilliant! unprecedented truths! And the people were dazzled! That’s it! they said. That’s the stuff! Let’s go and die for it! The people are always dying to die! That’s the way they are! ‘Long live Diderot!’ they yelled. And ‘Long live Voltaire!’ ….And long live everybody! Those guys at least don’t let the beloved people molder in ignorance and fetishism! They show the people the roads of Freedom! Emancipation! Things went fast after that! First teach everybody to read the papers! That’s the way to salvation! Hurry hurry! No more illiterates! We don’t need them anymore! Nothing but citizen-soldiers! Who vote! Who read! And who fight! And who march! And send kisses from the front! In no time the people were good and ripe! The enthusiasm of the liberated has to be good for something, doesn’t it? Danton wasn’t eloquent for the hell of it. With a few phrases, so rousing that we can still hear them today, he had the people mobilized before you could say fiddlesticks! That was when the first battalions of emancipated maniacs marched off! … the first voting, flagmatic suckers that Dumouriez led away to get themselves drilled full of holes in Flanders!… The free-gratis soldier . . . was something really new … So new that when Goethe arrived in Valmy… he was flabbergasted. At the sight of those ragged, impassioned cohorts, who had come of their own free will to get themselves disemboweled by the King of Prussia in defense of a patriotic fiction no one had ever heard of, Goethe realized that he still had much to learn. This day,’ he declaimed grandiloquently as befitted the habits of his genius, ‘marks the beginning of a new era!’ He could say that again! The system proved successful . . . pretty soon they were mass-producing heroes, and in the end, the system was so well perfected that they cost practically nothing. Everyone was delighted. Bismarck, the two Napoleons, Barrès, Elsa the Horsewoman. The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes. In olden times the fanatical fashion was: ‘Long live Jesus! Burn the heretics!’ . . . But heretics, after all, were few and voluntary . . . Whereas today vast hordes of men are fired with aim and purpose by cries of: ‘Hang the limp turnips! The juiceless lemons! The innocent readers! By the millions, eyes right!’ … Let whole legions of them perish, turn into smidgens, bleed, smolder in acid—and all that to make the Patrie more beloved, more fair, and more joyful! ”

    Replies: @songbird, @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations.

    Based on the comparative sizes, populations, and locations of the territory that changed hands, it would seemingly be more accurate to say that imperialists want their empires to grow at the expense of other empires.

    Anyway, the foreign minister of Austria approached Wilson’s government in 1917, before the US entered, with an offer of status quo ante as the basis for peace negotiations. And the US did not acquire any new territories. Perhaps, territorial acquisition was just a post hoc justification for the war.

    The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism.

    The newspapers were censored and full of propaganda. They were elite-driven.

    The European continental powers had conscript armies. Trench warfare would have been impossible without them. Strictly speaking, many of the men in these armies did not chose war. Those in France had their terms of service extended, even before the war began. Deserters were executed as an example to others.

    In the case of Britain, they had a relatively small volunteer army. By 1916, even with drawing volunteers from overseas territories, and even with the most vile propaganda, and even though they were not bearing the brunt of the fighting, they found the model was unsustainable. In the US, Wilson asked for the Army to increase to a force of one million. But by six weeks after war was declared, only 73,000 men had volunteered for service.

    The end of the war was forced by the mutiny of enlisted men in the German navy and army. They chose peace. It was not the elite.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @AP
    @songbird


    The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism.

    The newspapers were censored and full of propaganda. They were elite-driven.
     
    The owners were businessmen who emerged from the masses. Again, the monarchs were opposed to the war.

    The European continental powers had conscript armies. Trench warfare would have been impossible without them.
     
    Are you suggesting that conscription was proof that the war was unpopular in the beginning? You deny that there was a rush to join, parades, vilification of anti?

    Deserters were executed as an example to others.
     
    Sure. And murderers are executed in America, But the presence of neither type of execution proves that most people would would murder or desert.

    The end of the war was forced by the mutiny of enlisted men in the German navy and army. They chose peace. It was not the elite.
     
    They chose peace after the voluntary slaughter had run its course. Mutinies would have meant something in 1914, when it mattered. But the masses driven mad by nationalism wanted war, and got it.

    Replies: @songbird

  290. @songbird
    @AP


    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations.
     
    Based on the comparative sizes, populations, and locations of the territory that changed hands, it would seemingly be more accurate to say that imperialists want their empires to grow at the expense of other empires.

    Anyway, the foreign minister of Austria approached Wilson's government in 1917, before the US entered, with an offer of status quo ante as the basis for peace negotiations. And the US did not acquire any new territories. Perhaps, territorial acquisition was just a post hoc justification for the war.

    The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism.
     
    The newspapers were censored and full of propaganda. They were elite-driven.

    The European continental powers had conscript armies. Trench warfare would have been impossible without them. Strictly speaking, many of the men in these armies did not chose war. Those in France had their terms of service extended, even before the war began. Deserters were executed as an example to others.

    In the case of Britain, they had a relatively small volunteer army. By 1916, even with drawing volunteers from overseas territories, and even with the most vile propaganda, and even though they were not bearing the brunt of the fighting, they found the model was unsustainable. In the US, Wilson asked for the Army to increase to a force of one million. But by six weeks after war was declared, only 73,000 men had volunteered for service.

    The end of the war was forced by the mutiny of enlisted men in the German navy and army. They chose peace. It was not the elite.

    Replies: @AP

    The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism.

    The newspapers were censored and full of propaganda. They were elite-driven.

    The owners were businessmen who emerged from the masses. Again, the monarchs were opposed to the war.

    The European continental powers had conscript armies. Trench warfare would have been impossible without them.

    Are you suggesting that conscription was proof that the war was unpopular in the beginning? You deny that there was a rush to join, parades, vilification of anti?

    Deserters were executed as an example to others.

    Sure. And murderers are executed in America, But the presence of neither type of execution proves that most people would would murder or desert.

    The end of the war was forced by the mutiny of enlisted men in the German navy and army. They chose peace. It was not the elite.

    They chose peace after the voluntary slaughter had run its course. Mutinies would have meant something in 1914, when it mattered. But the masses driven mad by nationalism wanted war, and got it.

    • Agree: AltanBakshi
    • Replies: @songbird
    @AP


    The owners were businessmen who emerged from the masses. Again, the monarchs were opposed to the war.
     
    It would be folly to circumscribe the word "elite" around kings only. I did not mean to encompass them at all. And it is not tantamount to saying that the war drive came from peasants, to say that it did not come from kings. We have an elite today. In large part, they are not aristocrats, but that is hardly a public endorsement of their policies.

    Are you suggesting that conscription was proof that the war was unpopular in the beginning? You deny that there was a rush to join, parades, vilification of anti?
     
    Popularity in wartime is a difficult thing to judge. They didn't allow anti-war marches, or antiwar propaganda did they? In a nation of many millions, with ubiquitous state propaganda, you will have some volunteers. During the Civil War in Spain, the Republicans received volunteers from many nations, but that is not tantamount to saying communism was popular in those countries.

    A lot of the vilification came from people who were not expected to fight (ex: girls giving white feathers), and who were prey to this state propaganda.

    And murderers are executed in America
     
    In private, to a large degree, not with men in formations ordered to watch.

    Anyway, your idea that nationalism is evil is too reductive. At base, even if we attribute WWI to nationalism (I don't), then there are at least different kinds of nationalism. "Bull-dog nationalism" might be execrable. This is not equivalent to saying all nationalism is evil.

    Attributing WWI to nationalism seems to imply that if it triumphs, it will inevitably lead to WW3. That no lessons can be learned, and nationalists are not capable of peace. It also ignores the fact that we have nuclear peace, and other political changes that have taken place, such as having more open markets.

    If a thing is labeled "evil" that seems to imply that its opposite is "good." That it exists in a moral dichotomy. Is anti-nationalism good? Personally, speaking, I don't think I've ever glimpsed anything more evil.

    Replies: @AP

  291. @Hyperborean
    @Thulean Friend


    That is not because of their own efforts. It’s simply dumb luck (for them) that China itself is a de facto ethno-nationalist country, so it has no problem with those policies in its subcolonial tributary states.
     
    Assuming for the sake of the argument that this is true, if American power is weakening relative to China's then North Korea's position with regards to domestic nationalism should be improving and be less willing to cave, considering that they didn't collapse even during the worst years of the 1990s.

    Or is the expectation that China will undergo Peaceful Evolution and thereafter turn against the DPRK?

    Replies: @Astuteobservor II

    Well, he thinks DPRK is a subcolonial tributary state of China.

    That tells you everything you need to know regarding his opinion on this. Utterly worthless imo.

  292. @Dmitry
    @AltanBakshi


    Romans or Byzantines believed that those statues contain demons.
     
    Of course, many historical societies had believed about demons in the past, and they were used to explain things that were not understood at the time - for example, epilepsy, was believed to be a demonic possession.

    But in the last centuries, what we have observed systematically in the world, follows the laws of physics (or should be reducible to them by bridge laws).

    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.


    Buddhists the statues or paintings are just depictions of our mental objects of reverence or ideals

     

    Sure, most would understand these cartoons are symbolic depiction of different emotions, passions and fears - states of consciousness, dreams, art, etc.

    your childhood paintings were meaningless and senseless

     

    It doesn't mean that painting is meaningless and senseless. But the fact we can choose to recombine shapes (e.g. blue demon with ten hands; cat with wings; unicorns, etc) in our mind, doesn't imply that those shapes exist outside our mind. Creating such creatures, is a mental ability everyone has since childhood.

    edgy
     
    Perhaps it was "edgy" in 1740s, when Hume published "Of Miracles". "1740s kids" can remember this as a controversial view.

    I.e. That's around 280 years in the past - it's not so edgy today. Our shared reality conforms in lawlike and regular way, without need of interference by demons and fairies.

    To notice the regular and lawlike physical reality, is not to say that we have an explanation for it. A party of the mystery has been shifted onto why we have this lawlike, regular, physical reality.

    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed "miracle" of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself

    Replies: @AP, @AltanBakshi, @Daniel Chieh

    Theres nothing edgy in Scientific Materialism, but to claim that majority of historical humanity suffered schizophrenia, thats quite edgy. Or do you claim that it wasnt common for people to proscribe magical properties to their idols or fetishes? Many people still do so outside of first world countries.

    Perhaps after we die (or before we are born), our soul will be in a different reality, where the rules of the game will be differently arranged, and yet still connected in some interesting way to the rules of the game we are currently playing. Perhaps there might be extraordinary supernatural creatures in the next reality, including blue demons with ten hands. However, to claim to have knowledge about different realities, than the one we currently share and can talk about, seems rather a hubris.

    We deny the existence of soul, there is nothing separate, fixed or having its own essence in nature by our reasoning.

    As I have stated before, most Buddhists dont believe that mental factors, matter or energy will ever perish, they just change form, as we deny permanence of phenomena so do we deny the possible permanent annihilation of phenomena. All changes, nothing disappears.

    You are probably the first one in my life who takes “ten handed” beings literally

    Here is the Thousand armed Avalokiteshvara, he also has eyes in his every hand. Now do we take this depiction literally? Hell No! Avalokiteshvaras hands symbolises his immense compassion, that he will strive to help every being by every possible way, eyes in hands symbolises that his actions are always vigilant and conscious, that he sees the suffering of all beings and understands the chains of causality which have led being to a such suffering state of existence. That he always sees the best ways to help beings. Now do we claim that Avalokiteshvara is his own independent being? Of course not! By meditating on him and his good qualities, by giving respect to those immensely good attributes of his we try to awaken our own compassion, our own mirror like nature that reflects everything in universe. In other words depends on a Buddhist, you can take him more literally (especially if you are a poor farmer or a nomad, but even they dont take literally his depictions) or you can take him as a meditational deity, a goal to attain. By doing Avalokiteshvara practices and by meditating on him, we can gradually change ourselves to resemble him. But taking him absolutely or very literally and thinking that somewhere there is a guy with thousand hands and eyes is just silly!

    Same with the third eye, no learned Buddhist takes it literally, it just means that our mind also has a way to see and discern things.

    The question of different possible realities? This only good argument that you have. Yes I have no first hand knowledge about them. I simply put my trust in Buddha, everything that he has told amd taught oncerning the nature of mundane existence and nature of our mind has been personally true for me, so I have myself seen and experienced his wisdom regarding those before mentioned things, I simply believe him to be a trustworthy person. He taught that there are causes and conditions for our current state of existence, and if there are such causes and conditions they can be discerned and analyzed. Changed and transformed, bychanging them we change ourselves and the reality. Its simple as that. Actually there are very well done instructions how one can themselves perceive those other states or modes of existence, but one needs years of practice for that.

    A much more mysterious miracle is not the (never has been observed “miracle” of) supernatural intercession in the regular order of our current reality, but the stable regularity itself

    Maybe unstable universes are not very good for sustaining life? Simple as that. I dont understand why you bring miracles to this discussion? There is nothing miraculous in the Buddhas power, he is an object of mind for us, his power does not manifest miraculously, but by our own deeds and thoughts.

    • Thanks: AP
    • Replies: @Mikel
    @AltanBakshi


    most Buddhists dont believe that mental factors, matter or energy will ever perish, they just change form, as we deny permanence of phenomena so do we deny the possible permanent annihilation of phenomena.
     
    Do Buddhists deny the eventual thermal death of this Universe?

    I understand why people still cling to religious beliefs and, in fact, I have more respect for some oriental religions than for the Abrahamic ones, they are more sophisticated and not so obviously concocted as a means to soothe the human existential fears. But in the end, it looks like there is no escape from the dichotomy between the rational and the mythical approach to explaining things that classical Greeks were already familiar with.

    I actually agree with a certain poster above that it is very unlikely that our great ape brains are capable of a full understanding of Nature and the Universe. But we are much better at it when we use the rational approach than when we go back to the mythical one. That is what makes us dominate the rest of the species and control the environment to our advantage much better than them.

    Chimpanzees, cats and trees also live in a world where 2+2 always equals 4 and the square root of 9 is always 3. But it is only us that were able to discern these basic facts of reality thanks to our reasoning abilities, as opposed to our mythical/religious beliefs, that previous hominid species also had but didn't bring them much progress.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi

  293. @Mr. Hack
    @Hyperborean

    I appreciate your stance and ability to clearly articulate your preferences. As you point out, some modern art is accessible and interesting, and other is not. I too find a lot of the "way out" avant guard like what Pollock represents in painting or Sun Rae does to jazz music to be too grating to enjoy.

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela, @Hyperborean

    If I could recommend a jazz musician for you to listen to, it would be Chick Corea, A truly cutting edge and creative artist, whose been around for a long time now.

    I checked some Youtube clips of him, my cursory impression of his piano works is that he seems interesting, thank you.

  294. @Rattus Norwegius
    @TheTotallyAnonymous

    "Albanians are the single worst demographically performing ethnic group in the whole region."
    The Albanian demographic edge has been diminishing, but to say they are the worst performing group is to exaggerate. Besides, hypothetically if Serbs and Albanians both had a tfr of 1,6, Albanians would still have a stronger demographic profile than Serbs. Since Albanians have more demographic momentum, from past demographic, ie younger population.

    Perhaps in the future, Serbs will perform better demographically than Albanians?

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Perhaps in the future, Serbs will perform better demographically than Albanians?

    Definitely.

    The potential strongly exists there on the Serb side.

    Albanians also fudge their demographic statistics to a ridiculous degree by claiming that 1.8 million people live in Kosovo (LOL). Just one of many examples.

  295. @Dmitry
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    Serbia is definitely mentioned in Tolstoy and Serbia-Russia

     

    Yes Vronsky goes to fight for Serbia in the end of "Anna Karenina" .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Serbia#Statistics

    From this it’s clear that Chinese
     

    That's funny that Chinese tourists are already exploring the Balkans, while it seems that Japanese tourists don't go there at all. Chinese are something more adventurous in their choices, than other nationalities.

    Tourism numbers are low though for Serbia, even in normal years like 2019. There is a very low number - 64000 - of Russian tourists... (e.g. it's 24 times lower than Russian tourists in Georgia).

    Of course, from the point of view of the tourist, this is an attractive thing that the numbers are still not high - with lower numbers of tourists, Serbia must be relatively unspoilt by mass tourism, relatively "authentic" as a destination, not turned into too much "Disney land" yet.


    there’s no coastline which is something they should keep in mind. Although there

     

    It has should develop a similar attraction as Georgia, which is now overpopular - cheap food, cheap wine, unique culture, warm summers. And I'd rather go to Serbia than Georgia, not just as Georgia was getting flooded with too many tourists.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous

    You seem to be some sort of tourism expert. I’m clearly not.

    I think a part of the reason why Serbia has low tourism numbers is, apart from the fact that it’s landlocked, it also has a “bad” or “pariah” country reputation because of the wars of the 1990’s and breakup of Yugoslavia.

    Although many Serbs are a bunch of cucks that are desperate not to be judged and disliked by foreigners (pretending not to be Serbs, saying they’re something else besides Serbs or complementary or just giving up being Serbs all together etc.) because of garbage like “Srebrenica Genocide”, “Bosnian Genocide”, “Kosovo oppression” etc. I think this is sort of a good thing personally because income from tourism is overrated (especially now with lockdowns and corona).

  296. @AP
    @songbird


    Started with Austria-Hungary – arguably the most multicult empire in Europe.
     
    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity (nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism, less ugly than what came later such as Communism, Nazism, or modern hedonism-consumerism only because it is older than those) whom the nationalists sought to destroy. The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

    Over 138,000 Indians fought in Belgium and France. France recruited 450,000 troops from West and North Africa to fight against the Germans – where those African and Indian soldiers motivated by nationalism?
     
    These Africans and Indians are irrelevant because they are not the ones who chose war. The ones who chose war were the newly-literate masses riled up with their nationalism. The monarchs (neither Willie and Nicky wanted world war) were powerless, they were swept along.

    The UK with France and Russia. Are those England’s closest blood brothers? Well, France is arguable on a genetic level, but the fact is that it was a longtime enemy, and not held in high regard by the English people, who had relatively recently been quite congenial to Germans on a cultural level, and quite scornful of the French.
     
    Russia went to war out of nationalism using pan-Slavism, France out of nationalist resentment towards Germany for the lost war and territories, Germany out of its own nationalism, etc.

    One of the motivations for the war was gaining territories.
     
    Of course nationalists want their nations to grow in size at the expense of other nations. They will die and kill for the sake of their nations. Since I'm pasting beloved passages here is a great one from Celine:



    It’s the philosophers . . . another point to look out for while we’re at it … who first started giving the people ideas . . , when all they’d known up until then was the catechism! They began, so they proclaimed, to educate the people . . . Ah! What truths they had to reveal! Beautiful! brilliant! unprecedented truths! And the people were dazzled! That’s it! they said. That’s the stuff! Let’s go and die for it! The people are always dying to die! That’s the way they are! ‘Long live Diderot!’ they yelled. And ‘Long live Voltaire!’ ….And long live everybody! Those guys at least don’t let the beloved people molder in ignorance and fetishism! They show the people the roads of Freedom! Emancipation! Things went fast after that! First teach everybody to read the papers! That’s the way to salvation! Hurry hurry! No more illiterates! We don’t need them anymore! Nothing but citizen-soldiers! Who vote! Who read! And who fight! And who march! And send kisses from the front! In no time the people were good and ripe! The enthusiasm of the liberated has to be good for something, doesn’t it? Danton wasn’t eloquent for the hell of it. With a few phrases, so rousing that we can still hear them today, he had the people mobilized before you could say fiddlesticks! That was when the first battalions of emancipated maniacs marched off! … the first voting, flagmatic suckers that Dumouriez led away to get themselves drilled full of holes in Flanders!… The free-gratis soldier . . . was something really new … So new that when Goethe arrived in Valmy… he was flabbergasted. At the sight of those ragged, impassioned cohorts, who had come of their own free will to get themselves disemboweled by the King of Prussia in defense of a patriotic fiction no one had ever heard of, Goethe realized that he still had much to learn. This day,’ he declaimed grandiloquently as befitted the habits of his genius, ‘marks the beginning of a new era!’ He could say that again! The system proved successful . . . pretty soon they were mass-producing heroes, and in the end, the system was so well perfected that they cost practically nothing. Everyone was delighted. Bismarck, the two Napoleons, Barrès, Elsa the Horsewoman. The religion of the flag promptly replaced the cult of heaven, an old cloud which had already been deflated by the Reformation and reduced to a network of episcopal money boxes. In olden times the fanatical fashion was: ‘Long live Jesus! Burn the heretics!’ . . . But heretics, after all, were few and voluntary . . . Whereas today vast hordes of men are fired with aim and purpose by cries of: ‘Hang the limp turnips! The juiceless lemons! The innocent readers! By the millions, eyes right!’ … Let whole legions of them perish, turn into smidgens, bleed, smolder in acid—and all that to make the Patrie more beloved, more fair, and more joyful! ”

    Replies: @songbird, @TheTotallyAnonymous

    Austria-Hungary was a Conservative pre-nationalist entity

    Half-truth.

    It was an empire based on the property rights or “crown lands” of the Habsburg Dynasty on different nations and territories. It was also a Roman Catholic and oligarchic tyranny that only had any legitimacy among its subject peoples’ during most of its existence because it stood in the way of the Ottoman Empire’s penetration into Europe and conquest of lands in East-Central Europe/Balkans. The weaker and less threatening the Ottoman Empire became, the less legitimacy the Habsburg Empire had to exist in the eyes of most of its subjects.

    One of the few good things about the outcome of WW1, despite the wasted opportunity and epic fail by Serbs post-WW1, is that it is permanently gone and it will never make the first system of mass concentration camps in Europe, for Serbs, ever again (an untold story of horror, suffering, terror and crimes against Serbs that is mostly unknown in the world, even among many Serbs).

    nationalism is an ugly product of modernity and populism

    Wrong.

    Nations, ethnic groups (ethno-religious as well), and nationalism existed way before the 20th century. You would do well to read a bit to educate yourself about the obvious common sense nature of this.

    Although I guess this doesn’t exist in your “Ukrainian” worldview because you would have to cope with the fact that there was no such thing as Ukrainians before the 20th century and that Ukrainians are in fact really just Russians of the Roman Catholic Faith that are in deep denial about it.

    The tragic self-destruction of Europe of the early 20th century began with a vile crime of Serbian nationalists against Austria-Hungary.

    Before you write bullshit like this again, you should educate yourself about the basic facts of the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, who Gavrilo Princip and Young Bosnia really were and what they believed in, the facts of Serbia’s May 1903 coup (it was Serbia’s internal affair of liberals and freemasons taking power, had nothing to do with an anti-Habsburg nature), Serbia’s internal and geopolitical situation from 1903-1914 and etc.

    All your bullshit about the Habsburgs is thoroughly debunked in this book. It’s so worthwhile I’d even recommend it to Karlin to understand a few things about Serbia (one among a few other books).

    • Disagree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP
    @TheTotallyAnonymous


    It was an empire based on the property rights or “crown lands” of the Habsburg Dynasty on different nations and territories.
     
    So Conservative and pre-nationalist. When Russia was conservative and pre-nationalist it too protected property rights, even of Polish nobles at the expense of Rus serfs.

    It was also a Roman Catholic and oligarchic tyranny
     
    Catholic, thus pre-nationalist. “Oligarchic tyranny” is a propaganda phrase.

    first system of mass concentration camps in Europe, for Serbs, ever again (an untold story of horror, suffering, terror and crimes against Serbs that is mostly unknown in the world, even among many Serbs).

     

    Serbs certainly paid very very dearly for the evil they brought into the world. I understand they may have been manipulated by the English but evil does have consequences.

    The best Serb that ever existed, Tesla, was the product of Austrian schools.

    Nations, ethnic groups (ethno-religious as well), and nationalism existed way before the 20th century.
     
    Who said nationalism began in the 20th century? It began perhaps 150 years before that. It is the oldest of the modern -isms.

    Feminine has existed forever, communes existed among primitive tribes, nations have always been around (one can call them tribes or whatever) but feminism, communism, and nationalism are modern ideologies, all are in essence post-Christian idolatries.

    Although I guess this doesn’t exist in your “Ukrainian” worldview because you would have to cope with the fact that there was no such thing as Ukrainians before the 20th century
     
    You manage to be wrong twice, in one sentence.

    1. Ukrainians and their nationalism were simply renamed Little Russians. This nationalism (which was opposed to Great Russia but initially not towards the Tsar) like other nationalisms was first articulated in the late 18th century.

    2. The rebranding began in the 1860s, not the 20th century. Already by the end of the 19th century there are existed a large political party among eastern Slavs in Galicia with mass following that was called Ukrainian:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukrainian_Radical_Party

    Ukrainians are in fact really just Russians of the Roman Catholic Faith that are in deep denial about it.
     
    Ukrainian nationalism began amongst Orthodox Ukrainians of the Left Bank and was brought to Galicia, where the native Catholics were initially Russophiles. Ukraine is about 90% Orthodox. It the mid 20th century western Ukrainian Greek Catholics shamefully larped as Balkanoids and slaughtered Roman Catholics.

    Ukrainian language is rather far from Russian, like Dutch from German (it is not like Croatian vs. Serbian).

    You flatter yourself by comparing yourself to Russians and therefore imagining that Ukrainians are Croats, given that you are basically an Albanian in deep denial.

    All your bullshit about the Habsburgs is thoroughly debunked in this book
     
    Your comical ignorance is certainly no recommendation for that book.

    Replies: @TheTotallyAnonymous, @TheTotallyAnonymous

  297. @Thulean Friend
    Chile has voted for a new constitution replacing the old Pinochet-imposed one, which made them into feudal labrats. Next year, a new constitutonal assembly will be voted in - a clean slate of people who will write the next one from scratch.<