The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersRussian Reaction Blog
Open Thread 108
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeThanksLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Thanks, LOL, or Troll with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used three times during any eight hour period.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Moscow installs Monument to the Courier, who made self-isolation possible (via Актуальная Россия).

This is this week’s Open Thread.

As Steve Sailer just noted, this month has been record breaking for the website – despite a ~30-40% loss in traffic that we would otherwise have thanks to the Facebook ban and Google deranking. It was also very nearly a record for me as well, with this blog getting 160,000 pageviews and almost half a million comment words.

Thanks, to both my readers and BLM – and keep the “powerful takes” coming!

 
• Tags: Open Thread 
Hide 481 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Please keep off topic posts to the current Open Thread.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

  2. • Agree: Octavian
    • Replies: @fnn
    @Blinky Bill

    World's deepest human voice

  3. • Thanks: Thulean Friend
    • Replies: @Passer by
    @Blinky Bill

    Reshuffling the global R&D deck, 1980-2050

    China to dwarf US in R&D spending by 2050

    "These changes have potentially profound domestic and international economic development implications over the medium to long term."

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440631/

  4. Nothing helps inflate the traffic of this website more than a good conspiracy theory yarn. I’m not sure that Giraldi’s latest rant will help in this vein, but Steven Yate’s latest “The World Through the Eyes of a Globalist” presents a colorful tale that in short form rivals even something written by Michael C. Ruppert. Personally, I tend to side with commenters #31 and #55 of that thread, and maintain a cautious if not disbelieving stance about the myriad of “Jews, Marxists, Deep State Actors, Swamp Things and College Professors” all being controlled from within the bowels of a Rothschildian opera with George Soros acting as the Director and guiding light of the whole show.

    So why do you ask yourself, do I bring up my incredulity and mirth up over here at this thread regarding Mr. Yate’s recent piece? It seems that Yate’s is content to express his conspiracy theory including some startling and alarming ideas regarding tranhumanism, something that should interest our host here, Anatoly. I don’t know if AK has actually heard ideas like this expressed about one of his pet projects? Who knows?

    Are your servants in governments really supposed to pay Universal Basic Income to masses who will lay around and play video games all day for the rest of their lives?

    You’re thinking: supply them with Huxleyan soma. Eventually, as your co-opted scientists learn more about how to integrate technology into the developing fetal brain (or the brain into the technosphere!), you’ll be able to go well beyond what Huxley envisioned. You’ll be able to program whole populations so they’re born to the status you want for them, and be both physically and mentally unable to question it.

    Transhumanism at its finest! Eternally!

    Resistance is futile, and all that….

    https://www.unz.com/article/the-world-through-the-eyes-of-a-globalist/

    • Replies: @Svevlad
    @Mr. Hack

    With conspiracy theories, "support, but not believe" is the best course of action. No matter how outlandish.

    As debunkers try to debunk it, and supporters prop it up, eventually the real truth shall be found. Apply this to everything

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  5. @Blinky Bill
    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1279150168097591296?s=20

    Replies: @Passer by

    Reshuffling the global R&D deck, 1980-2050

    China to dwarf US in R&D spending by 2050

    “These changes have potentially profound domestic and international economic development implications over the medium to long term.”

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440631/

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  6. • Agree: mal
    • LOL: Denis
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend

    Is there anything the Chinese working class can't do ?

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcSj_zlSa02492MZdR7Ack43HmJX8Cbn7WxsQA&usqp.jpg

  7. I’m pessimistic on India, but sometimes it helps getting an ‘on-the-ground’ perspective to make flesh out of air so to speak. This Twitter thread is a great rundown of why you should be skeptical of India ever reaching China’s heights, too.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend

    Forget about overtaking China, India's supposed transition into the world's next big factory never occurred either. I remember in the late 2000s and early 2010s about how everyone was saying India would become the next manufacturing powerhouse and that Made in China would become Made in India. They just took this for granted. Now India's lunch is getting eaten up by countries like Bangladesh, the Philippines, and especially Vietnam.

    When did you hear Vietnam's government and people constantly bombard the internet about Vietnam becoming a huge manufacturing hub? Never. And here we are looking at the emergence of a powerful Vietnamese manufacturing center that was supposed to be India's for the taking.

    , @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Thulean Friend

    Based on India's growth from 2010-19, I estimate India will reach where China is currently by 2060. China's GDP was $14 trillion in 2019. In 2060, the same inflation adjusted amount will be $30 trillion+.


    2010: $1.7 trillion
    2019: $2.9 trillion
    https://tradingeconomics.com/india/gdp
     
    The Indian economy almost doubled over the last decade. I assume over the next several decades Indian growth by decade will be equal or lower to the performance of the 2010s. Naturally, as an economy becomes more developed the growth rate is lower. By back of the envelope math figures it will be 2060 or later before India reaches inflation adjusted Chinese levels.
  8. Anatoly, I posted in the wrong thread about recommended books about the Russian/Bolshevik revolutions of 1917. Do any stand out to you? I believe Tell mentioned AS the Red Wheel, bought the first book of that series.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @truthman

    The Russian Revolution by Sean McMeekin.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

  9. On the Chinese-Indian confrontation, the best analysis I’ve read so far is this. Essentially, India has three options:

    1. A direct confrontation to take back the 5+ places that China unilaterally took over.
    2. Try to take other areas along the Line of Actual Control and then attempt an ‘indirect pressure’ tactic which would ideally end in a swap for land so the neutral status quo is returned.
    3. Accept a faît accompli as a done deal and try to minimise the domestic outfall.

    The first option will be very hard, as China has carefully taken very defensive positions, so any attacker would be in a significant disadvantage. China is also prepared for a counter-attack now, so any element of surprise is long gone. Finally, China has reinforced all these positions in recent weeks.

    The second option is perhaps the most attractive one, but it would require a great mobilisation rate and a war of attrition that India cannot afford, as China has not only managed the fallout of COVID-19 better but also has significantly more resources at their disposal. India also has to watch the Pakistani flank at the Line of Control. A two-front campaign will be very straining for India.

    The third option seemed to be Modi’s initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that “China hadn’t crossed into Indian territory”. He was faced with a torrent of attacks and even the submissive media had to, for once, take him to task. That said, unless something drastic changes, this may seem like the least costly option economically but will carry a heavy price in terms of prestige. There’s also the signal that India is weak and could be provoked further into the future.

    To me, option #2 is the most likely to be tried and option #3 as a last-ditch only. Option #1 would be almost impossible given the excellent positions of China’s reinforced bases there. It would also essentially be tantamount to declaring an open war, which India at the moment cannot afford to spend money on. Finally, as Dan Altman has showed, the odds of a state getting territory back after a faît accompli is very low, and he has looked at the actual data. Most landgrabs aren’t actually stated threats, they “just happen”. Crimea is a great example of this.

    Still, I believe the Chinese miscalculated badly as this will push India into the arms of the US even more. Modi genuinely tried to build a bridge of communication to China but the PLA and the CCP unilaterally burned it. All for a few patches of remote desert. Remarkably foolish.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend


    Remarkably foolish.
     
    Which is why it's highly unlikely that China initiated this conflict. China has bigger fish to fry than India. My take is that India sensed a moment of Chinese weakness, Covid19/global anti China sentiment/tacit US backing. Thought it was a good time to press the Chinese and change facts on the ground. India did not expect such a assertive response from China/ thought China would let this one slide. A bad outcome for both nations in my opinion. US wins this one.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Not Only Wrathful, @Grahamsno(G64)

    , @Astuteobservor II
    @Thulean Friend

    I thought Chinese troops never crossed borders. How did they take out indian territory? Wasn't that what modi said? If Chinese troops did cross borders, took over 5+ indian posts, that would be huge.

    You would have something.

    , @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Thulean Friend


    The third option seemed to be Modi’s initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that “China hadn’t crossed into Indian territory”.
     
    It is not a bizarre statement. The area where the clashed occurred is contested and not controlled by either side. There are different perceptions by each side with differing claim lines. So a patrol by one side could be within one’s claim and at the same time an incursion on the other side. There is routine jockeying by each side with patrolling and putting up temporary structures. I don't know what the situation is tactically but I do not trust the characterization that China has simply salami sliced territory. Keep in mind actions by China occur in the context of a decade long mostly one sided Indian military buildup along the boundary area including the deployment by India of tanks and aircraft and construction of new roads.

    I see the piece you linked to is authored by someone from the Stimson Center. They have been out in front for years on China-India issues and I distrust them. I believe as an institution they have an agenda to foster friction and conflict between China and India.

    An AEI fellow who collaborates with Stimson on China-India gave this honest take of motivation:

    Notably, previous U.S. presidents have also attempted to convince New Delhi to take on a more proactive role in balancing against China. The Indo-Pacific strategy elevates India’s importance to the United States as a key partner in the region and calls on New Delhi to play a larger role as “a nation that can bookend and anchor the free and open order in the Indo-Pacific region.” The hope is that India’s active involvement will force China to divert and spread more thinly its resources, efforts, and capabilities from its eastern borders to its western borders.
     
    https://www.lawfareblog.com/can-india-help-united-states-against-china

    I do not believe the clash was a miscalculation because there was no calculation at work. It was not a pre-planned attack. According to the Indian Army, it was an on the spot escalation that spiraled out of control. However, I believe it will be a miscalculation for China to pursue this confrontation because allowing the Quad military alliance to take shape is too high of a cost. And it will be wise to figure out some way to reduce patrols to bring stability. However, there should be at the same time a large scale military buildup in the border region with India to give Indians a dose of realism that has been sorely missing in their calculations.
  10. Any insight of Turkey’s genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We’ve been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I’ve seen in Germany sure didn’t look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @truthman

    Muhacir or Muhajir is a term used to refer to an estimated 10 million Ottoman Muslim citizens, and their descendants born after the onset of the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, (including Turks, Albanians, Bosniaks, Greeks, Circassians, Crimean Tatars, Pomaks) who emigrated to Thrace and Anatolia from the late 18th century until the end of the 20th century. Today, between a third and a quarter of Turkey's population of 80 million have ancestry from these Muhacirs.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhacir

    , @Hyperborean
    @truthman


    Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?
     
    Definitely Turkish 44D-Chess:

    https://i2.milimaj.com/i/milliyet/75/0x410/5c8c351d07291c1d74fac0f8.jpg

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Svevlad
    @truthman

    Like the Balkans, Turks are wildly diverse, always was. Such is the consequence on being located on the most important goddamn chokepoint on the planet.

    Some do, some don't, very random. Easterners tend to pull to the more swarthier side

    Replies: @Korenchkin

    , @AaronB
    @truthman

    Turks in Istanbul look completely European. Many blonds.

    The moment you leave Istanbul they look like Arabs.

    The Ottomans used European slaves in their army, so there is a decent amount of - mostly Slavic - European blood in the capital.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    , @cutler
    @truthman

    The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers

    Replies: @Colin Wright

  11. @Thulean Friend
    On the Chinese-Indian confrontation, the best analysis I've read so far is this. Essentially, India has three options:

    1. A direct confrontation to take back the 5+ places that China unilaterally took over.
    2. Try to take other areas along the Line of Actual Control and then attempt an 'indirect pressure' tactic which would ideally end in a swap for land so the neutral status quo is returned.
    3. Accept a faît accompli as a done deal and try to minimise the domestic outfall.

    The first option will be very hard, as China has carefully taken very defensive positions, so any attacker would be in a significant disadvantage. China is also prepared for a counter-attack now, so any element of surprise is long gone. Finally, China has reinforced all these positions in recent weeks.

    The second option is perhaps the most attractive one, but it would require a great mobilisation rate and a war of attrition that India cannot afford, as China has not only managed the fallout of COVID-19 better but also has significantly more resources at their disposal. India also has to watch the Pakistani flank at the Line of Control. A two-front campaign will be very straining for India.

    The third option seemed to be Modi's initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that "China hadn't crossed into Indian territory". He was faced with a torrent of attacks and even the submissive media had to, for once, take him to task. That said, unless something drastic changes, this may seem like the least costly option economically but will carry a heavy price in terms of prestige. There's also the signal that India is weak and could be provoked further into the future.

    To me, option #2 is the most likely to be tried and option #3 as a last-ditch only. Option #1 would be almost impossible given the excellent positions of China's reinforced bases there. It would also essentially be tantamount to declaring an open war, which India at the moment cannot afford to spend money on. Finally, as Dan Altman has showed, the odds of a state getting territory back after a faît accompli is very low, and he has looked at the actual data. Most landgrabs aren't actually stated threats, they "just happen". Crimea is a great example of this.

    Still, I believe the Chinese miscalculated badly as this will push India into the arms of the US even more. Modi genuinely tried to build a bridge of communication to China but the PLA and the CCP unilaterally burned it. All for a few patches of remote desert. Remarkably foolish.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Astuteobservor II, @china-russia-all-the-way

    Remarkably foolish.

    Which is why it’s highly unlikely that China initiated this conflict. China has bigger fish to fry than India. My take is that India sensed a moment of Chinese weakness, Covid19/global anti China sentiment/tacit US backing. Thought it was a good time to press the Chinese and change facts on the ground. India did not expect such a assertive response from China/ thought China would let this one slide. A bad outcome for both nations in my opinion. US wins this one.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Blinky Bill

    While an interesting take, I don't think it's accurate for two reasons.

    1) The positions that China took were the same exact ones that India and China fought over in 1962. They've long coveted those positions precisely because how strong defensively they are.

    2) China moved into these positions in April, when India was at its weakest (not vice versa). India had arguably the world's harshest shutdown, and possibly the most chaotic as well. Migrants had to walk hundreds of kilometers back home, and many died on the journey.
    It was in this environment that China began to move into these areas.

    This was premeditated. China did a very calculated and coldly executed move. Now they have a near-insurmountable advantage along most of the LoAC, which is running 1000+ km between the two countries.

    It's basically a landversion of what they did in the South China Sea.

    Whatever they gained militarily along the LoAC, they massively lost geopolitically. Clearly many in the Chinese leadership had written off India as a lost cause regardless, otherwise they wouldn't have burned the bridges in such a public fashion. That was a dangerous miscalculation. Modi genuinely wanted a balance of power, now he has little choice but to run with abandon into the orbit of the US as India is too weak on its own. Very, very foolish of Beijing.

    Replies: @Passer by, @Tor597, @Astuteobservor II

    , @Not Only Wrathful
    @Blinky Bill

    Your reasoning for not believing that China started it is solely built on your belief that they're really brilliant, rather than what actually happened, which you then use to shore up your belief.

    This is the definition of confirmation bias.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Blinky Bill

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it's certainly not India's fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You're right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they're going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    Replies: @Lin, @Daniel Chieh, @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

  12. @Thulean Friend
    https://twitter.com/billbirtles/status/1278942433783320576

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    Is there anything the Chinese working class can’t do ?

    [MORE]

    • LOL: Thulean Friend
  13. Did you (or anyone else) ever play the game Empire Earth (2001)?

    It features an excellent example of nationalist-futurism in the Russian campaign in which a Russian nationalist is elected president and then conquers all of Eurasia with mecha (and it’s a good thing).

  14. @truthman
    Any insight of Turkey's genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We've been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I've seen in Germany sure didn't look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Hyperborean, @Svevlad, @AaronB, @cutler

    Muhacir or Muhajir is a term used to refer to an estimated 10 million Ottoman Muslim citizens, and their descendants born after the onset of the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, (including Turks, Albanians, Bosniaks, Greeks, Circassians, Crimean Tatars, Pomaks) who emigrated to Thrace and Anatolia from the late 18th century until the end of the 20th century. Today, between a third and a quarter of Turkey’s population of 80 million have ancestry from these Muhacirs.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhacir

  15. @truthman
    Any insight of Turkey's genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We've been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I've seen in Germany sure didn't look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Hyperborean, @Svevlad, @AaronB, @cutler

    Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Definitely Turkish 44D-Chess:

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    There's something sad about Turkey's self-hatred. Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    It's not just that wannabe gangster either. This kitschy version of a 'European village' in Turkey sold 350 of 700 units before the economic crisis hit:

    https://i.imgur.com/FkKgjp0.jpg

    I've also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I've interacted with them on the internet. To tell them that they have more in common with arabs seems like the greatest insult imaginable, they invariably explode in wounded rage.

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Nodwink, @silviosilver

  16. @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend


    Remarkably foolish.
     
    Which is why it's highly unlikely that China initiated this conflict. China has bigger fish to fry than India. My take is that India sensed a moment of Chinese weakness, Covid19/global anti China sentiment/tacit US backing. Thought it was a good time to press the Chinese and change facts on the ground. India did not expect such a assertive response from China/ thought China would let this one slide. A bad outcome for both nations in my opinion. US wins this one.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Not Only Wrathful, @Grahamsno(G64)

    While an interesting take, I don’t think it’s accurate for two reasons.

    1) The positions that China took were the same exact ones that India and China fought over in 1962. They’ve long coveted those positions precisely because how strong defensively they are.

    2) China moved into these positions in April, when India was at its weakest (not vice versa). India had arguably the world’s harshest shutdown, and possibly the most chaotic as well. Migrants had to walk hundreds of kilometers back home, and many died on the journey.
    It was in this environment that China began to move into these areas.

    This was premeditated. China did a very calculated and coldly executed move. Now they have a near-insurmountable advantage along most of the LoAC, which is running 1000+ km between the two countries.

    It’s basically a landversion of what they did in the South China Sea.

    Whatever they gained militarily along the LoAC, they massively lost geopolitically. Clearly many in the Chinese leadership had written off India as a lost cause regardless, otherwise they wouldn’t have burned the bridges in such a public fashion. That was a dangerous miscalculation. Modi genuinely wanted a balance of power, now he has little choice but to run with abandon into the orbit of the US as India is too weak on its own. Very, very foolish of Beijing.

    • Agree: AaronB
    • Disagree: Blinky Bill, Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Passer by
    @Thulean Friend

    India is having an accelerating Covid pandemic, so the country will be weakening itself during this year and probably the next.

    The IMF estimates growing economic gap between China and India due to this.

    As for India running to the US, it actually just bought 30 russian fighter aircraft in connection with the border issue.

    Moreover, the US is abandoning Afghanistan. "Partners" (Russia, Iran) will be important for regulating the US vacated area, so that it does not become a full gain for Pakistan.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    , @Tor597
    @Thulean Friend

    That is just the Anglo - Indian narrative.

    Here is a take from an Indian that shows Indian aggression.

    https://indianpunchline.com/1962-india-china-war-redeux/

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    , @Astuteobservor II
    @Thulean Friend

    Oooh, so India is going to become a mere US satellite like Japan?

    That is surprising considering all that chest thumping.

    So I was right, India did give up competing with China.

  17. @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend


    Remarkably foolish.
     
    Which is why it's highly unlikely that China initiated this conflict. China has bigger fish to fry than India. My take is that India sensed a moment of Chinese weakness, Covid19/global anti China sentiment/tacit US backing. Thought it was a good time to press the Chinese and change facts on the ground. India did not expect such a assertive response from China/ thought China would let this one slide. A bad outcome for both nations in my opinion. US wins this one.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Not Only Wrathful, @Grahamsno(G64)

    Your reasoning for not believing that China started it is solely built on your belief that they’re really brilliant, rather than what actually happened, which you then use to shore up your belief.

    This is the definition of confirmation bias.

    • Agree: SIMP simp
    • LOL: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Not Only Wrathful

    Summary:
    1959, Zhou Enlai offers to accept the McMahon Line in the East, if India accepts China's claims in the West.
    Nehru rejects.
    1962 war, China wins but decides to withdraw forces from Ladakh unilaterally, asking India to do the same.
    India refuses.
    1976: DMZ and patrolling limits established with new ROEs (including the 'no weapons while patrolling' rule).
    1993: "LAC" established.
    China begins building infrastructure and amassing troops in its new theater command.
    India keeps focusing all its energy against Pakistan.
    2010: China declares that it doesn't have a 'border' with India in Ladakh (validating Pakistan's claim on Kashmir.)
    2015 PLA's strategic reforms begin.
    2017: Doklam happens.
    2019: India unilaterally annexes Kashmir/Ladakh by revoking article 370
    China responds by throwing out the 1993 agreement plus the '62 status quo.

  18. @Hyperborean
    @truthman


    Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?
     
    Definitely Turkish 44D-Chess:

    https://i2.milimaj.com/i/milliyet/75/0x410/5c8c351d07291c1d74fac0f8.jpg

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    There’s something sad about Turkey’s self-hatred. Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    It’s not just that wannabe gangster either. This kitschy version of a ‘European village’ in Turkey sold 350 of 700 units before the economic crisis hit:

    I’ve also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I’ve interacted with them on the internet. To tell them that they have more in common with arabs seems like the greatest insult imaginable, they invariably explode in wounded rage.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @Thulean Friend

    How is not wanting to be seen as Turkish-speaking Arabs self-hating?

    Replies: @Not Raul

    , @Nodwink
    @Thulean Friend

    I'd be pretty mad too, if someone called me an Arab.

    , @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend


    Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.
     
    Actually, there's no evidence they're LARPing as anything, much less that they're engaged in a racial fantasy.

    If they're disproportionately featured on television, it's because whiter people, on average, simply look better than less white people, and non-whites as well as whites (except white libtards) have a preference for seeing whiter/lighter faces on television. (This preference may be marked or it may be slight, but it is seldom absent.)

    Of course, the average white is nothing much to look at. But at the highest echelons of human beauty, there's no competition, whites crush all before them. (And good looking non-whites far more often than not have hefty proportions of European ancestry themselves.)

    I’ve also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I’ve interacted with them on the internet.
     
    There's a substantial educated, liberal-leaning population in Turkey. I think it's more that they want to distance themselves from the conservative islamic image of their country and show that they can be enlightened and progressive too, rather than to be seen as European per se. When I used to post on race boards a lot, the Turkish factions there didn't strike me as desperate to be seen as white. They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Europe Europa

  19. Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @Thulean Friend

    Wrong about what?

    What else do you expect if the system advantaged energy production that produces less CO2?

    , @Denis
    @Thulean Friend

    Germany made a policy decision years ago to replace its nuclear energy sources with non-nuclear ones, so this is hardly a huge surprise.

    , @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020
     
    And, as an inevitable consequence, Germany has the highest electricity cost in Europe. (1)

    Germany has the highest electricity costs in Europe, with a rate of around 35 US cents a kilowatt-hour.
    ...
    There are ramifications involved in Germany’s contemporary renewable energy program, including an instable electric grid, the burden being placed upon German households by increased costs for electricity, and the need for secure back-up power that is affordable and reliable
     
    And, the expansion of wind power in Germany is grinding to a halt due to the mass kill of endangered birds. (2)

    The expansion of wind power in the first half of [2019] collapsed to its lowest level since the introduction of the Renewable Energy Act (EEG) in 2000. All in all, just 35 wind turbines were build with an output of 231 megawatts. “This corresponds to a decline of 82 percent compared to the already weak period of the previous year”, according to the German Wind Energy Association (BWE) in Berlin.
    ...
    when in 2021 thousands of wind turbines come to the end of the 20-year subsidy period of the Renewable Energy Act, more wind turbines will be demolished on balance than new ones will be added, the wind industry fears.
    ...
    The most important cause lies in the legal resistance of wildlife and forest conservationists fighting new wind farms. The BWE President referred to an industry survey of the onshore wind agency. According to its findings, more than 70 percent of the legal objections are based on species conservation, especially the threat to endangered bird species and bats.
     
    If you want something done wrong, go to the German government.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) From 2018: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/electricity-rates-around-the-world.html

    (2) https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/07/29/collapse-of-wind-power-threatens-germanys-green-energy-transition/

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @Thorfinnsson
    @Thulean Friend

    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers, which is far above the global average.

    https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Germany/electricity_prices/

    The policy is a success at its narrow mandate--to increase the share of electricity generated by renewables.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Thulean Friend

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Thulean Friend

    Germany spent half a trillion dollars to get some of Europe's highest electricity costs and probably isn't even that big of a deal in climate terms because wind (especially offshore wind) has low EROEI according to most estimates.

    Can't call that a much better use of resources than America's favorite pastime of Middle East adventures or Russia's of providing more villas for the Rotenbergs...

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @songbird
    @Thulean Friend

    Most of "Germany's biomass" comes from outside of Germany, places like Indonesia and Brazil.

  20. @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    There's something sad about Turkey's self-hatred. Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    It's not just that wannabe gangster either. This kitschy version of a 'European village' in Turkey sold 350 of 700 units before the economic crisis hit:

    https://i.imgur.com/FkKgjp0.jpg

    I've also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I've interacted with them on the internet. To tell them that they have more in common with arabs seems like the greatest insult imaginable, they invariably explode in wounded rage.

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Nodwink, @silviosilver

    How is not wanting to be seen as Turkish-speaking Arabs self-hating?

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Mitleser

    Agreed. Turks are neither from Arabia nor Arabic-speaking.

  21. @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    Wrong about what?

    What else do you expect if the system advantaged energy production that produces less CO2?

  22. mal says:

    Bloomberg is complaining about politics around Nord Stream 2. Apparently, it doesn’t go as planned.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/opinion/articles/2020-07-03/nord-stream-2-gas-pipeline-could-sever-u-s-germany-ties

    The best thing about this pipeline is clarity it brings to the geopolitical situation. Either Germany folds and fades into irrelevance like the dying Japan (another occupied province), or Germans grow a pair.

    As the old joke goes, the objective of NATO is to keep Americans in, Russians out, and Germans down. We will see if Germans are willing to stay down.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  23. @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    Germany made a policy decision years ago to replace its nuclear energy sources with non-nuclear ones, so this is hardly a huge surprise.

  24. News from the insane asylum:

    https://newsone.com/3970690/dawit-kelete-seattle-protest-hit-run-driver-identified/

    Black Lives Matter protesters block highway. A black man runs over two white lesbians. Protesters, who demand defunding the police, call the police, and have them arrest the black man.

    They should rename themselves ‘White lesbian lives matter’.

    • Agree: Mr. XYZ
  25. A123 says:
    @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    And, as an inevitable consequence, Germany has the highest electricity cost in Europe. (1)

    Germany has the highest electricity costs in Europe, with a rate of around 35 US cents a kilowatt-hour.

    There are ramifications involved in Germany’s contemporary renewable energy program, including an instable electric grid, the burden being placed upon German households by increased costs for electricity, and the need for secure back-up power that is affordable and reliable

    And, the expansion of wind power in Germany is grinding to a halt due to the mass kill of endangered birds. (2)

    The expansion of wind power in the first half of [2019] collapsed to its lowest level since the introduction of the Renewable Energy Act (EEG) in 2000. All in all, just 35 wind turbines were build with an output of 231 megawatts. “This corresponds to a decline of 82 percent compared to the already weak period of the previous year”, according to the German Wind Energy Association (BWE) in Berlin.

    when in 2021 thousands of wind turbines come to the end of the 20-year subsidy period of the Renewable Energy Act, more wind turbines will be demolished on balance than new ones will be added, the wind industry fears.

    The most important cause lies in the legal resistance of wildlife and forest conservationists fighting new wind farms. The BWE President referred to an industry survey of the onshore wind agency. According to its findings, more than 70 percent of the legal objections are based on species conservation, especially the threat to endangered bird species and bats.

    If you want something done wrong, go to the German government.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) From 2018: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/electricity-rates-around-the-world.html

    (2) https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/07/29/collapse-of-wind-power-threatens-germanys-green-energy-transition/

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @A123

    If you want a cheapest base load, the best option is gas combined cycle plant, - with German turbines.


    https://i.imgur.com/2Fe7dbb.jpg
    https://www.lazard.com/media/450784/lazards-levelized-cost-of-energy-version-120-vfinal.pdf
    But wind is cost competitive (although not suitable for base load)

    -

    (Alternatives like nuclear energy is not only presently absurdly expensive, inefficient, unnimble - but a large part of its future costs are hidden and vastly subsidized by future tax payers. While coal includes many times more deaths as externalities of air pollution, than gas. So such options are not sensible alternatives for gas.).

    Replies: @A123

  26. @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers, which is far above the global average.

    https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Germany/electricity_prices/

    The policy is a success at its narrow mandate–to increase the share of electricity generated by renewables.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @Thorfinnsson

    still a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.) and lower risk (no nuclear energy).

    Replies: @A123, @Mitleser, @EldnahYm

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Thorfinnsson


    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers
     
    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That's also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.

    Replies: @Vishnugupta, @Thorfinnsson

  27. The several comments about Turkey reminded me of something Paul Theroux, the great travel writer, said. He was asked what country he would reside in if the sole criterion was the friendliness of the people. He named Turkey, as well as Australia, New Zealand, and Italy. This result might have been skewed by the fact that Theroux is somewhat of a curmudgeon, and he had experienced which people responded with the greatest tolerance for a curmudgeon. Also, this was about 20 years ago.

    • Replies: @fnn
    @SafeNow

    Haha, more than "somewhat." I once heard him insulting a live audience at the site of an NPR event as if they were rednecks.

  28. @Mr. Hack
    Nothing helps inflate the traffic of this website more than a good conspiracy theory yarn. I'm not sure that Giraldi's latest rant will help in this vein, but Steven Yate's latest "The World Through the Eyes of a Globalist" presents a colorful tale that in short form rivals even something written by Michael C. Ruppert. Personally, I tend to side with commenters #31 and #55 of that thread, and maintain a cautious if not disbelieving stance about the myriad of "Jews, Marxists, Deep State Actors, Swamp Things and College Professors" all being controlled from within the bowels of a Rothschildian opera with George Soros acting as the Director and guiding light of the whole show.

    So why do you ask yourself, do I bring up my incredulity and mirth up over here at this thread regarding Mr. Yate's recent piece? It seems that Yate's is content to express his conspiracy theory including some startling and alarming ideas regarding tranhumanism, something that should interest our host here, Anatoly. I don't know if AK has actually heard ideas like this expressed about one of his pet projects? Who knows?


    Are your servants in governments really supposed to pay Universal Basic Income to masses who will lay around and play video games all day for the rest of their lives?

    You’re thinking: supply them with Huxleyan soma. Eventually, as your co-opted scientists learn more about how to integrate technology into the developing fetal brain (or the brain into the technosphere!), you’ll be able to go well beyond what Huxley envisioned. You’ll be able to program whole populations so they’re born to the status you want for them, and be both physically and mentally unable to question it.

    Transhumanism at its finest! Eternally!

    Resistance is futile, and all that….
     

    https://www.unz.com/article/the-world-through-the-eyes-of-a-globalist/

    Replies: @Svevlad

    With conspiracy theories, “support, but not believe” is the best course of action. No matter how outlandish.

    As debunkers try to debunk it, and supporters prop it up, eventually the real truth shall be found. Apply this to everything

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Svevlad

    Why does anybody need to "support" such outlandish ideas in the first place?

    Replies: @Svevlad, @Astuteobservor II

  29. @truthman
    Any insight of Turkey's genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We've been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I've seen in Germany sure didn't look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Hyperborean, @Svevlad, @AaronB, @cutler

    Like the Balkans, Turks are wildly diverse, always was. Such is the consequence on being located on the most important goddamn chokepoint on the planet.

    Some do, some don’t, very random. Easterners tend to pull to the more swarthier side

    • Replies: @Korenchkin
    @Svevlad

    Easterners tend to not be Turks

  30. @Svevlad
    @truthman

    Like the Balkans, Turks are wildly diverse, always was. Such is the consequence on being located on the most important goddamn chokepoint on the planet.

    Some do, some don't, very random. Easterners tend to pull to the more swarthier side

    Replies: @Korenchkin

    Easterners tend to not be Turks

  31. @truthman
    Any insight of Turkey's genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We've been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I've seen in Germany sure didn't look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Hyperborean, @Svevlad, @AaronB, @cutler

    Turks in Istanbul look completely European. Many blonds.

    The moment you leave Istanbul they look like Arabs.

    The Ottomans used European slaves in their army, so there is a decent amount of – mostly Slavic – European blood in the capital.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @AaronB

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil.

    Language and culture always seems to trump genetics at the end of the day. Ethnic nationalists generally claim the most important thing is race and that language and culture are small details by comparison yet I'm yet to see much real world evidence of that theory. Most people seem to divide themselves along linguistic and cultural lines, especially when thinking in an international sense.

    Ethnicity seems to be something that has more relevance within the society. Like white Turks, high-caste white Indians, white Brazilians, etc, will tend to cluster together within their respective societies, but when it comes to foreign countries, most of these people will say that their non-white fellow countryman is more their brother than a white foreigner.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Hyperborean, @Beckow

  32. @Svevlad
    @Mr. Hack

    With conspiracy theories, "support, but not believe" is the best course of action. No matter how outlandish.

    As debunkers try to debunk it, and supporters prop it up, eventually the real truth shall be found. Apply this to everything

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Why does anybody need to “support” such outlandish ideas in the first place?

    • Replies: @Svevlad
    @Mr. Hack

    To prevent staleness, but mostly to legitimize the others, as they're all under fire as "conspiracy theories" anyway and therefore equated.

    , @Astuteobservor II
    @Mr. Hack

    After snowden, I give all conspiracy theories a 99% rating. Of course not the obvious crazy ones. The one you mentioned would require technology that will not be available soon or even 50 years from Now. Unless AI makes huge break through.

    So, yes, support that theory (notice I took out the conspiracy word) but with incredulity.

  33. @Thorfinnsson
    @Thulean Friend

    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers, which is far above the global average.

    https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Germany/electricity_prices/

    The policy is a success at its narrow mandate--to increase the share of electricity generated by renewables.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Thulean Friend

    still a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.) and lower risk (no nuclear energy).

    • Replies: @A123
    @Erik Sieven


    a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.)
     
    Do you mean a high price for total dependency on China? (1)

    Modern wind turbines depend on rare earth minerals mined primarily from China. Unfortunately, given federal regulations in the U.S. that restrict rare earth mineral development and China’s poor record of environmental stewardship, the process of extracting these minerals imposes wretched environmental and public health impacts on local communities. It’s a story Big Wind doesn’t want you to hear.
    ...
    As more factories sprang up, the banks grew higher, the lake grew larger and the stench and fumes grew more overwhelming.

    ‘It turned into a mountain that towered over us,’ says Mr Su. ‘Anything we planted just withered, then our animals started to sicken and die.’

    People too began to suffer. Dalahai villagers say their teeth began to fall out, their hair turned white at unusually young ages, and they suffered from severe skin and respiratory diseases. Children were born with soft bones and cancer rates rocketed.
     
    Every time I see a wind turbine, I think of it as a gravestone marking the human sacrifice of a Chinese child on the alter of SJW Globalism & Political Correctness.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/renewable/wind/big-winds-dirty-little-secret-rare-earth-minerals/

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @Mitleser
    @Erik Sieven

    You did not read TF's article, did you?


    Natural gas-fired power stations increased their production by 13.9% across the first half of 2020 thanks to a suite of reasons including the global switch from coal, a mammoth drop in natural gas prices – which fell by around 50% – and the fact that natural gas power plants have lower CO₂ certificate prices.
     
    German energy policy is neither safer nor does it increase energy independence.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    , @EldnahYm
    @Erik Sieven

    Renewable energy is the least robust energy source. It does not provide energy independence.

  34. @AaronB
    @truthman

    Turks in Istanbul look completely European. Many blonds.

    The moment you leave Istanbul they look like Arabs.

    The Ottomans used European slaves in their army, so there is a decent amount of - mostly Slavic - European blood in the capital.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil.

    Language and culture always seems to trump genetics at the end of the day. Ethnic nationalists generally claim the most important thing is race and that language and culture are small details by comparison yet I’m yet to see much real world evidence of that theory. Most people seem to divide themselves along linguistic and cultural lines, especially when thinking in an international sense.

    Ethnicity seems to be something that has more relevance within the society. Like white Turks, high-caste white Indians, white Brazilians, etc, will tend to cluster together within their respective societies, but when it comes to foreign countries, most of these people will say that their non-white fellow countryman is more their brother than a white foreigner.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @Europe Europa


    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil
     
    .

    Oh, without question. I am blond, pale skinned, and look Aryan, yet I identify with a dark skinned Yemeni Israeli Jew much more than I do with any German or Norwegian.

    You can't build a nation on race. It is too abstract an idea. Its never been done before.

    But things like "culture" are too unscientific for most modern "white" nationalists, who are rationalists. You can't create a culture using conscious reason. It comes from the subconscious.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Colin Wright

    , @Hyperborean
    @Europe Europa


    White Turks (Turkish: Beyaz Türkler) is a term used in Turkey for the urban population that embraces progressive, secular, Western, Republican values. White Turks are in contrast to the so-called Black Turks (Turkish: Kara Türkler or Siyah Türkler), a name for the conservative, Islamic, and typically less educated among the originally rural Anatolian population. The two terms are related to the emergence of a middle class since the end of the 20th century, and is an expression of elite consciousness and also a contempt for a section of the population which is seen as backwards. Civilizing efforts had been part of the imagination of all Turkish elites since the Tanzimat reforms.
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Turks

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    , @Beckow
    @Europe Europa

    It only works that way with open borders and internationalised environment, people start having more in common with their own countrymen, language, culture. Once you isolate them in their countries they will be at each other throat. With corona travel restrictions the internal divisions within countries will surface.

    The dying globalism had an interesting side effect of strengthening solidarity within groups (elites and wanna-be-elites exempted). Soon we will see how they really feel when forced to live with each other. The recent migrant groups like Pakis in UK or Eritreans in Sweden will stand out like a sore thumb. And even within homogeneous countries it will be North vs. South, east vs. west, city against countryside, etc... We have already seen a dramatic increase in within-a-country hostilities. If corona goes on and on, there will be no stopping it. More people become aware of their identity, worse it will get.

  35. Lots of interesting points

    • Disagree: Thulean Friend
  36. A123 says:
    @Erik Sieven
    @Thorfinnsson

    still a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.) and lower risk (no nuclear energy).

    Replies: @A123, @Mitleser, @EldnahYm

    a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.)

    Do you mean a high price for total dependency on China? (1)

    Modern wind turbines depend on rare earth minerals mined primarily from China. Unfortunately, given federal regulations in the U.S. that restrict rare earth mineral development and China’s poor record of environmental stewardship, the process of extracting these minerals imposes wretched environmental and public health impacts on local communities. It’s a story Big Wind doesn’t want you to hear.

    As more factories sprang up, the banks grew higher, the lake grew larger and the stench and fumes grew more overwhelming.

    ‘It turned into a mountain that towered over us,’ says Mr Su. ‘Anything we planted just withered, then our animals started to sicken and die.’

    People too began to suffer. Dalahai villagers say their teeth began to fall out, their hair turned white at unusually young ages, and they suffered from severe skin and respiratory diseases. Children were born with soft bones and cancer rates rocketed.

    Every time I see a wind turbine, I think of it as a gravestone marking the human sacrifice of a Chinese child on the alter of SJW Globalism & Political Correctness.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/renewable/wind/big-winds-dirty-little-secret-rare-earth-minerals/

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @A123


    John Bolton: Trump sought Xi's help to win re-election
     
    US President Donald Trump sought help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton's new book says.


    和平👲

    Replies: @A123

  37. @Europe Europa
    @AaronB

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil.

    Language and culture always seems to trump genetics at the end of the day. Ethnic nationalists generally claim the most important thing is race and that language and culture are small details by comparison yet I'm yet to see much real world evidence of that theory. Most people seem to divide themselves along linguistic and cultural lines, especially when thinking in an international sense.

    Ethnicity seems to be something that has more relevance within the society. Like white Turks, high-caste white Indians, white Brazilians, etc, will tend to cluster together within their respective societies, but when it comes to foreign countries, most of these people will say that their non-white fellow countryman is more their brother than a white foreigner.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Hyperborean, @Beckow

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil

    .

    Oh, without question. I am blond, pale skinned, and look Aryan, yet I identify with a dark skinned Yemeni Israeli Jew much more than I do with any German or Norwegian.

    You can’t build a nation on race. It is too abstract an idea. Its never been done before.

    But things like “culture” are too unscientific for most modern “white” nationalists, who are rationalists. You can’t create a culture using conscious reason. It comes from the subconscious.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @AaronB

    Monsters from the yID.

    , @Colin Wright
    @AaronB

    '...But things like “culture” are too unscientific for most modern “white” nationalists, who are rationalists...'

    I'm certain that what little you share with a Yemeni Jew could not reasonably be described as a 'culture.'

    Go ahead: I'm sure there are venues where Yemeni Jews hang out. Drop in; tell me how at home you feel.

  38. It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing “BLM” badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I’m aware there’s been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn’t been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Europe Europa

    Premier League footballers are still going down on one knee in England.

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    @Europe Europa

    Not really. https://www.unz.com/akarlin/outliving-your-usefulness/

    , @AnonFromTN
    @Europe Europa

    In the US common sense is also gradually replacing madness. Newsweek published an unusually sane piece by a reasonable black guy “Why black lives don’t matter to ‘Black Lives Matter’”, where he exposes BLM for what they are, opportunistic frauds:
    https://www.newsweek.com/why-black-lives-dont-matter-black-lives-matter-opinion-1515183
    Nothing unexpected. Any organization getting money from large corporations is utterly disgusting. BLM included.

    Replies: @216

    , @Colin Wright
    @Europe Europa

    'It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing “BLM” badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    'As far as I’m aware there’s been no similar backlash against BLM in the US...'

    'Black Lives Matter' in the US has yet to make the mistake of attacking support for Israel.

    , @another anon
    @Europe Europa


    It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them.
     
    This. See the replies.

    https://twitter.com/ukblm/status/1277177624884850689

    And in the United States...

    https://twitter.com/DailyCaller/status/1278494688937459712

    If this continues, black lives will cease to matter very soon.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

  39. @Erik Sieven
    @Thorfinnsson

    still a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.) and lower risk (no nuclear energy).

    Replies: @A123, @Mitleser, @EldnahYm

    You did not read TF’s article, did you?

    Natural gas-fired power stations increased their production by 13.9% across the first half of 2020 thanks to a suite of reasons including the global switch from coal, a mammoth drop in natural gas prices – which fell by around 50% – and the fact that natural gas power plants have lower CO₂ certificate prices.

    German energy policy is neither safer nor does it increase energy independence.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @Mitleser

    in the long run a growing share of renewable energy in the energy mix will lead to less imports of all non-renewable resourcses like gas, oil, black coal.

    Replies: @Mitleser

  40. @SafeNow
    The several comments about Turkey reminded me of something Paul Theroux, the great travel writer, said. He was asked what country he would reside in if the sole criterion was the friendliness of the people. He named Turkey, as well as Australia, New Zealand, and Italy. This result might have been skewed by the fact that Theroux is somewhat of a curmudgeon, and he had experienced which people responded with the greatest tolerance for a curmudgeon. Also, this was about 20 years ago.

    Replies: @fnn

    Haha, more than “somewhat.” I once heard him insulting a live audience at the site of an NPR event as if they were rednecks.

  41. @Thulean Friend
    @Blinky Bill

    While an interesting take, I don't think it's accurate for two reasons.

    1) The positions that China took were the same exact ones that India and China fought over in 1962. They've long coveted those positions precisely because how strong defensively they are.

    2) China moved into these positions in April, when India was at its weakest (not vice versa). India had arguably the world's harshest shutdown, and possibly the most chaotic as well. Migrants had to walk hundreds of kilometers back home, and many died on the journey.
    It was in this environment that China began to move into these areas.

    This was premeditated. China did a very calculated and coldly executed move. Now they have a near-insurmountable advantage along most of the LoAC, which is running 1000+ km between the two countries.

    It's basically a landversion of what they did in the South China Sea.

    Whatever they gained militarily along the LoAC, they massively lost geopolitically. Clearly many in the Chinese leadership had written off India as a lost cause regardless, otherwise they wouldn't have burned the bridges in such a public fashion. That was a dangerous miscalculation. Modi genuinely wanted a balance of power, now he has little choice but to run with abandon into the orbit of the US as India is too weak on its own. Very, very foolish of Beijing.

    Replies: @Passer by, @Tor597, @Astuteobservor II

    India is having an accelerating Covid pandemic, so the country will be weakening itself during this year and probably the next.

    The IMF estimates growing economic gap between China and India due to this.

    As for India running to the US, it actually just bought 30 russian fighter aircraft in connection with the border issue.

    Moreover, the US is abandoning Afghanistan. “Partners” (Russia, Iran) will be important for regulating the US vacated area, so that it does not become a full gain for Pakistan.

    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Passer by


    As for India running to the US, it actually just bought 30 russian fighter aircraft in connection with the border issue.
     
    At a cynical level Russia is in a win win situation since it supplies arms to both the sides and it wants to regain its premier position as India's largest arms supplier which has been lost to the US. But whats interesting about this sale is that it happened so quickly and despite the Chinese trying to scuttle the deal. The message is clear from the Russian side that they do disapprove of this gratuitous Chinese dickwaving. They have signaled to the Chinese that their foreign policy with respect to India won't be influenced by the growing Sino-Indian problem. They also decided to expedite the supply of the S400 antiaircraft systems. Interesting isn't it?
  42. WHO RULES AMERICA IS EASY TO SEE WHEN… (W/ KMN & M. COLLETT)




    IMPORTANT: A RESPONSE TO JOHN DERBYSHIRE’S CLAIM THAT ‘WE’ ARE / WESTERN CIVILIZATION IS ‘DOOMED’.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/VY3pu2CmAfdg/

  43. • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Haruto Rat

    What else is new? Retarded primeval vandals don’t know or care what they vandalize.

    , @Pericles
    @Haruto Rat

    I'm surprised they haven't cancelled Disney yet. Hint: Goofy is BLACK!!1!

    https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/disney/images/2/21/Goofystar_1600.jpg

  44. @AaronB
    @Europe Europa


    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil
     
    .

    Oh, without question. I am blond, pale skinned, and look Aryan, yet I identify with a dark skinned Yemeni Israeli Jew much more than I do with any German or Norwegian.

    You can't build a nation on race. It is too abstract an idea. Its never been done before.

    But things like "culture" are too unscientific for most modern "white" nationalists, who are rationalists. You can't create a culture using conscious reason. It comes from the subconscious.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Colin Wright

    Monsters from the yID.

  45. @Europe Europa
    It's interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing "BLM" badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I'm aware there's been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn't been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Anatoly Karlin, @AnonFromTN, @Colin Wright, @another anon

    Premier League footballers are still going down on one knee in England.

  46. @Mitleser
    @Thulean Friend

    How is not wanting to be seen as Turkish-speaking Arabs self-hating?

    Replies: @Not Raul

    Agreed. Turks are neither from Arabia nor Arabic-speaking.

  47. @Europe Europa
    @AaronB

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil.

    Language and culture always seems to trump genetics at the end of the day. Ethnic nationalists generally claim the most important thing is race and that language and culture are small details by comparison yet I'm yet to see much real world evidence of that theory. Most people seem to divide themselves along linguistic and cultural lines, especially when thinking in an international sense.

    Ethnicity seems to be something that has more relevance within the society. Like white Turks, high-caste white Indians, white Brazilians, etc, will tend to cluster together within their respective societies, but when it comes to foreign countries, most of these people will say that their non-white fellow countryman is more their brother than a white foreigner.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Hyperborean, @Beckow

    White Turks (Turkish: Beyaz Türkler) is a term used in Turkey for the urban population that embraces progressive, secular, Western, Republican values. White Turks are in contrast to the so-called Black Turks (Turkish: Kara Türkler or Siyah Türkler), a name for the conservative, Islamic, and typically less educated among the originally rural Anatolian population. The two terms are related to the emergence of a middle class since the end of the 20th century, and is an expression of elite consciousness and also a contempt for a section of the population which is seen as backwards. Civilizing efforts had been part of the imagination of all Turkish elites since the Tanzimat reforms.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Turks

    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    @Hyperborean

    https://i.imgflip.com/1egm7b.jpg

    "I am not saying this is about race... but it's totally about race."

  48. @Hyperborean
    @Europe Europa


    White Turks (Turkish: Beyaz Türkler) is a term used in Turkey for the urban population that embraces progressive, secular, Western, Republican values. White Turks are in contrast to the so-called Black Turks (Turkish: Kara Türkler or Siyah Türkler), a name for the conservative, Islamic, and typically less educated among the originally rural Anatolian population. The two terms are related to the emergence of a middle class since the end of the 20th century, and is an expression of elite consciousness and also a contempt for a section of the population which is seen as backwards. Civilizing efforts had been part of the imagination of all Turkish elites since the Tanzimat reforms.
     
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Turks

    Replies: @Hyperborean

    “I am not saying this is about race… but it’s totally about race.”

    • LOL: Alexander Turok
  49. @truthman
    Anatoly, I posted in the wrong thread about recommended books about the Russian/Bolshevik revolutions of 1917. Do any stand out to you? I believe Tell mentioned AS the Red Wheel, bought the first book of that series.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    The Russian Revolution by Sean McMeekin.

    • Replies: @Mr. XYZ
    @Anatoly Karlin

    What about this book? It's old (from the late 1930s, I believe) but nevertheless quite good:

    https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.163949

  50. @Europe Europa
    It's interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing "BLM" badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I'm aware there's been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn't been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Anatoly Karlin, @AnonFromTN, @Colin Wright, @another anon

  51. @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    Germany spent half a trillion dollars to get some of Europe’s highest electricity costs and probably isn’t even that big of a deal in climate terms because wind (especially offshore wind) has low EROEI according to most estimates.

    Can’t call that a much better use of resources than America’s favorite pastime of Middle East adventures or Russia’s of providing more villas for the Rotenbergs…

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Anatoly Karlin


    has low EROEI according to most estimates
     
    "EROEI" - is really quite a nonsense concept, with no relation to science, and which you can see is a tautology after a minute of thinking about it.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

  52. @Europe Europa
    It's interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing "BLM" badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I'm aware there's been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn't been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Anatoly Karlin, @AnonFromTN, @Colin Wright, @another anon

    In the US common sense is also gradually replacing madness. Newsweek published an unusually sane piece by a reasonable black guy “Why black lives don’t matter to ‘Black Lives Matter’”, where he exposes BLM for what they are, opportunistic frauds:
    https://www.newsweek.com/why-black-lives-dont-matter-black-lives-matter-opinion-1515183
    Nothing unexpected. Any organization getting money from large corporations is utterly disgusting. BLM included.

    • Replies: @216
    @AnonFromTN

    Newsweek is politically irrelevant after its 2009 collapse, its just trading in on the legacy brand name.

    The system has firmly consolidated its culture war positions among white college women, which condemns our stances to Swine Right until further notice.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

  53. @Haruto Rat
    No statue is safe:

    'Racist fish': Little Mermaid statue vandalised in Copenhagen

    https://www.thelocal.dk/userdata/images/article/a4bd816834473a0a1dd213e9989e18dab76e0de902825296b1e67b3acc423ab7.jpg

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Pericles

    What else is new? Retarded primeval vandals don’t know or care what they vandalize.

  54. @Thulean Friend
    Energiwende was a failu-

    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020

    Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.

    Conversely, both nuclear and coal-fired generation saw their share of the total drop dramatically, with nuclear dropping by 12.9% while Germany’s two forms of coal-fired generation, lignite-fired power plants and hard coal-fired power plants saw their shares drop by 36.3% and 45% respectively.

    Fraunhofer ISE explained the “sharp decline” of coal by pointing to “the increased price of CO₂ certificates, which averaged 21.91 Euro/t-CO₂, as well as to the sharp drop in the day-ahead exchange electricity price of 22.94 Euro/MWh on average.”


     

    https://i.imgur.com/saW7WWU.jpg

    Why are reactionaries always wrong?

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Denis, @A123, @Thorfinnsson, @Anatoly Karlin, @songbird

    Most of “Germany’s biomass” comes from outside of Germany, places like Indonesia and Brazil.

  55. @Erik Sieven
    @Thorfinnsson

    still a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.) and lower risk (no nuclear energy).

    Replies: @A123, @Mitleser, @EldnahYm

    Renewable energy is the least robust energy source. It does not provide energy independence.

  56. “Think before you speak”

    I am seeing more of this, in the U.S., among liberal friends and family. It allows time to concoct the distortion. It reminds me of a scene in The Macintosh Man. James Mason, a spy, is confronting Paul Newman, also a spy. Mason wants to know the details of Newman’s activities. Mason is holding Newman’s girlfriend in front of himself, with a gun to her head. Mason says, approximately: “I am going to ask you a series of questions and you must answer instantaneously. If you hesitate I will know that you are constructing a lie, and I will shoot her.” Lying, omission, and distortion have become a progressive’s pattern of thought, habit of speech, a philosophy; but it is difficult to do this instantaneously.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @SafeNow

    I've been watching some old spy flicks recently including two really good ones including the perennial all-star James Mason, "Secret of Stamboul (The Spy in White)" and "Candlelight in Algeria" - both great films that I recommend. It's good to know that there are a few more of this type out there to be enjoyed. In addition to "Macintosh Man" I've discerned a few more to add to my wish list: "Secret Mission", "Hotel Reserve" and "5 Fingers". There could be more?...

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/5e/Candellight_in_Algeria_UKposter.jpg/220px-Candellight_in_Algeria_UKposter.jpg

    Replies: @Mikhail

  57. @SafeNow
    “Think before you speak”

    I am seeing more of this, in the U.S., among liberal friends and family. It allows time to concoct the distortion. It reminds me of a scene in The Macintosh Man. James Mason, a spy, is confronting Paul Newman, also a spy. Mason wants to know the details of Newman’s activities. Mason is holding Newman’s girlfriend in front of himself, with a gun to her head. Mason says, approximately: “I am going to ask you a series of questions and you must answer instantaneously. If you hesitate I will know that you are constructing a lie, and I will shoot her.” Lying, omission, and distortion have become a progressive’s pattern of thought, habit of speech, a philosophy; but it is difficult to do this instantaneously.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I’ve been watching some old spy flicks recently including two really good ones including the perennial all-star James Mason, “Secret of Stamboul (The Spy in White)” and “Candlelight in Algeria” – both great films that I recommend. It’s good to know that there are a few more of this type out there to be enjoyed. In addition to “Macintosh Man” I’ve discerned a few more to add to my wish list: “Secret Mission”, “Hotel Reserve” and “5 Fingers”. There could be more?…

    • Thanks: SafeNow
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Left of center but pretty good IMO:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHZ1KX7RJYA

    Another one based on the same character played by Michael Caine:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loYmE8SSf3E

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  58. @Mr. Hack
    @SafeNow

    I've been watching some old spy flicks recently including two really good ones including the perennial all-star James Mason, "Secret of Stamboul (The Spy in White)" and "Candlelight in Algeria" - both great films that I recommend. It's good to know that there are a few more of this type out there to be enjoyed. In addition to "Macintosh Man" I've discerned a few more to add to my wish list: "Secret Mission", "Hotel Reserve" and "5 Fingers". There could be more?...

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/5e/Candellight_in_Algeria_UKposter.jpg/220px-Candellight_in_Algeria_UKposter.jpg

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Left of center but pretty good IMO:

    Another one based on the same character played by Michael Caine:

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    I've seen "The Ipcress File" (but it's been a long time) and haven't "The Billion Dollar Brain", so I'll actually add both of these to my itinerary viewing list. What I had in mind though were spy flicks with the inimitable James Mason. If you've seen any of the ones that I've cited above or know of any others (his catalog of work is quite lengthy) that I haven't listed, please don't hold back.

    They've totally withdrawn opening up any outdoor pools here in AZ - how about in NY? :-(

    Replies: @Mikhail

  59. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Left of center but pretty good IMO:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHZ1KX7RJYA

    Another one based on the same character played by Michael Caine:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loYmE8SSf3E

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I’ve seen “The Ipcress File” (but it’s been a long time) and haven’t “The Billion Dollar Brain”, so I’ll actually add both of these to my itinerary viewing list. What I had in mind though were spy flicks with the inimitable James Mason. If you’ve seen any of the ones that I’ve cited above or know of any others (his catalog of work is quite lengthy) that I haven’t listed, please don’t hold back.

    They’ve totally withdrawn opening up any outdoor pools here in AZ – how about in NY? 🙁

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    You'll like Billion Dollar Brain.

    Are one of the Newman films you're referring to the one where he's in the DDR?

    The college pool I use might be closed for the remainder of the year. The local town pools presently have ridiculously short hours with no locker use. A state of the art county facility looks promising. Might very well get a 3 month membership there. Gyms remain closed.

    Meantime, a lot of walking at a nearby state park (with a lot of Russian speaking former Soviets, of numerous different ethnic groups), some home gym workouts and biking. Just got hold of a US made 1992 Trek 7000, with new tires. Needs a tuneup. I can't get it in the max gear, offering the greatest resistance for a more efficient workout. No traffic on a flat road, I can manage 12 miles in 45 minutes on it.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @dfordoom

  60. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    I've seen "The Ipcress File" (but it's been a long time) and haven't "The Billion Dollar Brain", so I'll actually add both of these to my itinerary viewing list. What I had in mind though were spy flicks with the inimitable James Mason. If you've seen any of the ones that I've cited above or know of any others (his catalog of work is quite lengthy) that I haven't listed, please don't hold back.

    They've totally withdrawn opening up any outdoor pools here in AZ - how about in NY? :-(

    Replies: @Mikhail

    You’ll like Billion Dollar Brain.

    Are one of the Newman films you’re referring to the one where he’s in the DDR?

    The college pool I use might be closed for the remainder of the year. The local town pools presently have ridiculously short hours with no locker use. A state of the art county facility looks promising. Might very well get a 3 month membership there. Gyms remain closed.

    Meantime, a lot of walking at a nearby state park (with a lot of Russian speaking former Soviets, of numerous different ethnic groups), some home gym workouts and biking. Just got hold of a US made 1992 Trek 7000, with new tires. Needs a tuneup. I can’t get it in the max gear, offering the greatest resistance for a more efficient workout. No traffic on a flat road, I can manage 12 miles in 45 minutes on it.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    As a college student I used to ride a 10 speed quite a lot, and enjoyed the activity quite a bit. I had a fancy bike for back then, quite light weight (made of molybdenum, the stuff they apparently used in building jet planes) and a shimano derailer. I notice that shimano derailers are somewhat ubiquitous these days, they weren't back then and were considered quite state of the art.

    Prices have really skyrocketed from back in the "molybdenum" age. I'm not really interested in spending $600+, and have seen bikes sold at outlets like Wal-Mart, Target and K-Mart selling for less than $200. Any opinions? What materials should I try to avoid or obtain for a bike? What little research I've already done several years back seems to indicate that alluminum is Okay?...

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @dfordoom
    @Mikhail


    You’ll like Billion Dollar Brain.
     
    Great movie. Directed by Ken Russell, of all people.

    Replies: @Mikhail

  61. Some questions I have as a White homeschooling mother in light of the immanent detonation of Mount Rushmore:

    1. Will mainstream publishers of curricular materials that celebrate the founding fathers be considered “racist” and subject to cancellation going forward? (Yes, these exist.)

    2. What about independent, conservative publishers specifically geared to homeschoolers?

    3. How long until parents’ private teaching of the lives of the unpersoned becomes a cancellable offense? Will it be months, years, or a generation?

    • Replies: @Rattus Norwegius
    @Rosie

    "1. Will mainstream publishers of curricular materials that celebrate the founding fathers be considered “racist” and subject to cancellation going forward? (Yes, these exist.)"
    Unlikely, but the curriculum could change meaning that what home taught students are tested in also changes.

    You might recieve some woke books in the coming years ;)

    Also.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeschooling_international_status_and_statistics

  62. @Thulean Friend
    @Blinky Bill

    While an interesting take, I don't think it's accurate for two reasons.

    1) The positions that China took were the same exact ones that India and China fought over in 1962. They've long coveted those positions precisely because how strong defensively they are.

    2) China moved into these positions in April, when India was at its weakest (not vice versa). India had arguably the world's harshest shutdown, and possibly the most chaotic as well. Migrants had to walk hundreds of kilometers back home, and many died on the journey.
    It was in this environment that China began to move into these areas.

    This was premeditated. China did a very calculated and coldly executed move. Now they have a near-insurmountable advantage along most of the LoAC, which is running 1000+ km between the two countries.

    It's basically a landversion of what they did in the South China Sea.

    Whatever they gained militarily along the LoAC, they massively lost geopolitically. Clearly many in the Chinese leadership had written off India as a lost cause regardless, otherwise they wouldn't have burned the bridges in such a public fashion. That was a dangerous miscalculation. Modi genuinely wanted a balance of power, now he has little choice but to run with abandon into the orbit of the US as India is too weak on its own. Very, very foolish of Beijing.

    Replies: @Passer by, @Tor597, @Astuteobservor II

    That is just the Anglo – Indian narrative.

    Here is a take from an Indian that shows Indian aggression.

    https://indianpunchline.com/1962-india-china-war-redeux/

    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Tor597

    That's India we allow dissenting opinions on crucial matters to be aired out freely, can you link us to the Chinese counterpart of Bhadrakumar? Surely the current Chinese policy to ratchet up pressure on all fronts should have dissidents who question the wisdom of such a move. It's very risky don't you think? What gain is there in pissing off so many of your neighbours and driving them into the American camp, shouldn't there be a lively public discussion of such an important issue. Can you link us to essays regarding these discussions? I'm not holding my breath. Where are the intellectuals who disagree with this current antagonistic foreign policy of China vis a vis her neighbors.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

  63. @Anatoly Karlin
    @truthman

    The Russian Revolution by Sean McMeekin.

    Replies: @Mr. XYZ

    What about this book? It’s old (from the late 1930s, I believe) but nevertheless quite good:

    https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.163949

  64. @AnonFromTN
    @Europe Europa

    In the US common sense is also gradually replacing madness. Newsweek published an unusually sane piece by a reasonable black guy “Why black lives don’t matter to ‘Black Lives Matter’”, where he exposes BLM for what they are, opportunistic frauds:
    https://www.newsweek.com/why-black-lives-dont-matter-black-lives-matter-opinion-1515183
    Nothing unexpected. Any organization getting money from large corporations is utterly disgusting. BLM included.

    Replies: @216

    Newsweek is politically irrelevant after its 2009 collapse, its just trading in on the legacy brand name.

    The system has firmly consolidated its culture war positions among white college women, which condemns our stances to Swine Right until further notice.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @216

    Didn’t know anything about Newsweek in the last 20+ years. I cancelled my subscription in 1995 after several issues were full of O.J. Simpson trial that I never gave a hoot about.

  65. How appropriate:

    The lyrics can be updated to present conditions.

  66. @Mitleser
    @Erik Sieven

    You did not read TF's article, did you?


    Natural gas-fired power stations increased their production by 13.9% across the first half of 2020 thanks to a suite of reasons including the global switch from coal, a mammoth drop in natural gas prices – which fell by around 50% – and the fact that natural gas power plants have lower CO₂ certificate prices.
     
    German energy policy is neither safer nor does it increase energy independence.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    in the long run a growing share of renewable energy in the energy mix will lead to less imports of all non-renewable resourcses like gas, oil, black coal.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @Erik Sieven

    Replaced by the import of the things necessary to produce renewable energy.

    Note what happened to the largest German solar manufacturer.


    Less than one year after originally filing for insolvency and getting a second chance, German-based SolarWorld has filed for bankruptcy again.

    In May 2017, SolarWorld AG–the parent company of SolarWorld Americas–cited price erosion as its reason for filing insolvency, which is essentially bankruptcy. In August 2017, the company’s assets were acquired by SolarWorld Industries GmbH, a new version of the company owned 51% by SolarWorld founder Frank Asbeck and 49% by the Qatar Foundation. Around 600 employees are still working at German manufacturing facilities and the Bonn headquarters, a drop from 3,000 before the first insolvency filing.

    This second insolvency filing has been attributed to price dumping from China and the new 30% import tariffs from the United States. SolarWorld Industries GmbH filed an exemption request from the U.S. tariffs, describing its panels as high quality and priced “significantly above the U.S. and international average” and therefore worthy of a lessened import duty.
     
    https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2018/03/german-solarworld-brand-files-for-bankruptcy-again/
  67. @AaronB
    @Europe Europa


    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil
     
    .

    Oh, without question. I am blond, pale skinned, and look Aryan, yet I identify with a dark skinned Yemeni Israeli Jew much more than I do with any German or Norwegian.

    You can't build a nation on race. It is too abstract an idea. Its never been done before.

    But things like "culture" are too unscientific for most modern "white" nationalists, who are rationalists. You can't create a culture using conscious reason. It comes from the subconscious.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Colin Wright

    ‘…But things like “culture” are too unscientific for most modern “white” nationalists, who are rationalists…’

    I’m certain that what little you share with a Yemeni Jew could not reasonably be described as a ‘culture.’

    Go ahead: I’m sure there are venues where Yemeni Jews hang out. Drop in; tell me how at home you feel.

  68. @Europe Europa
    It's interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing "BLM" badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I'm aware there's been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn't been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Anatoly Karlin, @AnonFromTN, @Colin Wright, @another anon

    ‘It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing “BLM” badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    ‘As far as I’m aware there’s been no similar backlash against BLM in the US…’

    ‘Black Lives Matter’ in the US has yet to make the mistake of attacking support for Israel.

  69. @truthman
    Any insight of Turkey's genetic makeup in terms of European admixture. We've been watching a Turkish TV show recently (Winter Sun) and so many of the actors look very Balkan European. Turks I've seen in Germany sure didn't look like them. Is this because the Gastarbeiter types came from poorer Eastern Turkey. Or maybe these TV shows are Erdogan propaganda to get White men to convert to Islam and move to Turkey in hopes of marrying a nice, somewhat Whitish Turkish gal?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Hyperborean, @Svevlad, @AaronB, @cutler

    The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
    @cutler

    'The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers'

    'Greeks' on Crete and Rhodes look much the same as 'Turks' all the way east to Cappadocia. I only restrict my claims to those regions because those are the only ones in which I have traveled.

    Replies: @Denis

  70. ‘Black Lives Matter’ in the US has yet to make the mistake of attacking support for Israel.

    British people, blacks included, don’t tend to idolise Jews like Americans do. They are much more likely to look at Israel as a white Apartheid state oppressing non-whites than as “special chosen people who must not be criticised” as Americans regard Jews.

    In the last few years the media establishment has been trying to change that and bring in the American mentality, with things like the Corbyn “anti-Semitism” nonsense.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    Everything I saw from British television about Israel, is very anti-Israel.

    British television is an opposite of Russian television on this topic (Russian television is pro-Israel, or presents the Israeli side only, and without criticism).

    -

    American television is varying by channel between religiously worshiping Israel, and moderately critical of Israel. Channels like CNN are lightly critical of Israel - like liberal Jews -, but on the other hand Fox News worships Israel - as some kind of religious object; probably because of large Evangelical Church viewers.

    I think the reason British media hates Israel can be as uninteresting and simple as that they imagine Israeli Jews are "white people", and therefore that its an extension of the evil of European colonialism.

    In reality, most Israelis are a racially a brown Middle Eastern, people, but in the symbolic world of Western Europe they have been identified as another "white people".

    British documentaries of Israel (many on YouTube) are also intentionally only looking at the European people there. It's really a strange image of the country in the English media compared to reality - where the main impression of the reality of Israel when you are there, is a very Eastern country, with many dark races included in the population.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Gerard-Mandela

  71. @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    There's something sad about Turkey's self-hatred. Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    It's not just that wannabe gangster either. This kitschy version of a 'European village' in Turkey sold 350 of 700 units before the economic crisis hit:

    https://i.imgur.com/FkKgjp0.jpg

    I've also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I've interacted with them on the internet. To tell them that they have more in common with arabs seems like the greatest insult imaginable, they invariably explode in wounded rage.

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Nodwink, @silviosilver

    I’d be pretty mad too, if someone called me an Arab.

  72. @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend


    Remarkably foolish.
     
    Which is why it's highly unlikely that China initiated this conflict. China has bigger fish to fry than India. My take is that India sensed a moment of Chinese weakness, Covid19/global anti China sentiment/tacit US backing. Thought it was a good time to press the Chinese and change facts on the ground. India did not expect such a assertive response from China/ thought China would let this one slide. A bad outcome for both nations in my opinion. US wins this one.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Not Only Wrathful, @Grahamsno(G64)

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it’s certainly not India’s fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You’re right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they’re going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    • Disagree: Blinky Bill
    • LOL: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Lin
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    Chinese have lost India for good
     
    I browse a number of hindu nationalist sites; my impression(before the recent clash)is the hindu nationalists will all die and be cremated with their 1962 war scars aching.
    I actually have some sympathy for their mental malaise but lost by whom or for whom?
    The Indians buy Chinese products because of the cost factor, not out of sentiments.
    If the Indians stop buying some or all Chinese products, what would the Indians make do without Chinese products(from incense sticks to pots&pans to thermal electric generators to solar panels to cell-phones)? My guess:
    --'Make in india'---a slogan that has been around for a while. How different it's now compared to years ago?
    --Import from other countries.
    …….
    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
    …………
    If trade deficit figure is the problem, I suggest Indians should try export more to china, like:
    --Meat of non-holy bovine species
    --Some agricultural products, like certain rice strains...

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    , @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Even Brussels is increasingly the deals it makes with China. While rather awkward in how it manages itself, China is rather triumphant relative to others.

    We can bet on this, though.

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.

    The fact that Modi didn’t even mention China by name in either of his addresses speaks volumes. I think the current BJP government is willing to de-escalate on the military front. It doesn't take much common sense and logic to deduct from even India's description of the events to tell which story is more realistic.

    Replies: @Mitleser

    , @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    You’re right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they’re going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.
     
    If this is true, India gets a guarantee from the US, then China will give a parallel guarantee to Pakistan. What do you think will be the extent of damage to India's long term future from having to shoulder the threat of a 2-front pact?

    Replies: @Mitleser

  73. @Haruto Rat
    No statue is safe:

    'Racist fish': Little Mermaid statue vandalised in Copenhagen

    https://www.thelocal.dk/userdata/images/article/a4bd816834473a0a1dd213e9989e18dab76e0de902825296b1e67b3acc423ab7.jpg

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Pericles

    I’m surprised they haven’t cancelled Disney yet. Hint: Goofy is BLACK!!1!

  74. @Mr. Hack
    @Svevlad

    Why does anybody need to "support" such outlandish ideas in the first place?

    Replies: @Svevlad, @Astuteobservor II

    To prevent staleness, but mostly to legitimize the others, as they’re all under fire as “conspiracy theories” anyway and therefore equated.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
  75. @Tor597
    @Thulean Friend

    That is just the Anglo - Indian narrative.

    Here is a take from an Indian that shows Indian aggression.

    https://indianpunchline.com/1962-india-china-war-redeux/

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    That’s India we allow dissenting opinions on crucial matters to be aired out freely, can you link us to the Chinese counterpart of Bhadrakumar? Surely the current Chinese policy to ratchet up pressure on all fronts should have dissidents who question the wisdom of such a move. It’s very risky don’t you think? What gain is there in pissing off so many of your neighbours and driving them into the American camp, shouldn’t there be a lively public discussion of such an important issue. Can you link us to essays regarding these discussions? I’m not holding my breath. Where are the intellectuals who disagree with this current antagonistic foreign policy of China vis a vis her neighbors.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    No amount of divergent Chinese views can help your inability to think.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

  76. Lin says:
    @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Blinky Bill

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it's certainly not India's fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You're right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they're going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    Replies: @Lin, @Daniel Chieh, @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    Chinese have lost India for good

    I browse a number of hindu nationalist sites; my impression(before the recent clash)is the hindu nationalists will all die and be cremated with their 1962 war scars aching.
    I actually have some sympathy for their mental malaise but lost by whom or for whom?
    The Indians buy Chinese products because of the cost factor, not out of sentiments.
    If the Indians stop buying some or all Chinese products, what would the Indians make do without Chinese products(from incense sticks to pots&pans to thermal electric generators to solar panels to cell-phones)? My guess:
    –‘Make in india’—a slogan that has been around for a while. How different it’s now compared to years ago?
    –Import from other countries.
    …….
    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
    …………
    If trade deficit figure is the problem, I suggest Indians should try export more to china, like:
    –Meat of non-holy bovine species
    –Some agricultural products, like certain rice strains…

    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Lin

    I'm not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype. I'm certainly not obsessed with the 1962 loss we got our asses kicked fair and square and the Chinese did behave honorably by unilaterally withdrawing from most areas.

    Our PM (whom I can't stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what? His face has been rubbed in the dirt but it's not his face it's the entire Indian foreign policy of dealing with China, grant them everything hoping to temper their behaviour but to no avail, you've not granted the smallest things like allowing us to be a member of the NSG, or support our bid to be a permanent member of the security council, all the while encircling us by cultivating our neighbors especially Pakistan, all this has been going on for quite sometime and yet we continued to ease trade restrictions and finally the brawl in the Himalayas. I welcome this stern message sent out by the Chinese, their are no more illusions about their larger foreign policy and there can be none, power struts naked. Our foreign policy makers have to contend with the terrifying fact that you will not countenance our 'peaceful rise,' strangle the infant in the cradle before it becomes a grown threat has to be considered as a Chinese strategic imperative in Asia. Did you think that we were going to gobble up Tibet? If the message was to scuttle the 'Quad' and India's growing ties with the US you have precisely done the opposite driven us into Uncle Sam's orbit. Believe me India's extremely wary about that but what choice do we have since we have to plan for a disastrous two front war.

    The trade relationships will definitely worsen at our pace because we're the importers. What choice do we have since the surplus generated by your side is being used to finance our mortal enemy.


    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
     
    What to do their's no other way to wean yourself off this supplier from Hell, drip drip we'll use that fabled Chinese water torture against your businesses. The world has woken up to the peril of concentrating manufacturing in one country, it leads to deindustrialization on a massive scale with the concomitant loss of engineering and technical skills, we still do have industry and have no choice but to support it aggressively just like you support yours. All those trinkets and non essential stuff will be the first to go. It's a long game and we have much to learn from you the masters of the long game.

    It all could have been otherwise, a trustworthy relationship between Asia's two largest countries and Asia would have been a bit different sadly it is not and how fervently we Indians wish that things didn't come to such a sorry pass, but here we are and have to deal with a menacing fire breathing dragon which can't be appeased. Hopefully we come out of it without 3rd degree burns.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Lin

  77. @Passer by
    @Thulean Friend

    India is having an accelerating Covid pandemic, so the country will be weakening itself during this year and probably the next.

    The IMF estimates growing economic gap between China and India due to this.

    As for India running to the US, it actually just bought 30 russian fighter aircraft in connection with the border issue.

    Moreover, the US is abandoning Afghanistan. "Partners" (Russia, Iran) will be important for regulating the US vacated area, so that it does not become a full gain for Pakistan.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    As for India running to the US, it actually just bought 30 russian fighter aircraft in connection with the border issue.

    At a cynical level Russia is in a win win situation since it supplies arms to both the sides and it wants to regain its premier position as India’s largest arms supplier which has been lost to the US. But whats interesting about this sale is that it happened so quickly and despite the Chinese trying to scuttle the deal. The message is clear from the Russian side that they do disapprove of this gratuitous Chinese dickwaving. They have signaled to the Chinese that their foreign policy with respect to India won’t be influenced by the growing Sino-Indian problem. They also decided to expedite the supply of the S400 antiaircraft systems. Interesting isn’t it?

  78. Black Smoke Matters

    • Replies: @brabantian
    @nickels

    https://i.ibb.co/n76yj60/black-p-ssy-matters.jpg

  79. We need a movement to stop modern-day slavery

  80. @Europe Europa
    It's interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them. Taking the knee is now discouraged, sports pundits are no longer wearing "BLM" badges. The British military have even expressly forbidden taking the knee for BLM.

    As far as I'm aware there's been no similar backlash against BLM in the US, it still seems to be going strong over there. I suppose this is because most British people have finally realised that this is imported American bullshit that has nothing to do with this country and are finally treating it with the contempt it deserves. Also, I think it hasn't been as successful here in that white British people have refused to grovel before blacks like white Americans have.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Anatoly Karlin, @AnonFromTN, @Colin Wright, @another anon

    It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them.

    This. See the replies.

    And in the United States…

    If this continues, black lives will cease to matter very soon.

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @another anon

    This is what happened in 2014 when Tamika Mallory, a leader in the BLM movement, began to turn against Israel. Within days, she was no longer invited to CNN where she had not only been a regular but treated with great respect.

    Folks in these social movements may think they are revolutionaries but their agenda is pushed/propped up by the MSM. Ideologies that truly threaten the system always gets stomped on by the jackboot. In that sense, there is no difference between supposed 'liberal democracy' and any 'authoritarian' system. They all work the same way.

    That's why I wasn't the least surprised Chapo got banned. It's one thing to do performative wokeness for neoliberalism. It's another to truly question its foundations. If you do, you'll quickly see the limits of the supposed democracy you're living in.

    Most censorship in the West is carried out by corporations and private actors, which upholds the illusion that the system is free because the state is less active. Does it matter whether private capital does the dirty work rather than the state? The end result is the same. The neoliberal argument is one fixated on process, not outcome.

    Replies: @dfordoom

  81. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Blinky Bill

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it's certainly not India's fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You're right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they're going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    Replies: @Lin, @Daniel Chieh, @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    Even Brussels is increasingly the deals it makes with China. While rather awkward in how it manages itself, China is rather triumphant relative to others.

    We can bet on this, though.

  82. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Tor597

    That's India we allow dissenting opinions on crucial matters to be aired out freely, can you link us to the Chinese counterpart of Bhadrakumar? Surely the current Chinese policy to ratchet up pressure on all fronts should have dissidents who question the wisdom of such a move. It's very risky don't you think? What gain is there in pissing off so many of your neighbours and driving them into the American camp, shouldn't there be a lively public discussion of such an important issue. Can you link us to essays regarding these discussions? I'm not holding my breath. Where are the intellectuals who disagree with this current antagonistic foreign policy of China vis a vis her neighbors.

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    No amount of divergent Chinese views can help your inability to think.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Daniel Chieh

    And what are these divergent views pray tell me. there certainly are divergent views in India regarding this crisis, what are the divergent views in China?

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

  83. I was told by “nebulafox” to come over here to ask this question. I’ll make it brief.

    Why is contemporary Russia so unconcerned with “the legacy of serfdom” while contemporary America is tied up in knots about it 24/7?

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @Jane Plain

    Probably because comparing serfdom to slavery is an extremely false equivalence.

    Serfs weren't chattel, and they weren't shipped from halfway around the world because to replace the locals who weren't cheap enough.

    Replies: @Denis, @AnonFromTN

    , @Denis
    @Jane Plain

    Serfdom was the burden of the average Russian, not imported slaves. If Russians were to give consideration to serfdom, they would be considering the plight of their ancestors, not the ancestors of some other minority with a grievance against them.

    Replies: @Ano4

    , @another anon
    @Jane Plain

    Because nearly everyone in Russia is descendant of serfs, and there is no one who is supposed to pay the reparations.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    , @AnonFromTN
    @Jane Plain

    I can answer you as the person whose ancestors were slaves (indentured peasants, who legally could be sold, like cattle, disregarding family ties, etc.). Indentured peasants in the Russian Empire were freed in 1861, same year American Civil war started. They were given a raw deal with “freedom”: they were forced to pay for the land they received for decades to their former owners. However, if I start blaming my problems on the fact that 160 years ago my ancestors weren’t free, all my Russian acquaintances would consider me a hopeless piece of shit. They would be 100% right.

  84. @Lin
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    Chinese have lost India for good
     
    I browse a number of hindu nationalist sites; my impression(before the recent clash)is the hindu nationalists will all die and be cremated with their 1962 war scars aching.
    I actually have some sympathy for their mental malaise but lost by whom or for whom?
    The Indians buy Chinese products because of the cost factor, not out of sentiments.
    If the Indians stop buying some or all Chinese products, what would the Indians make do without Chinese products(from incense sticks to pots&pans to thermal electric generators to solar panels to cell-phones)? My guess:
    --'Make in india'---a slogan that has been around for a while. How different it's now compared to years ago?
    --Import from other countries.
    …….
    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
    …………
    If trade deficit figure is the problem, I suggest Indians should try export more to china, like:
    --Meat of non-holy bovine species
    --Some agricultural products, like certain rice strains...

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    I’m not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype. I’m certainly not obsessed with the 1962 loss we got our asses kicked fair and square and the Chinese did behave honorably by unilaterally withdrawing from most areas.

    Our PM (whom I can’t stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what? His face has been rubbed in the dirt but it’s not his face it’s the entire Indian foreign policy of dealing with China, grant them everything hoping to temper their behaviour but to no avail, you’ve not granted the smallest things like allowing us to be a member of the NSG, or support our bid to be a permanent member of the security council, all the while encircling us by cultivating our neighbors especially Pakistan, all this has been going on for quite sometime and yet we continued to ease trade restrictions and finally the brawl in the Himalayas. I welcome this stern message sent out by the Chinese, their are no more illusions about their larger foreign policy and there can be none, power struts naked. Our foreign policy makers have to contend with the terrifying fact that you will not countenance our ‘peaceful rise,’ strangle the infant in the cradle before it becomes a grown threat has to be considered as a Chinese strategic imperative in Asia. Did you think that we were going to gobble up Tibet? If the message was to scuttle the ‘Quad’ and India’s growing ties with the US you have precisely done the opposite driven us into Uncle Sam’s orbit. Believe me India’s extremely wary about that but what choice do we have since we have to plan for a disastrous two front war.

    The trade relationships will definitely worsen at our pace because we’re the importers. What choice do we have since the surplus generated by your side is being used to finance our mortal enemy.

    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.

    What to do their’s no other way to wean yourself off this supplier from Hell, drip drip we’ll use that fabled Chinese water torture against your businesses. The world has woken up to the peril of concentrating manufacturing in one country, it leads to deindustrialization on a massive scale with the concomitant loss of engineering and technical skills, we still do have industry and have no choice but to support it aggressively just like you support yours. All those trinkets and non essential stuff will be the first to go. It’s a long game and we have much to learn from you the masters of the long game.

    It all could have been otherwise, a trustworthy relationship between Asia’s two largest countries and Asia would have been a bit different sadly it is not and how fervently we Indians wish that things didn’t come to such a sorry pass, but here we are and have to deal with a menacing fire breathing dragon which can’t be appeased. Hopefully we come out of it without 3rd degree burns.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    Our PM (whom I can’t stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what?
     
    Narendra Modi is the only high ranking Indian leader ever denied a U.S. visa, who for nearly a decade was prohibited from setting foot on U.S. soil. Mr. Modi was insulted and said that he wouldn't apply for a visa again. U.S. officials say, however, that he has tried indirectly. "From time to time, we would get feelers from people who knew him, or on his behalf, on whether we would grant a visa," says Richard Boucher, who headed the State Department's South Asia bureau from 2006 to 2009. "We would tell them, 'No, nothing's changed.'"
    , @Lin
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    I’m not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype
     
    I made my comments based on empirical observation and you can play around with your lexicals.
    I'm a Christian of alt.conviction and I'm also a part-time muslim. I did not specifically called you a 'Hindu nationalist'. You're about as 'Hindu nationalist' as I've muslim ancestors.
    …………
    I'm not judging the reaction of the average Indians to the recent border clash because India is a large country, of course, go say whatever price the less well off Indians should pay to satisfy your urge.(I remember that even during bad moments of sino-japan relation in recent decades, sure there was a number of demonstration but the Chinese govt let the consumers to decide. No hysteria.)
    https://theprint.in/opinion/newsmaker-of-the-week/green-tea-to-underpants-chinas-grip-on-indian-lives-goes-beyond-phone-apps/454259/
    --“China has, in recent years, become one of the preferred destinations of Indian students for pursuing higher studies”, the Indian embassy in Beijing says."
    --"Citizens like Dimple were making a lot of money using these mostly Chinese apps and becoming famous.
    “I would never make so much (money) with a 9-to-5 government job,” she had said last year.
    But that’s just Dimple. There are so many like her in India who can’t do without Chinese goods, culture and overall Chinese influence in their daily lives."
    ……..
    I wish 'Made in India' well as I mentioned at other thread, India has great agricultural potential and could become a major exporter of food to China.
  85. @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    No amount of divergent Chinese views can help your inability to think.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    And what are these divergent views pray tell me. there certainly are divergent views in India regarding this crisis, what are the divergent views in China?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    You don't read Chinese, so it wouldn't be obvious for you. But there were "dove" factions in the CCP as of 2016 and there still are in academia. Caixin is more business friendly, and Sixth Tone is more generally liberal.

    No one really pays that much attention or likes India in a particularist manner though. This isn't a factional thing. I've mentioned it before but the overall attitude of Indians(as you exemplify) is just irritating in its almost complete distance from reality and self-importance.

    Its like having a lunatic as your neighbor. Ultimately there's nothing to be done besides control because its impossible to engage with someone who doesn't live in reality.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

  86. @Erik Sieven
    @Mitleser

    in the long run a growing share of renewable energy in the energy mix will lead to less imports of all non-renewable resourcses like gas, oil, black coal.

    Replies: @Mitleser

    Replaced by the import of the things necessary to produce renewable energy.

    Note what happened to the largest German solar manufacturer.

    Less than one year after originally filing for insolvency and getting a second chance, German-based SolarWorld has filed for bankruptcy again.

    In May 2017, SolarWorld AG–the parent company of SolarWorld Americas–cited price erosion as its reason for filing insolvency, which is essentially bankruptcy. In August 2017, the company’s assets were acquired by SolarWorld Industries GmbH, a new version of the company owned 51% by SolarWorld founder Frank Asbeck and 49% by the Qatar Foundation. Around 600 employees are still working at German manufacturing facilities and the Bonn headquarters, a drop from 3,000 before the first insolvency filing.

    This second insolvency filing has been attributed to price dumping from China and the new 30% import tariffs from the United States. SolarWorld Industries GmbH filed an exemption request from the U.S. tariffs, describing its panels as high quality and priced “significantly above the U.S. and international average” and therefore worthy of a lessened import duty.

    https://www.solarpowerworldonline.com/2018/03/german-solarworld-brand-files-for-bankruptcy-again/

  87. @Thulean Friend
    I'm pessimistic on India, but sometimes it helps getting an 'on-the-ground' perspective to make flesh out of air so to speak. This Twitter thread is a great rundown of why you should be skeptical of India ever reaching China's heights, too.

    https://twitter.com/dakekang/status/1257709936437592065

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    Forget about overtaking China, India’s supposed transition into the world’s next big factory never occurred either. I remember in the late 2000s and early 2010s about how everyone was saying India would become the next manufacturing powerhouse and that Made in China would become Made in India. They just took this for granted. Now India’s lunch is getting eaten up by countries like Bangladesh, the Philippines, and especially Vietnam.

    When did you hear Vietnam’s government and people constantly bombard the internet about Vietnam becoming a huge manufacturing hub? Never. And here we are looking at the emergence of a powerful Vietnamese manufacturing center that was supposed to be India’s for the taking.

    • Agree: Thulean Friend
  88. @Jane Plain
    I was told by "nebulafox" to come over here to ask this question. I'll make it brief.

    Why is contemporary Russia so unconcerned with "the legacy of serfdom" while contemporary America is tied up in knots about it 24/7?

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis, @another anon, @AnonFromTN

    Probably because comparing serfdom to slavery is an extremely false equivalence.

    Serfs weren’t chattel, and they weren’t shipped from halfway around the world because to replace the locals who weren’t cheap enough.

    • Replies: @Denis
    @anonymous coward

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @anonymous coward

    , @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward


    Serfs weren’t chattel, and they weren’t shipped from halfway around the world
     
    Yea, black slaves were shipped from Africa, where they were enslaved and sold by their black “brothers”

    Replies: @anonymous coward

  89. @Not Only Wrathful
    @Blinky Bill

    Your reasoning for not believing that China started it is solely built on your belief that they're really brilliant, rather than what actually happened, which you then use to shore up your belief.

    This is the definition of confirmation bias.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    Summary:
    1959, Zhou Enlai offers to accept the McMahon Line in the East, if India accepts China’s claims in the West.
    Nehru rejects.
    1962 war, China wins but decides to withdraw forces from Ladakh unilaterally, asking India to do the same.
    India refuses.
    1976: DMZ and patrolling limits established with new ROEs (including the ‘no weapons while patrolling’ rule).
    1993: “LAC” established.
    China begins building infrastructure and amassing troops in its new theater command.
    India keeps focusing all its energy against Pakistan.
    2010: China declares that it doesn’t have a ‘border’ with India in Ladakh (validating Pakistan’s claim on Kashmir.)
    2015 PLA’s strategic reforms begin.
    2017: Doklam happens.
    2019: India unilaterally annexes Kashmir/Ladakh by revoking article 370
    China responds by throwing out the 1993 agreement plus the ’62 status quo.

    • Troll: Not Only Wrathful
  90. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    You'll like Billion Dollar Brain.

    Are one of the Newman films you're referring to the one where he's in the DDR?

    The college pool I use might be closed for the remainder of the year. The local town pools presently have ridiculously short hours with no locker use. A state of the art county facility looks promising. Might very well get a 3 month membership there. Gyms remain closed.

    Meantime, a lot of walking at a nearby state park (with a lot of Russian speaking former Soviets, of numerous different ethnic groups), some home gym workouts and biking. Just got hold of a US made 1992 Trek 7000, with new tires. Needs a tuneup. I can't get it in the max gear, offering the greatest resistance for a more efficient workout. No traffic on a flat road, I can manage 12 miles in 45 minutes on it.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @dfordoom

    As a college student I used to ride a 10 speed quite a lot, and enjoyed the activity quite a bit. I had a fancy bike for back then, quite light weight (made of molybdenum, the stuff they apparently used in building jet planes) and a shimano derailer. I notice that shimano derailers are somewhat ubiquitous these days, they weren’t back then and were considered quite state of the art.

    Prices have really skyrocketed from back in the “molybdenum” age. I’m not really interested in spending $600+, and have seen bikes sold at outlets like Wal-Mart, Target and K-Mart selling for less than $200. Any opinions? What materials should I try to avoid or obtain for a bike? What little research I’ve already done several years back seems to indicate that alluminum is Okay?…

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    I'm on a learning curve as well. Back in the day, I had a Schwinn Varsity, followed by a Peugeot 10 speed.

    What I'm hearing is that the bikes of today have vastly improved in terms of performance, much like cars. My '87 Integra was a blast to drive back in the day. My '06 Spec V Sentra blows it away.

    The '92 Trek 7000 I'm using originally sold for $592. When compared to the current crop it's considered quite subpar in overall performance.

    Road bikes are ridiculously priced. Regarding hybrids, I've been paying attention to the Giant Escape and Roam models as well as the Trek FX series. Right now, they're tough to find on account of demand - bikes made overseas, relative to Covid-19 leading to production and transport issues.

    On Ebay and Craig's List, sellers are generally asking a lot on account of the current market.

    Replies: @Sparkon

  91. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Blinky Bill

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it's certainly not India's fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You're right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they're going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    Replies: @Lin, @Daniel Chieh, @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.

    The fact that Modi didn’t even mention China by name in either of his addresses speaks volumes. I think the current BJP government is willing to de-escalate on the military front. It doesn’t take much common sense and logic to deduct from even India’s description of the events to tell which story is more realistic.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @Blinky Bill


    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.
     
    That sounds a bit like projection.

    https://twitter.com/fravel/status/1272960358915989505

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

  92. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    As a college student I used to ride a 10 speed quite a lot, and enjoyed the activity quite a bit. I had a fancy bike for back then, quite light weight (made of molybdenum, the stuff they apparently used in building jet planes) and a shimano derailer. I notice that shimano derailers are somewhat ubiquitous these days, they weren't back then and were considered quite state of the art.

    Prices have really skyrocketed from back in the "molybdenum" age. I'm not really interested in spending $600+, and have seen bikes sold at outlets like Wal-Mart, Target and K-Mart selling for less than $200. Any opinions? What materials should I try to avoid or obtain for a bike? What little research I've already done several years back seems to indicate that alluminum is Okay?...

    Replies: @Mikhail

    I’m on a learning curve as well. Back in the day, I had a Schwinn Varsity, followed by a Peugeot 10 speed.

    What I’m hearing is that the bikes of today have vastly improved in terms of performance, much like cars. My ’87 Integra was a blast to drive back in the day. My ’06 Spec V Sentra blows it away.

    The ’92 Trek 7000 I’m using originally sold for $592. When compared to the current crop it’s considered quite subpar in overall performance.

    Road bikes are ridiculously priced. Regarding hybrids, I’ve been paying attention to the Giant Escape and Roam models as well as the Trek FX series. Right now, they’re tough to find on account of demand – bikes made overseas, relative to Covid-19 leading to production and transport issues.

    On Ebay and Craig’s List, sellers are generally asking a lot on account of the current market.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    I rode a 10-speed Schwinn Varsity in college back in the 1970s. During the 1990s, I rode a Trek 700 hybrid, and a Trek 7100 for almost 15 years after that. Both Trek hybrids were durable, reliable, safe bikes.

    I recommend going to a real bike shop and avoiding the el cheapo models at Walmart and other mass merchandisers.

    For many riders, especially younger ones, bicycling is all about going fast. Speed is often the primary if not sole consideration for many of these guys, and some gals, who like to pretend they are in the Tour de France, always wear colorful outfits not unlike jockeys, and try to go as fast as they can everywhere they ride.

    Most of these riders are on road bikes with their very skinny tires, drop bars, tiny seats and uncomfortable riding position which has the further big disadvantage of poor vision while bent over like that.

    For most city riding and commuting, a hybrid is the best choice for a number of reasons. Currently, I ride a Trek Verve 2, for which I paid just about $600 brand new.


    I was very happy to get one of the last 2019 models that doesn't have disc brakes. Additionally, the current Verve 2 has no front suspension, but does have a simple seat post suspension. Disc brakes are heavier than standard rim brakes, and complicate front wheel removal. Unless you are coming down a mountain, there is little need for disc brakes. Similarly, a front fork suspension adds weight and reduces front wheel stability. It's overkill for city riding and really only worthwhile on a mountain bike.

    Because of its adjustable handlebar stem, the Verve series is superior to the FX in my opinion. Safety and comfort are much more important to me than going fast.

    The modern trend is toward wider tires. My Verve 2 has 700x45 tires, much wider than those on my two previous Trek hybrids, and much more comfortable than the skinny, hard tires on road bikes, with much better stability and traction, making them much safer, to boot.

    The popular misconception has been that skinny hard tires are much faster than wide tires, but tests show that there is really little difference.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/12-myths-in-cycling-1-wider-tires-are-slower/

    Finally, going to a bike shop will help ensure you get the right size frame for your height.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack, @Thulean Friend

  93. The judge in the case of Jeffrey Epstein’s longtime associate Ghislaine Maxwell, is a pioneer openly LGBT figure amongst the black robes of USA federal courts, Jewish lesbian Alison J. Nathan.

    Beyond being LGBT … is she LGBT+Q+P? (+queer+paedo)? What is her view of MAPs, ‘Minor-Attracted Persons’, as they now call them? That might be important as the case continues.

    Judge Nathan makes a household with her lesbian partner, law professor Meg Satterthwaite, and twin boys as their sons. She teaches part-time at the NYU School of Law.

    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @brabantian

    There seem to be an awful lot of lesbian Jews involved in the American judicial system

  94. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Daniel Chieh

    And what are these divergent views pray tell me. there certainly are divergent views in India regarding this crisis, what are the divergent views in China?

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    You don’t read Chinese, so it wouldn’t be obvious for you. But there were “dove” factions in the CCP as of 2016 and there still are in academia. Caixin is more business friendly, and Sixth Tone is more generally liberal.

    No one really pays that much attention or likes India in a particularist manner though. This isn’t a factional thing. I’ve mentioned it before but the overall attitude of Indians(as you exemplify) is just irritating in its almost complete distance from reality and self-importance.

    Its like having a lunatic as your neighbor. Ultimately there’s nothing to be done besides control because its impossible to engage with someone who doesn’t live in reality.

    • Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Daniel Chieh

    Look you can get out of the thread if you don't want to read me or don't reply to any of my posts. It's really that simple. As for irritable lunatics for neighbors here's what they look like

    https://www.google.com/search?q=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&oq=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.14079j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

  95. @Blinky Bill
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.

    The fact that Modi didn’t even mention China by name in either of his addresses speaks volumes. I think the current BJP government is willing to de-escalate on the military front. It doesn't take much common sense and logic to deduct from even India's description of the events to tell which story is more realistic.

    Replies: @Mitleser

    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.

    That sounds a bit like projection.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Mitleser

    Fravel’s work has gained attention because of an unanticipated finding growing out of his doctoral research: In the last several decades, to a greater extent than has been generally understood, China has often struck pragmatic compromises in foreign-policy disputes with its neighbors. Fravel’s 2008 book, Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, reveals this tendency and analyzes the reasons for it.

  96. @nickels
    Black Smoke Matters
    https://www.vmcdn.ca/f/files/longmontleader/import/2018_10_F-450_coal_rolling_Monster.jpg


    http://www.cyclingutah.com/cms/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Truck-Exhaust-1.jpg

    Replies: @brabantian

  97. @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    You don't read Chinese, so it wouldn't be obvious for you. But there were "dove" factions in the CCP as of 2016 and there still are in academia. Caixin is more business friendly, and Sixth Tone is more generally liberal.

    No one really pays that much attention or likes India in a particularist manner though. This isn't a factional thing. I've mentioned it before but the overall attitude of Indians(as you exemplify) is just irritating in its almost complete distance from reality and self-importance.

    Its like having a lunatic as your neighbor. Ultimately there's nothing to be done besides control because its impossible to engage with someone who doesn't live in reality.

    Replies: @Grahamsno(G64)

    Look you can get out of the thread if you don’t want to read me or don’t reply to any of my posts. It’s really that simple. As for irritable lunatics for neighbors here’s what they look like

    https://www.google.com/search?q=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&oq=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.14079j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    @Grahamsno(G64)

    Thanks for the passive aggression but no, I'll remark on anything that pleases me to remark on, including my observations on you.

  98. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Lin

    I'm not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype. I'm certainly not obsessed with the 1962 loss we got our asses kicked fair and square and the Chinese did behave honorably by unilaterally withdrawing from most areas.

    Our PM (whom I can't stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what? His face has been rubbed in the dirt but it's not his face it's the entire Indian foreign policy of dealing with China, grant them everything hoping to temper their behaviour but to no avail, you've not granted the smallest things like allowing us to be a member of the NSG, or support our bid to be a permanent member of the security council, all the while encircling us by cultivating our neighbors especially Pakistan, all this has been going on for quite sometime and yet we continued to ease trade restrictions and finally the brawl in the Himalayas. I welcome this stern message sent out by the Chinese, their are no more illusions about their larger foreign policy and there can be none, power struts naked. Our foreign policy makers have to contend with the terrifying fact that you will not countenance our 'peaceful rise,' strangle the infant in the cradle before it becomes a grown threat has to be considered as a Chinese strategic imperative in Asia. Did you think that we were going to gobble up Tibet? If the message was to scuttle the 'Quad' and India's growing ties with the US you have precisely done the opposite driven us into Uncle Sam's orbit. Believe me India's extremely wary about that but what choice do we have since we have to plan for a disastrous two front war.

    The trade relationships will definitely worsen at our pace because we're the importers. What choice do we have since the surplus generated by your side is being used to finance our mortal enemy.


    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
     
    What to do their's no other way to wean yourself off this supplier from Hell, drip drip we'll use that fabled Chinese water torture against your businesses. The world has woken up to the peril of concentrating manufacturing in one country, it leads to deindustrialization on a massive scale with the concomitant loss of engineering and technical skills, we still do have industry and have no choice but to support it aggressively just like you support yours. All those trinkets and non essential stuff will be the first to go. It's a long game and we have much to learn from you the masters of the long game.

    It all could have been otherwise, a trustworthy relationship between Asia's two largest countries and Asia would have been a bit different sadly it is not and how fervently we Indians wish that things didn't come to such a sorry pass, but here we are and have to deal with a menacing fire breathing dragon which can't be appeased. Hopefully we come out of it without 3rd degree burns.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Lin

    Our PM (whom I can’t stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what?

    Narendra Modi is the only high ranking Indian leader ever denied a U.S. visa, who for nearly a decade was prohibited from setting foot on U.S. soil. Mr. Modi was insulted and said that he wouldn’t apply for a visa again. U.S. officials say, however, that he has tried indirectly. “From time to time, we would get feelers from people who knew him, or on his behalf, on whether we would grant a visa,” says Richard Boucher, who headed the State Department’s South Asia bureau from 2006 to 2009. “We would tell them, ‘No, nothing’s changed.’”

  99. @Europe Europa

    ‘Black Lives Matter’ in the US has yet to make the mistake of attacking support for Israel.
     
    British people, blacks included, don't tend to idolise Jews like Americans do. They are much more likely to look at Israel as a white Apartheid state oppressing non-whites than as "special chosen people who must not be criticised" as Americans regard Jews.

    In the last few years the media establishment has been trying to change that and bring in the American mentality, with things like the Corbyn "anti-Semitism" nonsense.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    Everything I saw from British television about Israel, is very anti-Israel.

    British television is an opposite of Russian television on this topic (Russian television is pro-Israel, or presents the Israeli side only, and without criticism).

    American television is varying by channel between religiously worshiping Israel, and moderately critical of Israel. Channels like CNN are lightly critical of Israel – like liberal Jews -, but on the other hand Fox News worships Israel – as some kind of religious object; probably because of large Evangelical Church viewers.

    I think the reason British media hates Israel can be as uninteresting and simple as that they imagine Israeli Jews are “white people”, and therefore that its an extension of the evil of European colonialism.

    In reality, most Israelis are a racially a brown Middle Eastern, people, but in the symbolic world of Western Europe they have been identified as another “white people”.

    British documentaries of Israel (many on YouTube) are also intentionally only looking at the European people there. It’s really a strange image of the country in the English media compared to reality – where the main impression of the reality of Israel when you are there, is a very Eastern country, with many dark races included in the population.

    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Dmitry

    Very interesting, especially when one considers that British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs). Do European jews prefer to look at Israeli jews who look like them?

    Replies: @Dmitry

    , @Gerard-Mandela
    @Dmitry

    Post you replied to specifically mentioned Jews,not Israel.

    US and Russia have plenty of similarities in their populations general national consciousness of Jews.....in UK it is practically zero.

    US and Russia both have the common or interpersonal conceptions of "jewish mother" various "jewish humour" or "jewish character traits or mentality" "cunning" etc...none of them anti-semitic in tone, some of them complementary or just playful. UK has absolutely zero consciousness of Jewish traits among their population - perhaps explains why , even with a large number of muslims and afew terrorist attacks in Britain - zero Jewish communities( Orthodox or just rich-secular) have even been attacked (long may that continue)

    We have got our great ( and some degenerate but popular)_ contributions from Jews in the arts, film, science, politics and so on from Soviet time and now. USA idolises Gershwin, great American songbook is jewish dominated, plenty of scientists, film directors, lawyers, humanitarians idolised with their jewishness a central, not incidental part of them promoted... even extremely ugly and low talent jews like Lauren Baccall and Barbara Streisand get overly promoted and idolised. In UK I don't think the scale is anywhere near - and their jewishness is incidental

    America, but particularly Russia have loads of successful jewish sportsman/woman and coaches......UK it is zero from what I can see.

    Obviously Americans have great respect for those who make money, UK considers promoting such things vulgar. Russia is somewhere in between.


    Plenty of Russian singers will have yiddish songs in their repertoire ( or at least russian language version) such as Tumbalalaika, Hava Naglia and many others sung on our entertainment or cultural shows............such a cultural impression is non-existant in Britain, despite showbusiness, media business and plenty of other things dominated by jewish control over there.

    What you consider "anti-Israel" is probably just the usual "self-hating jew" pseudo-complex.....I reckon all these supposedly anti-Israel media support Israel foreign policy 100%. Though I do agree with your European/brown people hypothesis

    Replies: @Europe Europa

  100. @brabantian
    The judge in the case of Jeffrey Epstein's longtime associate Ghislaine Maxwell, is a pioneer openly LGBT figure amongst the black robes of USA federal courts, Jewish lesbian Alison J. Nathan.

    Beyond being LGBT ... is she LGBT+Q+P? (+queer+paedo)? What is her view of MAPs, 'Minor-Attracted Persons', as they now call them? That might be important as the case continues.

    Judge Nathan makes a household with her lesbian partner, law professor Meg Satterthwaite, and twin boys as their sons. She teaches part-time at the NYU School of Law.

    https://i.ibb.co/qpft6qz/Judge-Nathan-n-Ghislaine.jpg

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist

    There seem to be an awful lot of lesbian Jews involved in the American judicial system

  101. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Daniel Chieh

    Look you can get out of the thread if you don't want to read me or don't reply to any of my posts. It's really that simple. As for irritable lunatics for neighbors here's what they look like

    https://www.google.com/search?q=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&oq=chinese+workers+killed+in+pakistan&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.14079j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

    Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    Thanks for the passive aggression but no, I’ll remark on anything that pleases me to remark on, including my observations on you.

  102. @216
    @AnonFromTN

    Newsweek is politically irrelevant after its 2009 collapse, its just trading in on the legacy brand name.

    The system has firmly consolidated its culture war positions among white college women, which condemns our stances to Swine Right until further notice.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    Didn’t know anything about Newsweek in the last 20+ years. I cancelled my subscription in 1995 after several issues were full of O.J. Simpson trial that I never gave a hoot about.

  103. @A123
    @Thulean Friend


    German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020
     
    And, as an inevitable consequence, Germany has the highest electricity cost in Europe. (1)

    Germany has the highest electricity costs in Europe, with a rate of around 35 US cents a kilowatt-hour.
    ...
    There are ramifications involved in Germany’s contemporary renewable energy program, including an instable electric grid, the burden being placed upon German households by increased costs for electricity, and the need for secure back-up power that is affordable and reliable
     
    And, the expansion of wind power in Germany is grinding to a halt due to the mass kill of endangered birds. (2)

    The expansion of wind power in the first half of [2019] collapsed to its lowest level since the introduction of the Renewable Energy Act (EEG) in 2000. All in all, just 35 wind turbines were build with an output of 231 megawatts. “This corresponds to a decline of 82 percent compared to the already weak period of the previous year”, according to the German Wind Energy Association (BWE) in Berlin.
    ...
    when in 2021 thousands of wind turbines come to the end of the 20-year subsidy period of the Renewable Energy Act, more wind turbines will be demolished on balance than new ones will be added, the wind industry fears.
    ...
    The most important cause lies in the legal resistance of wildlife and forest conservationists fighting new wind farms. The BWE President referred to an industry survey of the onshore wind agency. According to its findings, more than 70 percent of the legal objections are based on species conservation, especially the threat to endangered bird species and bats.
     
    If you want something done wrong, go to the German government.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) From 2018: https://www.worldatlas.com/articles/electricity-rates-around-the-world.html

    (2) https://wattsupwiththat.com/2019/07/29/collapse-of-wind-power-threatens-germanys-green-energy-transition/

    Replies: @Dmitry

    If you want a cheapest base load, the best option is gas combined cycle plant, – with German turbines.

    https://www.lazard.com/media/450784/lazards-levelized-cost-of-energy-version-120-vfinal.pdf
    But wind is cost competitive (although not suitable for base load)

    (Alternatives like nuclear energy is not only presently absurdly expensive, inefficient, unnimble – but a large part of its future costs are hidden and vastly subsidized by future tax payers. While coal includes many times more deaths as externalities of air pollution, than gas. So such options are not sensible alternatives for gas.).

    • Replies: @A123
    @Dmitry


    But wind is cost competitive (although not suitable for base load)
     
    If wind is cost competitive, why is Germany's wind generated electricity the most expensive in Europe?

    The objective fact of German electrical costs shows that there is something wrong with the study you are presenting. The most common distortion is using an identical life for all "assets", when reality shows that nuclear plants often last 80 years while wind turbines last less than 20 years.

    Add to that, the extermination of endangered birds and the poisoning of Chinese villages. It is clear that onshore wind energy is both an economic and ecological disaster.


    Alternatives like nuclear energy is not only presently absurdly expensive, inefficient, unnimble – but a large part of its future costs are hidden and vastly subsidized by future tax payers.
     
    Nuclear can be cost effective and nimble, but those efforts are fairly young and impeded by government biases. The current selection of U235 reactors was based on the Cold War need to generate Pu239 for the military. It is not the correct choice for civilian applications.

    Small Modular Reactors [SMR] deal with the hideous cost over runs from unique designs for every build. Building the same small reactor repeatedly is much more cost effective.

    The best option is the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor [LFTR]. They use radioactive waste as fuel, which deals with the problem leftover from the old school of reactors. You can read more about LFTR's here:

    http://lftrnow.com

    The DOE buried decades of nuclear fuel in the Nevada desert. This can be unearthed at minimal cost. (1)


    the United States had 3216 metric tonnes of thorium nitrate in storage. Recently, this thorium was deemed worthless by the government and buried at the Nevada Test Site.
    ...
    the thorium required to fuel the entire world’s electrical needs would fit in a reasonably sized room, and the thorium required would only be about 2% of the mass of uranium mined today.
     
    http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/4956/2802/1600/ThN_burial.1.jpg

    Nuclear can be inexpensive and safe. However, it requires moving out entrenched bureaucracies that prevent the development of better alternatives.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://energyfromthorium.com/2006/04/29/how-much-thorium-would-it-take-to-power-the-whole-world/

  104. @Mitleser
    @Blinky Bill


    All Indian moves are aimed at a domestic audience. Beijing hasn’t retaliated because the damage done to Chinese interests is so slight it’s just unnecessary, and because China doesn’t want a war, so is not putting any pressure on Modi. In fact, China is actively limiting the pressure on Modi by not releasing casualty figures or making any public additional troop deployments to the boarder zone to counter the recently announced Indian military deployments. China is just letting him save face and not needlessly humiliate him.
     
    That sounds a bit like projection.

    https://twitter.com/fravel/status/1272960358915989505

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    Fravel’s work has gained attention because of an unanticipated finding growing out of his doctoral research: In the last several decades, to a greater extent than has been generally understood, China has often struck pragmatic compromises in foreign-policy disputes with its neighbors. Fravel’s 2008 book, Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, reveals this tendency and analyzes the reasons for it.

  105. @anonymous coward
    @Jane Plain

    Probably because comparing serfdom to slavery is an extremely false equivalence.

    Serfs weren't chattel, and they weren't shipped from halfway around the world because to replace the locals who weren't cheap enough.

    Replies: @Denis, @AnonFromTN

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Denis


    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections
     
    Maiming and killing serfs were the only illegal actions. Everything else was considered OK. Owners were punished very lightly even for maiming or killing their serfs. Only a few sadistic ones that maimed or killed many were seriously punished.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    , @anonymous coward
    @Denis


    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

     

    That's like saying that "in practice" Trump is a white supremacist or that "in practice" France is an African country. (I.e., a major dramatic overstatement.)

    Serfs were not chattel legally speaking, and the majority of landowners didn't view them as such.

    Abuses, of course, happened; but this was due to the ineffiecient and lacking judicial system in Russia at the time.

    Slavery, in contrast, was a vast industrial enterprise expressly designed to be inhumane, not an asystematic ad-hoc power imbalance.

  106. @Jane Plain
    I was told by "nebulafox" to come over here to ask this question. I'll make it brief.

    Why is contemporary Russia so unconcerned with "the legacy of serfdom" while contemporary America is tied up in knots about it 24/7?

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis, @another anon, @AnonFromTN

    Serfdom was the burden of the average Russian, not imported slaves. If Russians were to give consideration to serfdom, they would be considering the plight of their ancestors, not the ancestors of some other minority with a grievance against them.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Denis

    Russians had the 1917 Revolution, where the landlord class (помещики) was either decimated or expelled. I guess that settled the case.

  107. @Jane Plain
    I was told by "nebulafox" to come over here to ask this question. I'll make it brief.

    Why is contemporary Russia so unconcerned with "the legacy of serfdom" while contemporary America is tied up in knots about it 24/7?

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis, @another anon, @AnonFromTN

    Because nearly everyone in Russia is descendant of serfs, and there is no one who is supposed to pay the reparations.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    @another anon

    For most people living worldwide you will find a historical period in which the vast majority of the ancestors of those people from that specific historical period have been slaves.

  108. @A123
    @Erik Sieven


    a low price for higher indedepence (less imports of gas etc.)
     
    Do you mean a high price for total dependency on China? (1)

    Modern wind turbines depend on rare earth minerals mined primarily from China. Unfortunately, given federal regulations in the U.S. that restrict rare earth mineral development and China’s poor record of environmental stewardship, the process of extracting these minerals imposes wretched environmental and public health impacts on local communities. It’s a story Big Wind doesn’t want you to hear.
    ...
    As more factories sprang up, the banks grew higher, the lake grew larger and the stench and fumes grew more overwhelming.

    ‘It turned into a mountain that towered over us,’ says Mr Su. ‘Anything we planted just withered, then our animals started to sicken and die.’

    People too began to suffer. Dalahai villagers say their teeth began to fall out, their hair turned white at unusually young ages, and they suffered from severe skin and respiratory diseases. Children were born with soft bones and cancer rates rocketed.
     
    Every time I see a wind turbine, I think of it as a gravestone marking the human sacrifice of a Chinese child on the alter of SJW Globalism & Political Correctness.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/renewable/wind/big-winds-dirty-little-secret-rare-earth-minerals/

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    John Bolton: Trump sought Xi’s help to win re-election

    US President Donald Trump sought help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton’s new book says.

    和平👲

    • Replies: @A123
    @Blinky Bill


    US President Donald Trump sought help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton’s new book says.
     
    Bolton is a discredited figure who was fired by Trump. Why would anyone believe his lies about the guy who Kicked him to the Curb?

    Bolton's book is an audition piece to be Secretary of State in the Biden administration. He wants to lead the NeoConDemocrats into multiple foreign interventions on behalf of his supporters from the Military Industrial Complex.

    PEACE 😇
  109. @Mr. Hack
    @Svevlad

    Why does anybody need to "support" such outlandish ideas in the first place?

    Replies: @Svevlad, @Astuteobservor II

    After snowden, I give all conspiracy theories a 99% rating. Of course not the obvious crazy ones. The one you mentioned would require technology that will not be available soon or even 50 years from Now. Unless AI makes huge break through.

    So, yes, support that theory (notice I took out the conspiracy word) but with incredulity.

  110. @cutler
    @truthman

    The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers

    Replies: @Colin Wright

    ‘The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers’

    ‘Greeks’ on Crete and Rhodes look much the same as ‘Turks’ all the way east to Cappadocia. I only restrict my claims to those regions because those are the only ones in which I have traveled.

    • Replies: @Denis
    @Colin Wright

    Rather, it is the Turks who look like Greeks good sir

  111. @Anatoly Karlin
    @Thulean Friend

    Germany spent half a trillion dollars to get some of Europe's highest electricity costs and probably isn't even that big of a deal in climate terms because wind (especially offshore wind) has low EROEI according to most estimates.

    Can't call that a much better use of resources than America's favorite pastime of Middle East adventures or Russia's of providing more villas for the Rotenbergs...

    Replies: @Dmitry

    has low EROEI according to most estimates

    “EROEI” – is really quite a nonsense concept, with no relation to science, and which you can see is a tautology after a minute of thinking about it.

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @Dmitry

    Have fun powering your civilization by melting ice cubes.

  112. @Jane Plain
    I was told by "nebulafox" to come over here to ask this question. I'll make it brief.

    Why is contemporary Russia so unconcerned with "the legacy of serfdom" while contemporary America is tied up in knots about it 24/7?

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis, @another anon, @AnonFromTN

    I can answer you as the person whose ancestors were slaves (indentured peasants, who legally could be sold, like cattle, disregarding family ties, etc.). Indentured peasants in the Russian Empire were freed in 1861, same year American Civil war started. They were given a raw deal with “freedom”: they were forced to pay for the land they received for decades to their former owners. However, if I start blaming my problems on the fact that 160 years ago my ancestors weren’t free, all my Russian acquaintances would consider me a hopeless piece of shit. They would be 100% right.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
  113. @Thulean Friend
    @Blinky Bill

    While an interesting take, I don't think it's accurate for two reasons.

    1) The positions that China took were the same exact ones that India and China fought over in 1962. They've long coveted those positions precisely because how strong defensively they are.

    2) China moved into these positions in April, when India was at its weakest (not vice versa). India had arguably the world's harshest shutdown, and possibly the most chaotic as well. Migrants had to walk hundreds of kilometers back home, and many died on the journey.
    It was in this environment that China began to move into these areas.

    This was premeditated. China did a very calculated and coldly executed move. Now they have a near-insurmountable advantage along most of the LoAC, which is running 1000+ km between the two countries.

    It's basically a landversion of what they did in the South China Sea.

    Whatever they gained militarily along the LoAC, they massively lost geopolitically. Clearly many in the Chinese leadership had written off India as a lost cause regardless, otherwise they wouldn't have burned the bridges in such a public fashion. That was a dangerous miscalculation. Modi genuinely wanted a balance of power, now he has little choice but to run with abandon into the orbit of the US as India is too weak on its own. Very, very foolish of Beijing.

    Replies: @Passer by, @Tor597, @Astuteobservor II

    Oooh, so India is going to become a mere US satellite like Japan?

    That is surprising considering all that chest thumping.

    So I was right, India did give up competing with China.

  114. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    Everything I saw from British television about Israel, is very anti-Israel.

    British television is an opposite of Russian television on this topic (Russian television is pro-Israel, or presents the Israeli side only, and without criticism).

    -

    American television is varying by channel between religiously worshiping Israel, and moderately critical of Israel. Channels like CNN are lightly critical of Israel - like liberal Jews -, but on the other hand Fox News worships Israel - as some kind of religious object; probably because of large Evangelical Church viewers.

    I think the reason British media hates Israel can be as uninteresting and simple as that they imagine Israeli Jews are "white people", and therefore that its an extension of the evil of European colonialism.

    In reality, most Israelis are a racially a brown Middle Eastern, people, but in the symbolic world of Western Europe they have been identified as another "white people".

    British documentaries of Israel (many on YouTube) are also intentionally only looking at the European people there. It's really a strange image of the country in the English media compared to reality - where the main impression of the reality of Israel when you are there, is a very Eastern country, with many dark races included in the population.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Gerard-Mandela

    Very interesting, especially when one considers that British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs). Do European jews prefer to look at Israeli jews who look like them?

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Ray P

    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of "post-colonialist" ideology. Their attitude is something like - "If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed".

    In relation to Israel, British media seem to be enjoy to portray that it is a "white colony" (even though the majority of Israels are brown rednecks).

    After South Africa has fallen, then British media probably view Israel as one of the last targets remaining.

    Such a view is amusing, because Jews in Israel are more often brown people - not only racially, but also in part culturally and in their television and music -, than like some Europeans:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8e3NXxWSDI


    British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs)

     

    I don't think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

    On the plane between London and Tel Aviv, 2 years ago - I would say it is half Russian-speaking people. And then the other are mainly Haredi cults and (brown) Israeli tourists with rucksacks.

    So I assume that one of the main demographic connections between London and Israel, are Russian-speakers, as well as Haredim (who are speaking Yiddish to each other), and some young Israeli tourists.

    Russian domination of the flights to Israel is funny, because it shows how unpopular and disliked Israel is actually in England (at least as a travel destination) - that Russian-speakers can be dominant in flights between England and Israel, and yet in normal days it can be difficult to find Russian-speakers in England.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Kent Nationalist

  115. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    I'm on a learning curve as well. Back in the day, I had a Schwinn Varsity, followed by a Peugeot 10 speed.

    What I'm hearing is that the bikes of today have vastly improved in terms of performance, much like cars. My '87 Integra was a blast to drive back in the day. My '06 Spec V Sentra blows it away.

    The '92 Trek 7000 I'm using originally sold for $592. When compared to the current crop it's considered quite subpar in overall performance.

    Road bikes are ridiculously priced. Regarding hybrids, I've been paying attention to the Giant Escape and Roam models as well as the Trek FX series. Right now, they're tough to find on account of demand - bikes made overseas, relative to Covid-19 leading to production and transport issues.

    On Ebay and Craig's List, sellers are generally asking a lot on account of the current market.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    I rode a 10-speed Schwinn Varsity in college back in the 1970s. During the 1990s, I rode a Trek 700 hybrid, and a Trek 7100 for almost 15 years after that. Both Trek hybrids were durable, reliable, safe bikes.

    I recommend going to a real bike shop and avoiding the el cheapo models at Walmart and other mass merchandisers.

    For many riders, especially younger ones, bicycling is all about going fast. Speed is often the primary if not sole consideration for many of these guys, and some gals, who like to pretend they are in the Tour de France, always wear colorful outfits not unlike jockeys, and try to go as fast as they can everywhere they ride.

    Most of these riders are on road bikes with their very skinny tires, drop bars, tiny seats and uncomfortable riding position which has the further big disadvantage of poor vision while bent over like that.

    For most city riding and commuting, a hybrid is the best choice for a number of reasons. Currently, I ride a Trek Verve 2, for which I paid just about $600 brand new.

    I was very happy to get one of the last 2019 models that doesn’t have disc brakes. Additionally, the current Verve 2 has no front suspension, but does have a simple seat post suspension. Disc brakes are heavier than standard rim brakes, and complicate front wheel removal. Unless you are coming down a mountain, there is little need for disc brakes. Similarly, a front fork suspension adds weight and reduces front wheel stability. It’s overkill for city riding and really only worthwhile on a mountain bike.

    Because of its adjustable handlebar stem, the Verve series is superior to the FX in my opinion. Safety and comfort are much more important to me than going fast.

    The modern trend is toward wider tires. My Verve 2 has 700×45 tires, much wider than those on my two previous Trek hybrids, and much more comfortable than the skinny, hard tires on road bikes, with much better stability and traction, making them much safer, to boot.

    The popular misconception has been that skinny hard tires are much faster than wide tires, but tests show that there is really little difference.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/12-myths-in-cycling-1-wider-tires-are-slower/

    Finally, going to a bike shop will help ensure you get the right size frame for your height.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Sparkon

    Appreciate the input. Was wondering about the need for disc brakes myself.

    I heard that Dick's isn't as bad as Target & Walmart. The online sizing charts at Trek and Giant are pretty detailed.

    I'm not so into speed. Notwithstanding, I want to get a good feel of leg resistance which when pedaled fast will cover a greater distance in less time.

    My interest in outdoor use bikes is on account of the gyms being closed in my area. On a gym bike with 20 settings, I was once able to average 97.5 RPM for a full hour at level 14 manual.

    I'll look into that Trek you mention. Budget wise, I've been geared towards the Trek FX1, Giant Escape 3 and Giant Roam 4.

    , @Mr. Hack
    @Sparkon

    Back in the day, when I went to college, I rode an ultra lightweight Japanese bike, one with skinny tires and drop bars with a tiny seat. I do remember, that after a long winter my first three days of riding resulted in a very sore butt, but it would soon pass as I became more of a hardass. :-) It's been so long, that I don't even remember how I shifted gears, but the hand brakes were always in hand and served me well. In other words I like this style of bike, and remember that I enjoyed being stooped over. The overall ride and feel was that I was driving a fast, lightweight bike that was very precise in maneuverability. I drove up and down the streets of a big city alternating between streets and sidewalks. Going up long hills was the extent of my "mountain-climbing" and sometimes, depending on the height and steepness of the hill, I would just abandon driving it and resume pushing the bike up the remainder of the hill.

    Anyway, I don't intend to take-up mountain driving in the backwoods, and am interested in something similar that will cruise comfortably on asphalt and concrete. Any suggestions are appreciated.

    BTW, I really liked the new "chrome molybdenum" material that my bike posessed, but am afraid that this material is only now available in bikes that cost over $1,000. I'm budgiting now for $300 - $400.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Sparkon

    I am less concerned about speed per se, and more about making biking sustainable. Too many just throw away their bikes prematurely and don't invest time to understanding how to repair your own stuff. It isn't nearly as hard as many think and the most common things (like needing to change tires) are quite trivial. It's just about getting past the initial hurdle for most people.

    One trend in Sweden that I am grateful of is the relative increase of the so-called cykelkök. I go to this one from time to time. In these places, you can often exchange parts for free or a very low sum while learning the ropes of repairing your own bike. It's quite social, too - you meet lots of friendly people. The clientele are anything from yuppies, to suburban soccer moms, careerist men in suits to of course young prole men.

    It's part of a larger movement towards repairability and away from wear-and-tear. The EU has been pushing tech firms to increase repairability in products, as most of the stuff we use often just need a battery or some other single component replaced to keep functioning. Using custom ROMs for your Android phone can also prolong its life for many years.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  116. @Thulean Friend
    On the Chinese-Indian confrontation, the best analysis I've read so far is this. Essentially, India has three options:

    1. A direct confrontation to take back the 5+ places that China unilaterally took over.
    2. Try to take other areas along the Line of Actual Control and then attempt an 'indirect pressure' tactic which would ideally end in a swap for land so the neutral status quo is returned.
    3. Accept a faît accompli as a done deal and try to minimise the domestic outfall.

    The first option will be very hard, as China has carefully taken very defensive positions, so any attacker would be in a significant disadvantage. China is also prepared for a counter-attack now, so any element of surprise is long gone. Finally, China has reinforced all these positions in recent weeks.

    The second option is perhaps the most attractive one, but it would require a great mobilisation rate and a war of attrition that India cannot afford, as China has not only managed the fallout of COVID-19 better but also has significantly more resources at their disposal. India also has to watch the Pakistani flank at the Line of Control. A two-front campaign will be very straining for India.

    The third option seemed to be Modi's initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that "China hadn't crossed into Indian territory". He was faced with a torrent of attacks and even the submissive media had to, for once, take him to task. That said, unless something drastic changes, this may seem like the least costly option economically but will carry a heavy price in terms of prestige. There's also the signal that India is weak and could be provoked further into the future.

    To me, option #2 is the most likely to be tried and option #3 as a last-ditch only. Option #1 would be almost impossible given the excellent positions of China's reinforced bases there. It would also essentially be tantamount to declaring an open war, which India at the moment cannot afford to spend money on. Finally, as Dan Altman has showed, the odds of a state getting territory back after a faît accompli is very low, and he has looked at the actual data. Most landgrabs aren't actually stated threats, they "just happen". Crimea is a great example of this.

    Still, I believe the Chinese miscalculated badly as this will push India into the arms of the US even more. Modi genuinely tried to build a bridge of communication to China but the PLA and the CCP unilaterally burned it. All for a few patches of remote desert. Remarkably foolish.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Astuteobservor II, @china-russia-all-the-way

    I thought Chinese troops never crossed borders. How did they take out indian territory? Wasn’t that what modi said? If Chinese troops did cross borders, took over 5+ indian posts, that would be huge.

    You would have something.

  117. @Denis
    @Jane Plain

    Serfdom was the burden of the average Russian, not imported slaves. If Russians were to give consideration to serfdom, they would be considering the plight of their ancestors, not the ancestors of some other minority with a grievance against them.

    Replies: @Ano4

    Russians had the 1917 Revolution, where the landlord class (помещики) was either decimated or expelled. I guess that settled the case.

  118. @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    I rode a 10-speed Schwinn Varsity in college back in the 1970s. During the 1990s, I rode a Trek 700 hybrid, and a Trek 7100 for almost 15 years after that. Both Trek hybrids were durable, reliable, safe bikes.

    I recommend going to a real bike shop and avoiding the el cheapo models at Walmart and other mass merchandisers.

    For many riders, especially younger ones, bicycling is all about going fast. Speed is often the primary if not sole consideration for many of these guys, and some gals, who like to pretend they are in the Tour de France, always wear colorful outfits not unlike jockeys, and try to go as fast as they can everywhere they ride.

    Most of these riders are on road bikes with their very skinny tires, drop bars, tiny seats and uncomfortable riding position which has the further big disadvantage of poor vision while bent over like that.

    For most city riding and commuting, a hybrid is the best choice for a number of reasons. Currently, I ride a Trek Verve 2, for which I paid just about $600 brand new.


    I was very happy to get one of the last 2019 models that doesn't have disc brakes. Additionally, the current Verve 2 has no front suspension, but does have a simple seat post suspension. Disc brakes are heavier than standard rim brakes, and complicate front wheel removal. Unless you are coming down a mountain, there is little need for disc brakes. Similarly, a front fork suspension adds weight and reduces front wheel stability. It's overkill for city riding and really only worthwhile on a mountain bike.

    Because of its adjustable handlebar stem, the Verve series is superior to the FX in my opinion. Safety and comfort are much more important to me than going fast.

    The modern trend is toward wider tires. My Verve 2 has 700x45 tires, much wider than those on my two previous Trek hybrids, and much more comfortable than the skinny, hard tires on road bikes, with much better stability and traction, making them much safer, to boot.

    The popular misconception has been that skinny hard tires are much faster than wide tires, but tests show that there is really little difference.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/12-myths-in-cycling-1-wider-tires-are-slower/

    Finally, going to a bike shop will help ensure you get the right size frame for your height.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack, @Thulean Friend

    Appreciate the input. Was wondering about the need for disc brakes myself.

    I heard that Dick’s isn’t as bad as Target & Walmart. The online sizing charts at Trek and Giant are pretty detailed.

    I’m not so into speed. Notwithstanding, I want to get a good feel of leg resistance which when pedaled fast will cover a greater distance in less time.

    My interest in outdoor use bikes is on account of the gyms being closed in my area. On a gym bike with 20 settings, I was once able to average 97.5 RPM for a full hour at level 14 manual.

    I’ll look into that Trek you mention. Budget wise, I’ve been geared towards the Trek FX1, Giant Escape 3 and Giant Roam 4.

  119. A123 says:
    @Dmitry
    @A123

    If you want a cheapest base load, the best option is gas combined cycle plant, - with German turbines.


    https://i.imgur.com/2Fe7dbb.jpg
    https://www.lazard.com/media/450784/lazards-levelized-cost-of-energy-version-120-vfinal.pdf
    But wind is cost competitive (although not suitable for base load)

    -

    (Alternatives like nuclear energy is not only presently absurdly expensive, inefficient, unnimble - but a large part of its future costs are hidden and vastly subsidized by future tax payers. While coal includes many times more deaths as externalities of air pollution, than gas. So such options are not sensible alternatives for gas.).

    Replies: @A123

    But wind is cost competitive (although not suitable for base load)

    If wind is cost competitive, why is Germany’s wind generated electricity the most expensive in Europe?

    The objective fact of German electrical costs shows that there is something wrong with the study you are presenting. The most common distortion is using an identical life for all “assets”, when reality shows that nuclear plants often last 80 years while wind turbines last less than 20 years.

    Add to that, the extermination of endangered birds and the poisoning of Chinese villages. It is clear that onshore wind energy is both an economic and ecological disaster.

    Alternatives like nuclear energy is not only presently absurdly expensive, inefficient, unnimble – but a large part of its future costs are hidden and vastly subsidized by future tax payers.

    Nuclear can be cost effective and nimble, but those efforts are fairly young and impeded by government biases. The current selection of U235 reactors was based on the Cold War need to generate Pu239 for the military. It is not the correct choice for civilian applications.

    Small Modular Reactors [SMR] deal with the hideous cost over runs from unique designs for every build. Building the same small reactor repeatedly is much more cost effective.

    The best option is the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor [LFTR]. They use radioactive waste as fuel, which deals with the problem leftover from the old school of reactors. You can read more about LFTR’s here:

    http://lftrnow.com

    The DOE buried decades of nuclear fuel in the Nevada desert. This can be unearthed at minimal cost. (1)

    the United States had 3216 metric tonnes of thorium nitrate in storage. Recently, this thorium was deemed worthless by the government and buried at the Nevada Test Site.

    the thorium required to fuel the entire world’s electrical needs would fit in a reasonably sized room, and the thorium required would only be about 2% of the mass of uranium mined today.


    Nuclear can be inexpensive and safe. However, it requires moving out entrenched bureaucracies that prevent the development of better alternatives.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    (1) https://energyfromthorium.com/2006/04/29/how-much-thorium-would-it-take-to-power-the-whole-world/

  120. A123 says:
    @Blinky Bill
    @A123


    John Bolton: Trump sought Xi's help to win re-election
     
    US President Donald Trump sought help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton's new book says.


    和平👲

    Replies: @A123

    US President Donald Trump sought help from Chinese President Xi Jinping to win re-election, ex-National Security Adviser John Bolton’s new book says.

    Bolton is a discredited figure who was fired by Trump. Why would anyone believe his lies about the guy who Kicked him to the Curb?

    Bolton’s book is an audition piece to be Secretary of State in the Biden administration. He wants to lead the NeoConDemocrats into multiple foreign interventions on behalf of his supporters from the Military Industrial Complex.

    PEACE 😇

  121. @Colin Wright
    @cutler

    'The Turkish Govt themselves published data last year and opened up their immigration records from the time of the collapse of the Ottoman empre and according to their demographers at least 20% of Turks are of Balkan ancestry mostly Albanian Bosniak and Pomak and a further 20% are of Caucasian ancestry mostly Circassian, So a sizeable White or European minority. Most of the descendants of these Balkan settlers live in Western Turkey and these regions also have a very similar fertility rate to the nations of the Western Balkans whilst being the most secular. cheers'

    'Greeks' on Crete and Rhodes look much the same as 'Turks' all the way east to Cappadocia. I only restrict my claims to those regions because those are the only ones in which I have traveled.

    Replies: @Denis

    Rather, it is the Turks who look like Greeks good sir

  122. @anonymous coward
    @Jane Plain

    Probably because comparing serfdom to slavery is an extremely false equivalence.

    Serfs weren't chattel, and they weren't shipped from halfway around the world because to replace the locals who weren't cheap enough.

    Replies: @Denis, @AnonFromTN

    Serfs weren’t chattel, and they weren’t shipped from halfway around the world

    Yea, black slaves were shipped from Africa, where they were enslaved and sold by their black “brothers”

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @AnonFromTN

    Yes, the fact that slavery was expressly designed as an ethnic cleansing and population replacement exercise so that the (((usual suspects))) could turn a quick profit should be a major consideration in the equation.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

  123. @Denis
    @anonymous coward

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @anonymous coward

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    Maiming and killing serfs were the only illegal actions. Everything else was considered OK. Owners were punished very lightly even for maiming or killing their serfs. Only a few sadistic ones that maimed or killed many were seriously punished.

    • Replies: @Jane Plain
    @AnonFromTN

    Serfs could be, and were, whipped.

    Slave homicide laws were under constant revision in the US.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1g2km8v

    But yes, there was a difference in that families weren't broken up. That is a huge difference.

  124. @Denis
    @anonymous coward

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @anonymous coward

    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections

    That’s like saying that “in practice” Trump is a white supremacist or that “in practice” France is an African country. (I.e., a major dramatic overstatement.)

    Serfs were not chattel legally speaking, and the majority of landowners didn’t view them as such.

    Abuses, of course, happened; but this was due to the ineffiecient and lacking judicial system in Russia at the time.

    Slavery, in contrast, was a vast industrial enterprise expressly designed to be inhumane, not an asystematic ad-hoc power imbalance.

  125. @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    I rode a 10-speed Schwinn Varsity in college back in the 1970s. During the 1990s, I rode a Trek 700 hybrid, and a Trek 7100 for almost 15 years after that. Both Trek hybrids were durable, reliable, safe bikes.

    I recommend going to a real bike shop and avoiding the el cheapo models at Walmart and other mass merchandisers.

    For many riders, especially younger ones, bicycling is all about going fast. Speed is often the primary if not sole consideration for many of these guys, and some gals, who like to pretend they are in the Tour de France, always wear colorful outfits not unlike jockeys, and try to go as fast as they can everywhere they ride.

    Most of these riders are on road bikes with their very skinny tires, drop bars, tiny seats and uncomfortable riding position which has the further big disadvantage of poor vision while bent over like that.

    For most city riding and commuting, a hybrid is the best choice for a number of reasons. Currently, I ride a Trek Verve 2, for which I paid just about $600 brand new.


    I was very happy to get one of the last 2019 models that doesn't have disc brakes. Additionally, the current Verve 2 has no front suspension, but does have a simple seat post suspension. Disc brakes are heavier than standard rim brakes, and complicate front wheel removal. Unless you are coming down a mountain, there is little need for disc brakes. Similarly, a front fork suspension adds weight and reduces front wheel stability. It's overkill for city riding and really only worthwhile on a mountain bike.

    Because of its adjustable handlebar stem, the Verve series is superior to the FX in my opinion. Safety and comfort are much more important to me than going fast.

    The modern trend is toward wider tires. My Verve 2 has 700x45 tires, much wider than those on my two previous Trek hybrids, and much more comfortable than the skinny, hard tires on road bikes, with much better stability and traction, making them much safer, to boot.

    The popular misconception has been that skinny hard tires are much faster than wide tires, but tests show that there is really little difference.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/12-myths-in-cycling-1-wider-tires-are-slower/

    Finally, going to a bike shop will help ensure you get the right size frame for your height.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack, @Thulean Friend

    Back in the day, when I went to college, I rode an ultra lightweight Japanese bike, one with skinny tires and drop bars with a tiny seat. I do remember, that after a long winter my first three days of riding resulted in a very sore butt, but it would soon pass as I became more of a hardass. 🙂 It’s been so long, that I don’t even remember how I shifted gears, but the hand brakes were always in hand and served me well. In other words I like this style of bike, and remember that I enjoyed being stooped over. The overall ride and feel was that I was driving a fast, lightweight bike that was very precise in maneuverability. I drove up and down the streets of a big city alternating between streets and sidewalks. Going up long hills was the extent of my “mountain-climbing” and sometimes, depending on the height and steepness of the hill, I would just abandon driving it and resume pushing the bike up the remainder of the hill.

    Anyway, I don’t intend to take-up mountain driving in the backwoods, and am interested in something similar that will cruise comfortably on asphalt and concrete. Any suggestions are appreciated.

    BTW, I really liked the new “chrome molybdenum” material that my bike posessed, but am afraid that this material is only now available in bikes that cost over $1,000. I’m budgiting now for $300 – $400.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    @Mr. Hack


    ...a very sore butt, but it would soon pass...
     
    Well, some things may pass, while others may not. Here is the big, bad thing about skinny bicycle seats (saddles), or maybe I should really call it a dirty, little secret.

    When you sit on a chair, your weight is distributed across both buttocks. This takes pressure off the perineum, a region of the body that runs from the anus to the sex organs. It contains the nerves and arteries that supply the penis in men and the clitoris and labia in women. Sitting on a bicycle seat puts pressure on the perineum, compressing those crucial nerves and arteries. This can lead to loss of sensation and other problems.

    Nerve damage accounts for the penile numbness that some male bikers experience. Pressure on the pudendal artery can add to this nerve injury to produce temporary or prolonged erectile dysfunction. A narrow bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66%, and even a broad seat may reduce flow by 25%. The same processes account for bicycling-related sexual problems in women.
     

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/biking-and-sex-avoid-the-vicious-cycle-201209145290

    Like many things in this world, there is a hidden or at least muted factor in the equation. In the case of bicycles, there may be several muted factors.

    Indeed, it's not only the seat itself that determines the amount of pressure on the perineum. The riding position itself play a big role. No matter what kind of saddle you have on your bike, if you're riding bent over and leaning forward while pedaling hard and trying to go fast, it will be difficult if not impossible to avoid putting pressure on the perineum.

    Wide, angled handlebars pulled back closer to the rider encourage the upright riding position, and when combined with a wide, soft seat, this position allows the rider to sit further back on the saddle near its widest point, thereby putting most of the pressure on the buttocks.

    It helps also to get up off the saddle occasionally into the so-called attack position. Now the riders weight is being supported by the arms and legs, there is much more wind resistance, and the rider can use gravity to put his entire weight on one pedal while climbing tall hills, which is probably the best way to get a good workout on a bicycle without riding for hours.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail, @A123

  126. @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward


    Serfs weren’t chattel, and they weren’t shipped from halfway around the world
     
    Yea, black slaves were shipped from Africa, where they were enslaved and sold by their black “brothers”

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    Yes, the fact that slavery was expressly designed as an ethnic cleansing and population replacement exercise so that the (((usual suspects))) could turn a quick profit should be a major consideration in the equation.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward

    White slavers adhered to different religions. There were Jewish, Christian, and Moslem slavers. None of them actually enslaved blacks. Not because they were so nice, simply because other blacks did this job. They just bought on slave markets in Africa blacks already enslaved by their black “brethren”.

    To the best of my knowledge, they transported slaves to South and North America simply for profit: there was high demand there.

  127. Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I’ve noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement “Edinburgh is a British city”, although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples’ ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say “Barcelona is a Catalan city” would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    • Replies: @A123
    @Europe Europa


    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%.
     
    Theoretical polling and actual support are quite different things. Independence polls well, but one has to question the actual level of support.

    Spain has made it clear that they will block an independent Scotland from the EU and other European bodies to discourage any potential Basque/Catalan break away. This makes any attempt at Scottish succession effectively unworkable.

    PEACE 😇
    , @216
    @Europe Europa

    London is not an English or British city.

    , @AnonFromTN
    @Europe Europa


    “Barcelona is a Catalan city” would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.
     
    I’ve heard this story from a Swiss girl who had a boyfriend from Barcelona. When he went home to visit his family, she asked him in an email how are things in Spain. He angrily answered that he is not in Spain, he is in Catalonia.
    , @Matra
    @Europe Europa

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish.

    Although quite a few people outside of Spain do make a distinction - I've seen it literally written on a wall in Ireland that 'Catalonia is not Spain' - it's not as common as the recognition that Scotland is distinct from England because outside of Latin America Britain is more culturally familiar & influential than Spain. For normies throughout the world just seeing Scotland's national football & rugby teams playing against the likes of Italy and France is probably enough in and of itself for most foreigners to think of Scotland as a separate country already. If Catalonia had its own team at the World Cup it would eventually come to be seen by the masses as a country distinct from the rest of Spain.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    , @Mikel
    @Europe Europa


    no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish
     
    Well, some 66 million people in France would strongly disagree with the idea that Basques on their side of the frontier are Spaniards.

    Most Irish people I've met (including my brother in law) also hold the opinion that Basques are different from Spaniards. Your English mother tongue is much more similar to Spanish than Basque is, after all.

    And I suspect this is too much to expect you to know about but lots of people in places settled by Basque emigrants, like the West of the US or many Latin American countries would also disagree with your assessment.

    On the other hand, it looks like in this thread you have not repeated your usual mantra about the rest of the world hating the English. I really don't have any idea where you get that bizarre impression from. What I've always found is that Continental Europeans have a remarkable fondness of everything British: the culture, the music, London, the language (so much so that most everybody in Europe tries to speak British English as a native, usually failing in the attempt, except for maybe some Dutch).

    The only thing that prevents me from being a total Anglophile myself is the existence of the BBC. I know that many Western public broadcasters are also outlets of left-wing, woke propaganda but none goes to the extents of BBC, specially in their multi-lingual, global outreach services. You can be driving through the Nevada desert and find that the strongest signal is from the BBC Radio. All of this funded by a docile British populace that can vote Conservative or Brexit but still meekly accepts to continue paying for the extortion of the "TV license fee". Disgusting.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Matra

  128. @anonymous coward
    @AnonFromTN

    Yes, the fact that slavery was expressly designed as an ethnic cleansing and population replacement exercise so that the (((usual suspects))) could turn a quick profit should be a major consideration in the equation.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    White slavers adhered to different religions. There were Jewish, Christian, and Moslem slavers. None of them actually enslaved blacks. Not because they were so nice, simply because other blacks did this job. They just bought on slave markets in Africa blacks already enslaved by their black “brethren”.

    To the best of my knowledge, they transported slaves to South and North America simply for profit: there was high demand there.

  129. @Ray P
    @Dmitry

    Very interesting, especially when one considers that British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs). Do European jews prefer to look at Israeli jews who look like them?

    Replies: @Dmitry

    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of “post-colonialist” ideology. Their attitude is something like – “If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed”.

    In relation to Israel, British media seem to be enjoy to portray that it is a “white colony” (even though the majority of Israels are brown rednecks).

    After South Africa has fallen, then British media probably view Israel as one of the last targets remaining.

    Such a view is amusing, because Jews in Israel are more often brown people – not only racially, but also in part culturally and in their television and music -, than like some Europeans:

    British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs)

    I don’t think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

    On the plane between London and Tel Aviv, 2 years ago – I would say it is half Russian-speaking people. And then the other are mainly Haredi cults and (brown) Israeli tourists with rucksacks.

    So I assume that one of the main demographic connections between London and Israel, are Russian-speakers, as well as Haredim (who are speaking Yiddish to each other), and some young Israeli tourists.

    Russian domination of the flights to Israel is funny, because it shows how unpopular and disliked Israel is actually in England (at least as a travel destination) – that Russian-speakers can be dominant in flights between England and Israel, and yet in normal days it can be difficult to find Russian-speakers in England.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Dmitry


    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of “post-colonialist” ideology. Their attitude is something like – “If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed”.
     
    I think a lot of British people find it irritating that their history and legacy is widely chastised, yet many other countries still engage in practices that look very much like colonialism and yet get away with it, or are celebrated for it even.

    I'd say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a "If I can't have one, you can't have one" mentality.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @silviosilver

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Dmitry


    I don’t think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

     

    Almost all Jews in England have been to Israel at least one (thank you Birthright) and many visit it more frequently
  130. @Dmitry
    @Ray P

    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of "post-colonialist" ideology. Their attitude is something like - "If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed".

    In relation to Israel, British media seem to be enjoy to portray that it is a "white colony" (even though the majority of Israels are brown rednecks).

    After South Africa has fallen, then British media probably view Israel as one of the last targets remaining.

    Such a view is amusing, because Jews in Israel are more often brown people - not only racially, but also in part culturally and in their television and music -, than like some Europeans:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8e3NXxWSDI


    British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs)

     

    I don't think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

    On the plane between London and Tel Aviv, 2 years ago - I would say it is half Russian-speaking people. And then the other are mainly Haredi cults and (brown) Israeli tourists with rucksacks.

    So I assume that one of the main demographic connections between London and Israel, are Russian-speakers, as well as Haredim (who are speaking Yiddish to each other), and some young Israeli tourists.

    Russian domination of the flights to Israel is funny, because it shows how unpopular and disliked Israel is actually in England (at least as a travel destination) - that Russian-speakers can be dominant in flights between England and Israel, and yet in normal days it can be difficult to find Russian-speakers in England.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Kent Nationalist

    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of “post-colonialist” ideology. Their attitude is something like – “If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed”.

    I think a lot of British people find it irritating that their history and legacy is widely chastised, yet many other countries still engage in practices that look very much like colonialism and yet get away with it, or are celebrated for it even.

    I’d say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a “If I can’t have one, you can’t have one” mentality.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    If you compared with 1960s English videos about Israel, they were matching an attitude they had of other former Imperial Possessions.

    In 1960s - although British power has been displaced for more than a decade in the Middle East, they discuss like they view the region as if it was still one of their territories.

    British of this era are still mostly interested about industrial process, modernization, trains, electricity - they still had some viewpoint of a ruling caste.

    To some extent, there is concession of a tourist view as well - they assume some romantics are watching it for tourist infomation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOxWcI4V1xc

    Similar on Rhodesia - most interest is practical about industrialization, with no interest in morality of the situation.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I7C6bEep60


    British attitude sounds a mainly discussing "how to rule these countries", and concerns are related to a ruling class.

    -

    By 21st century, England's media attitude, is in a "post-colonial" attitude, and the old attitudes based on real power replaced.

    Watching the new videos, reminds more of how Sweden says they will be a "moral superpower".

    Without real power, British lost interest in practical issues of ruling - instead the interest of the English BBC man, is the moral dimension.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGahJzFdqaY

    Israel is mainly interesting for him, because they view one side as "brown" (Arabs) and the other "white" (Jews), and therefore can be a stage where English media act with moral superiority, by siding against violence and colonialism.

    Nowadays, if Ukraine fights with its own citizens, there will be no such angry discussion with Ukrainian officials, as there is no way for them to interpret the conflict according to post-colonial attitudes.

    Similarly, they will not discuss with Indian or Chinese officials in this way. But they might to American and Russian officials.

    -

    Although the attitude of 1960s England, is already that they are politely accepting the loss of their own imperial power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylDMrkHrWcg

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=572279669961124

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Not Only Wrathful, @Kent Nationalist

    , @silviosilver
    @Europe Europa


    I’d say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a “If I can’t have one, you can’t have one” mentality.
     
    It's something of a "supremacist" attitude, really. They decided that racism, nationalism, colonialism etc are awful, and they simply assumed that everybody else simply would agree with them, or could be made to agree with them. It's not surprising that they'd get ticked off on noticing that other peoples had only been pretending to abide by the same rules. The duplicity is most glaring in the case of Jews, who are never slow to assail Britons for historical misdeeds, while squealing about 'anti-semitism' the minute the spotlight is shined on themselves; but essentially everyone is up to the same thing, just substitute 'racism' for 'anti-semitism'.

    Also, I can't prove this, but it does seem to me that a fair few Anglo-Saxons think they are the only people who could really be racist, so they don't pay much attention to the racism of other races. Their feeling seems to be something like "they're already so 'unwhite' anyway, what could they possibly have to be racist about?" A very self-centered view, to say the least.

  131. https://www.mauritshuis.nl/-/media/44068c2e9dad40389108936fa121375d.ashx?mh=500&mw=500

    I came across “Girl With a Pearl Earring” yesterday. (Vermeer; usually around No.10 in the “most famous paintings” lists). I remember when I took art history there was a discussion about whether she was turning away from the viewer, or towards the viewer. I had always thought it was the latter. Sadly, I now see her turning away from me. I am being canceled. I am no psychiatrist, but that’s a heckuva Rorschach. That is my new mindset. Her lips are parted, ready to speak, ready to call me a racist or a dinosaur.

  132. A123 says:
    @Europe Europa
    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I've noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement "Edinburgh is a British city", although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples' ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say "Barcelona is a Catalan city" would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    Replies: @A123, @216, @AnonFromTN, @Matra, @Mikel

    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%.

    Theoretical polling and actual support are quite different things. Independence polls well, but one has to question the actual level of support.

    Spain has made it clear that they will block an independent Scotland from the EU and other European bodies to discourage any potential Basque/Catalan break away. This makes any attempt at Scottish succession effectively unworkable.

    PEACE 😇

  133. @Europe Europa
    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I've noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement "Edinburgh is a British city", although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples' ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say "Barcelona is a Catalan city" would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    Replies: @A123, @216, @AnonFromTN, @Matra, @Mikel

    London is not an English or British city.

  134. @Europe Europa
    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I've noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement "Edinburgh is a British city", although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples' ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say "Barcelona is a Catalan city" would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    Replies: @A123, @216, @AnonFromTN, @Matra, @Mikel

    “Barcelona is a Catalan city” would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    I’ve heard this story from a Swiss girl who had a boyfriend from Barcelona. When he went home to visit his family, she asked him in an email how are things in Spain. He angrily answered that he is not in Spain, he is in Catalonia.

  135. @AnonFromTN
    @Denis


    My understanding of Russian serfdom is that they were, in practice, chattel, but chattel with some legal protections
     
    Maiming and killing serfs were the only illegal actions. Everything else was considered OK. Owners were punished very lightly even for maiming or killing their serfs. Only a few sadistic ones that maimed or killed many were seriously punished.

    Replies: @Jane Plain

    Serfs could be, and were, whipped.

    Slave homicide laws were under constant revision in the US.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1g2km8v

    But yes, there was a difference in that families weren’t broken up. That is a huge difference.

  136. @Mr. Hack
    @Sparkon

    Back in the day, when I went to college, I rode an ultra lightweight Japanese bike, one with skinny tires and drop bars with a tiny seat. I do remember, that after a long winter my first three days of riding resulted in a very sore butt, but it would soon pass as I became more of a hardass. :-) It's been so long, that I don't even remember how I shifted gears, but the hand brakes were always in hand and served me well. In other words I like this style of bike, and remember that I enjoyed being stooped over. The overall ride and feel was that I was driving a fast, lightweight bike that was very precise in maneuverability. I drove up and down the streets of a big city alternating between streets and sidewalks. Going up long hills was the extent of my "mountain-climbing" and sometimes, depending on the height and steepness of the hill, I would just abandon driving it and resume pushing the bike up the remainder of the hill.

    Anyway, I don't intend to take-up mountain driving in the backwoods, and am interested in something similar that will cruise comfortably on asphalt and concrete. Any suggestions are appreciated.

    BTW, I really liked the new "chrome molybdenum" material that my bike posessed, but am afraid that this material is only now available in bikes that cost over $1,000. I'm budgiting now for $300 - $400.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    …a very sore butt, but it would soon pass…

    Well, some things may pass, while others may not. Here is the big, bad thing about skinny bicycle seats (saddles), or maybe I should really call it a dirty, little secret.

    When you sit on a chair, your weight is distributed across both buttocks. This takes pressure off the perineum, a region of the body that runs from the anus to the sex organs. It contains the nerves and arteries that supply the penis in men and the clitoris and labia in women. Sitting on a bicycle seat puts pressure on the perineum, compressing those crucial nerves and arteries. This can lead to loss of sensation and other problems.

    Nerve damage accounts for the penile numbness that some male bikers experience. Pressure on the pudendal artery can add to this nerve injury to produce temporary or prolonged erectile dysfunction. A narrow bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66%, and even a broad seat may reduce flow by 25%. The same processes account for bicycling-related sexual problems in women.

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/biking-and-sex-avoid-the-vicious-cycle-201209145290

    Like many things in this world, there is a hidden or at least muted factor in the equation. In the case of bicycles, there may be several muted factors.

    Indeed, it’s not only the seat itself that determines the amount of pressure on the perineum. The riding position itself play a big role. No matter what kind of saddle you have on your bike, if you’re riding bent over and leaning forward while pedaling hard and trying to go fast, it will be difficult if not impossible to avoid putting pressure on the perineum.

    Wide, angled handlebars pulled back closer to the rider encourage the upright riding position, and when combined with a wide, soft seat, this position allows the rider to sit further back on the saddle near its widest point, thereby putting most of the pressure on the buttocks.

    It helps also to get up off the saddle occasionally into the so-called attack position. Now the riders weight is being supported by the arms and legs, there is much more wind resistance, and the rider can use gravity to put his entire weight on one pedal while climbing tall hills, which is probably the best way to get a good workout on a bicycle without riding for hours.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Sparkon

    When I was a young man going to college, I never seemed to have any problems with "erectile dysfunction" or the likes, actually very much just the opposite. :-) Of course I wasn't always riding my bike, and had acquired a small car by that time too. But being much older now, I'll pay heed to your warnings and cautions. Also, I recall that I often didn't need to hunch all the way down the drop bars to hold on comfortably. There were actually two positions, a higher and a lower one where even the handbrakes were adjusted to handle either one. Getting down "deep and dirty" was usually reserved for only short bursts when speed was necessary, as in passing somebody or something. The lightweight and sturdiness of the bike is what impresses my memory most of all.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    , @Mikhail
    @Sparkon

    A quality gym bike and seat are considerably more comfy and I suspect less likely to develop or enhance ED symptoms.

    Multiple sources say that Trek bike seats are known for being harsh. I've been told that cushioned bike seat covers are prone to not staying still and that getting a whole different seat is a better route. For $35.00, a bike shop near me says he might've a better seat in place of the original on my 1992 Trek 7000.

    Be nice if he can tune my bike fairly soon. Specifically, the issue of my currently not getting the gear at its highest. Bike shops near me are swarmed with such work, with typical waits of a week to two weeks.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    , @A123
    @Sparkon

    Some mountain biking seems a bit too risky for my taste....

    Apparently the riders named the large boulder in the middle of the course "Dwayne". So, I have to give them points for sense of humor.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

    https://youtu.be/C7dIJ5X8ZSU?t=257

  137. Is the far east hektar program worth it for a foreigner who wants to immigrate, or are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Wei

    Vladivostok region is pretty warm. The sea to the South of it is remarkably picturesque and user-friendly: bays off bigger bays that are off even bigger bays. 30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded. There were two downsides: 1) lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water); 2) monsoon rains. I don’t know whether they give hectares (~2.5 acres) in Vladivostok region. I also don’t know whether they give land to immigrating foreigners. Find out.

    Replies: @AP

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Wei

    Rank City Population (2002) Avg Winter Temp (°C)

    1 Moscow 10,126,424. −13.0
    2 Saint Petersburg 4,661,219. −10.0
    3 Novosibirsk 1,425,508 −20.0
    4 Nizhny Novgorod 1,311,252. −15.0
    5 Yekaterinburg 1,293,537 −17.0
    6 Samara 1,157,880. −14.0
    7 Omsk 1,134,016. −20.0
    8 Kazan 1,105,289. −14.0
    9 Chelyabinsk 1,077,174. −18.0
    10 Rostov-on-Don 1,068,267. −7.0
    11 Ufa 1,042,437. −14.0
    12 Volgograd 1,011,417. −16.0
    13 Perm 1,001,653 −15.0
    14 Krasnoyarsk 909,341 −18.0
    15 Saratov 873,055. −12.0
    16 Voronezh 848,752. −6.0
    17 Tolyatti 702,879 −18.0
    18 Krasnodar 646,175. −7.0
    19 Ulyanovsk 635,947. −11.0
    20 Izhevsk 632,140. −14.0
    21 Yaroslavl 613,088 −11.0
    22 Barnaul 600,749. −15.5
    23 Vladivostok 594,701. −14.0
    24 Irkutsk 593,604 −15.0
    25 Khabarovsk 583,072. −22.0

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Wei


    are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?
     
    Western perspective

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRCq-V7qbbsoOeUVPe3puA3xIaWCBE4oiwvRQ&usqp.jpg

    Sakha perspective


    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcShXl8-wJRr11J3Hps7BIsfZn5udHYZDzBoFA&usqp.jpg

    https://siberiantimes.com/PICTURES/OTHERS/Buluus-glacier-Yakutia/12.jpg

    https://siberiantimes.com/PICTURES/OTHERS/Buluus-glacier-Yakutia/8.jpg

    https://siberiantimes.com/PICTURES/OTHERS/Buluus-glacier-Yakutia/19.jpg

    https://siberiantimes.com/PICTURES/OTHERS/Buluus-glacier-Yakutia/5.jpg
  138. @another anon
    @Jane Plain

    Because nearly everyone in Russia is descendant of serfs, and there is no one who is supposed to pay the reparations.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven

    For most people living worldwide you will find a historical period in which the vast majority of the ancestors of those people from that specific historical period have been slaves.

  139. @Dmitry
    @Ray P

    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of "post-colonialist" ideology. Their attitude is something like - "If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed".

    In relation to Israel, British media seem to be enjoy to portray that it is a "white colony" (even though the majority of Israels are brown rednecks).

    After South Africa has fallen, then British media probably view Israel as one of the last targets remaining.

    Such a view is amusing, because Jews in Israel are more often brown people - not only racially, but also in part culturally and in their television and music -, than like some Europeans:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8e3NXxWSDI


    British t.v. has a large number of jews in senior positions (particularly news and current affairs)

     

    I don't think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

    On the plane between London and Tel Aviv, 2 years ago - I would say it is half Russian-speaking people. And then the other are mainly Haredi cults and (brown) Israeli tourists with rucksacks.

    So I assume that one of the main demographic connections between London and Israel, are Russian-speakers, as well as Haredim (who are speaking Yiddish to each other), and some young Israeli tourists.

    Russian domination of the flights to Israel is funny, because it shows how unpopular and disliked Israel is actually in England (at least as a travel destination) - that Russian-speakers can be dominant in flights between England and Israel, and yet in normal days it can be difficult to find Russian-speakers in England.

    Replies: @Europe Europa, @Kent Nationalist

    I don’t think many English speakers visit Israel from England.

    Almost all Jews in England have been to Israel at least one (thank you Birthright) and many visit it more frequently

  140. @Sparkon
    @Mr. Hack


    ...a very sore butt, but it would soon pass...
     
    Well, some things may pass, while others may not. Here is the big, bad thing about skinny bicycle seats (saddles), or maybe I should really call it a dirty, little secret.

    When you sit on a chair, your weight is distributed across both buttocks. This takes pressure off the perineum, a region of the body that runs from the anus to the sex organs. It contains the nerves and arteries that supply the penis in men and the clitoris and labia in women. Sitting on a bicycle seat puts pressure on the perineum, compressing those crucial nerves and arteries. This can lead to loss of sensation and other problems.

    Nerve damage accounts for the penile numbness that some male bikers experience. Pressure on the pudendal artery can add to this nerve injury to produce temporary or prolonged erectile dysfunction. A narrow bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66%, and even a broad seat may reduce flow by 25%. The same processes account for bicycling-related sexual problems in women.
     

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/biking-and-sex-avoid-the-vicious-cycle-201209145290

    Like many things in this world, there is a hidden or at least muted factor in the equation. In the case of bicycles, there may be several muted factors.

    Indeed, it's not only the seat itself that determines the amount of pressure on the perineum. The riding position itself play a big role. No matter what kind of saddle you have on your bike, if you're riding bent over and leaning forward while pedaling hard and trying to go fast, it will be difficult if not impossible to avoid putting pressure on the perineum.

    Wide, angled handlebars pulled back closer to the rider encourage the upright riding position, and when combined with a wide, soft seat, this position allows the rider to sit further back on the saddle near its widest point, thereby putting most of the pressure on the buttocks.

    It helps also to get up off the saddle occasionally into the so-called attack position. Now the riders weight is being supported by the arms and legs, there is much more wind resistance, and the rider can use gravity to put his entire weight on one pedal while climbing tall hills, which is probably the best way to get a good workout on a bicycle without riding for hours.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail, @A123

    When I was a young man going to college, I never seemed to have any problems with “erectile dysfunction” or the likes, actually very much just the opposite. 🙂 Of course I wasn’t always riding my bike, and had acquired a small car by that time too. But being much older now, I’ll pay heed to your warnings and cautions. Also, I recall that I often didn’t need to hunch all the way down the drop bars to hold on comfortably. There were actually two positions, a higher and a lower one where even the handbrakes were adjusted to handle either one. Getting down “deep and dirty” was usually reserved for only short bursts when speed was necessary, as in passing somebody or something. The lightweight and sturdiness of the bike is what impresses my memory most of all.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Has t0o be one of the best, if not the best bike movie:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RosTfFAs-XM

  141. @Europe Europa
    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I've noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement "Edinburgh is a British city", although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples' ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say "Barcelona is a Catalan city" would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    Replies: @A123, @216, @AnonFromTN, @Matra, @Mikel

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish.

    Although quite a few people outside of Spain do make a distinction – I’ve seen it literally written on a wall in Ireland that ‘Catalonia is not Spain’ – it’s not as common as the recognition that Scotland is distinct from England because outside of Latin America Britain is more culturally familiar & influential than Spain. For normies throughout the world just seeing Scotland’s national football & rugby teams playing against the likes of Italy and France is probably enough in and of itself for most foreigners to think of Scotland as a separate country already. If Catalonia had its own team at the World Cup it would eventually come to be seen by the masses as a country distinct from the rest of Spain.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Matra

    Separate England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland teams for most sports seems to be a fluke of history, I can't think of another country where the national team does not correspond with the sovereign state. Probably a lot to do with the fact that Britain played a large role in setting up regulated international sport. The first "international" football match was England vs Scotland. Also in the 1800s I doubt there was quite such a formalised idea of what constituted a nation state than there is today, with the UN, etc.

    Interestingly, only "Great Britain" is allowed as the Olympic team because England, Wales, Scotland and NI don't meet the IOC's criteria as sovereign states.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Eugene Norman

  142. @Wei
    Is the far east hektar program worth it for a foreigner who wants to immigrate, or are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

    Vladivostok region is pretty warm. The sea to the South of it is remarkably picturesque and user-friendly: bays off bigger bays that are off even bigger bays. 30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded. There were two downsides: 1) lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water); 2) monsoon rains. I don’t know whether they give hectares (~2.5 acres) in Vladivostok region. I also don’t know whether they give land to immigrating foreigners. Find out.

    • Replies: @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Vladivostok region is pretty warm.
     
    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense "information."

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not "pretty warm." It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

  143. Anyone have any thoughts about Croatia’s parliamentary elections today. Looks like mainstream “right wing” party did well as did Skoro which is supposed to be “far right”.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @truthman

    The mainstream right in Croatia is as bogus (for nationalist purposes) as the right anywhere else in Europe. Skoro's outfit is nationalist, but it seems pretty heavily watered down, at least in the face it presents to the public. The most notable aspect of the election to me was the migration of voters from the mainstream liberal-left to the far left, mirroring trends elsewhere in Europe.

    Replies: @Not Raul

  144. The forbidden Tintin books are on libgen. So far, I’ve only read the one where he visits the Congo, but it was quite good.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @songbird

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/_NgXrMnZHoL4/TPko47ogS9I/AAAAAAAABHo/OeP9sxe8d5o/s640/Tintin+England.jpg

    Europe Europa is right, they'll never ban this one.

    Replies: @Ray P

  145. @Sparkon
    @Mr. Hack


    ...a very sore butt, but it would soon pass...
     
    Well, some things may pass, while others may not. Here is the big, bad thing about skinny bicycle seats (saddles), or maybe I should really call it a dirty, little secret.

    When you sit on a chair, your weight is distributed across both buttocks. This takes pressure off the perineum, a region of the body that runs from the anus to the sex organs. It contains the nerves and arteries that supply the penis in men and the clitoris and labia in women. Sitting on a bicycle seat puts pressure on the perineum, compressing those crucial nerves and arteries. This can lead to loss of sensation and other problems.

    Nerve damage accounts for the penile numbness that some male bikers experience. Pressure on the pudendal artery can add to this nerve injury to produce temporary or prolonged erectile dysfunction. A narrow bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66%, and even a broad seat may reduce flow by 25%. The same processes account for bicycling-related sexual problems in women.
     

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/biking-and-sex-avoid-the-vicious-cycle-201209145290

    Like many things in this world, there is a hidden or at least muted factor in the equation. In the case of bicycles, there may be several muted factors.

    Indeed, it's not only the seat itself that determines the amount of pressure on the perineum. The riding position itself play a big role. No matter what kind of saddle you have on your bike, if you're riding bent over and leaning forward while pedaling hard and trying to go fast, it will be difficult if not impossible to avoid putting pressure on the perineum.

    Wide, angled handlebars pulled back closer to the rider encourage the upright riding position, and when combined with a wide, soft seat, this position allows the rider to sit further back on the saddle near its widest point, thereby putting most of the pressure on the buttocks.

    It helps also to get up off the saddle occasionally into the so-called attack position. Now the riders weight is being supported by the arms and legs, there is much more wind resistance, and the rider can use gravity to put his entire weight on one pedal while climbing tall hills, which is probably the best way to get a good workout on a bicycle without riding for hours.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail, @A123

    A quality gym bike and seat are considerably more comfy and I suspect less likely to develop or enhance ED symptoms.

    Multiple sources say that Trek bike seats are known for being harsh. I’ve been told that cushioned bike seat covers are prone to not staying still and that getting a whole different seat is a better route. For $35.00, a bike shop near me says he might’ve a better seat in place of the original on my 1992 Trek 7000.

    Be nice if he can tune my bike fairly soon. Specifically, the issue of my currently not getting the gear at its highest. Bike shops near me are swarmed with such work, with typical waits of a week to two weeks.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    Yes, I replaced the stock saddle on my Verve 2 with a comfort seat from Bell. Its design allows me to sit back with my buttocks comfortably planted with no pressure on the perineum. The cushioned seat covers are worthless. Save your money, shop around, and get a replacement comfort saddle in the $30-50 price range. Even Walmart has them.

    As always, get an estimate from your bike shop before committing the bike for repairs. Everything has gotten more expensive in the past decade, and bike shops are no exception, so prepare to be surprised.

    When I took my 7100 in for service and repairs last year , the running estimate was up to $400 when I gave the cut sign, and walked out into the showroom. They rolled out the Verve 2, and it was love at first ride.

    It's rather difficult to justify spending maybe 500 bucks for repairs on a 15 year old bike that I bought new (last year's model) for $180 in '04.

    It seems your bike needs a rear derailleur adjustment so it will shift smoothly into all gears. There are numerous videos and articles online showing how to adjust front and rear derailleurs.

    Depending on the location and type of your shifters, it may be possible to invert your bike, stand it on the seat and handlebars, and work on your rear derailleur with the bike in that position, but usually, a bike stand is needed for derailleur adjustments because it is necessary that the bike be immobilized with the wheels and pedals free to turn, while also being able to use the shifters. There are articles online with suggestions and ideas for circumventing the need for a bike stand.

    All those new bikes you're considering are decent rides, but none in that group has an adjustable handlebar stem that allows the rider to fine tune his riding geometry. Neither does the bike you are riding now, as far as I can tell. No suspension seat posts either, but like the seat, those are easy to swap out.

    Good luck.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live, @(((They))) Live

  146. There are rumors that in view of America’s continuing descent into
    anarchy, growing numbers of people residing in the Washington, DC
    Beltway area are considering emigrating to Central Europe, esp.
    Poland and Czechia. If they are of British descent, who would want them?
    With all the horrors their ancestors inflicted on the world through colonialism
    and the transatlantic slave trade they are clearly descended from low quality
    stock.

    Similarly, in Europe the Germanics (esp. Germans and Swedes) represent
    low quality stock (I don’t want to say “untermenschen” because as Homo
    Sapiens we are animals) in view of their proclivity for extreme violence,
    higher than average for Homo Sapiens and amply demonstrated over the
    last 1200 years if not longer. For example, Lutheran Sweden invaded Poland in
    the 1650s killing, directly or indirectly, 4 million people, i.e., one-third the
    population of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (which, by the way,
    gained a very large area not through military conquest but through peaceful
    means – personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand
    Duchy of Lithuania)

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Anon 2


    For example, Lutheran Sweden invaded Poland in
    the 1650s killing, directly or indirectly, 4 million people, i.e., one-third the
    population of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (which, by the way,
    gained a very large area not through military conquest but through peaceful
    means – personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand
    Duchy of Lithuania)
     
    Swedish rule over Finland was if anything harsher than Russia's.
    , @Anon 2
    @Anon 2

    In case anyone still has difficulty thinking of human beings as animals,
    161 years since Darwin’s Origin of the Species (1859), clearly we are having
    extreme difficulty rising above the level of predatory primates as proved
    by the continuing wars, continuing arms race, and continuing criminality.

    P.S. Pacifism (and Unitarianism) was a very strong movement in Poland
    in the late 1500s as the Western Europeans were butchering each other
    over something as trivial as theological differences

  147. @Mr. Hack
    @Sparkon

    When I was a young man going to college, I never seemed to have any problems with "erectile dysfunction" or the likes, actually very much just the opposite. :-) Of course I wasn't always riding my bike, and had acquired a small car by that time too. But being much older now, I'll pay heed to your warnings and cautions. Also, I recall that I often didn't need to hunch all the way down the drop bars to hold on comfortably. There were actually two positions, a higher and a lower one where even the handbrakes were adjusted to handle either one. Getting down "deep and dirty" was usually reserved for only short bursts when speed was necessary, as in passing somebody or something. The lightweight and sturdiness of the bike is what impresses my memory most of all.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Has t0o be one of the best, if not the best bike movie:

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
  148. @Anon 2
    There are rumors that in view of America’s continuing descent into
    anarchy, growing numbers of people residing in the Washington, DC
    Beltway area are considering emigrating to Central Europe, esp.
    Poland and Czechia. If they are of British descent, who would want them?
    With all the horrors their ancestors inflicted on the world through colonialism
    and the transatlantic slave trade they are clearly descended from low quality
    stock.

    Similarly, in Europe the Germanics (esp. Germans and Swedes) represent
    low quality stock (I don’t want to say “untermenschen” because as Homo
    Sapiens we are animals) in view of their proclivity for extreme violence,
    higher than average for Homo Sapiens and amply demonstrated over the
    last 1200 years if not longer. For example, Lutheran Sweden invaded Poland in
    the 1650s killing, directly or indirectly, 4 million people, i.e., one-third the
    population of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (which, by the way,
    gained a very large area not through military conquest but through peaceful
    means - personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand
    Duchy of Lithuania)

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Anon 2

    For example, Lutheran Sweden invaded Poland in
    the 1650s killing, directly or indirectly, 4 million people, i.e., one-third the
    population of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (which, by the way,
    gained a very large area not through military conquest but through peaceful
    means – personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand
    Duchy of Lithuania)

    Swedish rule over Finland was if anything harsher than Russia’s.

    • Agree: Anon 2
  149. @Anon 2
    There are rumors that in view of America’s continuing descent into
    anarchy, growing numbers of people residing in the Washington, DC
    Beltway area are considering emigrating to Central Europe, esp.
    Poland and Czechia. If they are of British descent, who would want them?
    With all the horrors their ancestors inflicted on the world through colonialism
    and the transatlantic slave trade they are clearly descended from low quality
    stock.

    Similarly, in Europe the Germanics (esp. Germans and Swedes) represent
    low quality stock (I don’t want to say “untermenschen” because as Homo
    Sapiens we are animals) in view of their proclivity for extreme violence,
    higher than average for Homo Sapiens and amply demonstrated over the
    last 1200 years if not longer. For example, Lutheran Sweden invaded Poland in
    the 1650s killing, directly or indirectly, 4 million people, i.e., one-third the
    population of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (which, by the way,
    gained a very large area not through military conquest but through peaceful
    means - personal union between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand
    Duchy of Lithuania)

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Anon 2

    In case anyone still has difficulty thinking of human beings as animals,
    161 years since Darwin’s Origin of the Species (1859), clearly we are having
    extreme difficulty rising above the level of predatory primates as proved
    by the continuing wars, continuing arms race, and continuing criminality.

    P.S. Pacifism (and Unitarianism) was a very strong movement in Poland
    in the late 1500s as the Western Europeans were butchering each other
    over something as trivial as theological differences

  150. @Europe Europa
    @Dmitry


    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of “post-colonialist” ideology. Their attitude is something like – “If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed”.
     
    I think a lot of British people find it irritating that their history and legacy is widely chastised, yet many other countries still engage in practices that look very much like colonialism and yet get away with it, or are celebrated for it even.

    I'd say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a "If I can't have one, you can't have one" mentality.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @silviosilver

    If you compared with 1960s English videos about Israel, they were matching an attitude they had of other former Imperial Possessions.

    In 1960s – although British power has been displaced for more than a decade in the Middle East, they discuss like they view the region as if it was still one of their territories.

    British of this era are still mostly interested about industrial process, modernization, trains, electricity – they still had some viewpoint of a ruling caste.

    To some extent, there is concession of a tourist view as well – they assume some romantics are watching it for tourist infomation.

    Similar on Rhodesia – most interest is practical about industrialization, with no interest in morality of the situation.

    British attitude sounds a mainly discussing “how to rule these countries”, and concerns are related to a ruling class.

    By 21st century, England’s media attitude, is in a “post-colonial” attitude, and the old attitudes based on real power replaced.

    Watching the new videos, reminds more of how Sweden says they will be a “moral superpower”.

    Without real power, British lost interest in practical issues of ruling – instead the interest of the English BBC man, is the moral dimension.

    Israel is mainly interesting for him, because they view one side as “brown” (Arabs) and the other “white” (Jews), and therefore can be a stage where English media act with moral superiority, by siding against violence and colonialism.

    Nowadays, if Ukraine fights with its own citizens, there will be no such angry discussion with Ukrainian officials, as there is no way for them to interpret the conflict according to post-colonial attitudes.

    Similarly, they will not discuss with Indian or Chinese officials in this way. But they might to American and Russian officials.

    Although the attitude of 1960s England, is already that they are politely accepting the loss of their own imperial power.

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=572279669961124

    • Agree: Philip Owen
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Dmitry


    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.

     

    https://www.facebook.com/BBCArchive/videos/572279669961124/
    , @Not Only Wrathful
    @Dmitry

    It is so refreshing to watch a documentary style production without the core tone being one of moral narcissism.

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Dmitry

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVo_wkxH9dU

    Replies: @Dmitry

  151. @Dmitry
    @Anatoly Karlin


    has low EROEI according to most estimates
     
    "EROEI" - is really quite a nonsense concept, with no relation to science, and which you can see is a tautology after a minute of thinking about it.

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    Have fun powering your civilization by melting ice cubes.

  152. It is often remarked how homos stole the word “gay.” And it was quite remarkable that they managed to do it, but it is even stranger how Jews stole the word “holocaust” and essentially made it their own. They should use a Jewish word like Shoah and not one derived from a Proto-Indo-European language. And certainly not an English word. I don’t think it would have had the same power if it had been Hebrew – and it should have been since it has become a religion.

    As far as I can tell, in the sense of killing, it was first used to describe massacres of Christian Armenians by Turks. But it didn’t always have a dark tone. I read a novel from the early 1900s which contained a line like, “He had fallen so far behind, he would need a holocaust in order to catch up.” It was figurative, not referring to killing and only referring to fire, in a very figurative sense.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @songbird


    ...it is even stranger how Jews stole the word “holocaust” and essentially made it their own
     
    "holocaust, n.: a Jewish sacrificial offering which was burnt completely on an altar."

    At this point I would link to a history of the Judenrat, but why bother? This place is a dump with the collective IQ of an ape troop.

    Replies: @songbird

  153. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    If you compared with 1960s English videos about Israel, they were matching an attitude they had of other former Imperial Possessions.

    In 1960s - although British power has been displaced for more than a decade in the Middle East, they discuss like they view the region as if it was still one of their territories.

    British of this era are still mostly interested about industrial process, modernization, trains, electricity - they still had some viewpoint of a ruling caste.

    To some extent, there is concession of a tourist view as well - they assume some romantics are watching it for tourist infomation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOxWcI4V1xc

    Similar on Rhodesia - most interest is practical about industrialization, with no interest in morality of the situation.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I7C6bEep60


    British attitude sounds a mainly discussing "how to rule these countries", and concerns are related to a ruling class.

    -

    By 21st century, England's media attitude, is in a "post-colonial" attitude, and the old attitudes based on real power replaced.

    Watching the new videos, reminds more of how Sweden says they will be a "moral superpower".

    Without real power, British lost interest in practical issues of ruling - instead the interest of the English BBC man, is the moral dimension.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGahJzFdqaY

    Israel is mainly interesting for him, because they view one side as "brown" (Arabs) and the other "white" (Jews), and therefore can be a stage where English media act with moral superiority, by siding against violence and colonialism.

    Nowadays, if Ukraine fights with its own citizens, there will be no such angry discussion with Ukrainian officials, as there is no way for them to interpret the conflict according to post-colonial attitudes.

    Similarly, they will not discuss with Indian or Chinese officials in this way. But they might to American and Russian officials.

    -

    Although the attitude of 1960s England, is already that they are politely accepting the loss of their own imperial power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylDMrkHrWcg

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=572279669961124

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Not Only Wrathful, @Kent Nationalist

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.

    1963: Tonight Special: Alan Whicker Goes to Sweden

    #OnThisDay 1963: Alan Whicker reported from Sweden's "City of the Future".

    Posted by BBC Archive on Thursday, May 16, 2019

  154. @Sparkon
    @Mr. Hack


    ...a very sore butt, but it would soon pass...
     
    Well, some things may pass, while others may not. Here is the big, bad thing about skinny bicycle seats (saddles), or maybe I should really call it a dirty, little secret.

    When you sit on a chair, your weight is distributed across both buttocks. This takes pressure off the perineum, a region of the body that runs from the anus to the sex organs. It contains the nerves and arteries that supply the penis in men and the clitoris and labia in women. Sitting on a bicycle seat puts pressure on the perineum, compressing those crucial nerves and arteries. This can lead to loss of sensation and other problems.

    Nerve damage accounts for the penile numbness that some male bikers experience. Pressure on the pudendal artery can add to this nerve injury to produce temporary or prolonged erectile dysfunction. A narrow bike seat can reduce blood flow to the penis by as much as 66%, and even a broad seat may reduce flow by 25%. The same processes account for bicycling-related sexual problems in women.
     

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/biking-and-sex-avoid-the-vicious-cycle-201209145290

    Like many things in this world, there is a hidden or at least muted factor in the equation. In the case of bicycles, there may be several muted factors.

    Indeed, it's not only the seat itself that determines the amount of pressure on the perineum. The riding position itself play a big role. No matter what kind of saddle you have on your bike, if you're riding bent over and leaning forward while pedaling hard and trying to go fast, it will be difficult if not impossible to avoid putting pressure on the perineum.

    Wide, angled handlebars pulled back closer to the rider encourage the upright riding position, and when combined with a wide, soft seat, this position allows the rider to sit further back on the saddle near its widest point, thereby putting most of the pressure on the buttocks.

    It helps also to get up off the saddle occasionally into the so-called attack position. Now the riders weight is being supported by the arms and legs, there is much more wind resistance, and the rider can use gravity to put his entire weight on one pedal while climbing tall hills, which is probably the best way to get a good workout on a bicycle without riding for hours.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @Mikhail, @A123

    Some mountain biking seems a bit too risky for my taste….

    Apparently the riders named the large boulder in the middle of the course “Dwayne”. So, I have to give them points for sense of humor.

    PEACE 😇
    _______

  155. The talk about mining on the moon is getting more and more frequent. Some say it will probably happen in the next 10 years.

    https://oilprice.com/Metals/Commodities/Moon-Mining-Could-Begin-As-Early-As-2025.html

  156. AP says:
    @AnonFromTN
    @Wei

    Vladivostok region is pretty warm. The sea to the South of it is remarkably picturesque and user-friendly: bays off bigger bays that are off even bigger bays. 30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded. There were two downsides: 1) lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water); 2) monsoon rains. I don’t know whether they give hectares (~2.5 acres) in Vladivostok region. I also don’t know whether they give land to immigrating foreigners. Find out.

    Replies: @AP

    Vladivostok region is pretty warm.

    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense “information.”

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not “pretty warm.” It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.

    • Troll: Denis
    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @AP

    I like it when people who have never been somewhere pretend to know something about the place. The first sign of an ignoramus: it believes that it knows everything. You pass the test, congrats!

    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million. For comparison, the territory of Belgium is <31,000 km², Netherlands <43,000 km². So, its territory is more than twice as big as Belgium and Netherlands combined. It is located between 42 and 48 degrees North latitude, with North-South spread of ~900 km. So, the average temperature there is about as informative as an average fever level in a hospital. One can find detailed city-by-city info here:
    https://en.climate-data.org/asia/russian-federation/primorsky-krai-896/

    In mid-1980s I’ve spent two months (July-August) on the coast near Slavyanka, in the South of Primorsky Krai. The sea was remarkably warm, warmer that most years in Crimea at that time of year. The water was very clean, with abundant wild life. The only thing you had to be careful about in the sea were seas urchins with huge spikes. The shore is mostly stone, so there were thousands of them. On land it’s mostly forest-covered hills, with plenty of edible mushrooms in the forest.

    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C. So, it’s not hospitable for Africans and tropical Asians, but OK for those who are used to having four seasons. Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York. Monsoon rains in summer are something you must tolerate, though, but there is never as much rain as in Seattle.

    Replies: @AP

    , @Gerard-Mandela
    @AP


    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense “information.”

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not “pretty warm.” It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.
     
    LOL...FFS....I've got Karlin effectively holding a shotgun up my a**, I'm on the edge of yet another ban, can't make another wrong step.....but I've got another of your absurd drivel provocations right in front of me.

    Vladivostok is not like Siberia or Far North you cretin! It is not even like Khabarovsk which is more cold,frozen and far less humidity. Siberia, such as say Irkutsk will have far, far colder winters....but much hotter summers, many more days of +28C - although with nowhere near the humidity of somewhere like Vladivostok in summer.

    AnonFromTN's Post was clearly reacting to the other guys comment on the scheme giving out free hectares of land in the Far East and siberia , and the common perception of this great section of land being the same thing and permanantly frozen. Obviously they are not and Far North, Siberia do not merit being considered the same with all of Vladivostok or the whole of the Far East region you dimwit.

    Coming from AnonFromTN...

    30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded
     
    I can confirm, that is SO true, and so is....

    lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water
     
    ...brings back memories.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  157. @another anon
    @Europe Europa


    It’s interesting that BLM seems to have completely fizzled out in Britain, and the BBC and British establishment in general have turned on them.
     
    This. See the replies.

    https://twitter.com/ukblm/status/1277177624884850689

    And in the United States...

    https://twitter.com/DailyCaller/status/1278494688937459712

    If this continues, black lives will cease to matter very soon.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    This is what happened in 2014 when Tamika Mallory, a leader in the BLM movement, began to turn against Israel. Within days, she was no longer invited to CNN where she had not only been a regular but treated with great respect.

    Folks in these social movements may think they are revolutionaries but their agenda is pushed/propped up by the MSM. Ideologies that truly threaten the system always gets stomped on by the jackboot. In that sense, there is no difference between supposed ‘liberal democracy’ and any ‘authoritarian’ system. They all work the same way.

    That’s why I wasn’t the least surprised Chapo got banned. It’s one thing to do performative wokeness for neoliberalism. It’s another to truly question its foundations. If you do, you’ll quickly see the limits of the supposed democracy you’re living in.

    Most censorship in the West is carried out by corporations and private actors, which upholds the illusion that the system is free because the state is less active. Does it matter whether private capital does the dirty work rather than the state? The end result is the same. The neoliberal argument is one fixated on process, not outcome.

    • Replies: @dfordoom
    @Thulean Friend


    Most censorship in the West is carried out by corporations and private actors, which upholds the illusion that the system is free because the state is less active. Does it matter whether private capital does the dirty work rather than the state? The end result is the same.
     
    Censorship carried out by corporations and private actors is actually much worse. It's carried out by people who are totally unaccountable and there is no possibility of challenging decisions or seeking legal redress. And in practice it can be much more draconian.
  158. @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    I rode a 10-speed Schwinn Varsity in college back in the 1970s. During the 1990s, I rode a Trek 700 hybrid, and a Trek 7100 for almost 15 years after that. Both Trek hybrids were durable, reliable, safe bikes.

    I recommend going to a real bike shop and avoiding the el cheapo models at Walmart and other mass merchandisers.

    For many riders, especially younger ones, bicycling is all about going fast. Speed is often the primary if not sole consideration for many of these guys, and some gals, who like to pretend they are in the Tour de France, always wear colorful outfits not unlike jockeys, and try to go as fast as they can everywhere they ride.

    Most of these riders are on road bikes with their very skinny tires, drop bars, tiny seats and uncomfortable riding position which has the further big disadvantage of poor vision while bent over like that.

    For most city riding and commuting, a hybrid is the best choice for a number of reasons. Currently, I ride a Trek Verve 2, for which I paid just about $600 brand new.


    I was very happy to get one of the last 2019 models that doesn't have disc brakes. Additionally, the current Verve 2 has no front suspension, but does have a simple seat post suspension. Disc brakes are heavier than standard rim brakes, and complicate front wheel removal. Unless you are coming down a mountain, there is little need for disc brakes. Similarly, a front fork suspension adds weight and reduces front wheel stability. It's overkill for city riding and really only worthwhile on a mountain bike.

    Because of its adjustable handlebar stem, the Verve series is superior to the FX in my opinion. Safety and comfort are much more important to me than going fast.

    The modern trend is toward wider tires. My Verve 2 has 700x45 tires, much wider than those on my two previous Trek hybrids, and much more comfortable than the skinny, hard tires on road bikes, with much better stability and traction, making them much safer, to boot.

    The popular misconception has been that skinny hard tires are much faster than wide tires, but tests show that there is really little difference.

    https://www.renehersecycles.com/12-myths-in-cycling-1-wider-tires-are-slower/

    Finally, going to a bike shop will help ensure you get the right size frame for your height.

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mr. Hack, @Thulean Friend

    I am less concerned about speed per se, and more about making biking sustainable. Too many just throw away their bikes prematurely and don’t invest time to understanding how to repair your own stuff. It isn’t nearly as hard as many think and the most common things (like needing to change tires) are quite trivial. It’s just about getting past the initial hurdle for most people.

    One trend in Sweden that I am grateful of is the relative increase of the so-called cykelkök. I go to this one from time to time. In these places, you can often exchange parts for free or a very low sum while learning the ropes of repairing your own bike. It’s quite social, too – you meet lots of friendly people. The clientele are anything from yuppies, to suburban soccer moms, careerist men in suits to of course young prole men.

    It’s part of a larger movement towards repairability and away from wear-and-tear. The EU has been pushing tech firms to increase repairability in products, as most of the stuff we use often just need a battery or some other single component replaced to keep functioning. Using custom ROMs for your Android phone can also prolong its life for many years.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend


    Using custom ROMs for your Android phone can also prolong its life for many years.
     
    Lol. If people wanting to prolong the life of their phones is actually a thing, it's not surprising that Thulean fag would be among the first know about it.

    (There's some irony in me mocking him for this, since I am the biggest 'prolonger' I know: I've had the same phone for the last five years. Earlier this a year, a friend's teenage daughter saw me take it out and pointed at it in shock "What is that?!?" I was actually a bit taken aback. I'd forgotten how uncool it was to have an obviously out of date phone.)
  159. @Thorfinnsson
    @Thulean Friend

    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers, which is far above the global average.

    https://www.globalpetrolprices.com/Germany/electricity_prices/

    The policy is a success at its narrow mandate--to increase the share of electricity generated by renewables.

    Replies: @Erik Sieven, @Thulean Friend

    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers

    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That’s also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.

    • Replies: @Vishnugupta
    @Thulean Friend

    Coal isn't going away for a very long time as it is pretty much the only source of baseload electricity that China and India both have in abundance.

    For obvious strategic reasons it makes sense to have most of your electricity from a cheap fuel source that you have on your own territory.

    Solar/Wind is not viable for baseload power unless there is a breakthrough in energy storage and even then given the massive amounts of land required I doubt these will come anywhere close to replacing coal in densely populated Asian countries.

    That leaves breakthroughs in Methane hydrates(China/India both have theoretically massive gas reserves on their continenral shelves in the form of methane hydrates),Uranium from seawater (it presently costs 10x of mined uranium but if this becomes feasible the whole world effectively has unlimited Uranium) or Thorium based fuel cycles(India has the world's largest Thorium reserve most countries haven't surveyed theirs because Thorium is presently economically more or less useless).

    Unfortunately breakthroughs in these along with nuclear fusion are perpetually just around the corner so we will be stuck with coal for many decades.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    , @Thorfinnsson
    @Thulean Friend



    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That’s also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.
     
    Addressing climate change and pollution is not the purpose of Germany's electricity policy, because otherwise they would not have shuttered their perfectly functional atomic reactors.

    The true purpose of this policy is to erect religious icons of the official German state religion--globohomo. "Green" people have for whatever reason chosen to worship solar panels and windmills.

    If the purpose were to address climate change and pollution, wind and solar (maybe not solar so much in Germany) would of course be an important part of the generation mix, but one absolutely would not shutter functional atomic reactors.

    The absence of a global price on carbon also logically dictates carbon import tariffs on goods as well as subsidies to domestic industries hampered by higher energy costs. And to be fair, subsidies are in practice paid by suffering German residential customers on behalf of German business.
  160. @songbird
    The forbidden Tintin books are on libgen. So far, I've only read the one where he visits the Congo, but it was quite good.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill


    Europe Europa is right, they’ll never ban this one.

    • LOL: songbird
    • Replies: @Ray P
    @Blinky Bill

    "I'm not a Frenchy: I'm a Belgie!"

  161. @Thulean Friend
    @Thorfinnsson


    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers
     
    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That's also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.

    Replies: @Vishnugupta, @Thorfinnsson

    Coal isn’t going away for a very long time as it is pretty much the only source of baseload electricity that China and India both have in abundance.

    For obvious strategic reasons it makes sense to have most of your electricity from a cheap fuel source that you have on your own territory.

    Solar/Wind is not viable for baseload power unless there is a breakthrough in energy storage and even then given the massive amounts of land required I doubt these will come anywhere close to replacing coal in densely populated Asian countries.

    That leaves breakthroughs in Methane hydrates(China/India both have theoretically massive gas reserves on their continenral shelves in the form of methane hydrates),Uranium from seawater (it presently costs 10x of mined uranium but if this becomes feasible the whole world effectively has unlimited Uranium) or Thorium based fuel cycles(India has the world’s largest Thorium reserve most countries haven’t surveyed theirs because Thorium is presently economically more or less useless).

    Unfortunately breakthroughs in these along with nuclear fusion are perpetually just around the corner so we will be stuck with coal for many decades.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @Vishnugupta

    Coal is going away. It is mostly replaced by natural gas as I write this, but even that is a temporary phase.

    Baseload power for renewables isn't going to be a major issue as battery storage gets better and better. People who don't follow the sector don't understand that battery energy density improves by a factor of 2X every decade at the same pricepoint. And that's just legacy tech like LiOn, excluding new methods like Solid State batteries which radically improves these metrics on their own merits.

    And it's not like we have to look far into the future for this to take effect. It's already happening.

    Lots of aging boomers on this site have very aging talking points because they don't follow the sectors closely. This isn't the 1990s or even the early 2000s anymore.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Philip Owen

  162. @Wei
    Is the far east hektar program worth it for a foreigner who wants to immigrate, or are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

    Rank City Population (2002) Avg Winter Temp (°C)

    1 Moscow 10,126,424. −13.0
    2 Saint Petersburg 4,661,219. −10.0
    3 Novosibirsk 1,425,508 −20.0
    4 Nizhny Novgorod 1,311,252. −15.0
    5 Yekaterinburg 1,293,537 −17.0
    6 Samara 1,157,880. −14.0
    7 Omsk 1,134,016. −20.0
    8 Kazan 1,105,289. −14.0
    9 Chelyabinsk 1,077,174. −18.0
    10 Rostov-on-Don 1,068,267. −7.0
    11 Ufa 1,042,437. −14.0
    12 Volgograd 1,011,417. −16.0
    13 Perm 1,001,653 −15.0
    14 Krasnoyarsk 909,341 −18.0
    15 Saratov 873,055. −12.0
    16 Voronezh 848,752. −6.0
    17 Tolyatti 702,879 −18.0
    18 Krasnodar 646,175. −7.0
    19 Ulyanovsk 635,947. −11.0
    20 Izhevsk 632,140. −14.0
    21 Yaroslavl 613,088 −11.0
    22 Barnaul 600,749. −15.5
    23 Vladivostok 594,701. −14.0
    24 Irkutsk 593,604 −15.0
    25 Khabarovsk 583,072. −22.0

  163. @Thulean Friend
    I'm pessimistic on India, but sometimes it helps getting an 'on-the-ground' perspective to make flesh out of air so to speak. This Twitter thread is a great rundown of why you should be skeptical of India ever reaching China's heights, too.

    https://twitter.com/dakekang/status/1257709936437592065

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    Based on India’s growth from 2010-19, I estimate India will reach where China is currently by 2060. China’s GDP was $14 trillion in 2019. In 2060, the same inflation adjusted amount will be $30 trillion+.

    2010: $1.7 trillion
    2019: $2.9 trillion
    https://tradingeconomics.com/india/gdp

    The Indian economy almost doubled over the last decade. I assume over the next several decades Indian growth by decade will be equal or lower to the performance of the 2010s. Naturally, as an economy becomes more developed the growth rate is lower. By back of the envelope math figures it will be 2060 or later before India reaches inflation adjusted Chinese levels.

  164. Don’t plan on living too long if you’re a believer in the singularity in the 21st century. Well, at least not beyond your normal lifespan. Trouble in the paradise of longevity research. There is too much money in it, so it attracts fraud.

    https://forbetterscience.com/2020/06/22/jan-van-deursen-left-mayo-clinic/

    “Another source alleged that “99% of data that were not able to be reproduced over decades in the lab by anyone are traced back to Darren Baker and Bennett Childs“. Other sources reached me over their friends and are also considering speaking out.”

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  165. @Thulean Friend
    On the Chinese-Indian confrontation, the best analysis I've read so far is this. Essentially, India has three options:

    1. A direct confrontation to take back the 5+ places that China unilaterally took over.
    2. Try to take other areas along the Line of Actual Control and then attempt an 'indirect pressure' tactic which would ideally end in a swap for land so the neutral status quo is returned.
    3. Accept a faît accompli as a done deal and try to minimise the domestic outfall.

    The first option will be very hard, as China has carefully taken very defensive positions, so any attacker would be in a significant disadvantage. China is also prepared for a counter-attack now, so any element of surprise is long gone. Finally, China has reinforced all these positions in recent weeks.

    The second option is perhaps the most attractive one, but it would require a great mobilisation rate and a war of attrition that India cannot afford, as China has not only managed the fallout of COVID-19 better but also has significantly more resources at their disposal. India also has to watch the Pakistani flank at the Line of Control. A two-front campaign will be very straining for India.

    The third option seemed to be Modi's initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that "China hadn't crossed into Indian territory". He was faced with a torrent of attacks and even the submissive media had to, for once, take him to task. That said, unless something drastic changes, this may seem like the least costly option economically but will carry a heavy price in terms of prestige. There's also the signal that India is weak and could be provoked further into the future.

    To me, option #2 is the most likely to be tried and option #3 as a last-ditch only. Option #1 would be almost impossible given the excellent positions of China's reinforced bases there. It would also essentially be tantamount to declaring an open war, which India at the moment cannot afford to spend money on. Finally, as Dan Altman has showed, the odds of a state getting territory back after a faît accompli is very low, and he has looked at the actual data. Most landgrabs aren't actually stated threats, they "just happen". Crimea is a great example of this.

    Still, I believe the Chinese miscalculated badly as this will push India into the arms of the US even more. Modi genuinely tried to build a bridge of communication to China but the PLA and the CCP unilaterally burned it. All for a few patches of remote desert. Remarkably foolish.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Astuteobservor II, @china-russia-all-the-way

    The third option seemed to be Modi’s initial preference. In mid-June he bizarrely stated that “China hadn’t crossed into Indian territory”.

    It is not a bizarre statement. The area where the clashed occurred is contested and not controlled by either side. There are different perceptions by each side with differing claim lines. So a patrol by one side could be within one’s claim and at the same time an incursion on the other side. There is routine jockeying by each side with patrolling and putting up temporary structures. I don’t know what the situation is tactically but I do not trust the characterization that China has simply salami sliced territory. Keep in mind actions by China occur in the context of a decade long mostly one sided Indian military buildup along the boundary area including the deployment by India of tanks and aircraft and construction of new roads.

    I see the piece you linked to is authored by someone from the Stimson Center. They have been out in front for years on China-India issues and I distrust them. I believe as an institution they have an agenda to foster friction and conflict between China and India.

    An AEI fellow who collaborates with Stimson on China-India gave this honest take of motivation:

    Notably, previous U.S. presidents have also attempted to convince New Delhi to take on a more proactive role in balancing against China. The Indo-Pacific strategy elevates India’s importance to the United States as a key partner in the region and calls on New Delhi to play a larger role as “a nation that can bookend and anchor the free and open order in the Indo-Pacific region.” The hope is that India’s active involvement will force China to divert and spread more thinly its resources, efforts, and capabilities from its eastern borders to its western borders.

    https://www.lawfareblog.com/can-india-help-united-states-against-china

    I do not believe the clash was a miscalculation because there was no calculation at work. It was not a pre-planned attack. According to the Indian Army, it was an on the spot escalation that spiraled out of control. However, I believe it will be a miscalculation for China to pursue this confrontation because allowing the Quad military alliance to take shape is too high of a cost. And it will be wise to figure out some way to reduce patrols to bring stability. However, there should be at the same time a large scale military buildup in the border region with India to give Indians a dose of realism that has been sorely missing in their calculations.

    • Thanks: Blinky Bill
  166. @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Blinky Bill

    Not true at all the Chinese have been ratcheting up the pressure on all fronts, Duterte who had kicked the US forces out in hope of a better relationship with China was badly disappointed and let the US forces back, for the first time ever ASEAN publicly called for China to follow UNCLOS because Vietnam, Malaysia and now even Indonesia had enough of their bullying. The pressure on Senkaku Islands and Taiwan is being ratcheted up. Australia also had enough. Chinese relationships with the US are at the worst ever so see it's certainly not India's fault. The Chinese are chimping out.

    You're right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they're going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    Replies: @Lin, @Daniel Chieh, @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way

    You’re right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they’re going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.

    If this is true, India gets a guarantee from the US, then China will give a parallel guarantee to Pakistan. What do you think will be the extent of damage to India’s long term future from having to shoulder the threat of a 2-front pact?

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    The threat of a 2-front pact is a mutual threat the PRC will have to face as well.
    Who would be more likely to be cut off from the high sea ship lanes?
    Not India.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

  167. @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Grahamsno(G64)


    You’re right the US gains from this the Chinese have lost India for good, a momentous foreign policy blunder they’re going to have a Himalayan sized problem in the south where none existed before.
     
    If this is true, India gets a guarantee from the US, then China will give a parallel guarantee to Pakistan. What do you think will be the extent of damage to India's long term future from having to shoulder the threat of a 2-front pact?

    Replies: @Mitleser

    The threat of a 2-front pact is a mutual threat the PRC will have to face as well.
    Who would be more likely to be cut off from the high sea ship lanes?
    Not India.

    • Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Mitleser

    I am aware of this. However, the news media discourse is currently dominated by Indians who speak of options (e.g. military alliance with US, expanded naval base at Port Blair to menace Chinese shipping) without reference to repercussions. I am balancing the discussion by making it multi-sided.

    As for the "Malacca Dilemma", even over the long term with overseas bases and carrier armadas I don't see the feasibility of defending a long sea lane going through the Indian and Pacific Oceans. I wish the planners would give up on the idea of naval parity and spend the money instead on EV adoption, building an alliance with Russia, and everything else it will take to drastically reduce energy imports and improve energy security.

  168. @Mitleser
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    The threat of a 2-front pact is a mutual threat the PRC will have to face as well.
    Who would be more likely to be cut off from the high sea ship lanes?
    Not India.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

    I am aware of this. However, the news media discourse is currently dominated by Indians who speak of options (e.g. military alliance with US, expanded naval base at Port Blair to menace Chinese shipping) without reference to repercussions. I am balancing the discussion by making it multi-sided.

    As for the “Malacca Dilemma”, even over the long term with overseas bases and carrier armadas I don’t see the feasibility of defending a long sea lane going through the Indian and Pacific Oceans. I wish the planners would give up on the idea of naval parity and spend the money instead on EV adoption, building an alliance with Russia, and everything else it will take to drastically reduce energy imports and improve energy security.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  169. @Wei
    Is the far east hektar program worth it for a foreigner who wants to immigrate, or are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Blinky Bill, @Blinky Bill

    are all the far east oblasti frozen hell?

    Western perspective

    Sakha perspective

    [MORE]

  170. Lin says:
    @Grahamsno(G64)
    @Lin

    I'm not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype. I'm certainly not obsessed with the 1962 loss we got our asses kicked fair and square and the Chinese did behave honorably by unilaterally withdrawing from most areas.

    Our PM (whom I can't stand) went out of his way to court Xi Jin Ping like a lovesick teenage girl meeting him 18 times!! for what? His face has been rubbed in the dirt but it's not his face it's the entire Indian foreign policy of dealing with China, grant them everything hoping to temper their behaviour but to no avail, you've not granted the smallest things like allowing us to be a member of the NSG, or support our bid to be a permanent member of the security council, all the while encircling us by cultivating our neighbors especially Pakistan, all this has been going on for quite sometime and yet we continued to ease trade restrictions and finally the brawl in the Himalayas. I welcome this stern message sent out by the Chinese, their are no more illusions about their larger foreign policy and there can be none, power struts naked. Our foreign policy makers have to contend with the terrifying fact that you will not countenance our 'peaceful rise,' strangle the infant in the cradle before it becomes a grown threat has to be considered as a Chinese strategic imperative in Asia. Did you think that we were going to gobble up Tibet? If the message was to scuttle the 'Quad' and India's growing ties with the US you have precisely done the opposite driven us into Uncle Sam's orbit. Believe me India's extremely wary about that but what choice do we have since we have to plan for a disastrous two front war.

    The trade relationships will definitely worsen at our pace because we're the importers. What choice do we have since the surplus generated by your side is being used to finance our mortal enemy.


    Either way, it means higher inflation rate or higher trade deficit.
     
    What to do their's no other way to wean yourself off this supplier from Hell, drip drip we'll use that fabled Chinese water torture against your businesses. The world has woken up to the peril of concentrating manufacturing in one country, it leads to deindustrialization on a massive scale with the concomitant loss of engineering and technical skills, we still do have industry and have no choice but to support it aggressively just like you support yours. All those trinkets and non essential stuff will be the first to go. It's a long game and we have much to learn from you the masters of the long game.

    It all could have been otherwise, a trustworthy relationship between Asia's two largest countries and Asia would have been a bit different sadly it is not and how fervently we Indians wish that things didn't come to such a sorry pass, but here we are and have to deal with a menacing fire breathing dragon which can't be appeased. Hopefully we come out of it without 3rd degree burns.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @Lin

    I’m not a Hindu nationalist so go ahead and use some other stereotype

    I made my comments based on empirical observation and you can play around with your lexicals.
    I’m a Christian of alt.conviction and I’m also a part-time muslim. I did not specifically called you a ‘Hindu nationalist’. You’re about as ‘Hindu nationalist’ as I’ve muslim ancestors.
    …………
    I’m not judging the reaction of the average Indians to the recent border clash because India is a large country, of course, go say whatever price the less well off Indians should pay to satisfy your urge.(I remember that even during bad moments of sino-japan relation in recent decades, sure there was a number of demonstration but the Chinese govt let the consumers to decide. No hysteria.)
    https://theprint.in/opinion/newsmaker-of-the-week/green-tea-to-underpants-chinas-grip-on-indian-lives-goes-beyond-phone-apps/454259/
    –“China has, in recent years, become one of the preferred destinations of Indian students for pursuing higher studies”, the Indian embassy in Beijing says.”
    –“Citizens like Dimple were making a lot of money using these mostly Chinese apps and becoming famous.
    “I would never make so much (money) with a 9-to-5 government job,” she had said last year.
    But that’s just Dimple. There are so many like her in India who can’t do without Chinese goods, culture and overall Chinese influence in their daily lives.”
    ……..
    I wish ‘Made in India’ well as I mentioned at other thread, India has great agricultural potential and could become a major exporter of food to China.

  171. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    If you compared with 1960s English videos about Israel, they were matching an attitude they had of other former Imperial Possessions.

    In 1960s - although British power has been displaced for more than a decade in the Middle East, they discuss like they view the region as if it was still one of their territories.

    British of this era are still mostly interested about industrial process, modernization, trains, electricity - they still had some viewpoint of a ruling caste.

    To some extent, there is concession of a tourist view as well - they assume some romantics are watching it for tourist infomation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOxWcI4V1xc

    Similar on Rhodesia - most interest is practical about industrialization, with no interest in morality of the situation.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I7C6bEep60


    British attitude sounds a mainly discussing "how to rule these countries", and concerns are related to a ruling class.

    -

    By 21st century, England's media attitude, is in a "post-colonial" attitude, and the old attitudes based on real power replaced.

    Watching the new videos, reminds more of how Sweden says they will be a "moral superpower".

    Without real power, British lost interest in practical issues of ruling - instead the interest of the English BBC man, is the moral dimension.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGahJzFdqaY

    Israel is mainly interesting for him, because they view one side as "brown" (Arabs) and the other "white" (Jews), and therefore can be a stage where English media act with moral superiority, by siding against violence and colonialism.

    Nowadays, if Ukraine fights with its own citizens, there will be no such angry discussion with Ukrainian officials, as there is no way for them to interpret the conflict according to post-colonial attitudes.

    Similarly, they will not discuss with Indian or Chinese officials in this way. But they might to American and Russian officials.

    -

    Although the attitude of 1960s England, is already that they are politely accepting the loss of their own imperial power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylDMrkHrWcg

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=572279669961124

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Not Only Wrathful, @Kent Nationalist

    It is so refreshing to watch a documentary style production without the core tone being one of moral narcissism.

  172. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    If you compared with 1960s English videos about Israel, they were matching an attitude they had of other former Imperial Possessions.

    In 1960s - although British power has been displaced for more than a decade in the Middle East, they discuss like they view the region as if it was still one of their territories.

    British of this era are still mostly interested about industrial process, modernization, trains, electricity - they still had some viewpoint of a ruling caste.

    To some extent, there is concession of a tourist view as well - they assume some romantics are watching it for tourist infomation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iOxWcI4V1xc

    Similar on Rhodesia - most interest is practical about industrialization, with no interest in morality of the situation.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0I7C6bEep60


    British attitude sounds a mainly discussing "how to rule these countries", and concerns are related to a ruling class.

    -

    By 21st century, England's media attitude, is in a "post-colonial" attitude, and the old attitudes based on real power replaced.

    Watching the new videos, reminds more of how Sweden says they will be a "moral superpower".

    Without real power, British lost interest in practical issues of ruling - instead the interest of the English BBC man, is the moral dimension.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGahJzFdqaY

    Israel is mainly interesting for him, because they view one side as "brown" (Arabs) and the other "white" (Jews), and therefore can be a stage where English media act with moral superiority, by siding against violence and colonialism.

    Nowadays, if Ukraine fights with its own citizens, there will be no such angry discussion with Ukrainian officials, as there is no way for them to interpret the conflict according to post-colonial attitudes.

    Similarly, they will not discuss with Indian or Chinese officials in this way. But they might to American and Russian officials.

    -

    Although the attitude of 1960s England, is already that they are politely accepting the loss of their own imperial power.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylDMrkHrWcg

    And they are excited about prioritization of internal development and standard of living. Sweden is already such an aspiration for them, if you watch the 1960s BBC videos.
    https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=572279669961124

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Not Only Wrathful, @Kent Nationalist

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Kent Nationalist

    Not only the English produced such scientifically accurate documentaries about Italian economic processes.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RheMP25O-Kc

  173. Well here is a thought experiment, say, how many people are getting killed by bad ideas from the right like coronavirus is a just a flu, as opposed to bad ideas from the left like bioleninism? I mean Vietnam has a third of the population of the US, and is a third world corrupt craphole, and yet managed to stop their cases at 369 cases and no deaths, if Americans acted in a sheep like manner, as people say, like Koreans, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Japanese, how many lives will get saved?

    • Replies: @joni
    @Znzn

    Respect for bureaucracy is a definitive feature of Asian cultures. Russians do not have that, yet the West tries hard to lump them in with Asiatic Mongoloids.

    Americans are distinct from Western cultures. This pandemic was bound to explode because "MUH FREEDOM" or because we want to use it against those "Trumptards". No one can find any compromise in the US. The virus did spread at those protests. Probably not so much in NY - either because they were more careful or most people already had it. In Texas and California, protestors were not so lucky.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

  174. @Blinky Bill
    @songbird

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/_NgXrMnZHoL4/TPko47ogS9I/AAAAAAAABHo/OeP9sxe8d5o/s640/Tintin+England.jpg

    Europe Europa is right, they'll never ban this one.

    Replies: @Ray P

    “I’m not a Frenchy: I’m a Belgie!”

  175. I mean how many excess US deaths are caused by Steve Sailer’s so called Ferguson effect, as opposed to excess deaths caused by coronavirus conspiracy theories?

  176. And with regards to HDB, of there are in fact biological differences between races, why are people so reluctant to argue as to which race is superior to which? Or which superior race should rule over other inferior races, which is a logical extension of that argument. Since it is only natural and logical for those who are superior to rule, vanquish, and conquer those who are inferior, as demonstrated throughout history, through survival of the fittest. Like are whites superior to East Asians, or vice versa? I mean people sure do argue which sports car brand is superior to which.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Znzn


    Or which superior race should rule over other inferior races, which is a logical extension of that argument.
     
    If I am stronger than you, does that mean I should bash your head in? What if I'd rather be your friend?

    Replies: @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive

  177. @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Vladivostok region is pretty warm.
     
    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense "information."

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not "pretty warm." It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

    I like it when people who have never been somewhere pretend to know something about the place. The first sign of an ignoramus: it believes that it knows everything. You pass the test, congrats!

    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million. For comparison, the territory of Belgium is <31,000 km², Netherlands <43,000 km². So, its territory is more than twice as big as Belgium and Netherlands combined. It is located between 42 and 48 degrees North latitude, with North-South spread of ~900 km. So, the average temperature there is about as informative as an average fever level in a hospital. One can find detailed city-by-city info here:
    https://en.climate-data.org/asia/russian-federation/primorsky-krai-896/

    In mid-1980s I’ve spent two months (July-August) on the coast near Slavyanka, in the South of Primorsky Krai. The sea was remarkably warm, warmer that most years in Crimea at that time of year. The water was very clean, with abundant wild life. The only thing you had to be careful about in the sea were seas urchins with huge spikes. The shore is mostly stone, so there were thousands of them. On land it’s mostly forest-covered hills, with plenty of edible mushrooms in the forest.

    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C. So, it’s not hospitable for Africans and tropical Asians, but OK for those who are used to having four seasons. Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York. Monsoon rains in summer are something you must tolerate, though, but there is never as much rain as in Seattle.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Thanks: Jazman
    • Replies: @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million
     
    You mentioned “Vladivostok region” as being, in your words, “pretty warm”, and I provided statistics for the city of Vladivostok showing that it’s winters on average are colder than in Moscow and even Murmansk. You have written plenty of nonsense about a place where you have lived for 20+ years, it is no wonder that you also write nonsense about a place where you claimed to have spent a couple of months once in the 80s.

    Vladivostok is in the southern part of its region and as a large city probably has a heat island effect. So other places in Vladivostok region are even colder.


    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C
     
    Average low temperature in Vladivostok in January is - 15.4 Celsius. In February it is - 11.4 Celsius and in December - 11.9 Celsius.

    These are average lows.


    Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York.
     
    The coldest significant place in upstate New York, deep in the Adirondack Mountains, around Lake Placid, has a slightly warmer average low temperature in January (- 15.2 Celsius) than does the city of Vladivostok. All of the actual cities in upstate New York are of course much warmer than Vladivostok. Even cities north of upstate New York such as Montréal Canada (average January low is - 14 Celsius) are warmer than Vladivostok.

    Thanks for demonstrating yet again your reliability as a source for information. :-)

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis

  178. @Matra
    @Europe Europa

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish.

    Although quite a few people outside of Spain do make a distinction - I've seen it literally written on a wall in Ireland that 'Catalonia is not Spain' - it's not as common as the recognition that Scotland is distinct from England because outside of Latin America Britain is more culturally familiar & influential than Spain. For normies throughout the world just seeing Scotland's national football & rugby teams playing against the likes of Italy and France is probably enough in and of itself for most foreigners to think of Scotland as a separate country already. If Catalonia had its own team at the World Cup it would eventually come to be seen by the masses as a country distinct from the rest of Spain.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Separate England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland teams for most sports seems to be a fluke of history, I can’t think of another country where the national team does not correspond with the sovereign state. Probably a lot to do with the fact that Britain played a large role in setting up regulated international sport. The first “international” football match was England vs Scotland. Also in the 1800s I doubt there was quite such a formalised idea of what constituted a nation state than there is today, with the UN, etc.

    Interestingly, only “Great Britain” is allowed as the Olympic team because England, Wales, Scotland and NI don’t meet the IOC’s criteria as sovereign states.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Europe Europa

    Puerto Rico has its own national teams for the Olympics, FIFA World Cup, etc.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    , @Eugene Norman
    @Europe Europa

    International competitions in soccer are between representatives of the “leagues” not sovereign states.

  179. @Mikhail
    @Sparkon

    A quality gym bike and seat are considerably more comfy and I suspect less likely to develop or enhance ED symptoms.

    Multiple sources say that Trek bike seats are known for being harsh. I've been told that cushioned bike seat covers are prone to not staying still and that getting a whole different seat is a better route. For $35.00, a bike shop near me says he might've a better seat in place of the original on my 1992 Trek 7000.

    Be nice if he can tune my bike fairly soon. Specifically, the issue of my currently not getting the gear at its highest. Bike shops near me are swarmed with such work, with typical waits of a week to two weeks.

    Replies: @Sparkon

    Yes, I replaced the stock saddle on my Verve 2 with a comfort seat from Bell. Its design allows me to sit back with my buttocks comfortably planted with no pressure on the perineum. The cushioned seat covers are worthless. Save your money, shop around, and get a replacement comfort saddle in the $30-50 price range. Even Walmart has them.

    As always, get an estimate from your bike shop before committing the bike for repairs. Everything has gotten more expensive in the past decade, and bike shops are no exception, so prepare to be surprised.

    When I took my 7100 in for service and repairs last year , the running estimate was up to $400 when I gave the cut sign, and walked out into the showroom. They rolled out the Verve 2, and it was love at first ride.

    It’s rather difficult to justify spending maybe 500 bucks for repairs on a 15 year old bike that I bought new (last year’s model) for $180 in ’04.

    It seems your bike needs a rear derailleur adjustment so it will shift smoothly into all gears. There are numerous videos and articles online showing how to adjust front and rear derailleurs.

    Depending on the location and type of your shifters, it may be possible to invert your bike, stand it on the seat and handlebars, and work on your rear derailleur with the bike in that position, but usually, a bike stand is needed for derailleur adjustments because it is necessary that the bike be immobilized with the wheels and pedals free to turn, while also being able to use the shifters. There are articles online with suggestions and ideas for circumventing the need for a bike stand.

    All those new bikes you’re considering are decent rides, but none in that group has an adjustable handlebar stem that allows the rider to fine tune his riding geometry. Neither does the bike you are riding now, as far as I can tell. No suspension seat posts either, but like the seat, those are easy to swap out.

    Good luck.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    @Sparkon

    If you want a low maintenance bike get one with a belt drive and hub gears, I bought one about two and a half years ago and so far with zero servicing it runs perfect, you will pay a little extra but its worth it IMO

    , @(((They))) Live
    @Sparkon

    .

  180. joni says:
    @Znzn
    Well here is a thought experiment, say, how many people are getting killed by bad ideas from the right like coronavirus is a just a flu, as opposed to bad ideas from the left like bioleninism? I mean Vietnam has a third of the population of the US, and is a third world corrupt craphole, and yet managed to stop their cases at 369 cases and no deaths, if Americans acted in a sheep like manner, as people say, like Koreans, Vietnamese, Chinese, and Japanese, how many lives will get saved?

    Replies: @joni

    Respect for bureaucracy is a definitive feature of Asian cultures. Russians do not have that, yet the West tries hard to lump them in with Asiatic Mongoloids.

    Americans are distinct from Western cultures. This pandemic was bound to explode because “MUH FREEDOM” or because we want to use it against those “Trumptards”. No one can find any compromise in the US. The virus did spread at those protests. Probably not so much in NY – either because they were more careful or most people already had it. In Texas and California, protestors were not so lucky.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @joni


    In Texas and California, protestors were not so lucky.
     
    Serves them right. Maybe the virus will do something about violent criminals, as the authorities at all levels appear to be totally impotent.
  181. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa

    Everything I saw from British television about Israel, is very anti-Israel.

    British television is an opposite of Russian television on this topic (Russian television is pro-Israel, or presents the Israeli side only, and without criticism).

    -

    American television is varying by channel between religiously worshiping Israel, and moderately critical of Israel. Channels like CNN are lightly critical of Israel - like liberal Jews -, but on the other hand Fox News worships Israel - as some kind of religious object; probably because of large Evangelical Church viewers.

    I think the reason British media hates Israel can be as uninteresting and simple as that they imagine Israeli Jews are "white people", and therefore that its an extension of the evil of European colonialism.

    In reality, most Israelis are a racially a brown Middle Eastern, people, but in the symbolic world of Western Europe they have been identified as another "white people".

    British documentaries of Israel (many on YouTube) are also intentionally only looking at the European people there. It's really a strange image of the country in the English media compared to reality - where the main impression of the reality of Israel when you are there, is a very Eastern country, with many dark races included in the population.

    Replies: @Ray P, @Gerard-Mandela

    Post you replied to specifically mentioned Jews,not Israel.

    US and Russia have plenty of similarities in their populations general national consciousness of Jews…..in UK it is practically zero.

    US and Russia both have the common or interpersonal conceptions of “jewish mother” various “jewish humour” or “jewish character traits or mentality” “cunning” etc…none of them anti-semitic in tone, some of them complementary or just playful. UK has absolutely zero consciousness of Jewish traits among their population – perhaps explains why , even with a large number of muslims and afew terrorist attacks in Britain – zero Jewish communities( Orthodox or just rich-secular) have even been attacked (long may that continue)

    We have got our great ( and some degenerate but popular)_ contributions from Jews in the arts, film, science, politics and so on from Soviet time and now. USA idolises Gershwin, great American songbook is jewish dominated, plenty of scientists, film directors, lawyers, humanitarians idolised with their jewishness a central, not incidental part of them promoted… even extremely ugly and low talent jews like Lauren Baccall and Barbara Streisand get overly promoted and idolised. In UK I don’t think the scale is anywhere near – and their jewishness is incidental

    America, but particularly Russia have loads of successful jewish sportsman/woman and coaches……UK it is zero from what I can see.

    Obviously Americans have great respect for those who make money, UK considers promoting such things vulgar. Russia is somewhere in between.

    Plenty of Russian singers will have yiddish songs in their repertoire ( or at least russian language version) such as Tumbalalaika, Hava Naglia and many others sung on our entertainment or cultural shows…………such a cultural impression is non-existant in Britain, despite showbusiness, media business and plenty of other things dominated by jewish control over there.

    What you consider “anti-Israel” is probably just the usual “self-hating jew” pseudo-complex…..I reckon all these supposedly anti-Israel media support Israel foreign policy 100%. Though I do agree with your European/brown people hypothesis

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Gerard-Mandela

    Most British people aren't aware that well known media Jews in Britain are even Jews, and there's certainly no shortage of Jews in the British media and entertainment world.

    In general I'd say making a thing about peoples' ethnic/national origin or noticing their ethnic/national origins is also considered vulgar in British culture, and at odds with British ideals of being a meritocracy and a "fair play" sort of society.

    Also, due to the US's history of immigration, Americans are generally a lot more acutely aware of their ethnic origins and being a "hyphenated American" is the norm, I think the same goes for Russia although perhaps to a somewhat lesser extent, but I think Russians are similarly very aware of peoples' ethnic origins due to the similarly multi-ethnic history of Russia.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

  182. AP says:
    @AnonFromTN
    @AP

    I like it when people who have never been somewhere pretend to know something about the place. The first sign of an ignoramus: it believes that it knows everything. You pass the test, congrats!

    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million. For comparison, the territory of Belgium is <31,000 km², Netherlands <43,000 km². So, its territory is more than twice as big as Belgium and Netherlands combined. It is located between 42 and 48 degrees North latitude, with North-South spread of ~900 km. So, the average temperature there is about as informative as an average fever level in a hospital. One can find detailed city-by-city info here:
    https://en.climate-data.org/asia/russian-federation/primorsky-krai-896/

    In mid-1980s I’ve spent two months (July-August) on the coast near Slavyanka, in the South of Primorsky Krai. The sea was remarkably warm, warmer that most years in Crimea at that time of year. The water was very clean, with abundant wild life. The only thing you had to be careful about in the sea were seas urchins with huge spikes. The shore is mostly stone, so there were thousands of them. On land it’s mostly forest-covered hills, with plenty of edible mushrooms in the forest.

    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C. So, it’s not hospitable for Africans and tropical Asians, but OK for those who are used to having four seasons. Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York. Monsoon rains in summer are something you must tolerate, though, but there is never as much rain as in Seattle.

    Replies: @AP

    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million

    You mentioned “Vladivostok region” as being, in your words, “pretty warm”, and I provided statistics for the city of Vladivostok showing that it’s winters on average are colder than in Moscow and even Murmansk. You have written plenty of nonsense about a place where you have lived for 20+ years, it is no wonder that you also write nonsense about a place where you claimed to have spent a couple of months once in the 80s.

    Vladivostok is in the southern part of its region and as a large city probably has a heat island effect. So other places in Vladivostok region are even colder.

    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C

    Average low temperature in Vladivostok in January is – 15.4 Celsius. In February it is – 11.4 Celsius and in December – 11.9 Celsius.

    These are average lows.

    Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York.

    The coldest significant place in upstate New York, deep in the Adirondack Mountains, around Lake Placid, has a slightly warmer average low temperature in January (- 15.2 Celsius) than does the city of Vladivostok. All of the actual cities in upstate New York are of course much warmer than Vladivostok. Even cities north of upstate New York such as Montréal Canada (average January low is – 14 Celsius) are warmer than Vladivostok.

    Thanks for demonstrating yet again your reliability as a source for information. 🙂

    • Troll: Denis
    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't know the difference between a continental and a maritime climate
    > proceeds to "let me tell you about your country" about places he can barely find on a map

     

    Good Lord, Yellowstone can't blow its load sooner. Gott strafe Amerika.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    , @Denis
    @AP

    A normal person might say "oh well, I guess he meant warm compared to the rest of Siberia, or Canada, or wherever, maybe he's right and maybe he's wrong, who cares", but you are not normal.

    Replies: @AP, @anonymous coward

  183. @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Vladivostok region is pretty warm.
     
    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense "information."

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not "pretty warm." It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense “information.”

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not “pretty warm.” It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.

    LOL…FFS….I’ve got Karlin effectively holding a shotgun up my a**, I’m on the edge of yet another ban, can’t make another wrong step…..but I’ve got another of your absurd drivel provocations right in front of me.

    Vladivostok is not like Siberia or Far North you cretin! It is not even like Khabarovsk which is more cold,frozen and far less humidity. Siberia, such as say Irkutsk will have far, far colder winters….but much hotter summers, many more days of +28C – although with nowhere near the humidity of somewhere like Vladivostok in summer.

    AnonFromTN’s Post was clearly reacting to the other guys comment on the scheme giving out free hectares of land in the Far East and siberia , and the common perception of this great section of land being the same thing and permanantly frozen. Obviously they are not and Far North, Siberia do not merit being considered the same with all of Vladivostok or the whole of the Far East region you dimwit.

    Coming from AnonFromTN…

    30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded

    I can confirm, that is SO true, and so is….

    lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water

    …brings back memories.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard-Mandela


    I’ve got Karlin effectively holding a shotgun up my a**,
     
    More of your curmudgeonry you ungrateful lout! What you don't seem to realize is that Karlin is doing you the greatest of favors in trying to block that cavernous channel of yours that always seems to get filled up with the residue of unscrupulous donors. Do you really want to take another step backwards and continue with your sex change nom de plume, "Ms. Karlin-Gerard"? :-)
  184. @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    Yes, I replaced the stock saddle on my Verve 2 with a comfort seat from Bell. Its design allows me to sit back with my buttocks comfortably planted with no pressure on the perineum. The cushioned seat covers are worthless. Save your money, shop around, and get a replacement comfort saddle in the $30-50 price range. Even Walmart has them.

    As always, get an estimate from your bike shop before committing the bike for repairs. Everything has gotten more expensive in the past decade, and bike shops are no exception, so prepare to be surprised.

    When I took my 7100 in for service and repairs last year , the running estimate was up to $400 when I gave the cut sign, and walked out into the showroom. They rolled out the Verve 2, and it was love at first ride.

    It's rather difficult to justify spending maybe 500 bucks for repairs on a 15 year old bike that I bought new (last year's model) for $180 in '04.

    It seems your bike needs a rear derailleur adjustment so it will shift smoothly into all gears. There are numerous videos and articles online showing how to adjust front and rear derailleurs.

    Depending on the location and type of your shifters, it may be possible to invert your bike, stand it on the seat and handlebars, and work on your rear derailleur with the bike in that position, but usually, a bike stand is needed for derailleur adjustments because it is necessary that the bike be immobilized with the wheels and pedals free to turn, while also being able to use the shifters. There are articles online with suggestions and ideas for circumventing the need for a bike stand.

    All those new bikes you're considering are decent rides, but none in that group has an adjustable handlebar stem that allows the rider to fine tune his riding geometry. Neither does the bike you are riding now, as far as I can tell. No suspension seat posts either, but like the seat, those are easy to swap out.

    Good luck.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live, @(((They))) Live

    If you want a low maintenance bike get one with a belt drive and hub gears, I bought one about two and a half years ago and so far with zero servicing it runs perfect, you will pay a little extra but its worth it IMO

  185. @Sparkon
    @Mikhail

    Yes, I replaced the stock saddle on my Verve 2 with a comfort seat from Bell. Its design allows me to sit back with my buttocks comfortably planted with no pressure on the perineum. The cushioned seat covers are worthless. Save your money, shop around, and get a replacement comfort saddle in the $30-50 price range. Even Walmart has them.

    As always, get an estimate from your bike shop before committing the bike for repairs. Everything has gotten more expensive in the past decade, and bike shops are no exception, so prepare to be surprised.

    When I took my 7100 in for service and repairs last year , the running estimate was up to $400 when I gave the cut sign, and walked out into the showroom. They rolled out the Verve 2, and it was love at first ride.

    It's rather difficult to justify spending maybe 500 bucks for repairs on a 15 year old bike that I bought new (last year's model) for $180 in '04.

    It seems your bike needs a rear derailleur adjustment so it will shift smoothly into all gears. There are numerous videos and articles online showing how to adjust front and rear derailleurs.

    Depending on the location and type of your shifters, it may be possible to invert your bike, stand it on the seat and handlebars, and work on your rear derailleur with the bike in that position, but usually, a bike stand is needed for derailleur adjustments because it is necessary that the bike be immobilized with the wheels and pedals free to turn, while also being able to use the shifters. There are articles online with suggestions and ideas for circumventing the need for a bike stand.

    All those new bikes you're considering are decent rides, but none in that group has an adjustable handlebar stem that allows the rider to fine tune his riding geometry. Neither does the bike you are riding now, as far as I can tell. No suspension seat posts either, but like the seat, those are easy to swap out.

    Good luck.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live, @(((They))) Live

    .

  186. @Gerard-Mandela
    @Dmitry

    Post you replied to specifically mentioned Jews,not Israel.

    US and Russia have plenty of similarities in their populations general national consciousness of Jews.....in UK it is practically zero.

    US and Russia both have the common or interpersonal conceptions of "jewish mother" various "jewish humour" or "jewish character traits or mentality" "cunning" etc...none of them anti-semitic in tone, some of them complementary or just playful. UK has absolutely zero consciousness of Jewish traits among their population - perhaps explains why , even with a large number of muslims and afew terrorist attacks in Britain - zero Jewish communities( Orthodox or just rich-secular) have even been attacked (long may that continue)

    We have got our great ( and some degenerate but popular)_ contributions from Jews in the arts, film, science, politics and so on from Soviet time and now. USA idolises Gershwin, great American songbook is jewish dominated, plenty of scientists, film directors, lawyers, humanitarians idolised with their jewishness a central, not incidental part of them promoted... even extremely ugly and low talent jews like Lauren Baccall and Barbara Streisand get overly promoted and idolised. In UK I don't think the scale is anywhere near - and their jewishness is incidental

    America, but particularly Russia have loads of successful jewish sportsman/woman and coaches......UK it is zero from what I can see.

    Obviously Americans have great respect for those who make money, UK considers promoting such things vulgar. Russia is somewhere in between.


    Plenty of Russian singers will have yiddish songs in their repertoire ( or at least russian language version) such as Tumbalalaika, Hava Naglia and many others sung on our entertainment or cultural shows............such a cultural impression is non-existant in Britain, despite showbusiness, media business and plenty of other things dominated by jewish control over there.

    What you consider "anti-Israel" is probably just the usual "self-hating jew" pseudo-complex.....I reckon all these supposedly anti-Israel media support Israel foreign policy 100%. Though I do agree with your European/brown people hypothesis

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Most British people aren’t aware that well known media Jews in Britain are even Jews, and there’s certainly no shortage of Jews in the British media and entertainment world.

    In general I’d say making a thing about peoples’ ethnic/national origin or noticing their ethnic/national origins is also considered vulgar in British culture, and at odds with British ideals of being a meritocracy and a “fair play” sort of society.

    Also, due to the US’s history of immigration, Americans are generally a lot more acutely aware of their ethnic origins and being a “hyphenated American” is the norm, I think the same goes for Russia although perhaps to a somewhat lesser extent, but I think Russians are similarly very aware of peoples’ ethnic origins due to the similarly multi-ethnic history of Russia.

    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    @Europe Europa

    The BBCs main daily news program is called Newsnight, if they told the truth they would have to call it Jewsnight, its amazing how many times I watch it and it will be dominated by the Tribe telling the UK Goy how to run his country

    watch the video below

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8itF62yIJg

    (((Emily Maitlis))) interviews the Hungarian foreign minister, a typical Jewsnight interview

  187. @Europe Europa
    @Gerard-Mandela

    Most British people aren't aware that well known media Jews in Britain are even Jews, and there's certainly no shortage of Jews in the British media and entertainment world.

    In general I'd say making a thing about peoples' ethnic/national origin or noticing their ethnic/national origins is also considered vulgar in British culture, and at odds with British ideals of being a meritocracy and a "fair play" sort of society.

    Also, due to the US's history of immigration, Americans are generally a lot more acutely aware of their ethnic origins and being a "hyphenated American" is the norm, I think the same goes for Russia although perhaps to a somewhat lesser extent, but I think Russians are similarly very aware of peoples' ethnic origins due to the similarly multi-ethnic history of Russia.

    Replies: @(((They))) Live

    The BBCs main daily news program is called Newsnight, if they told the truth they would have to call it Jewsnight, its amazing how many times I watch it and it will be dominated by the Tribe telling the UK Goy how to run his country

    watch the video below

    (((Emily Maitlis))) interviews the Hungarian foreign minister, a typical Jewsnight interview

  188. @Thulean Friend
    @Hyperborean

    There's something sad about Turkey's self-hatred. Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    It's not just that wannabe gangster either. This kitschy version of a 'European village' in Turkey sold 350 of 700 units before the economic crisis hit:

    https://i.imgur.com/FkKgjp0.jpg

    I've also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I've interacted with them on the internet. To tell them that they have more in common with arabs seems like the greatest insult imaginable, they invariably explode in wounded rage.

    Replies: @Mitleser, @Nodwink, @silviosilver

    Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.

    Actually, there’s no evidence they’re LARPing as anything, much less that they’re engaged in a racial fantasy.

    If they’re disproportionately featured on television, it’s because whiter people, on average, simply look better than less white people, and non-whites as well as whites (except white libtards) have a preference for seeing whiter/lighter faces on television. (This preference may be marked or it may be slight, but it is seldom absent.)

    Of course, the average white is nothing much to look at. But at the highest echelons of human beauty, there’s no competition, whites crush all before them. (And good looking non-whites far more often than not have hefty proportions of European ancestry themselves.)

    I’ve also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I’ve interacted with them on the internet.

    There’s a substantial educated, liberal-leaning population in Turkey. I think it’s more that they want to distance themselves from the conservative islamic image of their country and show that they can be enlightened and progressive too, rather than to be seen as European per se. When I used to post on race boards a lot, the Turkish factions there didn’t strike me as desperate to be seen as white. They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Your redeeming quality is that at least you know your inferiority.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    , @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

  189. @joni
    @Znzn

    Respect for bureaucracy is a definitive feature of Asian cultures. Russians do not have that, yet the West tries hard to lump them in with Asiatic Mongoloids.

    Americans are distinct from Western cultures. This pandemic was bound to explode because "MUH FREEDOM" or because we want to use it against those "Trumptards". No one can find any compromise in the US. The virus did spread at those protests. Probably not so much in NY - either because they were more careful or most people already had it. In Texas and California, protestors were not so lucky.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    In Texas and California, protestors were not so lucky.

    Serves them right. Maybe the virus will do something about violent criminals, as the authorities at all levels appear to be totally impotent.

  190. @Europe Europa
    @Dmitry


    I think British Broadcasting television is a believer of “post-colonialist” ideology. Their attitude is something like – “If we do not have empire anymore, then nobody else can be allowed”.
     
    I think a lot of British people find it irritating that their history and legacy is widely chastised, yet many other countries still engage in practices that look very much like colonialism and yet get away with it, or are celebrated for it even.

    I'd say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a "If I can't have one, you can't have one" mentality.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @silviosilver

    I’d say a lot of British people feel bitter that their history has been singled out and scapegoated for colonialism in general, and that does promote a “If I can’t have one, you can’t have one” mentality.

    It’s something of a “supremacist” attitude, really. They decided that racism, nationalism, colonialism etc are awful, and they simply assumed that everybody else simply would agree with them, or could be made to agree with them. It’s not surprising that they’d get ticked off on noticing that other peoples had only been pretending to abide by the same rules. The duplicity is most glaring in the case of Jews, who are never slow to assail Britons for historical misdeeds, while squealing about ‘anti-semitism’ the minute the spotlight is shined on themselves; but essentially everyone is up to the same thing, just substitute ‘racism’ for ‘anti-semitism’.

    Also, I can’t prove this, but it does seem to me that a fair few Anglo-Saxons think they are the only people who could really be racist, so they don’t pay much attention to the racism of other races. Their feeling seems to be something like “they’re already so ‘unwhite’ anyway, what could they possibly have to be racist about?” A very self-centered view, to say the least.

  191. @truthman
    Anyone have any thoughts about Croatia's parliamentary elections today. Looks like mainstream "right wing" party did well as did Skoro which is supposed to be "far right".

    Replies: @silviosilver

    The mainstream right in Croatia is as bogus (for nationalist purposes) as the right anywhere else in Europe. Skoro’s outfit is nationalist, but it seems pretty heavily watered down, at least in the face it presents to the public. The most notable aspect of the election to me was the migration of voters from the mainstream liberal-left to the far left, mirroring trends elsewhere in Europe.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @silviosilver

    It’s like you said. They’re what AK might call “fake & gay” https://twitter.com/lilyslynch/status/1279516514496974848?s=21

    Replies: @Not Raul

  192. @Gerard-Mandela
    @AP


    AnoninTN is always good for posting some nonsense “information.”

    In January the average high temperature in Vladivostock is -8 C and average low is -15 C. That is colder than winter in Moscow and even Murmansk (which is on the Barents Sea north of the Arctic circle). It is not “pretty warm.” It is only warmer than places that are deep inland such as Irkutsk.
     
    LOL...FFS....I've got Karlin effectively holding a shotgun up my a**, I'm on the edge of yet another ban, can't make another wrong step.....but I've got another of your absurd drivel provocations right in front of me.

    Vladivostok is not like Siberia or Far North you cretin! It is not even like Khabarovsk which is more cold,frozen and far less humidity. Siberia, such as say Irkutsk will have far, far colder winters....but much hotter summers, many more days of +28C - although with nowhere near the humidity of somewhere like Vladivostok in summer.

    AnonFromTN's Post was clearly reacting to the other guys comment on the scheme giving out free hectares of land in the Far East and siberia , and the common perception of this great section of land being the same thing and permanantly frozen. Obviously they are not and Far North, Siberia do not merit being considered the same with all of Vladivostok or the whole of the Far East region you dimwit.

    Coming from AnonFromTN...

    30 years ago if you saw another person in the same bay as you, you called that crowded
     
    I can confirm, that is SO true, and so is....

    lots of sea urchins with huge spikes (the water was remarkably clean; sea urchins can’t live in contaminated water
     
    ...brings back memories.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    I’ve got Karlin effectively holding a shotgun up my a**,

    More of your curmudgeonry you ungrateful lout! What you don’t seem to realize is that Karlin is doing you the greatest of favors in trying to block that cavernous channel of yours that always seems to get filled up with the residue of unscrupulous donors. Do you really want to take another step backwards and continue with your sex change nom de plume, “Ms. Karlin-Gerard”? 🙂

  193. @Europe Europa
    @Matra

    Separate England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland teams for most sports seems to be a fluke of history, I can't think of another country where the national team does not correspond with the sovereign state. Probably a lot to do with the fact that Britain played a large role in setting up regulated international sport. The first "international" football match was England vs Scotland. Also in the 1800s I doubt there was quite such a formalised idea of what constituted a nation state than there is today, with the UN, etc.

    Interestingly, only "Great Britain" is allowed as the Olympic team because England, Wales, Scotland and NI don't meet the IOC's criteria as sovereign states.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Eugene Norman

    Puerto Rico has its own national teams for the Olympics, FIFA World Cup, etc.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Not Raul

    Puerto Rico is sort of a country though. England, Wales, Scotland and NI are all integral parts of the UK, probably the closest equivalent would be like US states.

    As far as I'm aware, Puerto Rico's status is more like that of a "British Overseas Territory", like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.

    I think the IOC don't allow individual England, Wales, Scotland and NI teams because politically it would be no different to having an individual Texas team or something.

    Replies: @A123

  194. @Thulean Friend
    @Sparkon

    I am less concerned about speed per se, and more about making biking sustainable. Too many just throw away their bikes prematurely and don't invest time to understanding how to repair your own stuff. It isn't nearly as hard as many think and the most common things (like needing to change tires) are quite trivial. It's just about getting past the initial hurdle for most people.

    One trend in Sweden that I am grateful of is the relative increase of the so-called cykelkök. I go to this one from time to time. In these places, you can often exchange parts for free or a very low sum while learning the ropes of repairing your own bike. It's quite social, too - you meet lots of friendly people. The clientele are anything from yuppies, to suburban soccer moms, careerist men in suits to of course young prole men.

    It's part of a larger movement towards repairability and away from wear-and-tear. The EU has been pushing tech firms to increase repairability in products, as most of the stuff we use often just need a battery or some other single component replaced to keep functioning. Using custom ROMs for your Android phone can also prolong its life for many years.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    Using custom ROMs for your Android phone can also prolong its life for many years.

    Lol. If people wanting to prolong the life of their phones is actually a thing, it’s not surprising that Thulean fag would be among the first know about it.

    (There’s some irony in me mocking him for this, since I am the biggest ‘prolonger’ I know: I’ve had the same phone for the last five years. Earlier this a year, a friend’s teenage daughter saw me take it out and pointed at it in shock “What is that?!?” I was actually a bit taken aback. I’d forgotten how uncool it was to have an obviously out of date phone.)

  195. @Znzn
    And with regards to HDB, of there are in fact biological differences between races, why are people so reluctant to argue as to which race is superior to which? Or which superior race should rule over other inferior races, which is a logical extension of that argument. Since it is only natural and logical for those who are superior to rule, vanquish, and conquer those who are inferior, as demonstrated throughout history, through survival of the fittest. Like are whites superior to East Asians, or vice versa? I mean people sure do argue which sports car brand is superior to which.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    Or which superior race should rule over other inferior races, which is a logical extension of that argument.

    If I am stronger than you, does that mean I should bash your head in? What if I’d rather be your friend?

    • Agree: Not Only Wrathful
    • Replies: @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive
    @silviosilver

    His question is valid.

    You cannot separate your male genes, wipe out ZNZN's male genes, and have him become a new organism that is half you. Yet that's what the spanish did in Latin America.
    Comparing individual humans to racial collectives only gets you so far in terms of reaching a moral conclusion.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  196. @songbird
    It is often remarked how homos stole the word "gay." And it was quite remarkable that they managed to do it, but it is even stranger how Jews stole the word "holocaust" and essentially made it their own. They should use a Jewish word like Shoah and not one derived from a Proto-Indo-European language. And certainly not an English word. I don't think it would have had the same power if it had been Hebrew - and it should have been since it has become a religion.

    As far as I can tell, in the sense of killing, it was first used to describe massacres of Christian Armenians by Turks. But it didn't always have a dark tone. I read a novel from the early 1900s which contained a line like, "He had fallen so far behind, he would need a holocaust in order to catch up." It was figurative, not referring to killing and only referring to fire, in a very figurative sense.

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    …it is even stranger how Jews stole the word “holocaust” and essentially made it their own

    holocaust, n.: a Jewish sacrificial offering which was burnt completely on an altar.”

    At this point I would link to a history of the Judenrat, but why bother? This place is a dump with the collective IQ of an ape troop.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @anonymous coward

    I'm aware of that definition, and it is not meaningful.

    Small "h" doesn't have a Semitic origin. It was not an exclusive use, and I doubt it was very common among Jews themselves. At any rate, I don't begrudge the use of a common word. I begrudge the theft of word, such that it becomes practically exclusive.

    What does it mean today? How can you use it in other senses? "Nuclear holocaust", maybe, but that just reinforces the idea - it's more cataclysmic than its original use. Can you use it in a calavier, figurative sense like I quoted from 1904? Can you use it in a joke? Why don't you go to the nearest ADL office and try it? Or make a donation, if you like handing stuff over to them. Or maybe collect a paycheck, if you are working for them.

  197. @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million
     
    You mentioned “Vladivostok region” as being, in your words, “pretty warm”, and I provided statistics for the city of Vladivostok showing that it’s winters on average are colder than in Moscow and even Murmansk. You have written plenty of nonsense about a place where you have lived for 20+ years, it is no wonder that you also write nonsense about a place where you claimed to have spent a couple of months once in the 80s.

    Vladivostok is in the southern part of its region and as a large city probably has a heat island effect. So other places in Vladivostok region are even colder.


    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C
     
    Average low temperature in Vladivostok in January is - 15.4 Celsius. In February it is - 11.4 Celsius and in December - 11.9 Celsius.

    These are average lows.


    Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York.
     
    The coldest significant place in upstate New York, deep in the Adirondack Mountains, around Lake Placid, has a slightly warmer average low temperature in January (- 15.2 Celsius) than does the city of Vladivostok. All of the actual cities in upstate New York are of course much warmer than Vladivostok. Even cities north of upstate New York such as Montréal Canada (average January low is - 14 Celsius) are warmer than Vladivostok.

    Thanks for demonstrating yet again your reliability as a source for information. :-)

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis

    > doesn’t know the difference between a continental and a maritime climate
    > proceeds to “let me tell you about your country” about places he can barely find on a map

    Good Lord, Yellowstone can’t blow its load sooner. Gott strafe Amerika.

    • Replies: @AP
    @anonymous coward

    Lol, another guy who gets everything wrong chimes in. All because I pointed out that the claim that Vladivostok, a city that is colder than Moscow, Murmansk, Montreal, etc. is “pretty warm” is nonsense.

    In my post I did mention that places like Irkutsk are even colder, so you managed to include a wrong statement in your post like in almost all of your other ones.

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    , @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward

    I naively thought that Ukies are like schizophrenics: deranged when you touch upon a certain subject, but relatively normal while discussing other things. I was wrong: Ukies are a lot worse than schizos, they are mental through and through, totally deranged on any topic. My bad.

    Replies: @AP

  198. @Europe Europa
    @AaronB

    Yet I imagine the whitest of Turks still identify more with the most Middle Eastern looking Turks than they would with other whites. Same goes for whites in other heavily mixed nations like India and Brazil.

    Language and culture always seems to trump genetics at the end of the day. Ethnic nationalists generally claim the most important thing is race and that language and culture are small details by comparison yet I'm yet to see much real world evidence of that theory. Most people seem to divide themselves along linguistic and cultural lines, especially when thinking in an international sense.

    Ethnicity seems to be something that has more relevance within the society. Like white Turks, high-caste white Indians, white Brazilians, etc, will tend to cluster together within their respective societies, but when it comes to foreign countries, most of these people will say that their non-white fellow countryman is more their brother than a white foreigner.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Hyperborean, @Beckow

    It only works that way with open borders and internationalised environment, people start having more in common with their own countrymen, language, culture. Once you isolate them in their countries they will be at each other throat. With corona travel restrictions the internal divisions within countries will surface.

    The dying globalism had an interesting side effect of strengthening solidarity within groups (elites and wanna-be-elites exempted). Soon we will see how they really feel when forced to live with each other. The recent migrant groups like Pakis in UK or Eritreans in Sweden will stand out like a sore thumb. And even within homogeneous countries it will be North vs. South, east vs. west, city against countryside, etc… We have already seen a dramatic increase in within-a-country hostilities. If corona goes on and on, there will be no stopping it. More people become aware of their identity, worse it will get.

  199. @silviosilver
    @truthman

    The mainstream right in Croatia is as bogus (for nationalist purposes) as the right anywhere else in Europe. Skoro's outfit is nationalist, but it seems pretty heavily watered down, at least in the face it presents to the public. The most notable aspect of the election to me was the migration of voters from the mainstream liberal-left to the far left, mirroring trends elsewhere in Europe.

    Replies: @Not Raul

    It’s like you said. They’re what AK might call “fake & gay” https://twitter.com/lilyslynch/status/1279516514496974848?s=21

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Not Raul

    More to the point https://twitter.com/markojurci/status/1279727917296168960?s=21

  200. @Not Raul
    @silviosilver

    It’s like you said. They’re what AK might call “fake & gay” https://twitter.com/lilyslynch/status/1279516514496974848?s=21

    Replies: @Not Raul

  201. @anonymous coward
    @songbird


    ...it is even stranger how Jews stole the word “holocaust” and essentially made it their own
     
    "holocaust, n.: a Jewish sacrificial offering which was burnt completely on an altar."

    At this point I would link to a history of the Judenrat, but why bother? This place is a dump with the collective IQ of an ape troop.

    Replies: @songbird

    I’m aware of that definition, and it is not meaningful.

    Small “h” doesn’t have a Semitic origin. It was not an exclusive use, and I doubt it was very common among Jews themselves. At any rate, I don’t begrudge the use of a common word. I begrudge the theft of word, such that it becomes practically exclusive.

    What does it mean today? How can you use it in other senses? “Nuclear holocaust”, maybe, but that just reinforces the idea – it’s more cataclysmic than its original use. Can you use it in a calavier, figurative sense like I quoted from 1904? Can you use it in a joke? Why don’t you go to the nearest ADL office and try it? Or make a donation, if you like handing stuff over to them. Or maybe collect a paycheck, if you are working for them.

  202. @Not Raul
    @Europe Europa

    Puerto Rico has its own national teams for the Olympics, FIFA World Cup, etc.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Puerto Rico is sort of a country though. England, Wales, Scotland and NI are all integral parts of the UK, probably the closest equivalent would be like US states.

    As far as I’m aware, Puerto Rico’s status is more like that of a “British Overseas Territory”, like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.

    I think the IOC don’t allow individual England, Wales, Scotland and NI teams because politically it would be no different to having an individual Texas team or something.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @A123
    @Europe Europa


    As far as I’m aware, Puerto Rico’s status is more like that of a “British Overseas Territory”, like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.
     
    Puerto Rico is a Territory, not a State. All Puerto Rican are full U.S. Citizens. Taxation, certain benefits programs, and other laws are different for U.S. Territories.

    I believe that American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands also have fielded separate teams the past. Whatever rules exist for international sport seem fairly consist about allowing territories (but not states) to participate separately.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Europe Europa

  203. @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't know the difference between a continental and a maritime climate
    > proceeds to "let me tell you about your country" about places he can barely find on a map

     

    Good Lord, Yellowstone can't blow its load sooner. Gott strafe Amerika.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    Lol, another guy who gets everything wrong chimes in. All because I pointed out that the claim that Vladivostok, a city that is colder than Moscow, Murmansk, Montreal, etc. is “pretty warm” is nonsense.

    In my post I did mention that places like Irkutsk are even colder, so you managed to include a wrong statement in your post like in almost all of your other ones.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't understand the difference between continental and maritime climates
    > persists in his error
    > an ad nauseam "akshually" non-discourse

     

    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

  204. @Rosie
    Some questions I have as a White homeschooling mother in light of the immanent detonation of Mount Rushmore:

    1. Will mainstream publishers of curricular materials that celebrate the founding fathers be considered "racist" and subject to cancellation going forward? (Yes, these exist.)

    2. What about independent, conservative publishers specifically geared to homeschoolers?

    3. How long until parents' private teaching of the lives of the unpersoned becomes a cancellable offense? Will it be months, years, or a generation?

    Replies: @Rattus Norwegius

    “1. Will mainstream publishers of curricular materials that celebrate the founding fathers be considered “racist” and subject to cancellation going forward? (Yes, these exist.)”
    Unlikely, but the curriculum could change meaning that what home taught students are tested in also changes.

    You might recieve some woke books in the coming years 😉

    Also.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeschooling_international_status_and_statistics

  205. A123 says:
    @Europe Europa
    @Not Raul

    Puerto Rico is sort of a country though. England, Wales, Scotland and NI are all integral parts of the UK, probably the closest equivalent would be like US states.

    As far as I'm aware, Puerto Rico's status is more like that of a "British Overseas Territory", like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.

    I think the IOC don't allow individual England, Wales, Scotland and NI teams because politically it would be no different to having an individual Texas team or something.

    Replies: @A123

    As far as I’m aware, Puerto Rico’s status is more like that of a “British Overseas Territory”, like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.

    Puerto Rico is a Territory, not a State. All Puerto Rican are full U.S. Citizens. Taxation, certain benefits programs, and other laws are different for U.S. Territories.

    I believe that American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands also have fielded separate teams the past. Whatever rules exist for international sport seem fairly consist about allowing territories (but not states) to participate separately.

    PEACE 😇

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @A123

    Right, but they're still not equivalent to Wales, Scotland and NI. That's the point I'm making. People from the Cayman Islands and Falkland Islands are also British citizens, but they are not part of the "UK proper" like Puerto Rico is not part of the "US proper" so to speak.

  206. Tammy Duckworth Lies on CNN

    She’s considered a VP candidate for Biden:

    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan – something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.

    Of course CNN host Dana Bash didn’t question Duckworth on this particular.

    Susan Rice is said to be another VP possibility for Biden. Rice gets a well deserved thrashing in this segment:

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Mikhail

    Well, CNN comes up with its own lies and spreads the lies of Dems. What else is new?

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikhail

    , @Mitleser
    @Mikhail


    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan – something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.
     
    https://twitter.com/phl43/status/1280249226170175489

    https://twitter.com/aaronjmate/status/1280211511550541824

    Replies: @songbird

  207. I am very curious about the anti-chinese sentiment China has been experiencing in recent months. I cannot find any good information on it and how well China is handling it. I am seeing only one sided Western, anti-Chinese takes. I would like a balanced take on the issue.

    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn’t seem to be handling it well.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse? Not only are companies trying to move out (Japan, Apple, etc), but it seems to be even further restricted from acquiring silicon or producing its own 7 nm chips and cannot acquire any as TSMC is afraid to work with China to not put its American factory at risk.

    I fear I am not understanding tsomething and cannot read mandarin to see what the chinese themselves are saying on the issue

    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @NazBolFren


    Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse?
     
    The short answer is no.

    Even Vietnam, which is arguably the developing country doing best in manufacturing, doesn't cut it in many areas.

    China's huge advantage is the scale. You can concentrate large supplier networks in a single country with great infrastructure. The only country that can theoretically mimic them would be India. Failing that, you need to spread suppliers out on many smaller countries. Branching out to many countries introduces complexity, which in turn raises costs. That is why there is a premium on density of suppliers. Interestingly, Apple's concentration in China increased from 2017 to 2019 despite the trade war.

    If you have the time, there's a great and factual discussion on this issue here.

    , @Erik Sieven
    @NazBolFren

    It is still unclear where the Virus came from, so there is still the possibility that it came from a lab-accident. A virus which came from one single country and affected almost every other country, leading to enormous costs. This would be a huge issue. Maybe China did right to enrage the international community with minor issues so that people talk less about the Virus, which right now is happening.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

    , @china-russia-all-the-way
    @NazBolFren


    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn’t seem to be handling it well.
     
    The clash with India is not related to world events. The fight was an on the spot escalation that spiraled out of control. Indian sources claim the Chinese battalion commander was killed in the melee. That detail alone should put serious doubt in the minds of those who insist China launched a planned assault.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something
     
    I think the backlash from Europe and the US towards the national security law is not harsh. Much of this is due to too much going on in the world.

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse?
     
    No. Chinese manufacturing and the Chinese economy is powered by both debt and productivity growth. China is able to remain competitive despite headwinds because of productivity gains, other competitive countries are relatively small (Vietnam), and sub-optimal large scale organization of other developing countries (India). And just think about the overall picture that keeps businesses expanding in China. As early as 2040, China could become a developed country.
    , @Astuteobservor II
    @NazBolFren

    All part of the full spectrum war on China.

    China wants to go high tech, developing and making their own chips.

    That is a huge no no. As that was exactly the same reason Japan got the smack down. I remember reading that Japan had like 60% to 80% market share of computer chips before getting smacked. China is too big to be smack by any country.

    That is why you are seeing all these attacks in the English media.

    In the case of India, it is just trying to profit from this new China vs US information and economic war. And it is willing to become a vassal from the looks of it.

    And get this, India is blaming China that it wants to become a mere US satellite.

    And the funny part of all this is, USA pushed China into this 2025 plan with the Asian pivot. The start of this show was 2012.

  208. @Europe Europa
    @Matra

    Separate England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland teams for most sports seems to be a fluke of history, I can't think of another country where the national team does not correspond with the sovereign state. Probably a lot to do with the fact that Britain played a large role in setting up regulated international sport. The first "international" football match was England vs Scotland. Also in the 1800s I doubt there was quite such a formalised idea of what constituted a nation state than there is today, with the UN, etc.

    Interestingly, only "Great Britain" is allowed as the Olympic team because England, Wales, Scotland and NI don't meet the IOC's criteria as sovereign states.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Eugene Norman

    International competitions in soccer are between representatives of the “leagues” not sovereign states.

  209. @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't know the difference between a continental and a maritime climate
    > proceeds to "let me tell you about your country" about places he can barely find on a map

     

    Good Lord, Yellowstone can't blow its load sooner. Gott strafe Amerika.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    I naively thought that Ukies are like schizophrenics: deranged when you touch upon a certain subject, but relatively normal while discussing other things. I was wrong: Ukies are a lot worse than schizos, they are mental through and through, totally deranged on any topic. My bad.

    • Replies: @AP
    @AnonFromTN

    I was providing a public service for other readers, to know that you are clueless about most hings you write. You claimed that Vladivostok region, which colder than Moscow, colder than Murmansk, is "pretty warm." You claimed it almost never gets below -10 Celsius. But the average low in January is - 15 Celsius. Did you know that - 15 is lower than -10? One isn't a "schizo" for pointing out reality.

    And even funnier - you said you spent 2 months there. And are still so clueless. Well, remember some of the nonsense you've written about Tennessee, where you claim to live for the past 20 years?

    Vladivostok climate:

    https://weather-and-climate.com/average-monthly-Rainfall-Temperature-Sunshine,vladivostok,Russia

    Moscow climate:

    https://weather-and-climate.com/average-monthly-Rainfall-Temperature-Sunshine,moscow,Russia

  210. @Mikhail
    Tammy Duckworth Lies on CNN

    She's considered a VP candidate for Biden:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcSioXuQosU

    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan - something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.

    Of course CNN host Dana Bash didn't question Duckworth on this particular.

    Susan Rice is said to be another VP possibility for Biden. Rice gets a well deserved thrashing in this segment:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP5wtWCs9j0

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Mitleser

    Well, CNN comes up with its own lies and spreads the lies of Dems. What else is new?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @AnonFromTN

    For sure. The bit with Duckworth is the latest. Among the absurd includes the follow-up on Fiona Hill's Capitol Hill testimony with Wolf Blitzer repeating a CNN byline, saying that Hill shattered the notion that there was Kiev regime-Democratic Party collusion against Donald Trump during the 2016 US presidential election.

    Carrying on in a very un-academic manner, Hill did nothing of the sort. Rather, she launched a subjectively flawed claim, without directly answering the facts and fact based opinions running counter to the preferred Deep State narrative.

    The details concerning this and related issues are given in these pieces:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/11/12/us-mass-media-government-ties-remain-strong-on-russia-bashing/

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/10/17/geopolitical-realism-utilized-by-obama-and-trump/

    As suggested in these articles, it can be reasonably believed that the evidence of Ukrainian government meddling in the 2016 US presidential election is arguably greater than what has been said of the Russian government.

    Contrary to CNN-MSNBC spin, there's nothing especially brave about what Hill said on Capitol Hill. If anything, its appears braver for someone in the US foreign policy establishment to openly shatter the overtly inaccurate anti-Russian BS regularly being spewed.

    Matt Gaetz stood out for saying on Fox News that it's overly simplistic to believe that the Ukrainian government is 100% right in its differences with the Russian government. The kind of thought typically not getting a substantive overview in the US mass media and body politic at large.

    , @Mikhail
    @AnonFromTN

    For sure. The bit with Duckworth is the latest. Among the absurd includes the follow-up on Fiona Hill's Capitol Hill testimony with Wolf Blitzer repeating a CNN byline, saying that Hill shattered the notion that there was Kiev regime-Democratic Party collusion against Donald Trump during the 2016 US presidential election.

    Carrying on in a very un-academic manner, Hill did nothing of the sort. Rather, she launched a subjectively flawed claim, without directly answering the facts and fact based opinions running counter to the preferred Deep State narrative.

    The details concerning this and related issues are given in these pieces:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/11/12/us-mass-media-government-ties-remain-strong-on-russia-bashing/

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/10/17/geopolitical-realism-utilized-by-obama-and-trump/

    As suggested in these articles, it can be reasonably believed that the evidence of Ukrainian government meddling in the 2016 US presidential election is arguably greater than what has been said of the Russian government.

    Contrary to CNN-MSNBC spin, there's nothing especially brave about what Hill said on Capitol Hill. If anything, its appears braver for someone in the US foreign policy establishment to openly shatter the overtly inaccurate anti-Russian BS regularly being spewed.

    Matt Gaetz stood out for saying on Fox News that it's overly simplistic to believe that the Ukrainian government is 100% right in its differences with the Russian government. The kind of thought typically not getting a substantive overview in the US mass media and body politic at large.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  211. AP says:
    @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward

    I naively thought that Ukies are like schizophrenics: deranged when you touch upon a certain subject, but relatively normal while discussing other things. I was wrong: Ukies are a lot worse than schizos, they are mental through and through, totally deranged on any topic. My bad.

    Replies: @AP

    I was providing a public service for other readers, to know that you are clueless about most hings you write. You claimed that Vladivostok region, which colder than Moscow, colder than Murmansk, is “pretty warm.” You claimed it almost never gets below -10 Celsius. But the average low in January is – 15 Celsius. Did you know that – 15 is lower than -10? One isn’t a “schizo” for pointing out reality.

    And even funnier – you said you spent 2 months there. And are still so clueless. Well, remember some of the nonsense you’ve written about Tennessee, where you claim to live for the past 20 years?

    Vladivostok climate:

    https://weather-and-climate.com/average-monthly-Rainfall-Temperature-Sunshine,vladivostok,Russia

    Moscow climate:

    https://weather-and-climate.com/average-monthly-Rainfall-Temperature-Sunshine,moscow,Russia

  212. AP says:

    Are these guys Baptist-Pentacostal Russian-Ukrainian immigrants to the Pacific Northwest?

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/oregon-beach-nazi-salutes-black-family-police

    Oregon police were called to an ocean beach on the Fourth of July and arrested seven white adults they say harassed a Black family with racial slurs and Nazi salutes.

    The incident began with officers responding around 9:30 p.m. to a report of a group of people shooting off illegal fireworks and causing a disturbance, Lincoln City police said.

    More officers arrived after the cops who initially responded were surrounded by the group, taunted and challenged to fights, police said.

    Police said officers also spoke to the family who complained about the harassment and said they felt intimidated.

    The family left the beach safely after officers formed a line between the group and the family, police said.

    “During this time several in the group of white persons continued to taunt the officers, trying to challenge them to fight,” police said “Other members from the group of white persons then began shooting off multiple large illegal aerial fireworks in front of the officers.

    “After several more officers arrived on scene, they moved in on the confrontational and highly intoxicated group and began placing them under arrest for a variety of criminal charges.”

    [MORE]

    The men arrested were: Gennadiy Kachankov, 30, Antoliy Kachankov, 28, Andrey Zaytsev, 28, Oleg Saranchuk, 45, Ruslan Tkachenko, 22, and Yuriy Kachankov, 30. A seventh man refused to identify himself, police said. All were from Clark County in Washington state.

  213. @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend


    Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.
     
    Actually, there's no evidence they're LARPing as anything, much less that they're engaged in a racial fantasy.

    If they're disproportionately featured on television, it's because whiter people, on average, simply look better than less white people, and non-whites as well as whites (except white libtards) have a preference for seeing whiter/lighter faces on television. (This preference may be marked or it may be slight, but it is seldom absent.)

    Of course, the average white is nothing much to look at. But at the highest echelons of human beauty, there's no competition, whites crush all before them. (And good looking non-whites far more often than not have hefty proportions of European ancestry themselves.)

    I’ve also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I’ve interacted with them on the internet.
     
    There's a substantial educated, liberal-leaning population in Turkey. I think it's more that they want to distance themselves from the conservative islamic image of their country and show that they can be enlightened and progressive too, rather than to be seen as European per se. When I used to post on race boards a lot, the Turkish factions there didn't strike me as desperate to be seen as white. They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Europe Europa

    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    Your redeeming quality is that at least you know your inferiority.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend

    It's an endearing quality, isn't it. More than that, it's pretty useful personally too. There are numerous facts in this world that are not to our liking -- some of them unsettle us and trouble us deeply -- but if something is indeed a fact, it is best to accept it as a fact rather than deny it or fight it, because when you do, you will find its power dissipates surprisingly quickly. (That doesn't mean liking it, or giving up trying to do anything about it; it just means accepting that, at least for now, it is true.)

    When I was a kid I watched this movie "The Thief of Baghdad" (1978 version). The thief and some prince had to follow a narrow path up an enchanted mountain to retrieve a precious jewel. If they strayed from the path they would be petrified. To lure them from the path, the enchanted mountain projected faceless voices insulting the trekkers -- eg "you're mother was a whore." The highborn prince, of course, was insulted and tried to answer back and was eventually lured off the path and petrified. When the thief heard the same insults, he smiled, nodded, and displayed an attitude of "yeah okay, and...?" I thought that attitude was the right way to go.

    Although it sounds trivial, it made an impression on me because it was the first time I became conscious of an attitude that I approved of but which contrasted so sharply from my parents' -- who'd have rather died than admitted to any vulnerability. They were working class people but with extreme middle class values. They also refused to live in a working class neighborhood, so I grew up with everyone I knew having more and better stuff than me. That sort of thing can get to you at any age, but it's especially tough to deal with as a kid. (Oh, and if you heap a few doses of old-fashioned Anglo-Saxon racism on top of it, it's not a pretty picture at all.) So it really helped to have a way of shrugging it off when other kids inevitably put down your clothes, shoes or other possessions, or went for the racial angle (which was rare, but it only takes a few incidents). (It was far from a perfect remedy though -- I still grew up pretty angry and feisty.)

    If I position myself on the right today, a hundred years ago I would almost surely have been a commie. A world in which you're deemed worthy or unworthy, and treated as such, on the basis of factors completely outside your control is a lousy deal for sure. But I think social reform has been taken as far as it can realistically be expected to go. Actually, it's been taken too far -- right into la la land.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Blinky Bill

  214. @NazBolFren
    I am very curious about the anti-chinese sentiment China has been experiencing in recent months. I cannot find any good information on it and how well China is handling it. I am seeing only one sided Western, anti-Chinese takes. I would like a balanced take on the issue.

    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn't seem to be handling it well.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse? Not only are companies trying to move out (Japan, Apple, etc), but it seems to be even further restricted from acquiring silicon or producing its own 7 nm chips and cannot acquire any as TSMC is afraid to work with China to not put its American factory at risk.

    I fear I am not understanding tsomething and cannot read mandarin to see what the chinese themselves are saying on the issue

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Erik Sieven, @china-russia-all-the-way, @Astuteobservor II

    Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse?

    The short answer is no.

    Even Vietnam, which is arguably the developing country doing best in manufacturing, doesn’t cut it in many areas.

    China’s huge advantage is the scale. You can concentrate large supplier networks in a single country with great infrastructure. The only country that can theoretically mimic them would be India. Failing that, you need to spread suppliers out on many smaller countries. Branching out to many countries introduces complexity, which in turn raises costs. That is why there is a premium on density of suppliers. Interestingly, Apple’s concentration in China increased from 2017 to 2019 despite the trade war.

    If you have the time, there’s a great and factual discussion on this issue here.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  215. @Vishnugupta
    @Thulean Friend

    Coal isn't going away for a very long time as it is pretty much the only source of baseload electricity that China and India both have in abundance.

    For obvious strategic reasons it makes sense to have most of your electricity from a cheap fuel source that you have on your own territory.

    Solar/Wind is not viable for baseload power unless there is a breakthrough in energy storage and even then given the massive amounts of land required I doubt these will come anywhere close to replacing coal in densely populated Asian countries.

    That leaves breakthroughs in Methane hydrates(China/India both have theoretically massive gas reserves on their continenral shelves in the form of methane hydrates),Uranium from seawater (it presently costs 10x of mined uranium but if this becomes feasible the whole world effectively has unlimited Uranium) or Thorium based fuel cycles(India has the world's largest Thorium reserve most countries haven't surveyed theirs because Thorium is presently economically more or less useless).

    Unfortunately breakthroughs in these along with nuclear fusion are perpetually just around the corner so we will be stuck with coal for many decades.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend

    Coal is going away. It is mostly replaced by natural gas as I write this, but even that is a temporary phase.

    Baseload power for renewables isn’t going to be a major issue as battery storage gets better and better. People who don’t follow the sector don’t understand that battery energy density improves by a factor of 2X every decade at the same pricepoint. And that’s just legacy tech like LiOn, excluding new methods like Solid State batteries which radically improves these metrics on their own merits.

    And it’s not like we have to look far into the future for this to take effect. It’s already happening.

    Lots of aging boomers on this site have very aging talking points because they don’t follow the sectors closely. This isn’t the 1990s or even the early 2000s anymore.

    • Agree: Not Raul
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Thulean Friend

    Any stock tips?

    , @Philip Owen
    @Thulean Friend

    In the UK in the New Year there are typically 2-4 weeks of high pressure weather (mostly late January to early February). This means windless weather and fog. No wind, no sun. This is also the time of maximum demand. There is no battery technology remotely in sight that can supply the UK's maximum demand for continuous hours far less weeks. The UK's biggest hydro scheme running flat out lasts for 20 minutes. Current storage technology is good for frequency protection. Even then, battery storage cannot deliver a Dark Start. The grid needs rotating devices to provide inertia.

    Conceivably, tidal, configured to provide maximum demand could generate hydrogen for storage during the slack times. A tidal/hydrogen system would only have to cover a 6 hour lull in output. That is also within reach for compressed air and liquified air systems. Hydrogen might be preferred as it would also be a fuel for motor vehicles. Renewables could supply extra hydrogen. The tidal schemes to do this would be massive. ££££££££££

    Replies: @Not Raul

  216. @NazBolFren
    I am very curious about the anti-chinese sentiment China has been experiencing in recent months. I cannot find any good information on it and how well China is handling it. I am seeing only one sided Western, anti-Chinese takes. I would like a balanced take on the issue.

    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn't seem to be handling it well.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse? Not only are companies trying to move out (Japan, Apple, etc), but it seems to be even further restricted from acquiring silicon or producing its own 7 nm chips and cannot acquire any as TSMC is afraid to work with China to not put its American factory at risk.

    I fear I am not understanding tsomething and cannot read mandarin to see what the chinese themselves are saying on the issue

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Erik Sieven, @china-russia-all-the-way, @Astuteobservor II

    It is still unclear where the Virus came from, so there is still the possibility that it came from a lab-accident. A virus which came from one single country and affected almost every other country, leading to enormous costs. This would be a huge issue. Maybe China did right to enrage the international community with minor issues so that people talk less about the Virus, which right now is happening.

    • Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Erik Sieven


    April 30, 2020

    Intelligence Community Statement on Origins of COVID-19

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Office of the Director of National Intelligence today issued the following Intelligence Community (IC) statement:

    “The entire Intelligence Community has been consistently providing critical support to U.S. policymakers and those responding to the COVID-19 virus, which originated in China. The Intelligence Community also concurs with the wide scientific consensus that the COVID-19 virus was not manmade or genetically modified.
     
    https://www.dni.gov/index.php/newsroom/press-releases/item/2112-intelligence-community-statement-on-origins-of-covid-19

    Let's follow the statement and assume it was not modified. Then it is not likely to have come from a lab. Otherwise the virus would have jumped from bat cave to lab to people? Doesn't sound likely.

    “Look, the best experts so far seem to think it was man-made. I have no reason to disbelieve that at this point,” the secretary answered.

    Raddatz then pointed out to Pompeo that he was contradicting the ODNI’s own statement, repeating their conclusions that “the scientific consensus was that the COVID-19 virus was not man-made or genetically modified.”

    But Pompeo wasn’t done confusing matters, saying, “That’s right. I agree with that. Yes. I’ve seen their analysis. I’ve seen the summary that you saw that was released publicly. I have no reason to doubt that that is accurate at this point.”
     
    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/interview-pompeo-sends-mixed-messages-coronavirus-wuhan-lab-993341/

    Pompeo during an interview with This Week forgot that the decision was made to not fabricate evidence the virus came from a lab.
  217. @Thulean Friend
    @Vishnugupta

    Coal is going away. It is mostly replaced by natural gas as I write this, but even that is a temporary phase.

    Baseload power for renewables isn't going to be a major issue as battery storage gets better and better. People who don't follow the sector don't understand that battery energy density improves by a factor of 2X every decade at the same pricepoint. And that's just legacy tech like LiOn, excluding new methods like Solid State batteries which radically improves these metrics on their own merits.

    And it's not like we have to look far into the future for this to take effect. It's already happening.

    Lots of aging boomers on this site have very aging talking points because they don't follow the sectors closely. This isn't the 1990s or even the early 2000s anymore.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Philip Owen

    Any stock tips?

  218. @AnonFromTN
    @Mikhail

    Well, CNN comes up with its own lies and spreads the lies of Dems. What else is new?

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikhail

    For sure. The bit with Duckworth is the latest. Among the absurd includes the follow-up on Fiona Hill’s Capitol Hill testimony with Wolf Blitzer repeating a CNN byline, saying that Hill shattered the notion that there was Kiev regime-Democratic Party collusion against Donald Trump during the 2016 US presidential election.

    Carrying on in a very un-academic manner, Hill did nothing of the sort. Rather, she launched a subjectively flawed claim, without directly answering the facts and fact based opinions running counter to the preferred Deep State narrative.

    The details concerning this and related issues are given in these pieces:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/11/12/us-mass-media-government-ties-remain-strong-on-russia-bashing/

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/10/17/geopolitical-realism-utilized-by-obama-and-trump/

    As suggested in these articles, it can be reasonably believed that the evidence of Ukrainian government meddling in the 2016 US presidential election is arguably greater than what has been said of the Russian government.

    Contrary to CNN-MSNBC spin, there’s nothing especially brave about what Hill said on Capitol Hill. If anything, its appears braver for someone in the US foreign policy establishment to openly shatter the overtly inaccurate anti-Russian BS regularly being spewed.

    Matt Gaetz stood out for saying on Fox News that it’s overly simplistic to believe that the Ukrainian government is 100% right in its differences with the Russian government. The kind of thought typically not getting a substantive overview in the US mass media and body politic at large.

  219. @AnonFromTN
    @Mikhail

    Well, CNN comes up with its own lies and spreads the lies of Dems. What else is new?

    Replies: @Mikhail, @Mikhail

    For sure. The bit with Duckworth is the latest. Among the absurd includes the follow-up on Fiona Hill’s Capitol Hill testimony with Wolf Blitzer repeating a CNN byline, saying that Hill shattered the notion that there was Kiev regime-Democratic Party collusion against Donald Trump during the 2016 US presidential election.

    Carrying on in a very un-academic manner, Hill did nothing of the sort. Rather, she launched a subjectively flawed claim, without directly answering the facts and fact based opinions running counter to the preferred Deep State narrative.

    The details concerning this and related issues are given in these pieces:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/11/12/us-mass-media-government-ties-remain-strong-on-russia-bashing/

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/10/17/geopolitical-realism-utilized-by-obama-and-trump/

    As suggested in these articles, it can be reasonably believed that the evidence of Ukrainian government meddling in the 2016 US presidential election is arguably greater than what has been said of the Russian government.

    Contrary to CNN-MSNBC spin, there’s nothing especially brave about what Hill said on Capitol Hill. If anything, its appears braver for someone in the US foreign policy establishment to openly shatter the overtly inaccurate anti-Russian BS regularly being spewed.

    Matt Gaetz stood out for saying on Fox News that it’s overly simplistic to believe that the Ukrainian government is 100% right in its differences with the Russian government. The kind of thought typically not getting a substantive overview in the US mass media and body politic at large.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    It's obvious that whatever Fiona Hill or any other talking head that you follow says about any Ukrainian collusion with the Democratic or Republican party is pure nonsense. Trump and Zelensky made it abundantly clear that "no pressure" was ever applied to Zelensky or his new administration to cough up any dirt on Biden or his son's shenanigans within Ukraine. Trump often relied on Zelensky's pronouncements put forth at this famous news conference during the whole Democratic sponsored sordid affair:

    https://youtu.be/eZVxMS3CWT8

    Replies: @Mikhail

  220. Pardon the hiccup, resulting from some glitch that wasn’t on my end.

  221. @NazBolFren
    I am very curious about the anti-chinese sentiment China has been experiencing in recent months. I cannot find any good information on it and how well China is handling it. I am seeing only one sided Western, anti-Chinese takes. I would like a balanced take on the issue.

    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn't seem to be handling it well.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse? Not only are companies trying to move out (Japan, Apple, etc), but it seems to be even further restricted from acquiring silicon or producing its own 7 nm chips and cannot acquire any as TSMC is afraid to work with China to not put its American factory at risk.

    I fear I am not understanding tsomething and cannot read mandarin to see what the chinese themselves are saying on the issue

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Erik Sieven, @china-russia-all-the-way, @Astuteobservor II

    1. How well is China handling the anti-Chinese sentiment? With the recent events in India, it doesn’t seem to be handling it well.

    The clash with India is not related to world events. The fight was an on the spot escalation that spiraled out of control. Indian sources claim the Chinese battalion commander was killed in the melee. That detail alone should put serious doubt in the minds of those who insist China launched a planned assault.

    2. It seems to be escalating anti-Chinese hysteria with the introduction of the national security law. However, I may be missing something

    I think the backlash from Europe and the US towards the national security law is not harsh. Much of this is due to too much going on in the world.

    3. Is China finished as a global manufactering powerhouse?

    No. Chinese manufacturing and the Chinese economy is powered by both debt and productivity growth. China is able to remain competitive despite headwinds because of productivity gains, other competitive countries are relatively small (Vietnam), and sub-optimal large scale organization of other developing countries (India). And just think about the overall picture that keeps businesses expanding in China. As early as 2040, China could become a developed country.

  222. @Erik Sieven
    @NazBolFren

    It is still unclear where the Virus came from, so there is still the possibility that it came from a lab-accident. A virus which came from one single country and affected almost every other country, leading to enormous costs. This would be a huge issue. Maybe China did right to enrage the international community with minor issues so that people talk less about the Virus, which right now is happening.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

    April 30, 2020

    Intelligence Community Statement on Origins of COVID-19

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Office of the Director of National Intelligence today issued the following Intelligence Community (IC) statement:

    “The entire Intelligence Community has been consistently providing critical support to U.S. policymakers and those responding to the COVID-19 virus, which originated in China. The Intelligence Community also concurs with the wide scientific consensus that the COVID-19 virus was not manmade or genetically modified.

    https://www.dni.gov/index.php/newsroom/press-releases/item/2112-intelligence-community-statement-on-origins-of-covid-19

    Let’s follow the statement and assume it was not modified. Then it is not likely to have come from a lab. Otherwise the virus would have jumped from bat cave to lab to people? Doesn’t sound likely.

    “Look, the best experts so far seem to think it was man-made. I have no reason to disbelieve that at this point,” the secretary answered.

    Raddatz then pointed out to Pompeo that he was contradicting the ODNI’s own statement, repeating their conclusions that “the scientific consensus was that the COVID-19 virus was not man-made or genetically modified.”

    But Pompeo wasn’t done confusing matters, saying, “That’s right. I agree with that. Yes. I’ve seen their analysis. I’ve seen the summary that you saw that was released publicly. I have no reason to doubt that that is accurate at this point.”

    https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/interview-pompeo-sends-mixed-messages-coronavirus-wuhan-lab-993341/

    Pompeo during an interview with This Week forgot that the decision was made to not fabricate evidence the virus came from a lab.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  223. @AP
    @anonymous coward

    Lol, another guy who gets everything wrong chimes in. All because I pointed out that the claim that Vladivostok, a city that is colder than Moscow, Murmansk, Montreal, etc. is “pretty warm” is nonsense.

    In my post I did mention that places like Irkutsk are even colder, so you managed to include a wrong statement in your post like in almost all of your other ones.

    Replies: @anonymous coward

    > doesn’t understand the difference between continental and maritime climates
    > persists in his error
    > an ad nauseam “akshually” non-discourse

    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.

    • Replies: @AP
    @anonymous coward

    When in a hole, you keep digging.


    doesn’t understand the difference between continental and maritime climates
     
    Speaking of yourself? None of the cities I mentioned have a maritime climate.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladivostok#Climate

    Vladivostok has a monsoon-influenced humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dwb)

    Your record of being wrong in almost every post continues.
    , @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward


    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.
     
    Americans (I mean born and bred in the US, not recent immigrants) are intellectually and educationally very diverse, from highly educated and brilliant to ignorant morons, and everything in between. It’s Ukies who have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  224. @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend


    Most of those women are Turkish, but they are forced to LARP as pseudo-white in some kind of bizarre racialised fantasy.
     
    Actually, there's no evidence they're LARPing as anything, much less that they're engaged in a racial fantasy.

    If they're disproportionately featured on television, it's because whiter people, on average, simply look better than less white people, and non-whites as well as whites (except white libtards) have a preference for seeing whiter/lighter faces on television. (This preference may be marked or it may be slight, but it is seldom absent.)

    Of course, the average white is nothing much to look at. But at the highest echelons of human beauty, there's no competition, whites crush all before them. (And good looking non-whites far more often than not have hefty proportions of European ancestry themselves.)

    I’ve also found Turks to be desperate to be viewed as European whenever I’ve interacted with them on the internet.
     
    There's a substantial educated, liberal-leaning population in Turkey. I think it's more that they want to distance themselves from the conservative islamic image of their country and show that they can be enlightened and progressive too, rather than to be seen as European per se. When I used to post on race boards a lot, the Turkish factions there didn't strike me as desperate to be seen as white. They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Europe Europa

    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.

    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as “black and white” as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn’t matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they’d still be non-white to most on the right.

    • Agree: Ano4, dfordoom, Not Raul
    • Replies: @AP
    @Europe Europa

    I consider strictly biological arguments about this to be silly. Culture matters enormously, and religion determines much of culture. A Catholic Spanish-speaking Mestizo is "ours" far more than is a blonde, blue-eyed Chechen Islamist.

    , @silviosilver
    @Europe Europa


    The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument.
     
    I would call it a cultural argument, rather than strictly religious. I doubt they really care very much about religious beliefs per se, but it's very hard (almost impossible) to share a truly meaningful common cultural identity with somebody of a different religion - especially a traditional enemy religion like Islam.

    A definition of 'white' which encompasses the Balkans and the Caucuses is 'good enough' for most day to day purposes. That is, if they're clearly 'assimilated' - if they speak and act more or less like any other white - then the fact they may look somewhat 'off' is generally not that big a deal. But trying to build a racialist-nationalist political movement based on that definition is a total non-starter. Put these people in the same room and your typical Anglo-Saxon would look around and think geezus, if that's what I'm fighting to preserve, then this struggle is already lost. And because this phenomenon occurs so reliably, it becomes very hard to build the kind of unity that a nationalist movement requires.

    Replies: @128

    , @Thulean Friend
    @Europe Europa


    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as “black and white” as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn’t matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they’d still be non-white to most on the right.
     
    You haven't met Varg yet.

    https://i.imgur.com/qev7JQ9.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa


    Georgians
     
    Most Georgians are brown. But as a group, Georgians cannot quite be called as either fully white or brown, as the nationality includes diverse races of people who are brown (majority) and also white (minority) - unlike Armenians.

    The nationality (Georgian) refers to nationalist created by different races (originally different tribes with different races), which have culturally/linguistically assimilated to each other - this is aside from slavic minority in the country.


    Many Georgians looking like Saakashvili

    https://im.kommersant.ru/Issues.photo/CORP/2020/05/07/KMO_175776_00003_1_t218_213318.jpg


    But some Georgians have a Southern European appearance

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCQfIfIBQtX/

    Some look like Berbers from North Africa (their Minister of Economy)


    https://i.imgur.com/PK0kTGV.jpg


    Some look like like Arab men- this is wife of American nationalist Richard Spencer

    https://i.imgur.com/fykdC9e.jpg


    But a significant minority are like Europeans. This is Georgian nationalist politician - looks stereotypically French or Italian.

    http://www.parliament.ge/cache/photos/2189.jpg

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Blinky Bill, @BB753

    , @EldnahYm
    @Europe Europa

    There are too many Eastern Europe-inhabiting sexpats among right wing "nationalist" groups.

  225. @A123
    @Europe Europa


    As far as I’m aware, Puerto Rico’s status is more like that of a “British Overseas Territory”, like the Cayman Islands or Falkland Islands, which I think are also treated as sort of countries in their own right in some contexts.
     
    Puerto Rico is a Territory, not a State. All Puerto Rican are full U.S. Citizens. Taxation, certain benefits programs, and other laws are different for U.S. Territories.

    I believe that American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands also have fielded separate teams the past. Whatever rules exist for international sport seem fairly consist about allowing territories (but not states) to participate separately.

    PEACE 😇

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    Right, but they’re still not equivalent to Wales, Scotland and NI. That’s the point I’m making. People from the Cayman Islands and Falkland Islands are also British citizens, but they are not part of the “UK proper” like Puerto Rico is not part of the “US proper” so to speak.

  226. @Mikhail
    Tammy Duckworth Lies on CNN

    She's considered a VP candidate for Biden:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcSioXuQosU

    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan - something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.

    Of course CNN host Dana Bash didn't question Duckworth on this particular.

    Susan Rice is said to be another VP possibility for Biden. Rice gets a well deserved thrashing in this segment:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP5wtWCs9j0

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Mitleser

    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan – something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @Mitleser

    I used to think the NYT had a racism plot wheel or dartboard. Now, I'm beginning to suspect that they have a Russian conspiracy plot wheel.

  227. Why does conservatism seem to be predominantly a white ideology? The most famous and outspoken conservatives internationally at the moment are people like Putin, Trump, Orban, Bolsonaro, Kurz, Salvini, etc. All white men, you could probably add Netanyahu to the list as well depending on whether you see him as white, I think many would.

    Maybe it’s just the way the Western media portrays it, but there doesn’t seem to be many of these sorts of outspokenly conservative non-white leaders. The only non-white example I can think of is probably Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, but the Philippines is something of an anomaly in Asia anyway, being majority Catholic and highly Americanised/Westernised culturally.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    @Europe Europa

    Pretty much all African leaders are "conservative" in one sense or another.

    , @Not Only Wrathful
    @Europe Europa

    You have it the wrong way round.

    Only white leaders wouldn't classify as conservative in the West.

    , @Philip Owen
    @Europe Europa

    The King of Saudi Arabia is a liberal?

    Modi is deeply conservative. Close to the Mussolini line.

    Xi is hardly radical.

    The military who run Burma/Myanmar are not members of Gay Pride.

    Look around a bit.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  228. @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    Now, for those who really want to know.
    The territory of Primorsky Krai (Vladivostok region) is 165,900 km² (64,100 sq miles) with population ~2 million
     
    You mentioned “Vladivostok region” as being, in your words, “pretty warm”, and I provided statistics for the city of Vladivostok showing that it’s winters on average are colder than in Moscow and even Murmansk. You have written plenty of nonsense about a place where you have lived for 20+ years, it is no wonder that you also write nonsense about a place where you claimed to have spent a couple of months once in the 80s.

    Vladivostok is in the southern part of its region and as a large city probably has a heat island effect. So other places in Vladivostok region are even colder.


    In winter it gets colder and snows, but the temperature virtually never drops below -10 degrees C
     
    Average low temperature in Vladivostok in January is - 15.4 Celsius. In February it is - 11.4 Celsius and in December - 11.9 Celsius.

    These are average lows.


    Would seem pretty mild for an inhabitant of upstate New York.
     
    The coldest significant place in upstate New York, deep in the Adirondack Mountains, around Lake Placid, has a slightly warmer average low temperature in January (- 15.2 Celsius) than does the city of Vladivostok. All of the actual cities in upstate New York are of course much warmer than Vladivostok. Even cities north of upstate New York such as Montréal Canada (average January low is - 14 Celsius) are warmer than Vladivostok.

    Thanks for demonstrating yet again your reliability as a source for information. :-)

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Denis

    A normal person might say “oh well, I guess he meant warm compared to the rest of Siberia, or Canada, or wherever, maybe he’s right and maybe he’s wrong, who cares”, but you are not normal.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Denis

    I was providing a PSA by pointing out when somewhere here wrote something ridiculous (i.e.,, Vladivostok region is "pretty warm" with temperatures almost never going below minus 10 Celsius). In reality, Vladivostok is one of the coldest cities on Earth, particularly in winter. In winter Vladivostok is colder than every large city in Europe (including European Russia, such as Moscow), America and Canada with the exception of Winnipeg (Vladivostok is even colder in January than Edmonton). Due to its continental climate its summers, while colder than those in Berlin, Siberia, or Moscow are similar to Stockholm's.

    AnoninTN: Mr. X is "pretty nonviolent."

    AP: Mr. X killed a dozen people.

    Denis: A normal person might say “oh well, I guess he meant nonviolent compared to Breivik or the guy who shot all those people in Las Vegas he wasn't really wrong. "

    Replies: @Denis

    , @anonymous coward
    @Denis

    Vladivostok is hot in the summer, cold in the winter, very wet and prone to monsoons/hurricanes. The climate is certainly harsh, but the world "cold" is about the last word you'd use to describe it.

    Does this look like an arctic wasteland to you?

    https://s00.yaplakal.com/pics/pics_original/0/1/9/3027910.jpg

    Replies: @AP

  229. @Mitleser
    @Mikhail


    Seeing how CNN is big on saying that Trump lies on any number of matters, it should be fair game to say that Duckworth lied, when out of the blue, she stated as fact that Russia had put out a bounty on US troops in Afghanistan – something which remains unclear and likely bogus, along the lines of Adam Schiff saying he has proof of Trump-Russia collusion.
     
    https://twitter.com/phl43/status/1280249226170175489

    https://twitter.com/aaronjmate/status/1280211511550541824

    Replies: @songbird

    I used to think the NYT had a racism plot wheel or dartboard. Now, I’m beginning to suspect that they have a Russian conspiracy plot wheel.

  230. @Mikhail
    @AnonFromTN

    For sure. The bit with Duckworth is the latest. Among the absurd includes the follow-up on Fiona Hill's Capitol Hill testimony with Wolf Blitzer repeating a CNN byline, saying that Hill shattered the notion that there was Kiev regime-Democratic Party collusion against Donald Trump during the 2016 US presidential election.

    Carrying on in a very un-academic manner, Hill did nothing of the sort. Rather, she launched a subjectively flawed claim, without directly answering the facts and fact based opinions running counter to the preferred Deep State narrative.

    The details concerning this and related issues are given in these pieces:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/11/12/us-mass-media-government-ties-remain-strong-on-russia-bashing/

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/10/17/geopolitical-realism-utilized-by-obama-and-trump/

    As suggested in these articles, it can be reasonably believed that the evidence of Ukrainian government meddling in the 2016 US presidential election is arguably greater than what has been said of the Russian government.

    Contrary to CNN-MSNBC spin, there's nothing especially brave about what Hill said on Capitol Hill. If anything, its appears braver for someone in the US foreign policy establishment to openly shatter the overtly inaccurate anti-Russian BS regularly being spewed.

    Matt Gaetz stood out for saying on Fox News that it's overly simplistic to believe that the Ukrainian government is 100% right in its differences with the Russian government. The kind of thought typically not getting a substantive overview in the US mass media and body politic at large.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    It’s obvious that whatever Fiona Hill or any other talking head that you follow says about any Ukrainian collusion with the Democratic or Republican party is pure nonsense. Trump and Zelensky made it abundantly clear that “no pressure” was ever applied to Zelensky or his new administration to cough up any dirt on Biden or his son’s shenanigans within Ukraine. Trump often relied on Zelensky’s pronouncements put forth at this famous news conference during the whole Democratic sponsored sordid affair:

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Hill suggests a greater possibility of Russian meddling or Trump-Russia collusion than Ukrainian meddling or DNC-Ukraine collusion.

    Chalupa was employed by the DNC, when she coordinated with some Kiev based politicos to find dirt on Trump's then campaign manager.

    On the subject of Zelensky:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/five-reasons-why-zelensky-failing-ukraine-164181

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  231. I know people are tired of Corona, but Melbourne (AU) is now entering a six-week lockdown starting today.

    Australia, as you may recall, handled the virus better than most. But as I’ve emphasised from the beginning, lockdowns aren’t sustainable. And you shouldn’t count on the vaccine being great, or being developed that quickly. So countries that got hit proportionally less early on are going to be massively vulnerable going forward to these kinds of episodes. Meanwhile in Sweden:

    • Replies: @AP
    @Thulean Friend

    The problem, it seems, with Sweden's approach is that it didn't take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time, regardless of vaccine. If Sweden's peak occurred later the death rate would have been lower. Places that will peak long after Sweden has achieved herd immunity will probably have death rates much lower than Sweden's even if the vaccine isn't made before everyone has gotten it.

    https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/06/20/coronavirus-treatments/

    It is better to be a coronavirus patient in June than it was in March.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Dieter Kief

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend

    https://www.unz.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ulf-karlsson.png

    https://media2.giphy.com/media/3oxHQIjnn12jpjbeOQ/source.gif

    , @Znzn
    @Thulean Friend

    I am sure after your screw up, you would want others to screw up as much as you, so you would not be alone in your screw up, so that misery loves company. And you are not even a real Swede, just an Indian fraud and impostor pretending to be a Swede, are you even posting within 500 miles of Sweden, or from some undistinguished flat in Madras?

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend

    Brazil's Jair Bolsonaro tests positive for Covid-19 .

  232. AP says:
    @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't understand the difference between continental and maritime climates
    > persists in his error
    > an ad nauseam "akshually" non-discourse

     

    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    When in a hole, you keep digging.

    doesn’t understand the difference between continental and maritime climates

    Speaking of yourself? None of the cities I mentioned have a maritime climate.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladivostok#Climate

    Vladivostok has a monsoon-influenced humid continental climate (Köppen climate classification Dwb)

    Your record of being wrong in almost every post continues.

  233. Tech and scientific workers overtake finance professionals as highest-paid jobs in China.

    [MORE]

    The average annual income for workers employed by companies in the telecoms, software and information technology fields reached US$22,998 per person last year. The average annual wage in information technology was 1.78 times higher than the annual average for all industries.

    Compensation levels in China’s finance sector continue to lose ground to the tech industry, with the latest example being scientists and researchers who are now better paid than financial professionals.

    After average salaries in China’s information technology industry exceeded those in the financial sector for the first time in 2016, scientific researchers have now achieved the same milestone when it comes to paychecks issued last year.

    The average annual income for workers employed by companies in the telecoms, software and information technology fields reached 161,352 yuan (US$22,998) per person, followed by an average annual income of 133,459 yuan in the scientific research and technical services industry and 131,405 yuan in finance.

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @Blinky Bill

    How much is that per hour? Considering that 100 hour work weeks are not unheard of in China?

    Replies: @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

  234. AP says:
    @Denis
    @AP

    A normal person might say "oh well, I guess he meant warm compared to the rest of Siberia, or Canada, or wherever, maybe he's right and maybe he's wrong, who cares", but you are not normal.

    Replies: @AP, @anonymous coward

    I was providing a PSA by pointing out when somewhere here wrote something ridiculous (i.e.,, Vladivostok region is “pretty warm” with temperatures almost never going below minus 10 Celsius). In reality, Vladivostok is one of the coldest cities on Earth, particularly in winter. In winter Vladivostok is colder than every large city in Europe (including European Russia, such as Moscow), America and Canada with the exception of Winnipeg (Vladivostok is even colder in January than Edmonton). Due to its continental climate its summers, while colder than those in Berlin, Siberia, or Moscow are similar to Stockholm’s.

    AnoninTN: Mr. X is “pretty nonviolent.”

    AP: Mr. X killed a dozen people.

    Denis: A normal person might say “oh well, I guess he meant nonviolent compared to Breivik or the guy who shot all those people in Las Vegas he wasn’t really wrong. “

    • Troll: Denis
    • Replies: @Denis
    @AP

    You weren't arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data. Oh no, God forbid, can't have someone disagree with you about that! Better be snide to them to make sure it never happens again!

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP

  235. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend
    I know people are tired of Corona, but Melbourne (AU) is now entering a six-week lockdown starting today.

    Australia, as you may recall, handled the virus better than most. But as I've emphasised from the beginning, lockdowns aren't sustainable. And you shouldn't count on the vaccine being great, or being developed that quickly. So countries that got hit proportionally less early on are going to be massively vulnerable going forward to these kinds of episodes. Meanwhile in Sweden:

    https://i.imgur.com/BpKtz0S.jpg

    Replies: @AP, @Blinky Bill, @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    The problem, it seems, with Sweden’s approach is that it didn’t take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time, regardless of vaccine. If Sweden’s peak occurred later the death rate would have been lower. Places that will peak long after Sweden has achieved herd immunity will probably have death rates much lower than Sweden’s even if the vaccine isn’t made before everyone has gotten it.

    https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/06/20/coronavirus-treatments/

    It is better to be a coronavirus patient in June than it was in March.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill, dfordoom
    • Replies: @Thulean Friend
    @AP


    didn’t take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time
     
    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us. Hindsight is 20/20 after all.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.

    Replies: @AP

    , @Dieter Kief
    @AP

    Just what are the measures that made the biggest difference?

    1) Not intubating people too soon.

    2) Not moving them into care homes when they were still seriously ill without isolating them there under strict conditions.

    3) Let patients ly on their stomach to prevent the need to intubate them.

    4) Various medicines -

    5) Better equipment for hospital staff.

    6) Regulating access to the care-homes for the elderly (test and temperatures measured regularly for care workers).

    7) Opening windows regularly and washing hands more rigorously.

    8) Masks

    9) More testing

    10) CO-19 apps etc. - digital helpers for backtracking

  236. @Thulean Friend
    I know people are tired of Corona, but Melbourne (AU) is now entering a six-week lockdown starting today.

    Australia, as you may recall, handled the virus better than most. But as I've emphasised from the beginning, lockdowns aren't sustainable. And you shouldn't count on the vaccine being great, or being developed that quickly. So countries that got hit proportionally less early on are going to be massively vulnerable going forward to these kinds of episodes. Meanwhile in Sweden:

    https://i.imgur.com/BpKtz0S.jpg

    Replies: @AP, @Blinky Bill, @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    [MORE]

  237. @Blinky Bill

    Tech and scientific workers overtake finance professionals as highest-paid jobs in China.
     

    The average annual income for workers employed by companies in the telecoms, software and information technology fields reached US$22,998 per person last year. The average annual wage in information technology was 1.78 times higher than the annual average for all industries.

    Compensation levels in China’s finance sector continue to lose ground to the tech industry, with the latest example being scientists and researchers who are now better paid than financial professionals.

    After average salaries in China’s information technology industry exceeded those in the financial sector for the first time in 2016, scientific researchers have now achieved the same milestone when it comes to paychecks issued last year.

    The average annual income for workers employed by companies in the telecoms, software and information technology fields reached 161,352 yuan (US$22,998) per person, followed by an average annual income of 133,459 yuan in the scientific research and technical services industry and 131,405 yuan in finance.

    Replies: @Znzn

    How much is that per hour? Considering that 100 hour work weeks are not unheard of in China?

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @Znzn

    And a 100 sqm apartment in Peking is like 3000000000000000000000 dollars per square meter?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way, @BS

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Znzn

    Imagine you worked 100 hrs a week in Tech/Science and still earned less on average than someone who works X amount of hours in Finance . That doesn't happen anymore in China, that's good.

  238. Znzn says:
    @Thulean Friend
    I know people are tired of Corona, but Melbourne (AU) is now entering a six-week lockdown starting today.

    Australia, as you may recall, handled the virus better than most. But as I've emphasised from the beginning, lockdowns aren't sustainable. And you shouldn't count on the vaccine being great, or being developed that quickly. So countries that got hit proportionally less early on are going to be massively vulnerable going forward to these kinds of episodes. Meanwhile in Sweden:

    https://i.imgur.com/BpKtz0S.jpg

    Replies: @AP, @Blinky Bill, @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    I am sure after your screw up, you would want others to screw up as much as you, so you would not be alone in your screw up, so that misery loves company. And you are not even a real Swede, just an Indian fraud and impostor pretending to be a Swede, are you even posting within 500 miles of Sweden, or from some undistinguished flat in Madras?

  239. @Znzn
    @Blinky Bill

    How much is that per hour? Considering that 100 hour work weeks are not unheard of in China?

    Replies: @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    And a 100 sqm apartment in Peking is like 3000000000000000000000 dollars per square meter?

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Znzn

    Beijing population 1400000000. TIL

    , @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Znzn

    In the area around Sanlitun Village in Beijing, a shopping district that is the city's equivalent to Times Square, apartments cost about $8,000 per square meter (this is taking into account the hit in value in recent months from coronavirus). Superprime Central London was about $4,500 in 2018.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

    , @BS
    @Znzn

    Chinese companies tend to pay outsized annual bonuses, often coupled with physical gifts and occasionally all in cash, around the Chinese New Year period. That on top of gifts from subordinates (China is still a 人情社会, a society of personal relationships, after all). Conversely, much of your disposable income goes towards gift giving - I recall a study of rural household spending patterns that found that something like 10 or 20% of disposable income went towards Chinese New Year gift-giving in the form of alcohol, smokes or just plain cash.

    Anecdotal as always but I have a friend working at BAT whose base salary is around 40k USD who received a 30k USD bonus - practically doubling his real take-home income. The really salubrious bonuses are at the SOEs though (and I think corruption has something to do with it).

  240. @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

    I consider strictly biological arguments about this to be silly. Culture matters enormously, and religion determines much of culture. A Catholic Spanish-speaking Mestizo is “ours” far more than is a blonde, blue-eyed Chechen Islamist.

  241. @Znzn
    @Znzn

    And a 100 sqm apartment in Peking is like 3000000000000000000000 dollars per square meter?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way, @BS

    Beijing population 1400000000. TIL

  242. @AP
    @Denis

    I was providing a PSA by pointing out when somewhere here wrote something ridiculous (i.e.,, Vladivostok region is "pretty warm" with temperatures almost never going below minus 10 Celsius). In reality, Vladivostok is one of the coldest cities on Earth, particularly in winter. In winter Vladivostok is colder than every large city in Europe (including European Russia, such as Moscow), America and Canada with the exception of Winnipeg (Vladivostok is even colder in January than Edmonton). Due to its continental climate its summers, while colder than those in Berlin, Siberia, or Moscow are similar to Stockholm's.

    AnoninTN: Mr. X is "pretty nonviolent."

    AP: Mr. X killed a dozen people.

    Denis: A normal person might say “oh well, I guess he meant nonviolent compared to Breivik or the guy who shot all those people in Las Vegas he wasn't really wrong. "

    Replies: @Denis

    You weren’t arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data. Oh no, God forbid, can’t have someone disagree with you about that! Better be snide to them to make sure it never happens again!

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point?

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Denis

    He was right and presented a lot of data to prove his point. It looks more like it's you that's barking up the wrong tree and doesn't know when to let it go.

    Replies: @Denis

    , @AP
    @Denis


    You weren’t arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data.
     
    Someone wrote something wildly inaccurate (Vladivostok is pretty warm), I showed it with easy-to-find data. “Panties in a twist” is your projection.

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point
     
    If someone who claims to know anything about Ukraine writes that Vynnytsia has a tropical climate I would indeed highlight his ignorance of the place by posting data about reality. Someone this wrong about a seemingly trivial thing is probably wrong on much more (and he is). Someone willing to defend a ridiculous claim is likely to defend many more ridiculous claims. It is therefore useful to have this highlighted.

    What’s interesting is the reaction of those who have read this exchange. Anonymous coward who is almost always wrong defends the ridiculous claim. He is just as clueless. You attack the guy who shows the ridiculousness of the statement, like a little ankle-biting dog coming to the defense of its master, extending what should have been a quick exchange about a minor point into several posts. So we see how some several people here react when they are told that black is black and not white.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela, @Denis

  243. @anonymous coward
    @AP


    > doesn't understand the difference between continental and maritime climates
    > persists in his error
    > an ad nauseam "akshually" non-discourse

     

    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.

    Americans (I mean born and bred in the US, not recent immigrants) are intellectually and educationally very diverse, from highly educated and brilliant to ignorant morons, and everything in between. It’s Ukies who have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    • LOL: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    BTW, what nationality are you anyway? I thought that you were a Ukie, from Ukraine? You are so pathetic. :-(

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

  244. @Thulean Friend
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Your redeeming quality is that at least you know your inferiority.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    It’s an endearing quality, isn’t it. More than that, it’s pretty useful personally too. There are numerous facts in this world that are not to our liking — some of them unsettle us and trouble us deeply — but if something is indeed a fact, it is best to accept it as a fact rather than deny it or fight it, because when you do, you will find its power dissipates surprisingly quickly. (That doesn’t mean liking it, or giving up trying to do anything about it; it just means accepting that, at least for now, it is true.)

    When I was a kid I watched this movie “The Thief of Baghdad” (1978 version). The thief and some prince had to follow a narrow path up an enchanted mountain to retrieve a precious jewel. If they strayed from the path they would be petrified. To lure them from the path, the enchanted mountain projected faceless voices insulting the trekkers — eg “you’re mother was a whore.” The highborn prince, of course, was insulted and tried to answer back and was eventually lured off the path and petrified. When the thief heard the same insults, he smiled, nodded, and displayed an attitude of “yeah okay, and…?” I thought that attitude was the right way to go.

    Although it sounds trivial, it made an impression on me because it was the first time I became conscious of an attitude that I approved of but which contrasted so sharply from my parents’ — who’d have rather died than admitted to any vulnerability. They were working class people but with extreme middle class values. They also refused to live in a working class neighborhood, so I grew up with everyone I knew having more and better stuff than me. That sort of thing can get to you at any age, but it’s especially tough to deal with as a kid. (Oh, and if you heap a few doses of old-fashioned Anglo-Saxon racism on top of it, it’s not a pretty picture at all.) So it really helped to have a way of shrugging it off when other kids inevitably put down your clothes, shoes or other possessions, or went for the racial angle (which was rare, but it only takes a few incidents). (It was far from a perfect remedy though — I still grew up pretty angry and feisty.)

    If I position myself on the right today, a hundred years ago I would almost surely have been a commie. A world in which you’re deemed worthy or unworthy, and treated as such, on the basis of factors completely outside your control is a lousy deal for sure. But I think social reform has been taken as far as it can realistically be expected to go. Actually, it’s been taken too far — right into la la land.

    • Agree: AaronB
    • Replies: @AaronB
    @silviosilver

    Great comment.

    Even tho I generally agreed with TF than you.

    , @Blinky Bill
    @silviosilver


    https://youtu.be/VlJMrXSyTIA

    Replies: @silviosilver

  245. @Znzn
    @Znzn

    And a 100 sqm apartment in Peking is like 3000000000000000000000 dollars per square meter?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way, @BS

    In the area around Sanlitun Village in Beijing, a shopping district that is the city’s equivalent to Times Square, apartments cost about $8,000 per square meter (this is taking into account the hit in value in recent months from coronavirus). Superprime Central London was about $4,500 in 2018.

    • Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way
    @china-russia-all-the-way

    Correction. Nice parts of London are way more expensive.


    For 2017, Mayfair apartment prices averaged GBP2,378 per sq ft.
     
    https://www.propertyfundsworld.com/2018/04/03/262814/knightsbridge-losing-out-mayfair-londons-top-address
  246. @Znzn
    @Blinky Bill

    How much is that per hour? Considering that 100 hour work weeks are not unheard of in China?

    Replies: @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    Imagine you worked 100 hrs a week in Tech/Science and still earned less on average than someone who works X amount of hours in Finance . That doesn’t happen anymore in China, that’s good.

  247. @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

    The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument.

    I would call it a cultural argument, rather than strictly religious. I doubt they really care very much about religious beliefs per se, but it’s very hard (almost impossible) to share a truly meaningful common cultural identity with somebody of a different religion – especially a traditional enemy religion like Islam.

    A definition of ‘white’ which encompasses the Balkans and the Caucuses is ‘good enough’ for most day to day purposes. That is, if they’re clearly ‘assimilated’ – if they speak and act more or less like any other white – then the fact they may look somewhat ‘off’ is generally not that big a deal. But trying to build a racialist-nationalist political movement based on that definition is a total non-starter. Put these people in the same room and your typical Anglo-Saxon would look around and think geezus, if that’s what I’m fighting to preserve, then this struggle is already lost. And because this phenomenon occurs so reliably, it becomes very hard to build the kind of unity that a nationalist movement requires.

    • Replies: @128
    @silviosilver

    Race is useless as a biological category if its definition is cultural in nature.

    Replies: @silviosilver

  248. @Denis
    @AP

    You weren't arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data. Oh no, God forbid, can't have someone disagree with you about that! Better be snide to them to make sure it never happens again!

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP

    He was right and presented a lot of data to prove his point. It looks more like it’s you that’s barking up the wrong tree and doesn’t know when to let it go.

    • Replies: @Denis
    @Mr. Hack

    I just think that it is immature of him to find any reason at all to be snide to people like AnonfromTN, no matter how banal the subject.

    But you have a point, nobody elected me Police Chief of the Karlin forums. I shouldn't be barking at anyone.

  249. @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend

    It's an endearing quality, isn't it. More than that, it's pretty useful personally too. There are numerous facts in this world that are not to our liking -- some of them unsettle us and trouble us deeply -- but if something is indeed a fact, it is best to accept it as a fact rather than deny it or fight it, because when you do, you will find its power dissipates surprisingly quickly. (That doesn't mean liking it, or giving up trying to do anything about it; it just means accepting that, at least for now, it is true.)

    When I was a kid I watched this movie "The Thief of Baghdad" (1978 version). The thief and some prince had to follow a narrow path up an enchanted mountain to retrieve a precious jewel. If they strayed from the path they would be petrified. To lure them from the path, the enchanted mountain projected faceless voices insulting the trekkers -- eg "you're mother was a whore." The highborn prince, of course, was insulted and tried to answer back and was eventually lured off the path and petrified. When the thief heard the same insults, he smiled, nodded, and displayed an attitude of "yeah okay, and...?" I thought that attitude was the right way to go.

    Although it sounds trivial, it made an impression on me because it was the first time I became conscious of an attitude that I approved of but which contrasted so sharply from my parents' -- who'd have rather died than admitted to any vulnerability. They were working class people but with extreme middle class values. They also refused to live in a working class neighborhood, so I grew up with everyone I knew having more and better stuff than me. That sort of thing can get to you at any age, but it's especially tough to deal with as a kid. (Oh, and if you heap a few doses of old-fashioned Anglo-Saxon racism on top of it, it's not a pretty picture at all.) So it really helped to have a way of shrugging it off when other kids inevitably put down your clothes, shoes or other possessions, or went for the racial angle (which was rare, but it only takes a few incidents). (It was far from a perfect remedy though -- I still grew up pretty angry and feisty.)

    If I position myself on the right today, a hundred years ago I would almost surely have been a commie. A world in which you're deemed worthy or unworthy, and treated as such, on the basis of factors completely outside your control is a lousy deal for sure. But I think social reform has been taken as far as it can realistically be expected to go. Actually, it's been taken too far -- right into la la land.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Blinky Bill

    Great comment.

    Even tho I generally agreed with TF than you.

  250. @silviosilver
    @Thulean Friend

    It's an endearing quality, isn't it. More than that, it's pretty useful personally too. There are numerous facts in this world that are not to our liking -- some of them unsettle us and trouble us deeply -- but if something is indeed a fact, it is best to accept it as a fact rather than deny it or fight it, because when you do, you will find its power dissipates surprisingly quickly. (That doesn't mean liking it, or giving up trying to do anything about it; it just means accepting that, at least for now, it is true.)

    When I was a kid I watched this movie "The Thief of Baghdad" (1978 version). The thief and some prince had to follow a narrow path up an enchanted mountain to retrieve a precious jewel. If they strayed from the path they would be petrified. To lure them from the path, the enchanted mountain projected faceless voices insulting the trekkers -- eg "you're mother was a whore." The highborn prince, of course, was insulted and tried to answer back and was eventually lured off the path and petrified. When the thief heard the same insults, he smiled, nodded, and displayed an attitude of "yeah okay, and...?" I thought that attitude was the right way to go.

    Although it sounds trivial, it made an impression on me because it was the first time I became conscious of an attitude that I approved of but which contrasted so sharply from my parents' -- who'd have rather died than admitted to any vulnerability. They were working class people but with extreme middle class values. They also refused to live in a working class neighborhood, so I grew up with everyone I knew having more and better stuff than me. That sort of thing can get to you at any age, but it's especially tough to deal with as a kid. (Oh, and if you heap a few doses of old-fashioned Anglo-Saxon racism on top of it, it's not a pretty picture at all.) So it really helped to have a way of shrugging it off when other kids inevitably put down your clothes, shoes or other possessions, or went for the racial angle (which was rare, but it only takes a few incidents). (It was far from a perfect remedy though -- I still grew up pretty angry and feisty.)

    If I position myself on the right today, a hundred years ago I would almost surely have been a commie. A world in which you're deemed worthy or unworthy, and treated as such, on the basis of factors completely outside your control is a lousy deal for sure. But I think social reform has been taken as far as it can realistically be expected to go. Actually, it's been taken too far -- right into la la land.

    Replies: @AaronB, @Blinky Bill

    [MORE]

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Blinky Bill

    That's the one.

    It was a more innocent time, when "Islam" to most westerners was still just magic lanterns and flying carpets.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

  251. @AP
    @Thulean Friend

    The problem, it seems, with Sweden's approach is that it didn't take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time, regardless of vaccine. If Sweden's peak occurred later the death rate would have been lower. Places that will peak long after Sweden has achieved herd immunity will probably have death rates much lower than Sweden's even if the vaccine isn't made before everyone has gotten it.

    https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/06/20/coronavirus-treatments/

    It is better to be a coronavirus patient in June than it was in March.

    Replies: @Thulean Friend, @Dieter Kief

    didn’t take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time

    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us. Hindsight is 20/20 after all.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.

    • Agree: Not Only Wrathful
    • Replies: @AP
    @Thulean Friend


    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us
     
    I think it was reasonable to predict that some progress would have been made with respect to treatment and that therefore the longer one held off the wave of cases, the better the outcome would be for those cases.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.
     
    This may have to do with factors such as healthier population and better healthcare system than in those other countries. Sweden’s results would have been even better if the peak were occurring now rather than a month or two ago.

    Replies: @A123, @Mikhail

  252. @AnonFromTN
    @anonymous coward


    Lord, give me patience and spare me from the Americans, the most moronic people in history.
     
    Americans (I mean born and bred in the US, not recent immigrants) are intellectually and educationally very diverse, from highly educated and brilliant to ignorant morons, and everything in between. It’s Ukies who have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    BTW, what nationality are you anyway? I thought that you were a Ukie, from Ukraine? You are so pathetic. 🙁

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack

    Ukrainian is a nationality. Ukie is a mental disorder.
    Repeat:
    Ukies have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    , @Gerard-Mandela
    @Mr. Hack

    There is a clear distinction between "Ukrainians" and Ukies/Ukrops you dimwit Mr Hack! This should be obvious for a schizophrenic state that can't run itself like Ukraine.

    It's now going completely full circle into the abyss of farce and stupidity and failure under Zelensky....just like in Poroshenko/Valtsman's time...and just like with Yushchenko - each time holding onto the next placebo and doing the same things over and over again - both from being forced by the west and things of their own volition.

    I did enjoy one moment though - Zelensky saying that he can't find a Education, Culture and Finance Minister who isn't both non-corrupt and competent at the same time. Seeing as 2 of those 3 positions are the most Svidomy in all the cabinet, and the 3rd one is an American controlled department that just needs moderate amount of pig behaviour from the Ukie in position....that is quite an admission. lol!

  253. @silviosilver
    @Europe Europa


    The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument.
     
    I would call it a cultural argument, rather than strictly religious. I doubt they really care very much about religious beliefs per se, but it's very hard (almost impossible) to share a truly meaningful common cultural identity with somebody of a different religion - especially a traditional enemy religion like Islam.

    A definition of 'white' which encompasses the Balkans and the Caucuses is 'good enough' for most day to day purposes. That is, if they're clearly 'assimilated' - if they speak and act more or less like any other white - then the fact they may look somewhat 'off' is generally not that big a deal. But trying to build a racialist-nationalist political movement based on that definition is a total non-starter. Put these people in the same room and your typical Anglo-Saxon would look around and think geezus, if that's what I'm fighting to preserve, then this struggle is already lost. And because this phenomenon occurs so reliably, it becomes very hard to build the kind of unity that a nationalist movement requires.

    Replies: @128

    Race is useless as a biological category if its definition is cultural in nature.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @128

    Race still retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political category is called into question.

    Look at that Turk Thulean posted and whom Varg was talking about. You'd have to be off your rocker to call him non-white. But cultural identity exerts a tremendous pull on people, and he'd be most unlikely, I imagine, to return Varg the favor. He's already got a common nationality, common tongue, common culture. He's supposed to give all that up and LARP as a 'fellow nord'? Even if that's what he is biologically, it's just not a particularly meaningful basis for identity for most people - at least not at this juncture, after some 60, 70 years of hard propagandizing against racial thinking.

    Now for Varg it is a meaningful basis. He's not only able to imagine a common bond stretching back tens of thousands of years and to experience this bond as meaningful (to something like a religious degree, I gather), but he also has the advantage of being able to base this bond on biological reality -- which is not insignificant in an age of extreme bullshit, in which "all that is solid melts into air." His problem is that he has, so far, been unable to motivate very many of the people who share that biological bond to think the same way, and it's doubtful he ever will.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  254. @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as “black and white” as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn’t matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they’d still be non-white to most on the right.

    You haven’t met Varg yet.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Thulean Friend

    Tatlıtuğ was born on 27 October 1983, in Adana, to Erdem and Nurten Tatlıtuğ. During an interview he has stated that his father is Albanian from the city of Pristina.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kıvanç_Tatlıtuğ

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQ0SCs7UmpOavVj8cK1Q694lv-kTdDQliN4Qg&usqp.jpg

  255. @Thulean Friend
    @Europe Europa


    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as “black and white” as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it’s a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn’t matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they’d still be non-white to most on the right.
     
    You haven't met Varg yet.

    https://i.imgur.com/qev7JQ9.jpg

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    Tatlıtuğ was born on 27 October 1983, in Adana, to Erdem and Nurten Tatlıtuğ. During an interview he has stated that his father is Albanian from the city of Pristina.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kıvanç_Tatlıtuğ

  256. @Europe Europa
    Why does conservatism seem to be predominantly a white ideology? The most famous and outspoken conservatives internationally at the moment are people like Putin, Trump, Orban, Bolsonaro, Kurz, Salvini, etc. All white men, you could probably add Netanyahu to the list as well depending on whether you see him as white, I think many would.

    Maybe it's just the way the Western media portrays it, but there doesn't seem to be many of these sorts of outspokenly conservative non-white leaders. The only non-white example I can think of is probably Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, but the Philippines is something of an anomaly in Asia anyway, being majority Catholic and highly Americanised/Westernised culturally.

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Not Only Wrathful, @Philip Owen

    Pretty much all African leaders are “conservative” in one sense or another.

    • Agree: Not Only Wrathful
  257. @Thulean Friend
    @Thorfinnsson


    Absent from this post: the PRICE paid for electricity by German customers
     
    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That's also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.

    Replies: @Vishnugupta, @Thorfinnsson

    Absent from your post: climate change and pollution.

    As Elon Musk has often dryly noted, there is no global carbon price, though there is one in the EU. That’s also why coal is sinking. It is finally starting to be priced accordingly concomitant to its destructive impact on emissions (and pollution).

    Just thinking about energy in terms of prices alone without regard to other factors, including those which affect our very habitation on this planet, is monumentally idiotic.

    Addressing climate change and pollution is not the purpose of Germany’s electricity policy, because otherwise they would not have shuttered their perfectly functional atomic reactors.

    The true purpose of this policy is to erect religious icons of the official German state religion–globohomo. “Green” people have for whatever reason chosen to worship solar panels and windmills.

    If the purpose were to address climate change and pollution, wind and solar (maybe not solar so much in Germany) would of course be an important part of the generation mix, but one absolutely would not shutter functional atomic reactors.

    The absence of a global price on carbon also logically dictates carbon import tariffs on goods as well as subsidies to domestic industries hampered by higher energy costs. And to be fair, subsidies are in practice paid by suffering German residential customers on behalf of German business.

  258. @Blinky Bill
    @silviosilver


    https://youtu.be/VlJMrXSyTIA

    Replies: @silviosilver

    That’s the one.

    It was a more innocent time, when “Islam” to most westerners was still just magic lanterns and flying carpets.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @silviosilver

    One year before it all changed.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/09/Iran_hostage_crisis_-_Iraninan_students_comes_up_U.S._embassy_in_Tehran.jpg

  259. @silviosilver
    @Blinky Bill

    That's the one.

    It was a more innocent time, when "Islam" to most westerners was still just magic lanterns and flying carpets.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    One year before it all changed.

  260. @china-russia-all-the-way
    @Znzn

    In the area around Sanlitun Village in Beijing, a shopping district that is the city's equivalent to Times Square, apartments cost about $8,000 per square meter (this is taking into account the hit in value in recent months from coronavirus). Superprime Central London was about $4,500 in 2018.

    Replies: @china-russia-all-the-way

    Correction. Nice parts of London are way more expensive.

    For 2017, Mayfair apartment prices averaged GBP2,378 per sq ft.

    https://www.propertyfundsworld.com/2018/04/03/262814/knightsbridge-losing-out-mayfair-londons-top-address

  261. BS says:
    @Znzn
    @Znzn

    And a 100 sqm apartment in Peking is like 3000000000000000000000 dollars per square meter?

    Replies: @Blinky Bill, @china-russia-all-the-way, @BS

    Chinese companies tend to pay outsized annual bonuses, often coupled with physical gifts and occasionally all in cash, around the Chinese New Year period. That on top of gifts from subordinates (China is still a 人情社会, a society of personal relationships, after all). Conversely, much of your disposable income goes towards gift giving – I recall a study of rural household spending patterns that found that something like 10 or 20% of disposable income went towards Chinese New Year gift-giving in the form of alcohol, smokes or just plain cash.

    Anecdotal as always but I have a friend working at BAT whose base salary is around 40k USD who received a 30k USD bonus – practically doubling his real take-home income. The really salubrious bonuses are at the SOEs though (and I think corruption has something to do with it).

  262. @128
    @silviosilver

    Race is useless as a biological category if its definition is cultural in nature.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    Race still retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political category is called into question.

    Look at that Turk Thulean posted and whom Varg was talking about. You’d have to be off your rocker to call him non-white. But cultural identity exerts a tremendous pull on people, and he’d be most unlikely, I imagine, to return Varg the favor. He’s already got a common nationality, common tongue, common culture. He’s supposed to give all that up and LARP as a ‘fellow nord’? Even if that’s what he is biologically, it’s just not a particularly meaningful basis for identity for most people – at least not at this juncture, after some 60, 70 years of hard propagandizing against racial thinking.

    Now for Varg it is a meaningful basis. He’s not only able to imagine a common bond stretching back tens of thousands of years and to experience this bond as meaningful (to something like a religious degree, I gather), but he also has the advantage of being able to base this bond on biological reality — which is not insignificant in an age of extreme bullshit, in which “all that is solid melts into air.” His problem is that he has, so far, been unable to motivate very many of the people who share that biological bond to think the same way, and it’s doubtful he ever will.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @silviosilver


    retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political
     
    Not to answer your post specifically, but just to write some arguments.

    Culture and race is interacting, and (if you forgive me for the barbaric analogy) some "hardware" (race) is perhaps more suitable to "run in-house developed software" ("native" culture), and vice versa.

    Japanese are believed to have a higher ratio of introverts in the population.

    Introverts and extroverts are now believed to have the largely genetic basis. It would not be implausible to argue that Japanese culture is suitable precisely for a population with genetically high ratios of introverts in the population. There are many indications in the lifestyle of the country, its emphasis on etiquette, etc.

    If you gave experimentally a representative group of Italian or Spanish, newborn children, to Japanese culture - on average they might have have a bit too genetic inclination to be noisy, loud and impolite, to recreate Japanese life very successfully as a mass.

    On the other hand, perhaps representative children from Finland (where levels of introversion are closer to Japan) - perhaps there would be less "hardware limitions" to run introverted Japanese culture software as a group.

    -

    Until the 20th century, when there was absurd reductionism about race and genetics, on both sides (both in favour and against) - most historians had usually assumed influence of blood as just one of many influences on historical development.

    E.g. Thucydides seems to assume a "bloodthirty" tendency to Thracians' race (not too different to a national stereotypes of Balkanoid races today). But neither, Thucydides would expect that the blood can explain anything interesting about Greek history, that required more than sentence of his book.

    It's obvious when you look at history, that the racial component, is at best just a necessary condition for anything interesting.

    Tacitus has perceived Germanic tribes, only with ethnographic interest, like someone studying native American tribes. And their virtues are similar which were perceived by 18th century Europeans, in native American tribes. And their vices - incredible poverty and savagery . In the first century, Germans were far less interesting than Indians, or Chinese, Iranians, which seems almost comic to consider today, considering the German superiority in modern times.

    Germanic tribemen encountered by the Romans, had the same genetics as the culture which would later produce the Waldstein sonata; and yet perceivable virtues and vices were those of the "noble savage". German tribes that encountered Tacitus, there is no indication that such a people could create Bruckner's 8th, or "Critique of Pure Reason".

    The awesome (and self-destructive) German soul, is a product of thousands years of lucky and path-dependent "software engineering", using many foreign ingredients - fusing with Middle Eastern religion and Ancient Southern European high culture - and was only even conceivable in modern historical conditions.

    Replies: @AP

  263. @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

    Georgians

    Most Georgians are brown. But as a group, Georgians cannot quite be called as either fully white or brown, as the nationality includes diverse races of people who are brown (majority) and also white (minority) – unlike Armenians.

    The nationality (Georgian) refers to nationalist created by different races (originally different tribes with different races), which have culturally/linguistically assimilated to each other – this is aside from slavic minority in the country.

    Many Georgians looking like Saakashvili

    But some Georgians have a Southern European appearance

    View this post on Instagram

    #🌸 #loveistheanswer #myuniverse

    A post shared by Janeta Ker (@janet__kerdikoshvili) on

    Some look like Berbers from North Africa (their Minister of Economy)

    Some look like like Arab men- this is wife of American nationalist Richard Spencer

    But a significant minority are like Europeans. This is Georgian nationalist politician – looks stereotypically French or Italian.

    • Replies: @Kent Nationalist
    @Dmitry

    I never believed that Richard Spencer was a homosexual previously, but that picture makes me wonder.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    , @Blinky Bill
    @Dmitry

    Favourite photo of Saakashvili.


    https://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/09/20/world/20EXILE/20EXILE-articleLarge.jpg

    , @BB753
    @Dmitry

    Only a minority of Berbers look that way, a very tiny minority. Most look like ordinary North-Africans.

    Replies: @Ano4

  264. AP says:
    @Denis
    @AP

    You weren't arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data. Oh no, God forbid, can't have someone disagree with you about that! Better be snide to them to make sure it never happens again!

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point?

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @AP

    You weren’t arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data.

    Someone wrote something wildly inaccurate (Vladivostok is pretty warm), I showed it with easy-to-find data. “Panties in a twist” is your projection.

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point

    If someone who claims to know anything about Ukraine writes that Vynnytsia has a tropical climate I would indeed highlight his ignorance of the place by posting data about reality. Someone this wrong about a seemingly trivial thing is probably wrong on much more (and he is). Someone willing to defend a ridiculous claim is likely to defend many more ridiculous claims. It is therefore useful to have this highlighted.

    What’s interesting is the reaction of those who have read this exchange. Anonymous coward who is almost always wrong defends the ridiculous claim. He is just as clueless. You attack the guy who shows the ridiculousness of the statement, like a little ankle-biting dog coming to the defense of its master, extending what should have been a quick exchange about a minor point into several posts. So we see how some several people here react when they are told that black is black and not white.

    • Troll: Denis
    • Replies: @Gerard-Mandela
    @AP


    Someone wrote something wildly inaccurate (Vladivostok is pretty warm), I showed it with easy-to-find data. “Panties in a twist” is your projection.
     
    Somebody of substance (AnonFromTN)wrote accurately and informatively about real experiences on something they know something about - visiting Vladivostok, and a whole myriad of other issues

    Somebody else ( you) , a worthless bum , with absolute zero knowledge of the area and a raging jealousy of his knowledge, went to the only thing a pathetic creature as you can do ( copy and paste from wikipedia), ridiculously distorted it into a fake argument designed to occupy your non-life as long as possible and USE God knows whatever other deranged tactics . As it is, of course Vladivostok is warm in the summer you dummy, amplified by the humidity, and does not have winters as long and extreme as pretty much all the Russian mainland within about a 3000km radius of it, including along the same latitudinal line. There was nothing in his statement even remotely possible to contradict

    I am under strict instruction from Karlin to follow the rules of the blog. So I , as the pupil, will ask for advice from you , "master" of the " art " of Ukrainian language - to teach me authentic ukrop, and give you the respect you warmly deserve.

    Now, I thought I was fluent in Ukrainian,....and although nothing to suggest you have ever even been in Europe, and can actually say one even one word in Ukrop or Russian.... in order to comply with Karlin's rules I am designating you master of Ukrainian language - a real honour

    Please showcase my ignorance and explain more to me the real Ukrainian language being spoken by some of its biggest ideologists and practitioners in the following video!:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=45&v=mhlHY_M5W48&feature=emb_title

    Now this is right in the centre of Khokholistan, some of the real disciples are there in that room in this video, there is a load of people shouting in there, all under stress - during this time of emotion the natural Ukrainian language is going to flow from their tongues. Isn't it? LOL

    Can you do me another favour and select a favour Ukrainian word in this video, I know that even if they were quoting the words to the Ukrainian national anthem in this video, you would still be clueless to it - but with many high profile people talking in that video there is, of course, ONE Ukrainian word in there? LOL
    , @Denis
    @AP


    What’s interesting is the reaction of those who have read this exchange.
     
    What's interesting is that you take any opportunity to snap at an actual Ukrainian (AnonfromTN) when they have the gall to disagree with you. A very unfortunate habit of yours.

    Replies: @AP

  265. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa


    Georgians
     
    Most Georgians are brown. But as a group, Georgians cannot quite be called as either fully white or brown, as the nationality includes diverse races of people who are brown (majority) and also white (minority) - unlike Armenians.

    The nationality (Georgian) refers to nationalist created by different races (originally different tribes with different races), which have culturally/linguistically assimilated to each other - this is aside from slavic minority in the country.


    Many Georgians looking like Saakashvili

    https://im.kommersant.ru/Issues.photo/CORP/2020/05/07/KMO_175776_00003_1_t218_213318.jpg


    But some Georgians have a Southern European appearance

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCQfIfIBQtX/

    Some look like Berbers from North Africa (their Minister of Economy)


    https://i.imgur.com/PK0kTGV.jpg


    Some look like like Arab men- this is wife of American nationalist Richard Spencer

    https://i.imgur.com/fykdC9e.jpg


    But a significant minority are like Europeans. This is Georgian nationalist politician - looks stereotypically French or Italian.

    http://www.parliament.ge/cache/photos/2189.jpg

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Blinky Bill, @BB753

    I never believed that Richard Spencer was a homosexual previously, but that picture makes me wonder.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    @Kent Nationalist

    She has her positive points. 😉

    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcSotlLqkd5VTkfrGAjSolsF682d5s49C3jQsw&usqp.jpg

  266. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa


    Georgians
     
    Most Georgians are brown. But as a group, Georgians cannot quite be called as either fully white or brown, as the nationality includes diverse races of people who are brown (majority) and also white (minority) - unlike Armenians.

    The nationality (Georgian) refers to nationalist created by different races (originally different tribes with different races), which have culturally/linguistically assimilated to each other - this is aside from slavic minority in the country.


    Many Georgians looking like Saakashvili

    https://im.kommersant.ru/Issues.photo/CORP/2020/05/07/KMO_175776_00003_1_t218_213318.jpg


    But some Georgians have a Southern European appearance

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCQfIfIBQtX/

    Some look like Berbers from North Africa (their Minister of Economy)


    https://i.imgur.com/PK0kTGV.jpg


    Some look like like Arab men- this is wife of American nationalist Richard Spencer

    https://i.imgur.com/fykdC9e.jpg


    But a significant minority are like Europeans. This is Georgian nationalist politician - looks stereotypically French or Italian.

    http://www.parliament.ge/cache/photos/2189.jpg

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Blinky Bill, @BB753

    Favourite photo of Saakashvili.

    [MORE]

  267. @Kent Nationalist
    @Dmitry

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVo_wkxH9dU

    Replies: @Dmitry

    Not only the English produced such scientifically accurate documentaries about Italian economic processes.

  268. @Kent Nationalist
    @Dmitry

    I never believed that Richard Spencer was a homosexual previously, but that picture makes me wonder.

    Replies: @Blinky Bill

    She has her positive points. 😉

    [MORE]

  269. @Denis
    @AP

    A normal person might say "oh well, I guess he meant warm compared to the rest of Siberia, or Canada, or wherever, maybe he's right and maybe he's wrong, who cares", but you are not normal.

    Replies: @AP, @anonymous coward

    Vladivostok is hot in the summer, cold in the winter, very wet and prone to monsoons/hurricanes. The climate is certainly harsh, but the world “cold” is about the last word you’d use to describe it.

    Does this look like an arctic wasteland to you?

    • Replies: @AP
    @anonymous coward

    Lol, keep digging.


    Vladivostok is hot in the summer
     
    It can have hot days in summer (as can the Arctic) but average high during the warmest summer month is only 23.2 C or 73.8 F. This is cooler than Moscow, Berlin, London. It is about the same as Saint Petersburg and Stockholm but of course winters in Vladivostok are much colder than in those cities.

    The climate is certainly harsh, but the world “cold” is about the last word you’d use to describe it.
     
    Average annual daily mean temperature in Vladivostok (4.9 C) is significantly lower than in Edmonton Canada (9.3 C), Anchorage, Alaska (6.5 C) and Moscow (5.9 C ).

    The picture you posted is nice and comparable to Arctic beaches in Norway.
  270. Znzn says:

    Among Tokyo residents in their 20s, 1 in 10 is now foreign-born. And Tokyo is no longer an outlier. Much of the migration is happening in small industrial towns around the country, such as Shimukappu in central Hokkaido and Oizumi in Gunma prefecture, where migrant populations make up more than 15 percent of the local population. In the mostly rural Mie prefecture, east of Osaka and Kyoto, foreign migration has reversed years of population loss. So Japan is basically Germany in the 60s?

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    @Znzn

    If true, Japan will be fucked.

    Replies: @Znzn

  271. Jacek Komuda, a great when writing historical anecdotes and poor when writing mediocre fantasy stories, have published a fantasy story in “Nowa Fantastyka”. I have not read it, supposedly it’s rather poor (as usual with his stories). And there would be nothing to write about, if not for one thing:

    It’s about homosexual trying to escape backward Lendia, where his homosexualism is punishable by death, to some liberal progressive paradise. His partner has kidnapped children to sell them to paedophiles in that paradise, so happy homosexual pair can live and prosper.

    “Nowa Fantastyka” was attacked by hordes of enraged “fans”, most of whom do no read the magazine. Editors quickly apologised for a crime of having homosexual as a bad character and promised they will quickly publish a special rainbow issue, co-edited with LGBT activists.

    All hail my based and conservative country!

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @szopen

    Where is Stanislaw Lem when we need him. I recall reading The futurological Congress when I was 14. I read it in a russian translation and still remember the following sentence: "прочь подонков и каналий что не любят гениталий " (away with the scum and rascals that do not love genital organs). I believe the LGBTQ movement worldwide should adopt it as a slogan in their quest for absolute and transcendental sexual liberation .

    😁

    , @another anon
    @szopen


    “Nowa Fantastyka” was attacked by hordes of enraged “fans”, most of whom do no read the magazine. Editors quickly apologised for a crime of having homosexual as a bad character and promised they will quickly publish a special rainbow issue, co-edited with LGBT activists.

    All hail my based and conservative country!
     
    The future is coming, and it is so rainbow bright we will all need mirror shades.

    https://twitter.com/stabilityisgre1/status/1280534199548751874

    Anyone who is homophobic, or, gods forbid, transphobic, is going to be cancelled. Regardless of nationality, religion or skin color. Everywhere.

    And it will be beautiful.

    https://twitter.com/nathancofnas/status/1278756948855255040

    Replies: @dfordoom

  272. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    It's obvious that whatever Fiona Hill or any other talking head that you follow says about any Ukrainian collusion with the Democratic or Republican party is pure nonsense. Trump and Zelensky made it abundantly clear that "no pressure" was ever applied to Zelensky or his new administration to cough up any dirt on Biden or his son's shenanigans within Ukraine. Trump often relied on Zelensky's pronouncements put forth at this famous news conference during the whole Democratic sponsored sordid affair:

    https://youtu.be/eZVxMS3CWT8

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Hill suggests a greater possibility of Russian meddling or Trump-Russia collusion than Ukrainian meddling or DNC-Ukraine collusion.

    Chalupa was employed by the DNC, when she coordinated with some Kiev based politicos to find dirt on Trump’s then campaign manager.

    On the subject of Zelensky:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/five-reasons-why-zelensky-failing-ukraine-164181

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    So, what proof does Hill provide to try and make her case of greater Russian collusion?

    Replies: @Mikhail

  273. Ano4 says:
    @szopen
    Jacek Komuda, a great when writing historical anecdotes and poor when writing mediocre fantasy stories, have published a fantasy story in "Nowa Fantastyka". I have not read it, supposedly it's rather poor (as usual with his stories). And there would be nothing to write about, if not for one thing:

    It's about homosexual trying to escape backward Lendia, where his homosexualism is punishable by death, to some liberal progressive paradise. His partner has kidnapped children to sell them to paedophiles in that paradise, so happy homosexual pair can live and prosper.

    "Nowa Fantastyka" was attacked by hordes of enraged "fans", most of whom do no read the magazine. Editors quickly apologised for a crime of having homosexual as a bad character and promised they will quickly publish a special rainbow issue, co-edited with LGBT activists.

    All hail my based and conservative country!

    Replies: @Ano4, @another anon

    Where is Stanislaw Lem when we need him. I recall reading The futurological Congress when I was 14. I read it in a russian translation and still remember the following sentence: “прочь подонков и каналий что не любят гениталий ” (away with the scum and rascals that do not love genital organs). I believe the LGBTQ movement worldwide should adopt it as a slogan in their quest for absolute and transcendental sexual liberation .

    😁

  274. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Hill suggests a greater possibility of Russian meddling or Trump-Russia collusion than Ukrainian meddling or DNC-Ukraine collusion.

    Chalupa was employed by the DNC, when she coordinated with some Kiev based politicos to find dirt on Trump's then campaign manager.

    On the subject of Zelensky:

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/five-reasons-why-zelensky-failing-ukraine-164181

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    So, what proof does Hill provide to try and make her case of greater Russian collusion?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    Nothing significant. As I recall, along the lines of her sensing the possibility, as opposed to knowing for sure. In contrast, she was very firm on denying any DNC-Ukrainian government collusion.

    Hill comes across as pretty much along the lines of McFaul

  275. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    BTW, what nationality are you anyway? I thought that you were a Ukie, from Ukraine? You are so pathetic. :-(

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

    Ukrainian is a nationality. Ukie is a mental disorder.
    Repeat:
    Ukies have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    Where I grew up the term "Ukie" was used as a kind of insider way of identifying Ukrainians in general. As a teenager, I might ask somebody (in the know), "were there any Ukies there?" Actually, with time we even dropped off the "ie" sound, and shortened Ukrainian even further to just "Uke".

    Can you point out anybody that you consider to be a Ukrainian and contrast that to a "Ukie"?

    BTW, there are many internet entries for the word "Ukie" and not a single one defines it as "mental disorder".

    There is however a syndrome called ethnic self hatred, and is defined as such:


    Self-hatred is a pejorative characterization of persons who are judged to hold members of their apparent identity group to a higher standard of behavior than those not in that social group. In academia, the term is generally taken to mean an internalization of the prejudices of a dominant culture against a subculture by members belonging to that subculture./blockquote>
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-hatred.

    From what you've explained about yourself being born and brought up in Ukraine, your education in your early years was conducted in both Ukrainian and Russian. By the time you went to college, I'm relatively certain that your coursework was now conducted exclusively in Russian. Actually, all along, you were brought up to believe that Russian was the language of higher culture,and Ukrainian was second class. The "Ukies" that you currently hate, are likely those that unlike yourself are totally comfortable conversing in Ukrainian and do not feel compelled to converse in matters of science in Russian. I can understand your malady, but hopefully its not too late for you to try and rid yourself of this debilitating self deprecating state of mind.
     

     

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

  276. AP says:
    @anonymous coward
    @Denis

    Vladivostok is hot in the summer, cold in the winter, very wet and prone to monsoons/hurricanes. The climate is certainly harsh, but the world "cold" is about the last word you'd use to describe it.

    Does this look like an arctic wasteland to you?

    https://s00.yaplakal.com/pics/pics_original/0/1/9/3027910.jpg

    Replies: @AP

    Lol, keep digging.

    Vladivostok is hot in the summer

    It can have hot days in summer (as can the Arctic) but average high during the warmest summer month is only 23.2 C or 73.8 F. This is cooler than Moscow, Berlin, London. It is about the same as Saint Petersburg and Stockholm but of course winters in Vladivostok are much colder than in those cities.

    The climate is certainly harsh, but the world “cold” is about the last word you’d use to describe it.

    Average annual daily mean temperature in Vladivostok (4.9 C) is significantly lower than in Edmonton Canada (9.3 C), Anchorage, Alaska (6.5 C) and Moscow (5.9 C ).

    The picture you posted is nice and comparable to Arctic beaches in Norway.

  277. @Dmitry
    @Europe Europa


    Georgians
     
    Most Georgians are brown. But as a group, Georgians cannot quite be called as either fully white or brown, as the nationality includes diverse races of people who are brown (majority) and also white (minority) - unlike Armenians.

    The nationality (Georgian) refers to nationalist created by different races (originally different tribes with different races), which have culturally/linguistically assimilated to each other - this is aside from slavic minority in the country.


    Many Georgians looking like Saakashvili

    https://im.kommersant.ru/Issues.photo/CORP/2020/05/07/KMO_175776_00003_1_t218_213318.jpg


    But some Georgians have a Southern European appearance

    https://www.instagram.com/p/CCQfIfIBQtX/

    Some look like Berbers from North Africa (their Minister of Economy)


    https://i.imgur.com/PK0kTGV.jpg


    Some look like like Arab men- this is wife of American nationalist Richard Spencer

    https://i.imgur.com/fykdC9e.jpg


    But a significant minority are like Europeans. This is Georgian nationalist politician - looks stereotypically French or Italian.

    http://www.parliament.ge/cache/photos/2189.jpg

    Replies: @Kent Nationalist, @Blinky Bill, @BB753

    Only a minority of Berbers look that way, a very tiny minority. Most look like ordinary North-Africans.

    • Disagree: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @BB753

    The tatooed gentlemen on the right, with feathers in their hair are ancient Berber as depicted on frescoes during the Egyptian XIX dynasty.

    https://dailyhistory.org/images/3/36/Libyans.jpg



    Kabyle Children:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/e9dkdFobwb2AK3617

    A Kabyle granma with one of her offspring:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/5tq6XgWJPCoRjzgs8

    A young girl from Kabylia:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/Vaoui4XSWSYp4dEt9

    A young Chleuh Berber :

    https://images.app.goo.gl/swwdpRgjH72QoDMJ7

    A representation of captive Guanche Berbers from Canary islands being presented to the Catholic Kings:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/4WwDftWJAhxY2U3V8

    Guanche surrender to the Spanish conquerors:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/j1ScZ6TToqRK4uVx7

    Wogs start in Calais!

    Replies: @BB753

  278. @Thulean Friend
    I know people are tired of Corona, but Melbourne (AU) is now entering a six-week lockdown starting today.

    Australia, as you may recall, handled the virus better than most. But as I've emphasised from the beginning, lockdowns aren't sustainable. And you shouldn't count on the vaccine being great, or being developed that quickly. So countries that got hit proportionally less early on are going to be massively vulnerable going forward to these kinds of episodes. Meanwhile in Sweden:

    https://i.imgur.com/BpKtz0S.jpg

    Replies: @AP, @Blinky Bill, @Znzn, @Blinky Bill

    Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro tests positive for Covid-19 .

  279. AP says:
    @Thulean Friend
    @AP


    didn’t take into account improvements in care for people with Covid-19 over time
     
    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us. Hindsight is 20/20 after all.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.

    Replies: @AP

    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us

    I think it was reasonable to predict that some progress would have been made with respect to treatment and that therefore the longer one held off the wave of cases, the better the outcome would be for those cases.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.

    This may have to do with factors such as healthier population and better healthcare system than in those other countries. Sweden’s results would have been even better if the peak were occurring now rather than a month or two ago.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @A123
    @AP

    The CQ/AZ/ZN combo is safe and effective for early stage patients. Now that the SJW Globalist hysterics have conceded that Trump was right, hopefully early treatment will be more consistently deployed.

    For the most part increased testing is finding cases with few to no symptoms. This explains with The U.S. case rate is up while deaths are down.

    At this point WUHAN-19 is primarily about high risk, elderly populations. There are some troubling hotspots around South Tampa / North Sarasota, which is "golf cart country". Outside of hotspots, the closures should be largely lifted in search of herd immunity.

    PEACE 😇

    , @Mikhail
    @AP

    As reported Sweden didn't do a good job in protecting the elderly in assisted living venues.

  280. @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack

    Ukrainian is a nationality. Ukie is a mental disorder.
    Repeat:
    Ukies have tunnel vision, which makes them morons regardless of individual intellectual capabilities.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    Where I grew up the term “Ukie” was used as a kind of insider way of identifying Ukrainians in general. As a teenager, I might ask somebody (in the know), “were there any Ukies there?” Actually, with time we even dropped off the “ie” sound, and shortened Ukrainian even further to just “Uke”.

    Can you point out anybody that you consider to be a Ukrainian and contrast that to a “Ukie”?

    BTW, there are many internet entries for the word “Ukie” and not a single one defines it as “mental disorder”.

    There is however a syndrome called ethnic self hatred, and is defined as such:

    Self-hatred is a pejorative characterization of persons who are judged to hold members of their apparent identity group to a higher standard of behavior than those not in that social group. In academia, the term is generally taken to mean an internalization of the prejudices of a dominant culture against a subculture by members belonging to that subculture./blockquote>
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-hatred.

    From what you’ve explained about yourself being born and brought up in Ukraine, your education in your early years was conducted in both Ukrainian and Russian. By the time you went to college, I’m relatively certain that your coursework was now conducted exclusively in Russian. Actually, all along, you were brought up to believe that Russian was the language of higher culture,and Ukrainian was second class. The “Ukies” that you currently hate, are likely those that unlike yourself are totally comfortable conversing in Ukrainian and do not feel compelled to converse in matters of science in Russian. I can understand your malady, but hopefully its not too late for you to try and rid yourself of this debilitating self deprecating state of mind.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack

    Where I was born (Lvov) and grew up (Lugansk), the term Ukrainian meant a Ukrainian. The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).

    As far as languages go, Ukrainian remains grossly under-developed. Considering that self-appointed “patriots” are ignorant morons, it would remain so until sane people govern Ukraine (if there is still Ukraine ~5 years from now: current liquidation team calling itself government does its level best to destroy what’s left).

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).

    There is nothing wrong in being a Ukrainian, and everything wrong in being a Ukie. Ukies are destroying the country, killing it’s industry, culture, and traditions. They are replacing culture with quasi-Nazi BS and history with preposterous myths. They are doing all they can to make Ukrainian language a sign of mental retardation. I do hope that they won’t succeed, that the country will shake off these lice and become normal.

    Normal means having pragmatic relations with all its neighbors and staying away from the dying Empire, like from a leper, as it deserves.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  281. Ano4 says:
    @BB753
    @Dmitry

    Only a minority of Berbers look that way, a very tiny minority. Most look like ordinary North-Africans.

    Replies: @Ano4

    The tatooed gentlemen on the right, with feathers in their hair are ancient Berber as depicted on frescoes during the Egyptian XIX dynasty.

    [MORE]

    Kabyle Children:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/e9dkdFobwb2AK3617

    A Kabyle granma with one of her offspring:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/5tq6XgWJPCoRjzgs8

    A young girl from Kabylia:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/Vaoui4XSWSYp4dEt9

    A young Chleuh Berber :

    https://images.app.goo.gl/swwdpRgjH72QoDMJ7

    A representation of captive Guanche Berbers from Canary islands being presented to the Catholic Kings:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/4WwDftWJAhxY2U3V8

    Guanche surrender to the Spanish conquerors:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/j1ScZ6TToqRK4uVx7

    Wogs start in Calais!

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Ano4

    Well, you can pick and choose individuals, but the fact that that Berbers do not differ much from other North Africans TODAY remains. Surely, they might have less Black admixture on the maternal side north of the Atlas, but that's not even true everywhere else. I mean, just look at the Tuaregs. And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards. But hold on to your Berbers mystique because of Zidane.

    Replies: @Ano4

  282. A123 says:
    @AP
    @Thulean Friend


    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us
     
    I think it was reasonable to predict that some progress would have been made with respect to treatment and that therefore the longer one held off the wave of cases, the better the outcome would be for those cases.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.
     
    This may have to do with factors such as healthier population and better healthcare system than in those other countries. Sweden’s results would have been even better if the peak were occurring now rather than a month or two ago.

    Replies: @A123, @Mikhail

    The CQ/AZ/ZN combo is safe and effective for early stage patients. Now that the SJW Globalist hysterics have conceded that Trump was right, hopefully early treatment will be more consistently deployed.

    For the most part increased testing is finding cases with few to no symptoms. This explains with The U.S. case rate is up while deaths are down.

    At this point WUHAN-19 is primarily about high risk, elderly populations. There are some troubling hotspots around South Tampa / North Sarasota, which is “golf cart country”. Outside of hotspots, the closures should be largely lifted in search of herd immunity.

    PEACE 😇

  283. @Europe Europa
    Why does conservatism seem to be predominantly a white ideology? The most famous and outspoken conservatives internationally at the moment are people like Putin, Trump, Orban, Bolsonaro, Kurz, Salvini, etc. All white men, you could probably add Netanyahu to the list as well depending on whether you see him as white, I think many would.

    Maybe it's just the way the Western media portrays it, but there doesn't seem to be many of these sorts of outspokenly conservative non-white leaders. The only non-white example I can think of is probably Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, but the Philippines is something of an anomaly in Asia anyway, being majority Catholic and highly Americanised/Westernised culturally.

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Not Only Wrathful, @Philip Owen

    You have it the wrong way round.

    Only white leaders wouldn’t classify as conservative in the West.

  284. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    Where I grew up the term "Ukie" was used as a kind of insider way of identifying Ukrainians in general. As a teenager, I might ask somebody (in the know), "were there any Ukies there?" Actually, with time we even dropped off the "ie" sound, and shortened Ukrainian even further to just "Uke".

    Can you point out anybody that you consider to be a Ukrainian and contrast that to a "Ukie"?

    BTW, there are many internet entries for the word "Ukie" and not a single one defines it as "mental disorder".

    There is however a syndrome called ethnic self hatred, and is defined as such:


    Self-hatred is a pejorative characterization of persons who are judged to hold members of their apparent identity group to a higher standard of behavior than those not in that social group. In academia, the term is generally taken to mean an internalization of the prejudices of a dominant culture against a subculture by members belonging to that subculture./blockquote>
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-hatred.

    From what you've explained about yourself being born and brought up in Ukraine, your education in your early years was conducted in both Ukrainian and Russian. By the time you went to college, I'm relatively certain that your coursework was now conducted exclusively in Russian. Actually, all along, you were brought up to believe that Russian was the language of higher culture,and Ukrainian was second class. The "Ukies" that you currently hate, are likely those that unlike yourself are totally comfortable conversing in Ukrainian and do not feel compelled to converse in matters of science in Russian. I can understand your malady, but hopefully its not too late for you to try and rid yourself of this debilitating self deprecating state of mind.
     

     

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    Where I was born (Lvov) and grew up (Lugansk), the term Ukrainian meant a Ukrainian. The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).

    As far as languages go, Ukrainian remains grossly under-developed. Considering that self-appointed “patriots” are ignorant morons, it would remain so until sane people govern Ukraine (if there is still Ukraine ~5 years from now: current liquidation team calling itself government does its level best to destroy what’s left).

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).

    There is nothing wrong in being a Ukrainian, and everything wrong in being a Ukie. Ukies are destroying the country, killing it’s industry, culture, and traditions. They are replacing culture with quasi-Nazi BS and history with preposterous myths. They are doing all they can to make Ukrainian language a sign of mental retardation. I do hope that they won’t succeed, that the country will shake off these lice and become normal.

    Normal means having pragmatic relations with all its neighbors and staying away from the dying Empire, like from a leper, as it deserves.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).
     
    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960's is one that you only became familiar with in 2014. I think that the definition that I included in comment #282 and that is verified by at least one dozen definitions through the internet is a little bit more accurate than something that you've concocted in your imagination.

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).
     
    Since I don't really know you, I cannot speculate on your proficiency in the Ukrainian language. But, I have listened to and know something about the six Ukrainian presidents, and in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

  285. @Mr. Hack
    @Mikhail

    So, what proof does Hill provide to try and make her case of greater Russian collusion?

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Nothing significant. As I recall, along the lines of her sensing the possibility, as opposed to knowing for sure. In contrast, she was very firm on denying any DNC-Ukrainian government collusion.

    Hill comes across as pretty much along the lines of McFaul

  286. @AP
    @Thulean Friend


    Impossible to predict when national policy has to be decided, which was March of 2020 for most of us
     
    I think it was reasonable to predict that some progress would have been made with respect to treatment and that therefore the longer one held off the wave of cases, the better the outcome would be for those cases.

    If you look at excess mortality throughout most of Western Europe, Sweden does better than quite a number of them, while still having far less economic damage.
     
    This may have to do with factors such as healthier population and better healthcare system than in those other countries. Sweden’s results would have been even better if the peak were occurring now rather than a month or two ago.

    Replies: @A123, @Mikhail

    As reported Sweden didn’t do a good job in protecting the elderly in assisted living venues.

  287. This is what Anglo-Americans like Coe and Tygart are hoping for:

    https://www.rt.com/sport/494075-anzhelika-sidorova-citizenship-change/

  288. @Mikhail
    @Mr. Hack

    You'll like Billion Dollar Brain.

    Are one of the Newman films you're referring to the one where he's in the DDR?

    The college pool I use might be closed for the remainder of the year. The local town pools presently have ridiculously short hours with no locker use. A state of the art county facility looks promising. Might very well get a 3 month membership there. Gyms remain closed.

    Meantime, a lot of walking at a nearby state park (with a lot of Russian speaking former Soviets, of numerous different ethnic groups), some home gym workouts and biking. Just got hold of a US made 1992 Trek 7000, with new tires. Needs a tuneup. I can't get it in the max gear, offering the greatest resistance for a more efficient workout. No traffic on a flat road, I can manage 12 miles in 45 minutes on it.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack, @dfordoom

    You’ll like Billion Dollar Brain.

    Great movie. Directed by Ken Russell, of all people.

    • Thanks: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @dfordoom

    Len Deighton shouldn't be overlooked as well.

  289. @Thulean Friend
    @another anon

    This is what happened in 2014 when Tamika Mallory, a leader in the BLM movement, began to turn against Israel. Within days, she was no longer invited to CNN where she had not only been a regular but treated with great respect.

    Folks in these social movements may think they are revolutionaries but their agenda is pushed/propped up by the MSM. Ideologies that truly threaten the system always gets stomped on by the jackboot. In that sense, there is no difference between supposed 'liberal democracy' and any 'authoritarian' system. They all work the same way.

    That's why I wasn't the least surprised Chapo got banned. It's one thing to do performative wokeness for neoliberalism. It's another to truly question its foundations. If you do, you'll quickly see the limits of the supposed democracy you're living in.

    Most censorship in the West is carried out by corporations and private actors, which upholds the illusion that the system is free because the state is less active. Does it matter whether private capital does the dirty work rather than the state? The end result is the same. The neoliberal argument is one fixated on process, not outcome.

    Replies: @dfordoom

    Most censorship in the West is carried out by corporations and private actors, which upholds the illusion that the system is free because the state is less active. Does it matter whether private capital does the dirty work rather than the state? The end result is the same.

    Censorship carried out by corporations and private actors is actually much worse. It’s carried out by people who are totally unaccountable and there is no possibility of challenging decisions or seeking legal redress. And in practice it can be much more draconian.

  290. @Europe Europa
    @silviosilver


    They were more concerned about correcting the distortions of delusional balkanoids who pretend there is some clear dividing line between themselves and Turks.
     
    Most right wing nationalist types seem to sincerely believe that Bulgaria and Greece are 100% white, and as soon as you cross the border into Turkey the population is 100% Middle Eastern/non-white.

    If you suggest that the situation is not as "black and white" as that, they usually just call you a troll and a Muslim appeaser. The irony is many would try to argue that Armenians and Georgians are white, basically it's a religious argument. They see Muslims as fundamentally non-white, it wouldn't matter if a Muslim looked Nordic they'd still be non-white to most on the right.

    Replies: @AP, @silviosilver, @Thulean Friend, @Dmitry, @EldnahYm

    There are too many Eastern Europe-inhabiting sexpats among right wing “nationalist” groups.

  291. Protesters in Serbia attempting to occupy the Parliament building: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-serbia-protests-idUSKBN24835R

    They’re ostensibly over Coronavirus lockdowns but its pretty clear the real factor here is the elections a few weeks ago. No idea how important they will actually end up being. My guess is probably not at all.

    As for an ideological alignment, Vučić is a Putin ally and vaguely sorta nationalistic, in the typical Eastern European fashion, so it smells kinda like a color revolution. But on the other hand, some of the protestors have been accused of being “fascist” and “far right” and Vučić’s party pretty much threw the hardcore nationalists out of contention. Thoughts?

  292. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    BTW, what nationality are you anyway? I thought that you were a Ukie, from Ukraine? You are so pathetic. :-(

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Gerard-Mandela

    There is a clear distinction between “Ukrainians” and Ukies/Ukrops you dimwit Mr Hack! This should be obvious for a schizophrenic state that can’t run itself like Ukraine.

    It’s now going completely full circle into the abyss of farce and stupidity and failure under Zelensky….just like in Poroshenko/Valtsman’s time…and just like with Yushchenko – each time holding onto the next placebo and doing the same things over and over again – both from being forced by the west and things of their own volition.

    I did enjoy one moment though – Zelensky saying that he can’t find a Education, Culture and Finance Minister who isn’t both non-corrupt and competent at the same time. Seeing as 2 of those 3 positions are the most Svidomy in all the cabinet, and the 3rd one is an American controlled department that just needs moderate amount of pig behaviour from the Ukie in position….that is quite an admission. lol!

  293. @Ano4
    @BB753

    The tatooed gentlemen on the right, with feathers in their hair are ancient Berber as depicted on frescoes during the Egyptian XIX dynasty.

    https://dailyhistory.org/images/3/36/Libyans.jpg



    Kabyle Children:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/e9dkdFobwb2AK3617

    A Kabyle granma with one of her offspring:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/5tq6XgWJPCoRjzgs8

    A young girl from Kabylia:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/Vaoui4XSWSYp4dEt9

    A young Chleuh Berber :

    https://images.app.goo.gl/swwdpRgjH72QoDMJ7

    A representation of captive Guanche Berbers from Canary islands being presented to the Catholic Kings:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/4WwDftWJAhxY2U3V8

    Guanche surrender to the Spanish conquerors:

    https://images.app.goo.gl/j1ScZ6TToqRK4uVx7

    Wogs start in Calais!

    Replies: @BB753

    Well, you can pick and choose individuals, but the fact that that Berbers do not differ much from other North Africans TODAY remains. Surely, they might have less Black admixture on the maternal side north of the Atlas, but that’s not even true everywhere else. I mean, just look at the Tuaregs. And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards. But hold on to your Berbers mystique because of Zidane.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @BB753


    And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards.

     

    Well the pictures of Guanches drawn by Spaniards themselves prove otherwise. I know Berbers first hand, I know a little about their genetics and their history.

    You just know Zidane (who BTW is darker than the majority of the Berber I met). Maybe you should educate yourself. Start reading books, stop watching soccer and avoid posting nonsense and embarrassing yourself by doubling down on it.

    And just so you know, Touaregs are an outlier, they speak Berber but are distantly genetically related to the Ethiopian Oromo, yet they are still a little bit more fair-skinned than their Horn of Africa cousins. I could explain you how this happened, it's quite easy really, but you already know everything, don't you?

    Be well buddy.

    🙂

    Replies: @BB753

  294. @AP
    @Denis


    You weren’t arguing about killing people, you, a grown-ass man, were getting your panties in a twist over climate data.
     
    Someone wrote something wildly inaccurate (Vladivostok is pretty warm), I showed it with easy-to-find data. “Panties in a twist” is your projection.

    If the weatherman reports rain in Vinnytsia, do you call him to argue the point
     
    If someone who claims to know anything about Ukraine writes that Vynnytsia has a tropical climate I would indeed highlight his ignorance of the place by posting data about reality. Someone this wrong about a seemingly trivial thing is probably wrong on much more (and he is). Someone willing to defend a ridiculous claim is likely to defend many more ridiculous claims. It is therefore useful to have this highlighted.

    What’s interesting is the reaction of those who have read this exchange. Anonymous coward who is almost always wrong defends the ridiculous claim. He is just as clueless. You attack the guy who shows the ridiculousness of the statement, like a little ankle-biting dog coming to the defense of its master, extending what should have been a quick exchange about a minor point into several posts. So we see how some several people here react when they are told that black is black and not white.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela, @Denis

    Someone wrote something wildly inaccurate (Vladivostok is pretty warm), I showed it with easy-to-find data. “Panties in a twist” is your projection.

    Somebody of substance (AnonFromTN)wrote accurately and informatively about real experiences on something they know something about – visiting Vladivostok, and a whole myriad of other issues

    Somebody else ( you) , a worthless bum , with absolute zero knowledge of the area and a raging jealousy of his knowledge, went to the only thing a pathetic creature as you can do ( copy and paste from wikipedia), ridiculously distorted it into a fake argument designed to occupy your non-life as long as possible and USE God knows whatever other deranged tactics . As it is, of course Vladivostok is warm in the summer you dummy, amplified by the humidity, and does not have winters as long and extreme as pretty much all the Russian mainland within about a 3000km radius of it, including along the same latitudinal line. There was nothing in his statement even remotely possible to contradict

    I am under strict instruction from Karlin to follow the rules of the blog. So I , as the pupil, will ask for advice from you , “master” of the ” art ” of Ukrainian language – to teach me authentic ukrop, and give you the respect you warmly deserve.

    Now, I thought I was fluent in Ukrainian,….and although nothing to suggest you have ever even been in Europe, and can actually say one even one word in Ukrop or Russian…. in order to comply with Karlin’s rules I am designating you master of Ukrainian language – a real honour

    Please showcase my ignorance and explain more to me the real Ukrainian language being spoken by some of its biggest ideologists and practitioners in the following video!:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=45&v=mhlHY_M5W48&feature=emb_title

    Now this is right in the centre of Khokholistan, some of the real disciples are there in that room in this video, there is a load of people shouting in there, all under stress – during this time of emotion the natural Ukrainian language is going to flow from their tongues. Isn’t it? LOL

    Can you do me another favour and select a favour Ukrainian word in this video, I know that even if they were quoting the words to the Ukrainian national anthem in this video, you would still be clueless to it – but with many high profile people talking in that video there is, of course, ONE Ukrainian word in there? LOL

  295. Ano4 says:
    @BB753
    @Ano4

    Well, you can pick and choose individuals, but the fact that that Berbers do not differ much from other North Africans TODAY remains. Surely, they might have less Black admixture on the maternal side north of the Atlas, but that's not even true everywhere else. I mean, just look at the Tuaregs. And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards. But hold on to your Berbers mystique because of Zidane.

    Replies: @Ano4

    And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards.

    Well the pictures of Guanches drawn by Spaniards themselves prove otherwise. I know Berbers first hand, I know a little about their genetics and their history.

    You just know Zidane (who BTW is darker than the majority of the Berber I met). Maybe you should educate yourself. Start reading books, stop watching soccer and avoid posting nonsense and embarrassing yourself by doubling down on it.

    And just so you know, Touaregs are an outlier, they speak Berber but are distantly genetically related to the Ethiopian Oromo, yet they are still a little bit more fair-skinned than their Horn of Africa cousins. I could explain you how this happened, it’s quite easy really, but you already know everything, don’t you?

    Be well buddy.

    🙂

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Ano4

    Buddy, I'm trained in history and both cultural and physical anthropology, (among other fields) and I'm familiar with modern population genetics. But whatever floats your boat.

    Replies: @Ano4

  296. @Blinky Bill
    https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRyy1BPyiKDjUbJZyING-3lEB-Ggjlm1FTqNw&usqp.jpg

    Replies: @fnn

    World’s deepest human voice

  297. @Europe Europa
    Apparently support for independence in Scotland is now over 50%. I've noticed that most people and the media internationally now tend to refer to Scotland as if it was already an independent country by default, and perception is three quarters of the battle in independence struggles.

    What I find odd is how the recognition of nationhood seems to vary by individual group. For instance, Ukrainians are now well established as a completely separate ethnic group to Russians, even though before 1991 I doubt most outsiders made any distinction between Russians and Ukrainians.

    Another odd one is Catalans and Basques, their independence struggles have never managed to gain much respect or support abroad because no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish.

    Edinburgh and Glasgow are always referred to as Scottish cities, but you would never hear anyone outside Spain refer to Barcelona as a Catalan city or Bilbao as a Basque city, they are both considered absolutely Spanish. The statement "Edinburgh is a British city", although entirely factually correct would sound strange to most peoples' ears, most people think of it as Scottish, in contrast to say "Barcelona is a Catalan city" would sound overly political or pedantic to most people.

    Replies: @A123, @216, @AnonFromTN, @Matra, @Mikel

    no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish

    Well, some 66 million people in France would strongly disagree with the idea that Basques on their side of the frontier are Spaniards.

    Most Irish people I’ve met (including my brother in law) also hold the opinion that Basques are different from Spaniards. Your English mother tongue is much more similar to Spanish than Basque is, after all.

    And I suspect this is too much to expect you to know about but lots of people in places settled by Basque emigrants, like the West of the US or many Latin American countries would also disagree with your assessment.

    On the other hand, it looks like in this thread you have not repeated your usual mantra about the rest of the world hating the English. I really don’t have any idea where you get that bizarre impression from. What I’ve always found is that Continental Europeans have a remarkable fondness of everything British: the culture, the music, London, the language (so much so that most everybody in Europe tries to speak British English as a native, usually failing in the attempt, except for maybe some Dutch).

    The only thing that prevents me from being a total Anglophile myself is the existence of the BBC. I know that many Western public broadcasters are also outlets of left-wing, woke propaganda but none goes to the extents of BBC, specially in their multi-lingual, global outreach services. You can be driving through the Nevada desert and find that the strongest signal is from the BBC Radio. All of this funded by a docile British populace that can vote Conservative or Brexit but still meekly accepts to continue paying for the extortion of the “TV license fee”. Disgusting.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Mikel


    of the world hating the English.
     
    It's not only in European Union, but much of the world, has such unrequited love of England and the English culture.

    In Russia, there is might be even more anglomania, than probably in Poland, which sent a million immigrants to England in recent years. And probably China, Japan, America, Latin America, etc, there is not that much less anglomania.

    There is just a usual reversal of reality of the Unz forum. Where people here are claiming that perhaps a China, or Poland are the desirable countries, while England is the undesirable.

    In reality, a significant proportion of the world dreams to live somewhere like England, and English are the victims of their own popularity in some ways, when half the world tries to immigrate there.

    , @Matra
    @Mikel

    All of this funded by a docile British populace that can vote Conservative or Brexit but still meekly accepts to continue paying for the extortion of the “TV license fee”. Disgusting.

    Defunding the BBC has become a bit of a political issue in the UK with more voices suggesting it.

    However, this idea that the British are unusual for having a TV licence fee is very American. I've been seeing it on Sailer's blog for about a decade. Most Western countries have had a mandatory TV licence fee throughout the TV age with most that've dropped it having done so only in recent years.

    Most Irish people I’ve met (including my brother in law) also hold the opinion that Basques are different from Spaniards.

    I pointed out in my earlier post that I'd seen wall murals in Ireland on Spanish separatism. The Irish Republican Army and the Basque terrorists, ETA, have always had close ties. Basque musicians perform at annual Irish Republican music festival in Belfast and Catalonia's independence cause is very popular amongst Irish Catholics in Northern Ireland who look at Spain as an imperialist country much like they do the UK. Lately, Scottish so-called nationalists - many of whom are of Irish descent - have also become vocal supporters of Catalonian independence.

  298. @dfordoom
    @Mikhail


    You’ll like Billion Dollar Brain.
     
    Great movie. Directed by Ken Russell, of all people.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    Len Deighton shouldn’t be overlooked as well.

  299. @silviosilver
    @Znzn


    Or which superior race should rule over other inferior races, which is a logical extension of that argument.
     
    If I am stronger than you, does that mean I should bash your head in? What if I'd rather be your friend?

    Replies: @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive

    His question is valid.

    You cannot separate your male genes, wipe out ZNZN’s male genes, and have him become a new organism that is half you. Yet that’s what the spanish did in Latin America.
    Comparing individual humans to racial collectives only gets you so far in terms of reaching a moral conclusion.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive


    His question is valid.
     
    He wasn't questioning anything. He was asserting that a logical extension of believing in racial differences is that if one race can be shown to be 'superior' (generally meaning a higher IQ) to another it has the right, perhaps even the duty, to 'rule' other races (which can mean various things)

    So let's say China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians as part of exerting its 'rule' over them: it may look horrible, but the Chinese have a higher IQ, so it's all good. He claims that scenarios like this are what IQ-believers are refusing to discuss; we're 'hiding' it.

    I think his ethical reasoning is completely up shit creek, to say nothing of his conspiratorial skepticism about our motives.

    Replies: @Znzn, @Dmitry

  300. An interesting perspective on the tensions between China and India:

    https://asiatimes.com/2020/07/territorial-nationalism-a-dead-end-for-modi/

    • Replies: @Mitleser
    @Ano4

    Sounds like an anti-Modi piece.


    The second option is a “Wuhan-style” breakthrough like what happened during the 2017 Doklam standoff. This option is far from happening. Jaishankar can’t directly face his Chinese counterpart, Wang. Similarly, Modi cannot face Chinese President Xi Jinping directly.
     
    They cannot?
    Isn't it the opposite side who does not want to face them again?

    China didn’t want to hold political-level talks with Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, the pro-US Indian external affairs minister. It preferred to talk with Doval instead, bypassing Jaishankar in the same way as it had avoided Sushma Swaraj, who was external affairs minister during the Doklam standoff in 2017
     

    Replies: @Ano4, @Astuteobservor II

  301. @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack

    Where I was born (Lvov) and grew up (Lugansk), the term Ukrainian meant a Ukrainian. The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).

    As far as languages go, Ukrainian remains grossly under-developed. Considering that self-appointed “patriots” are ignorant morons, it would remain so until sane people govern Ukraine (if there is still Ukraine ~5 years from now: current liquidation team calling itself government does its level best to destroy what’s left).

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).

    There is nothing wrong in being a Ukrainian, and everything wrong in being a Ukie. Ukies are destroying the country, killing it’s industry, culture, and traditions. They are replacing culture with quasi-Nazi BS and history with preposterous myths. They are doing all they can to make Ukrainian language a sign of mental retardation. I do hope that they won’t succeed, that the country will shake off these lice and become normal.

    Normal means having pragmatic relations with all its neighbors and staying away from the dying Empire, like from a leper, as it deserves.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

    The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).

    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014. I think that the definition that I included in comment #282 and that is verified by at least one dozen definitions through the internet is a little bit more accurate than something that you’ve concocted in your imagination.

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).

    Since I don’t really know you, I cannot speculate on your proficiency in the Ukrainian language. But, I have listened to and know something about the six Ukrainian presidents, and in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    This issue, and most “facts” that he provides, are simply nonsense, from the trivial to the substantive.
    , @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language
     
    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

  302. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).
     
    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960's is one that you only became familiar with in 2014. I think that the definition that I included in comment #282 and that is verified by at least one dozen definitions through the internet is a little bit more accurate than something that you've concocted in your imagination.

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).
     
    Since I don't really know you, I cannot speculate on your proficiency in the Ukrainian language. But, I have listened to and know something about the six Ukrainian presidents, and in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.

    This issue, and most “facts” that he provides, are simply nonsense, from the trivial to the substantive.

  303. @Ano4
    @BB753


    And yes, Guanches were described as both taller and swarthier than Spaniards.

     

    Well the pictures of Guanches drawn by Spaniards themselves prove otherwise. I know Berbers first hand, I know a little about their genetics and their history.

    You just know Zidane (who BTW is darker than the majority of the Berber I met). Maybe you should educate yourself. Start reading books, stop watching soccer and avoid posting nonsense and embarrassing yourself by doubling down on it.

    And just so you know, Touaregs are an outlier, they speak Berber but are distantly genetically related to the Ethiopian Oromo, yet they are still a little bit more fair-skinned than their Horn of Africa cousins. I could explain you how this happened, it's quite easy really, but you already know everything, don't you?

    Be well buddy.

    🙂

    Replies: @BB753

    Buddy, I’m trained in history and both cultural and physical anthropology, (among other fields) and I’m familiar with modern population genetics. But whatever floats your boat.

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @BB753

    Alright pal, let's accept your academic claims and say you are qualified to comment on the Berber populations genetics, anthropology and historical record.

    Why don't you tell us more about the paleogenetics of the Y haplogroup Eb1b1 (E-M35) and the implications of these data on the history of the populations of the Mediterranean and MENA regions?

    Also why not providing a break-up of the modern North African populations by Y haplogroup?

    A brief historical account of the Berber populations transformation into the modern Maghrebian ethnic groups would certainly also be of interest.

    And while you're at it, perhaps you could also dwell a little on the putative Afroasiatic substrate in the insular Celtic and its impact on the structure of the modern English grammar.

    Please enlighten us!

    🙂

    Replies: @BB753

  304. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    The term Ukie appeared in 2014, meaning deranged Banderite (the latter term in East Ukraine was always derogatory, and still is, despite continuous attempts of coup-installed “government” to make it sound good).
     
    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960's is one that you only became familiar with in 2014. I think that the definition that I included in comment #282 and that is verified by at least one dozen definitions through the internet is a little bit more accurate than something that you've concocted in your imagination.

    FYI, I speak Ukrainian better than 90% of self-styled “patriots”, including the two clowns calling themselves “presidents”. Unlike them, I’ve read practically all literature in Ukrainian worth reading, and have books in Ukrainian in my home (“patriots” don’t have books, as they never read, even low-grade dross written by Bandera).
     
    Since I don't really know you, I cannot speculate on your proficiency in the Ukrainian language. But, I have listened to and know something about the six Ukrainian presidents, and in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language.

    Replies: @AP, @AnonFromTN

    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.

    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language

    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    • Replies: @AP
    @AnonFromTN


    A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.
     
    You wrote nonsense about Vladivostok and now you write nonsense about Suprun. It’s your pattern. Most of what you “think” and write is nonsense.

    She graduated with an MD from Michigan State, completed her residency in radiology at Mount Sinai in New York, and is a board-certified radiologist. She is licensed in New York.

    https://www.doximity.com/pub/ulana-suprun-md

    Dr. Ulana Suprun, MD is a board certified radiologist in New York, New York. She is currently licensed to practice medicine in New York. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

    Certifications & Licensure
    NY State Medical LicenseNY State Medical License
    1995 - 2020

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away.
     
    So you've taken a term that was already in vogue by 1966 and changed its meaning in 2014 and expect the whole world to accept your own interpretation? Nice try buddy! :-)


     Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine.
     I couldn't disagree with you more. There weren't more than a dozen "Ukrainians" from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers who just found a situation already in place that was beyond their means to help change. It was actually "real Ukrainians" like yourself that really went on to help destroy Ukraine into the country that we have today, leftovers and heirs of their sovok past. Guys like you just happened to have a science background that wasn't appreciated enough in Ukraine and were able to parlay your skills in the West and make a decent living. The political types stayed in Ukraine, a fledgling new country that didn't have a developed culture that knew how to implement a democratic form of governance, and therefore resorted to what they knew best, swindle and theft. I wouldn't at all be surprised that if you didn't have a scientific skill set, you'd be still in Ukraine taking part in the orgy of theft and manipulation yourself.

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away.
     
    So you've taken a term that was already in vogue by 1966 and changed its meaning in 2014 and expect the whole world to accept your own interpretation? Nice try buddy! :-)

    Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine.
     
    I couldn't disagree with you more. There weren't more than a dozen "Ukrainians" from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers who just found a situation already in place that was beyond their means to help change. It was actually "real Ukrainians" like yourself that really went on to help destroy Ukraine into the country that we have today, leftovers and heirs of their sovok past. Guys like you that just happened to have a science background that wasn't appreciated enough in Ukraine and were able to parlay your skills in the West and make a decent living. The political types stayed in Ukraine, a fledgling new country that didn't have a developed culture that knew how to implement a democratic form of governance, and therefore resorted to what they knew best, swindle and theft. I wouldn't at all be surprised that if you didn't have a scientific skill set, you'd be still in Ukraine taking part in the orgy of theft and manipulation yourself.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    , @Gerard-Mandela
    @AnonFromTN

    It's actually astounding that this cretin Mr Hack thinks Poroshenko/Valtsman has a decent level of Ukrainian. I'm baffled because I thought Mr Hack, unlike the fantasist nutjob troll, actually could speak Ukrainian. It's undeniably bad Ukrainian that he speaks........and no surprise that his youngest son can't speak a word of it (LOL)- which just goes to show the hypocrisy and lies of these freaks.

    Yushchenko was certainly not very comfortable in it, albeit some competence - his Russian was far better.

    Zelensky's Ukrainian is also terrible. Now, let's consider these are the heads of state we are talking about.....the Minister of Defence and the (scumbag) Interior Minister can't actually speak a word of ukrop. When he is in foreign interview ( well, English) - his translator is doing it in Russian, which is the language he talks in when he can't talk in English.


    It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement.
     
    You know, in comment 296 I did actually link the video! Even funnier is that none of the other Khokhols, including the National Prosecutor ( who can speak it fluently...I have to assume), say a single word of Ukrainian in the entire clip.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=45&v=mhlHY_M5W48&feature=emb_title

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  305. Ano4 says:
    @BB753
    @Ano4

    Buddy, I'm trained in history and both cultural and physical anthropology, (among other fields) and I'm familiar with modern population genetics. But whatever floats your boat.

    Replies: @Ano4

    Alright pal, let’s accept your academic claims and say you are qualified to comment on the Berber populations genetics, anthropology and historical record.

    Why don’t you tell us more about the paleogenetics of the Y haplogroup Eb1b1 (E-M35) and the implications of these data on the history of the populations of the Mediterranean and MENA regions?

    Also why not providing a break-up of the modern North African populations by Y haplogroup?

    A brief historical account of the Berber populations transformation into the modern Maghrebian ethnic groups would certainly also be of interest.

    And while you’re at it, perhaps you could also dwell a little on the putative Afroasiatic substrate in the insular Celtic and its impact on the structure of the modern English grammar.

    Please enlighten us!

    🙂

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Ano4

    Since you insist so much, why not do it yourself?

    Replies: @Ano4

  306. AP says:
    @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language
     
    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    You wrote nonsense about Vladivostok and now you write nonsense about Suprun. It’s your pattern. Most of what you “think” and write is nonsense.

    She graduated with an MD from Michigan State, completed her residency in radiology at Mount Sinai in New York, and is a board-certified radiologist. She is licensed in New York.

    https://www.doximity.com/pub/ulana-suprun-md

    Dr. Ulana Suprun, MD is a board certified radiologist in New York, New York. She is currently licensed to practice medicine in New York. She is an Assistant Clinical Professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

    Certifications & Licensure
    NY State Medical LicenseNY State Medical License
    1995 – 2020

  307. @Ano4
    @BB753

    Alright pal, let's accept your academic claims and say you are qualified to comment on the Berber populations genetics, anthropology and historical record.

    Why don't you tell us more about the paleogenetics of the Y haplogroup Eb1b1 (E-M35) and the implications of these data on the history of the populations of the Mediterranean and MENA regions?

    Also why not providing a break-up of the modern North African populations by Y haplogroup?

    A brief historical account of the Berber populations transformation into the modern Maghrebian ethnic groups would certainly also be of interest.

    And while you're at it, perhaps you could also dwell a little on the putative Afroasiatic substrate in the insular Celtic and its impact on the structure of the modern English grammar.

    Please enlighten us!

    🙂

    Replies: @BB753

    Since you insist so much, why not do it yourself?

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @BB753

    I actually could, but I am not the one who unambiguously stated that the Mediterranean Europeoid phenotype is an absolute minority in the modern Berber populations.

    You did.

    And this affirmation of yours is utter BS as anyone who would have lived long enough in the Maghreb would know.

    I just corrected your erroneous claims.

    🙂

    Replies: @Mikel

  308. @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive
    @silviosilver

    His question is valid.

    You cannot separate your male genes, wipe out ZNZN's male genes, and have him become a new organism that is half you. Yet that's what the spanish did in Latin America.
    Comparing individual humans to racial collectives only gets you so far in terms of reaching a moral conclusion.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    His question is valid.

    He wasn’t questioning anything. He was asserting that a logical extension of believing in racial differences is that if one race can be shown to be ‘superior’ (generally meaning a higher IQ) to another it has the right, perhaps even the duty, to ‘rule’ other races (which can mean various things)

    So let’s say China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians as part of exerting its ‘rule’ over them: it may look horrible, but the Chinese have a higher IQ, so it’s all good. He claims that scenarios like this are what IQ-believers are refusing to discuss; we’re ‘hiding’ it.

    I think his ethical reasoning is completely up shit creek, to say nothing of his conspiratorial skepticism about our motives.

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @silviosilver

    No, I mean it just begs the philosophical question, if there is a superior and an inferior, why is it immoral for the superior to rule over the inferior? Like who the Romans ruled over the Gauls and the various Italic polities, or how the Sioux ruled over the Cheyenne, or how the Wing ruled over the Turks in Sinkiang, I mean it has been going on all throughout history, so what is wrong with it?

    , @Dmitry
    @silviosilver


    China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians
     
    Isn't this just a bit of a tautological discussion.

    As has been proposed (I would say, with validity) since philologists of at least the 19th century, what is "superior" and "inferior" in societal terms, has commonly emerged in terms of what is desirable to the ruling caste. Their favourite example, was to study when nomads conquer an agricultural society, as this has been quite a common story in history.

    (E.g. In a case of the Aryan conquest of India which had influenced 19th century thought - the word "Aryan" in Sanskrit, which was self-designation of the conquerors, is also synonym in the language for "honourable", "noble", "respectable", "master",. While in Pali - it is synonym for "Buddha".)

    Discussion about "IQ" represents a bit of the idiotization that has occurred since the 20th century. Of course, if the Chinese government successfully conquered India, and has a monopoly of violence in the country. Then they might institute some arbitrary "measurement" like IQ, if it was seen to be favourable for a Chinese ruling caste.

    Such behaviours are common in history, without implying some objective superiority. Often, nomadic Mongol/Islamic and perhaps even some Ancient Aryan conquerors, could be more primitive by our view, than more agricultural societies they conquered. The latter were simply less capable in the most important sense: the military one.

    -

    *People like Nietzsche also proposed theories about the possibility of e.g. "slave revolt" in morality, that can successfully undermine the rulers, to try to explain Christianization of Europe.

    According to this theory, perhaps unfairly simplified - Christianity is a result of slaves and lowest castes of society, being able to trick what were effectively their masters to adopt values harmful to life of the elites. This adoption of slave morality was possible because being weaker, the lower castes, required a greater development of cleverness, etc. (Nietzsche even sees Socrates as a preshadow of Jesus in this sense).
    http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/LoserLit/The%20Anti-Christ%20Ecce%20Homo%20Twilight%20of%20the%20Idols%20&%20Other%20Writings%20Friedrich%20Nietzsche.pdf

    -
    It's probably possible accept a "light" version of this view, without falling into relativism. It's clear that a some of our society's values, are mainly trained into us, because they historically benefit certain factions of society. But then there are others which have some more metaphysical and universal aspect - i.e. in terms of cruelty, killing, etc, we can understand this as metaphysical knowledge. There are also aesthetic values, like complexity, harmony, in music - which are clearly universal, and cannot be explained as relative to interests of power. There are also universal effects of some art - e.g. classical music effects Chinese as much as Europeans.

  309. @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language
     
    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away.

    So you’ve taken a term that was already in vogue by 1966 and changed its meaning in 2014 and expect the whole world to accept your own interpretation? Nice try buddy! 🙂

    Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine.

    I couldn’t disagree with you more. There weren’t more than a dozen “Ukrainians” from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers who just found a situation already in place that was beyond their means to help change. It was actually “real Ukrainians” like yourself that really went on to help destroy Ukraine into the country that we have today, leftovers and heirs of their sovok past. Guys like you just happened to have a science background that wasn’t appreciated enough in Ukraine and were able to parlay your skills in the West and make a decent living. The political types stayed in Ukraine, a fledgling new country that didn’t have a developed culture that knew how to implement a democratic form of governance, and therefore resorted to what they knew best, swindle and theft. I wouldn’t at all be surprised that if you didn’t have a scientific skill set, you’d be still in Ukraine taking part in the orgy of theft and manipulation yourself.

  310. Ano4 says:
    @BB753
    @Ano4

    Since you insist so much, why not do it yourself?

    Replies: @Ano4

    I actually could, but I am not the one who unambiguously stated that the Mediterranean Europeoid phenotype is an absolute minority in the modern Berber populations.

    You did.

    And this affirmation of yours is utter BS as anyone who would have lived long enough in the Maghreb would know.

    I just corrected your erroneous claims.

    🙂

    • Replies: @Mikel
    @Ano4

    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don't remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?

    In a past discussion Dmitry, based on a trip to the Basque Country, was skeptical of any big difference with the surrounding populations.

    But, having been born there, I do find obvious differences and I think that what I believe to be the current consensus is likely correct. Since the Iron Age, right after the IE incursions that made us all be R1b and up until the 19th century there was minimal admixture with any new group and that is mainly what sets us apart from our Spanish and French neighbors.

    On the other hand, most autosomal DNA studies show that we are closer to our neighbors than to other very high R1b populations, such as the Welsh or Irish.

    Would that be correct?

    Replies: @BB753, @Ano4

  311. @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language
     
    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away.

    So you’ve taken a term that was already in vogue by 1966 and changed its meaning in 2014 and expect the whole world to accept your own interpretation? Nice try buddy! 🙂

    Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine.

    I couldn’t disagree with you more. There weren’t more than a dozen “Ukrainians” from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers who just found a situation already in place that was beyond their means to help change. It was actually “real Ukrainians” like yourself that really went on to help destroy Ukraine into the country that we have today, leftovers and heirs of their sovok past. Guys like you that just happened to have a science background that wasn’t appreciated enough in Ukraine and were able to parlay your skills in the West and make a decent living. The political types stayed in Ukraine, a fledgling new country that didn’t have a developed culture that knew how to implement a democratic form of governance, and therefore resorted to what they knew best, swindle and theft. I wouldn’t at all be surprised that if you didn’t have a scientific skill set, you’d be still in Ukraine taking part in the orgy of theft and manipulation yourself.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    There weren’t more than a dozen “Ukrainians” from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers
     
    They are about as Ukrainian as I am Chinese. Their language is outdated and full of mangled English words. Their worldview is decades behind the curve. Most of them are descendants of Banderites who served Hitler, committed numerous crimes, and ran away from the advancing Red Army with Nazi occupiers. Naturally, their interests have very little in common with the interests of the people who actually live in Ukraine.

    As to well-wishers, we all know which road is paved with good intentions. They proved this once more beyond reasonable doubt.

    Replies: @Mr. Hack

  312. Znzn says:
    @silviosilver
    @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive


    His question is valid.
     
    He wasn't questioning anything. He was asserting that a logical extension of believing in racial differences is that if one race can be shown to be 'superior' (generally meaning a higher IQ) to another it has the right, perhaps even the duty, to 'rule' other races (which can mean various things)

    So let's say China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians as part of exerting its 'rule' over them: it may look horrible, but the Chinese have a higher IQ, so it's all good. He claims that scenarios like this are what IQ-believers are refusing to discuss; we're 'hiding' it.

    I think his ethical reasoning is completely up shit creek, to say nothing of his conspiratorial skepticism about our motives.

    Replies: @Znzn, @Dmitry

    No, I mean it just begs the philosophical question, if there is a superior and an inferior, why is it immoral for the superior to rule over the inferior? Like who the Romans ruled over the Gauls and the various Italic polities, or how the Sioux ruled over the Cheyenne, or how the Wing ruled over the Turks in Sinkiang, I mean it has been going on all throughout history, so what is wrong with it?

  313. @silviosilver
    @Autists Anonymous Rehab Camp Fugitive


    His question is valid.
     
    He wasn't questioning anything. He was asserting that a logical extension of believing in racial differences is that if one race can be shown to be 'superior' (generally meaning a higher IQ) to another it has the right, perhaps even the duty, to 'rule' other races (which can mean various things)

    So let's say China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians as part of exerting its 'rule' over them: it may look horrible, but the Chinese have a higher IQ, so it's all good. He claims that scenarios like this are what IQ-believers are refusing to discuss; we're 'hiding' it.

    I think his ethical reasoning is completely up shit creek, to say nothing of his conspiratorial skepticism about our motives.

    Replies: @Znzn, @Dmitry

    China storms into India, starts massacring the Indians

    Isn’t this just a bit of a tautological discussion.

    As has been proposed (I would say, with validity) since philologists of at least the 19th century, what is “superior” and “inferior” in societal terms, has commonly emerged in terms of what is desirable to the ruling caste. Their favourite example, was to study when nomads conquer an agricultural society, as this has been quite a common story in history.

    (E.g. In a case of the Aryan conquest of India which had influenced 19th century thought – the word “Aryan” in Sanskrit, which was self-designation of the conquerors, is also synonym in the language for “honourable”, “noble”, “respectable”, “master”,. While in Pali – it is synonym for “Buddha”.)

    Discussion about “IQ” represents a bit of the idiotization that has occurred since the 20th century. Of course, if the Chinese government successfully conquered India, and has a monopoly of violence in the country. Then they might institute some arbitrary “measurement” like IQ, if it was seen to be favourable for a Chinese ruling caste.

    Such behaviours are common in history, without implying some objective superiority. Often, nomadic Mongol/Islamic and perhaps even some Ancient Aryan conquerors, could be more primitive by our view, than more agricultural societies they conquered. The latter were simply less capable in the most important sense: the military one.

    *People like Nietzsche also proposed theories about the possibility of e.g. “slave revolt” in morality, that can successfully undermine the rulers, to try to explain Christianization of Europe.

    According to this theory, perhaps unfairly simplified – Christianity is a result of slaves and lowest castes of society, being able to trick what were effectively their masters to adopt values harmful to life of the elites. This adoption of slave morality was possible because being weaker, the lower castes, required a greater development of cleverness, etc. (Nietzsche even sees Socrates as a preshadow of Jesus in this sense).
    http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/LoserLit/The%20Anti-Christ%20Ecce%20Homo%20Twilight%20of%20the%20Idols%20&%20Other%20Writings%20Friedrich%20Nietzsche.pdf


    It’s probably possible accept a “light” version of this view, without falling into relativism. It’s clear that a some of our society’s values, are mainly trained into us, because they historically benefit certain factions of society. But then there are others which have some more metaphysical and universal aspect – i.e. in terms of cruelty, killing, etc, we can understand this as metaphysical knowledge. There are also aesthetic values, like complexity, harmony, in music – which are clearly universal, and cannot be explained as relative to interests of power. There are also universal effects of some art – e.g. classical music effects Chinese as much as Europeans.

  314. @Mikel
    @Europe Europa


    no one outside Spain considers Catalans and Basques to be separate groups to the Spanish
     
    Well, some 66 million people in France would strongly disagree with the idea that Basques on their side of the frontier are Spaniards.

    Most Irish people I've met (including my brother in law) also hold the opinion that Basques are different from Spaniards. Your English mother tongue is much more similar to Spanish than Basque is, after all.

    And I suspect this is too much to expect you to know about but lots of people in places settled by Basque emigrants, like the West of the US or many Latin American countries would also disagree with your assessment.

    On the other hand, it looks like in this thread you have not repeated your usual mantra about the rest of the world hating the English. I really don't have any idea where you get that bizarre impression from. What I've always found is that Continental Europeans have a remarkable fondness of everything British: the culture, the music, London, the language (so much so that most everybody in Europe tries to speak British English as a native, usually failing in the attempt, except for maybe some Dutch).

    The only thing that prevents me from being a total Anglophile myself is the existence of the BBC. I know that many Western public broadcasters are also outlets of left-wing, woke propaganda but none goes to the extents of BBC, specially in their multi-lingual, global outreach services. You can be driving through the Nevada desert and find that the strongest signal is from the BBC Radio. All of this funded by a docile British populace that can vote Conservative or Brexit but still meekly accepts to continue paying for the extortion of the "TV license fee". Disgusting.

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Matra

    of the world hating the English.

    It’s not only in European Union, but much of the world, has such unrequited love of England and the English culture.

    In Russia, there is might be even more anglomania, than probably in Poland, which sent a million immigrants to England in recent years. And probably China, Japan, America, Latin America, etc, there is not that much less anglomania.

    There is just a usual reversal of reality of the Unz forum. Where people here are claiming that perhaps a China, or Poland are the desirable countries, while England is the undesirable.

    In reality, a significant proportion of the world dreams to live somewhere like England, and English are the victims of their own popularity in some ways, when half the world tries to immigrate there.

  315. @silviosilver
    @128

    Race still retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political category is called into question.

    Look at that Turk Thulean posted and whom Varg was talking about. You'd have to be off your rocker to call him non-white. But cultural identity exerts a tremendous pull on people, and he'd be most unlikely, I imagine, to return Varg the favor. He's already got a common nationality, common tongue, common culture. He's supposed to give all that up and LARP as a 'fellow nord'? Even if that's what he is biologically, it's just not a particularly meaningful basis for identity for most people - at least not at this juncture, after some 60, 70 years of hard propagandizing against racial thinking.

    Now for Varg it is a meaningful basis. He's not only able to imagine a common bond stretching back tens of thousands of years and to experience this bond as meaningful (to something like a religious degree, I gather), but he also has the advantage of being able to base this bond on biological reality -- which is not insignificant in an age of extreme bullshit, in which "all that is solid melts into air." His problem is that he has, so far, been unable to motivate very many of the people who share that biological bond to think the same way, and it's doubtful he ever will.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political

    Not to answer your post specifically, but just to write some arguments.

    Culture and race is interacting, and (if you forgive me for the barbaric analogy) some “hardware” (race) is perhaps more suitable to “run in-house developed software” (“native” culture), and vice versa.

    Japanese are believed to have a higher ratio of introverts in the population.

    Introverts and extroverts are now believed to have the largely genetic basis. It would not be implausible to argue that Japanese culture is suitable precisely for a population with genetically high ratios of introverts in the population. There are many indications in the lifestyle of the country, its emphasis on etiquette, etc.

    If you gave experimentally a representative group of Italian or Spanish, newborn children, to Japanese culture – on average they might have have a bit too genetic inclination to be noisy, loud and impolite, to recreate Japanese life very successfully as a mass.

    On the other hand, perhaps representative children from Finland (where levels of introversion are closer to Japan) – perhaps there would be less “hardware limitions” to run introverted Japanese culture software as a group.

    Until the 20th century, when there was absurd reductionism about race and genetics, on both sides (both in favour and against) – most historians had usually assumed influence of blood as just one of many influences on historical development.

    E.g. Thucydides seems to assume a “bloodthirty” tendency to Thracians’ race (not too different to a national stereotypes of Balkanoid races today). But neither, Thucydides would expect that the blood can explain anything interesting about Greek history, that required more than sentence of his book.

    It’s obvious when you look at history, that the racial component, is at best just a necessary condition for anything interesting.

    Tacitus has perceived Germanic tribes, only with ethnographic interest, like someone studying native American tribes. And their virtues are similar which were perceived by 18th century Europeans, in native American tribes. And their vices – incredible poverty and savagery . In the first century, Germans were far less interesting than Indians, or Chinese, Iranians, which seems almost comic to consider today, considering the German superiority in modern times.

    Germanic tribemen encountered by the Romans, had the same genetics as the culture which would later produce the Waldstein sonata; and yet perceivable virtues and vices were those of the “noble savage”. German tribes that encountered Tacitus, there is no indication that such a people could create Bruckner’s 8th, or “Critique of Pure Reason”.

    The awesome (and self-destructive) German soul, is a product of thousands years of lucky and path-dependent “software engineering”, using many foreign ingredients – fusing with Middle Eastern religion and Ancient Southern European high culture – and was only even conceivable in modern historical conditions.

    • Agree: Ano4
    • Replies: @AP
    @Dmitry

    A small correction to a generally excellent comment:


    Germanic tribemen encountered by the Romans, had the same genetics as the culture which would later produce the Waldstein sonata
     
    No, because there has been considerable pruning during the centuries of increasingly higher levels of civilization and urbanization, which presumably selects for traits conducive to living in an increasingly abstract and socially complex world and eliminates those that are not.

    The (rare) wild, undisciplined, intemperate quick-to-violence German, who is marginalized and perhaps incarcerated in modern Germany, may be a an atavistic, or rather a leftover vestige of the old type of German written about by the Romans. A genetic leftover or emissary from the distant past. If civilization persists such types, rare as they are now, may almost completely disappear among Germans

    Replies: @NazBolFren, @EldnahYm

  316. AP says:
    @Dmitry
    @silviosilver


    retains its validity as a biological category, but its usefulness as a political
     
    Not to answer your post specifically, but just to write some arguments.

    Culture and race is interacting, and (if you forgive me for the barbaric analogy) some "hardware" (race) is perhaps more suitable to "run in-house developed software" ("native" culture), and vice versa.

    Japanese are believed to have a higher ratio of introverts in the population.

    Introverts and extroverts are now believed to have the largely genetic basis. It would not be implausible to argue that Japanese culture is suitable precisely for a population with genetically high ratios of introverts in the population. There are many indications in the lifestyle of the country, its emphasis on etiquette, etc.

    If you gave experimentally a representative group of Italian or Spanish, newborn children, to Japanese culture - on average they might have have a bit too genetic inclination to be noisy, loud and impolite, to recreate Japanese life very successfully as a mass.

    On the other hand, perhaps representative children from Finland (where levels of introversion are closer to Japan) - perhaps there would be less "hardware limitions" to run introverted Japanese culture software as a group.

    -

    Until the 20th century, when there was absurd reductionism about race and genetics, on both sides (both in favour and against) - most historians had usually assumed influence of blood as just one of many influences on historical development.

    E.g. Thucydides seems to assume a "bloodthirty" tendency to Thracians' race (not too different to a national stereotypes of Balkanoid races today). But neither, Thucydides would expect that the blood can explain anything interesting about Greek history, that required more than sentence of his book.

    It's obvious when you look at history, that the racial component, is at best just a necessary condition for anything interesting.

    Tacitus has perceived Germanic tribes, only with ethnographic interest, like someone studying native American tribes. And their virtues are similar which were perceived by 18th century Europeans, in native American tribes. And their vices - incredible poverty and savagery . In the first century, Germans were far less interesting than Indians, or Chinese, Iranians, which seems almost comic to consider today, considering the German superiority in modern times.

    Germanic tribemen encountered by the Romans, had the same genetics as the culture which would later produce the Waldstein sonata; and yet perceivable virtues and vices were those of the "noble savage". German tribes that encountered Tacitus, there is no indication that such a people could create Bruckner's 8th, or "Critique of Pure Reason".

    The awesome (and self-destructive) German soul, is a product of thousands years of lucky and path-dependent "software engineering", using many foreign ingredients - fusing with Middle Eastern religion and Ancient Southern European high culture - and was only even conceivable in modern historical conditions.

    Replies: @AP

    A small correction to a generally excellent comment:

    Germanic tribemen encountered by the Romans, had the same genetics as the culture which would later produce the Waldstein sonata

    No, because there has been considerable pruning during the centuries of increasingly higher levels of civilization and urbanization, which presumably selects for traits conducive to living in an increasingly abstract and socially complex world and eliminates those that are not.

    The (rare) wild, undisciplined, intemperate quick-to-violence German, who is marginalized and perhaps incarcerated in modern Germany, may be a an atavistic, or rather a leftover vestige of the old type of German written about by the Romans. A genetic leftover or emissary from the distant past. If civilization persists such types, rare as they are now, may almost completely disappear among Germans

    • Replies: @NazBolFren
    @AP

    Genetics won't disappear so quickly, especially given the fact that such people where favored as recently as WW2.

    They are simply repressed and biding their time until the thin veneer of society slips.

    Replies: @AP, @EldnahYm

    , @EldnahYm
    @AP


    No, because there has been considerable pruning during the centuries of increasingly higher levels of civilization and urbanization, which presumably selects for traits conducive to living in an increasingly abstract and socially complex world and eliminates those that are not.
     
    There is no evidence for any of this.

    Replies: @AP, @AP

  317. @Ano4
    @BB753

    I actually could, but I am not the one who unambiguously stated that the Mediterranean Europeoid phenotype is an absolute minority in the modern Berber populations.

    You did.

    And this affirmation of yours is utter BS as anyone who would have lived long enough in the Maghreb would know.

    I just corrected your erroneous claims.

    🙂

    Replies: @Mikel

    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don’t remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?

    In a past discussion Dmitry, based on a trip to the Basque Country, was skeptical of any big difference with the surrounding populations.

    But, having been born there, I do find obvious differences and I think that what I believe to be the current consensus is likely correct. Since the Iron Age, right after the IE incursions that made us all be R1b and up until the 19th century there was minimal admixture with any new group and that is mainly what sets us apart from our Spanish and French neighbors.

    On the other hand, most autosomal DNA studies show that we are closer to our neighbors than to other very high R1b populations, such as the Welsh or Irish.

    Would that be correct?

    • Replies: @BB753
    @Mikel

    Basques came from the Middle East, probably via the Caucusus, and thus are a Neolithic people, like Sardinians and Iberians.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikel

    , @Ano4
    @Mikel


    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don’t remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca
     
    Berbers are not a homogeneous ethnic group, they are a highly admixed heterogeneous population. They have lived in North Africa for a 10 000 years and have intermixed with completely different populations. Some of this admixture was European, some was Semitic or Levantine and there was also Sub-saharan admixture in the South of the Maghreb.

    This is why you will have the both extremes of rather fair skinned and the rather dark skinned individuals depending on their geographical location. I would say that among the Algerian Berbers that I personally met in great numbers in Algiers, either Kabyle or Chaoui, around 20% were more fair skinned than a typical Mediterranean person from either Greece or southern Spain and Italy. Some of these people were really close to a Nordic phenotype: fair skinned, blond or red haired and blue, green or grey eyed. This is mainly the case in Kabylia.

    On the other hand, Saharan Berbers (Touaregs mainly, but also Mozabites) would be more dark skinned, sometimes reminiscent of the Somali or Ethiopian people. The majority of the Berbers (probably some 60%) were somewhat in between these two extremes: typical Mediterranean / Levantine people, the like of whom you would find all around the Mediterranean sea. Zidane is a good representative of this category.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?
     
    I believe that the Basque people are the direct descendants of the original Bell Beaker population. Of course given that Euskara is not an Indo-European language, this either means that the original Bell Beaker folks were not Indo-European, or that for some reason the Bell Beaker ancestors of the Basques have switched to an indigenous Iberian language after their arrival to the Iberian peninsula.

    I would also add that the Picts, who inhabited Scotland and were assimilated into the Gaelic Scots, possibly also did not speak an Indo-European Celtic language. The Picts were also most probably directly descended from the Bell Beaker folks who colonized British Isles in the Bronze Age prior to the arrival of the Celtic tribes during the Iron Age.

    Scots, Irishmen and Basque males have the highest proportion of the Bell Beaker subtypes of the haplogroup R1b. Gaelic mythology describes a series of invasions of the British Isles from modern day Spain. Maybe there is some truth to it, but the first populations of the Megalithic Britain were neither Bell Beaker, nor Indo-European and of course they were not Celts who arrived thousands of years later.

    This is why the presence of the Mediterranean haplogroup E in the Welsh and Cornish male population is so intriguing. And this is why there is controversy around the possible Afroasiatic substratum in the Insular Celtic languages.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Philip Owen, @Mikel

  318. @Ano4
    An interesting perspective on the tensions between China and India:

    https://asiatimes.com/2020/07/territorial-nationalism-a-dead-end-for-modi/

    Replies: @Mitleser

    Sounds like an anti-Modi piece.

    The second option is a “Wuhan-style” breakthrough like what happened during the 2017 Doklam standoff. This option is far from happening. Jaishankar can’t directly face his Chinese counterpart, Wang. Similarly, Modi cannot face Chinese President Xi Jinping directly.

    They cannot?
    Isn’t it the opposite side who does not want to face them again?

    China didn’t want to hold political-level talks with Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, the pro-US Indian external affairs minister. It preferred to talk with Doval instead, bypassing Jaishankar in the same way as it had avoided Sushma Swaraj, who was external affairs minister during the Doklam standoff in 2017

    • Replies: @Ano4
    @Mitleser

    I agree that the article is somewhat imbalanced.

    OTOH I find it highly intriguing that with the notable exception of the Hindu nationalists, everyone else seems quite confident that Chinese will be the ones who will have the upper hand in this standoff.

    , @Astuteobservor II
    @Mitleser

    You can read the pro indian piece linked by thulean. It is unfortunate a lot of the Chinese experts are all in Chinese. I can barely understand them with my shit learned Mandarin.

  319. @Thulean Friend
    @Vishnugupta

    Coal is going away. It is mostly replaced by natural gas as I write this, but even that is a temporary phase.

    Baseload power for renewables isn't going to be a major issue as battery storage gets better and better. People who don't follow the sector don't understand that battery energy density improves by a factor of 2X every decade at the same pricepoint. And that's just legacy tech like LiOn, excluding new methods like Solid State batteries which radically improves these metrics on their own merits.

    And it's not like we have to look far into the future for this to take effect. It's already happening.

    Lots of aging boomers on this site have very aging talking points because they don't follow the sectors closely. This isn't the 1990s or even the early 2000s anymore.

    Replies: @Not Raul, @Philip Owen

    In the UK in the New Year there are typically 2-4 weeks of high pressure weather (mostly late January to early February). This means windless weather and fog. No wind, no sun. This is also the time of maximum demand. There is no battery technology remotely in sight that can supply the UK’s maximum demand for continuous hours far less weeks. The UK’s biggest hydro scheme running flat out lasts for 20 minutes. Current storage technology is good for frequency protection. Even then, battery storage cannot deliver a Dark Start. The grid needs rotating devices to provide inertia.

    Conceivably, tidal, configured to provide maximum demand could generate hydrogen for storage during the slack times. A tidal/hydrogen system would only have to cover a 6 hour lull in output. That is also within reach for compressed air and liquified air systems. Hydrogen might be preferred as it would also be a fuel for motor vehicles. Renewables could supply extra hydrogen. The tidal schemes to do this would be massive. ££££££££££

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Philip Owen

    What about flywheels?

  320. @Europe Europa
    Why does conservatism seem to be predominantly a white ideology? The most famous and outspoken conservatives internationally at the moment are people like Putin, Trump, Orban, Bolsonaro, Kurz, Salvini, etc. All white men, you could probably add Netanyahu to the list as well depending on whether you see him as white, I think many would.

    Maybe it's just the way the Western media portrays it, but there doesn't seem to be many of these sorts of outspokenly conservative non-white leaders. The only non-white example I can think of is probably Rodrigo Duterte in the Philippines, but the Philippines is something of an anomaly in Asia anyway, being majority Catholic and highly Americanised/Westernised culturally.

    Replies: @anonymous coward, @Not Only Wrathful, @Philip Owen

    The King of Saudi Arabia is a liberal?

    Modi is deeply conservative. Close to the Mussolini line.

    Xi is hardly radical.

    The military who run Burma/Myanmar are not members of Gay Pride.

    Look around a bit.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    @Philip Owen

    I think he meant they don't go around deriving elaborate ideologies from their basic values. (If not, I have no idea what he meant.)

    Of course, it's doubtful in the extreme he knows any of their languages, so even if they had created such ideologies, he is most unlikely to have ever heard about it.

    Replies: @Elmer's Washable School Glue

  321. @Mikel
    @Ano4

    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don't remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?

    In a past discussion Dmitry, based on a trip to the Basque Country, was skeptical of any big difference with the surrounding populations.

    But, having been born there, I do find obvious differences and I think that what I believe to be the current consensus is likely correct. Since the Iron Age, right after the IE incursions that made us all be R1b and up until the 19th century there was minimal admixture with any new group and that is mainly what sets us apart from our Spanish and French neighbors.

    On the other hand, most autosomal DNA studies show that we are closer to our neighbors than to other very high R1b populations, such as the Welsh or Irish.

    Would that be correct?

    Replies: @BB753, @Ano4

    Basques came from the Middle East, probably via the Caucusus, and thus are a Neolithic people, like Sardinians and Iberians.

    • LOL: Ano4
    • Replies: @Ano4
    @BB753

    The BS you post is absolutely amazing.

    "Trained in physical anthropology, familiar with population genetics ... Basques are like Sardinians"

    Holly Cow!

    Wikipedia grade understanding spewed with such a high level of self confidence.

    I am beyond entertained...

    😂😂😂

    Replies: @BB753

    , @Mikel
    @BB753

    What does being "a Neolithic people" mean? Do we still practice subsistence agriculture with some foraging in the bad years? :-)

  322. Ano4 says:
    @Mikel
    @Ano4

    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don't remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?

    In a past discussion Dmitry, based on a trip to the Basque Country, was skeptical of any big difference with the surrounding populations.

    But, having been born there, I do find obvious differences and I think that what I believe to be the current consensus is likely correct. Since the Iron Age, right after the IE incursions that made us all be R1b and up until the 19th century there was minimal admixture with any new group and that is mainly what sets us apart from our Spanish and French neighbors.

    On the other hand, most autosomal DNA studies show that we are closer to our neighbors than to other very high R1b populations, such as the Welsh or Irish.

    Would that be correct?

    Replies: @BB753, @Ano4

    I have been to Morocco a couple of times and I don’t remember having seen any blond natives. But I did get the impression that some people in the North (around Tetouan) were lighter than Moroccans from Rabat or Casablanca

    Berbers are not a homogeneous ethnic group, they are a highly admixed heterogeneous population. They have lived in North Africa for a 10 000 years and have intermixed with completely different populations. Some of this admixture was European, some was Semitic or Levantine and there was also Sub-saharan admixture in the South of the Maghreb.

    This is why you will have the both extremes of rather fair skinned and the rather dark skinned individuals depending on their geographical location. I would say that among the Algerian Berbers that I personally met in great numbers in Algiers, either Kabyle or Chaoui, around 20% were more fair skinned than a typical Mediterranean person from either Greece or southern Spain and Italy. Some of these people were really close to a Nordic phenotype: fair skinned, blond or red haired and blue, green or grey eyed. This is mainly the case in Kabylia.

    On the other hand, Saharan Berbers (Touaregs mainly, but also Mozabites) would be more dark skinned, sometimes reminiscent of the Somali or Ethiopian people. The majority of the Berbers (probably some 60%) were somewhat in between these two extremes: typical Mediterranean / Levantine people, the like of whom you would find all around the Mediterranean sea. Zidane is a good representative of this category.

    Since you are familiar with genetic research, do you have any opinion of any kind on the Basque origins question?

    I believe that the Basque people are the direct descendants of the original Bell Beaker population. Of course given that Euskara is not an Indo-European language, this either means that the original Bell Beaker folks were not Indo-European, or that for some reason the Bell Beaker ancestors of the Basques have switched to an indigenous Iberian language after their arrival to the Iberian peninsula.

    I would also add that the Picts, who inhabited Scotland and were assimilated into the Gaelic Scots, possibly also did not speak an Indo-European Celtic language. The Picts were also most probably directly descended from the Bell Beaker folks who colonized British Isles in the Bronze Age prior to the arrival of the Celtic tribes during the Iron Age.

    Scots, Irishmen and Basque males have the highest proportion of the Bell Beaker subtypes of the haplogroup R1b. Gaelic mythology describes a series of invasions of the British Isles from modern day Spain. Maybe there is some truth to it, but the first populations of the Megalithic Britain were neither Bell Beaker, nor Indo-European and of course they were not Celts who arrived thousands of years later.

    This is why the presence of the Mediterranean haplogroup E in the Welsh and Cornish male population is so intriguing. And this is why there is controversy around the possible Afroasiatic substratum in the Insular Celtic languages.

    • Replies: @Not Raul
    @Ano4

    Corsairs used to raid Wales, Cornwall, & England. Perhaps that accounts for the presence of the E haplotype.

    https://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofEngland/Barbary-Pirates-English-Slaves/

    Replies: @Ano4, @Philip Owen

    , @Philip Owen
    @Ano4

    The few people who speak both claim that there are resemblences between berber and Welsh. Well one professor in Wales did about 40 years ago.

    Replies: @Ano4, @Mikel

    , @Mikel
    @Ano4

    Thanks. I don't know much about the Bell Beaker populations but I always thought that it was mainly a cultural phenomenon that spread throughout Western Europe in prehistoric times.

    As you move westwards in Europe towards the Atlantic fringes you often end up seeing genetic and linguistic remnants from ancient times. This is probably most evident in the British Islands, where Celtic languages only survive in the westernmost parts and the Germanic component is also the weakest there.

    There is probably some ancient connection among all the Atlantic peoples, when Western Europe was inhabited by a mix of hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers but things are very complicated. Not least because Atlantic people are disproportionately R1b, which does not seem to have originated in either of those two groups in the mix. I tend to be skeptical of simple explanations like people suddenly navigating thousands of miles to some far-away islands.

    Replies: @Ano4

  323. @Mitleser
    @Ano4

    Sounds like an anti-Modi piece.


    The second option is a “Wuhan-style” breakthrough like what happened during the 2017 Doklam standoff. This option is far from happening. Jaishankar can’t directly face his Chinese counterpart, Wang. Similarly, Modi cannot face Chinese President Xi Jinping directly.
     
    They cannot?
    Isn't it the opposite side who does not want to face them again?

    China didn’t want to hold political-level talks with Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, the pro-US Indian external affairs minister. It preferred to talk with Doval instead, bypassing Jaishankar in the same way as it had avoided Sushma Swaraj, who was external affairs minister during the Doklam standoff in 2017
     

    Replies: @Ano4, @Astuteobservor II

    I agree that the article is somewhat imbalanced.

    OTOH I find it highly intriguing that with the notable exception of the Hindu nationalists, everyone else seems quite confident that Chinese will be the ones who will have the upper hand in this standoff.

  324. @Znzn
    Among Tokyo residents in their 20s, 1 in 10 is now foreign-born. And Tokyo is no longer an outlier. Much of the migration is happening in small industrial towns around the country, such as Shimukappu in central Hokkaido and Oizumi in Gunma prefecture, where migrant populations make up more than 15 percent of the local population. In the mostly rural Mie prefecture, east of Osaka and Kyoto, foreign migration has reversed years of population loss. So Japan is basically Germany in the 60s?

    Replies: @Astuteobservor II

    If true, Japan will be fucked.

    • Replies: @Znzn
    @Astuteobservor II

    Saw that article from foreignpolicy.com

  325. @AnonFromTN
    @Mr. Hack


    So a term that I was completely familiar with and used in the late 1960’s is one that you only became familiar with in 2014.
     
    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away. Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine. A good example is US born Dr. Death (Ulana Suprun), who decimated Ukrainian healthcare system serving as Ukraine health minister, while not even being a licensed physician.

    in my judgement Kravchuk, Yushchenko and Poroshenko all have a very good command of the Ukrainian language
     
    I don’t know about Kravchuk or Yushchenko, but Porky’s Ukrainian was pathetic even on those rare occasions when he was sober while speaking publicly. It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement. While he is first and foremost a thief and liar, i.e., nothing to be proud of, his mother tongue is Russian, and his Ukrainian was and is defective.

    Replies: @AP, @Mr. Hack, @Mr. Hack, @Gerard-Mandela

    It’s actually astounding that this cretin Mr Hack thinks Poroshenko/Valtsman has a decent level of Ukrainian. I’m baffled because I thought Mr Hack, unlike the fantasist nutjob troll, actually could speak Ukrainian. It’s undeniably bad Ukrainian that he speaks……..and no surprise that his youngest son can’t speak a word of it (LOL)- which just goes to show the hypocrisy and lies of these freaks.

    Yushchenko was certainly not very comfortable in it, albeit some competence – his Russian was far better.

    Zelensky’s Ukrainian is also terrible. Now, let’s consider these are the heads of state we are talking about…..the Minister of Defence and the (scumbag) Interior Minister can’t actually speak a word of ukrop. When he is in foreign interview ( well, English) – his translator is doing it in Russian, which is the language he talks in when he can’t talk in English.

    It is no surprise that he switched to Russian during questioning by law enforcement.

    You know, in comment 296 I did actually link the video! Even funnier is that none of the other Khokhols, including the National Prosecutor ( who can speak it fluently…I have to assume), say a single word of Ukrainian in the entire clip.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=45&v=mhlHY_M5W48&feature=emb_title

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @Gerard-Mandela

    Yes, in my opinion Ex-President Poroshenko does indeed have a solid ability to communicate in literary Ukrainian. BTW, I studied Ukrainian at the intermediate level at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and got an "A", and also have communicated in it since I was born (I was brought up bilingual Ukrainian/English) so I know a little bit about the topic. I've also picked up some Polish "on the streets" and from my Godmother who was Polish from Ukraine. Two years of college Russian too (straight A's). So what makes you such an expert about the Ukrainian language? :-)

    BTW, I don't have the patience of AP to debate this point with you for 30+ comments, mainly because I think that you're a moron. :-(

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela

  326. @Astuteobservor II
    @Znzn

    If true, Japan will be fucked.

    Replies: @Znzn

    Saw that article from foreignpolicy.com

  327. @Mitleser
    @Ano4

    Sounds like an anti-Modi piece.


    The second option is a “Wuhan-style” breakthrough like what happened during the 2017 Doklam standoff. This option is far from happening. Jaishankar can’t directly face his Chinese counterpart, Wang. Similarly, Modi cannot face Chinese President Xi Jinping directly.
     
    They cannot?
    Isn't it the opposite side who does not want to face them again?

    China didn’t want to hold political-level talks with Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, the pro-US Indian external affairs minister. It preferred to talk with Doval instead, bypassing Jaishankar in the same way as it had avoided Sushma Swaraj, who was external affairs minister during the Doklam standoff in 2017
     

    Replies: @Ano4, @Astuteobservor II

    You can read the pro indian piece linked by thulean. It is unfortunate a lot of the Chinese experts are all in Chinese. I can barely understand them with my shit learned Mandarin.

  328. @Philip Owen
    @Europe Europa

    The King of Saudi Arabia is a liberal?

    Modi is deeply conservative. Close to the Mussolini line.

    Xi is hardly radical.

    The military who run Burma/Myanmar are not members of Gay Pride.

    Look around a bit.

    Replies: @silviosilver

    I think he meant they don’t go around deriving elaborate ideologies from their basic values. (If not, I have no idea what he meant.)

    Of course, it’s doubtful in the extreme he knows any of their languages, so even if they had created such ideologies, he is most unlikely to have ever heard about it.

    • Replies: @Elmer's Washable School Glue
    @silviosilver


    I think he meant they don’t go around deriving elaborate ideologies from their basic values. (If not, I have no idea what he meant.)
     
    Well it makes sense that there would be a correlation between having "elaborate" (i.e. semi-coherent and thought out) ideologies and IQ. So maybe in that regard he is correct about, e.g., Africa not being "conservative." But even in this most charitable interpretation claiming that China and Japan are somehow a) progressive, or b) ideologically simplistic, is obviously stupid. Even if you don't know either language.
  329. @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN


    Mind you, I am talking about people born and raised in Ukraine, not half a globe away.
     
    So you've taken a term that was already in vogue by 1966 and changed its meaning in 2014 and expect the whole world to accept your own interpretation? Nice try buddy! :-)

    Part of the tragedy of Ukraine is that foreign people claiming to be Ukrainians had too much influence. They were instrumental in the destruction of Ukraine.
     
    I couldn't disagree with you more. There weren't more than a dozen "Ukrainians" from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers who just found a situation already in place that was beyond their means to help change. It was actually "real Ukrainians" like yourself that really went on to help destroy Ukraine into the country that we have today, leftovers and heirs of their sovok past. Guys like you that just happened to have a science background that wasn't appreciated enough in Ukraine and were able to parlay your skills in the West and make a decent living. The political types stayed in Ukraine, a fledgling new country that didn't have a developed culture that knew how to implement a democratic form of governance, and therefore resorted to what they knew best, swindle and theft. I wouldn't at all be surprised that if you didn't have a scientific skill set, you'd be still in Ukraine taking part in the orgy of theft and manipulation yourself.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    There weren’t more than a dozen “Ukrainians” from the West that played any sort of a role in the formation of the new Ukrainian state. A lot of these were indeed good solid well-wishers

    They are about as Ukrainian as I am Chinese. Their language is outdated and full of mangled English words. Their worldview is decades behind the curve. Most of them are descendants of Banderites who served Hitler, committed numerous crimes, and ran away from the advancing Red Army with Nazi occupiers. Naturally, their interests have very little in common with the interests of the people who actually live in Ukraine.

    As to well-wishers, we all know which road is paved with good intentions. They proved this once more beyond reasonable doubt.

    • Disagree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    @AnonFromTN

    Ukraine's main problem politically is that there just aren't many real patriots in government that care about their country. Politicians around the planet are by and large part of a shiftless, parasitic class mostly in it for themselves to fulfill their own egotistical needs. Is there any country in today's world that can count on the altruistic morals of their political class? Just