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True elites:

  • Rarely flaunt status or obsess over conventions – sometimes actively troll them, by dressing scruffily to formal events.
  • Can be vulgar where appropriate, make no apologies about it.
  • Don’t make much of displaying their credentials (“we know the lion by his claw”).

Proles misplaced into elites:

  • Insist on proper norms and protocols.
  • Are insufferable about “keeping up appearances” like Hyacinth Bucket (“it’s Bouquet”).
  • “Pardon my French” when swearing, and put asterixis over “cuss words.”
  • Proudly flaunt their more often than not very mediocre educational credentials for lack of any other significant or interesting accomplishments. (Unsurprisingly, this tends to be most common amongst “scientists” in fields like cultural anthropology).

One set of behaviors comes from confidence and a deep, innate sense of self-worth. The other comes from insecurity and a failure to understand actual social dynamics. This endears them neither to the true elites, who view them as tasteless posers, nor by their prole brethren, who resent how they now look down on them.

As such, we shouldn’t begrudge the likes of Dr. Jill Biden or Sebastian Gorka, PhD for so helpfully, if inadvertently, signaling their narcissism, low social acumen, lackluster IQ, and lack of any real class.

 
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  1. Please keep off topic posts to the current Open Thread.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    Commenting rules. Please note that anonymous comments are not allowed.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Anatoly Karlin

    According to a guest on Tucker Carlson's 12/14 Fox News show, The NYT refers to Stein as "Dr.", while not being so strident with that title when mentioning Ben Carson, who is a very accomplished MD, unlike Stein's education related doctorate.

    The very same guest said that AP typically only uses "Dr." when referring to those with a medical degree.

    Should having a doctorate give people the permission to blatantly lie like pro-Clinton/Ioffe/Tanden, Evelyn Farkas, whose PC fallacious Tweets have seen no punitive action from Twitter?

  2. “Doctor” Jill Biden is a mediocrity just like her husband. I don’t think you would call a junior college English teacher an ‘academic

    Some other charlatans who claim titles.

    Meghan Markle

    Reverend Al Sharpton

    Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @unit472

    Hillary Clinton is trying to say something feminist about Jill Biden - that she is not just a wife of a president, but a professionally successful woman independently of marriage. (I.e. that her use in society is beyond just being a wife to a President).

    Of course, it's response to her sense of inferiority about women's status, as it looks like she believes (at least in terms of supporting the current propaganda) the wife of the president is being viewed as having no independent professional status.

    Although American politics became so partisan, that she probably does not care if Trump's wife viewed only in terms of being wife of the presidential husband.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela

    , @Beckow
    @unit472


    ...Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman
     
    But Vindman is planning security operations against Russia and under Biden he could get a top role. The enemies are shaking (with laughter).

    Any Empire that has the likes of Vindman doing their strategy is in trouble. The human morphology has its faults, but face and body still speak to us: Biden's says 'pre-natal alcohol syndrome', Jill Biden's says "I want to please my teachers!", and Hunter is a druggie sociopath.

    None of them worries me as much as that morphologically quasi-human Colonel Vindman who was presented at some hearing as a 'national security' something-or-other. Vindman looks like a short-order cook who plays with shiny medals for fun and could gender change on us in between cheeseburgers. How is that scaring the enemies?

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

  3. What is the context of that Hillary tweet? Who is she saying this to?

  4. Good observation. It is unfortunate that more people do not understand this.

  5. I like the broad use of “Dr.” because it can sometimes add that extra bit of comedy to a funny-sounding name. Though, of course, I am against formal credentialism.

    I also dislike it, when older people tell a young person to call them by their first name. I prefer formality over over-familiarity, and would rather adopt the German tradition of compound titles, than first names for everyone.

  6. Only got 1 out of 3 correct for WASPs during their heyday before WW2, or maybe up to the early 50s. Or maybe people confused Jews with WASPs.

  7. “Are insufferable about “keeping up appearances” like Hyacinth Bucket (“it’s Bouquet”).”
    Can we say that this also relates to a gay country somewhere insisting on how every language on Earth should spell its capital’s name? Real countries, sure of their own identity, don’t do this.

    • Replies: @AP
    @Carlo

    Peking?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @utu

    , @El Dato
    @Carlo

    The one named after that 2020 infection, "Coof"?

  8. To be fair she is married to a drooling guy who will soon have his arm tied to his wheelchair to restrain his jacking off so why not cut her a little slack.

    • Agree: Leander Starr
    • Replies: @Peter D. Bredon
    @Morton's toes

    In the spirit of S. Sailer's "Hunter S. Biden" thread elsewhere:

    Indeed: "KNOW YOUR DOPE FIEND. YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT! You will not be
    able to see his eyes because of Tea-Shades, but his knuckles will be white from inner tension and
    his pants will be crusted with semen from constantly jacking off when he can’t find a rape victim.
    He will stagger and babble when questioned. He will not respect your badge. The Dope Fiend
    fears nothing. He will attack, for no reason, with every weapon at his command – including
    yours. BEWARE. Any officer apprehending a suspected marijuana addict should use all necessary
    force immediately. One stitch in time (on him) will usually save nine on you. Good luck." --
    The Chief

    , @Joe Paluka
    @Morton's toes

    Just give him a wig to play with and push his wheelchair into the corner so he can enjoy his last years of sniffing.

  9. This may not be on topic- but since someone mentioned Al Sharpton.

    I like Jesse Jackson. Everyone called him Reverend Jesse Jackson- while most people knew that he was “shtupping” (hope my Yiddish spelling is acceptable) his staff. “Shakedown Jesse,” and I referred to him as “Shakedown Jesse” before the book, was paying for abortions for his staff while lambasting white America.

    Regardless, my favorite title is the self-proclaimed “Bishop,” of which there are hundreds in New York City. One Bishop appoints his son or daughter as a “Bishop” so that the shakedown of African-Americans can continue unabated.

    When I was writing for a “Black” newspaper, I met an individual from African. This man’s father was a prominent religious clergyman. This African immigrant, who was proficient in computer tech, spoke to me. He told me that his father had to study Hebrew and Greek to become a clergyman and then he made an observation. His father could quote in Hebrew and Greek and this was not uncommon. But in America these self-proclaimed religious leaders, who were born in the United States, were unable to speak proper English.

    I hope that I am not straying too far from the topic.

    Thank you.

    Edward Manfredonia

    • Replies: @Bugs
    @edward manfredonia

    What? No white reverends to dis? Coincidence that all objects of your derision are African? Please, some equal time here.

    , @songbird
    @edward manfredonia

    I always thought there was something really off about people saying "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day." Even not considering the plagiarism, and the man's numerous shortcomings, it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called "doctor" on top of it.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Wyatt

  10. @Carlo
    "Are insufferable about “keeping up appearances” like Hyacinth Bucket (“it’s Bouquet”)."
    Can we say that this also relates to a gay country somewhere insisting on how every language on Earth should spell its capital's name? Real countries, sure of their own identity, don't do this.

    Replies: @AP, @El Dato

    Peking?

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @AP

    Im not sure if PRC is demanding that other countries call Peking Beijing? In German, Swedish, Spanish and in many other languages its still Peking or Pekin. Also Peking is from the older Wade-Giles system of transliteration to western languages, before that it was called Pechinum or Pequin in western sources. So its quite different case than the name of the Kiev, but I shouldnt written all this, soon there will be a khokhloscrach about all this...

    Maybe Burmas situation is more similar to Ukraines, Rangoon and Yangoon etc..

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Mr. Hack, @AP

    , @utu
    @AP

    Kolkata?

  11. True elites:

    Rarely flaunt status

    It’s not a question of peoples’ desires, but what they afford considering their position in the power rankings.

    If you are Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg or Jeff Bezos, then you can afford to wear shabby clothes and drive old cars, and you will not pay a penalty for it. Rather, the less you outwardly flaunt status, the more it will be seen as charming.

    On the other hand, if you were unemployed university student, who is dating Bill Gates’ daughter – then you should wear clean shoes when you visit the parents’ house, and mention that you are in a good university, or that your parents are not drug dealers.

    If you are the owner of the business, then you can go to work in your pajamas and spit on the floor, talk drunkenly in the office, and no-one can fire you.

    However, if you are a young intern on probation in the business, then you need to wear clean clothes, write your qualifications on a CV, boast about why you are useful to the business, etc. Junior people need to work hard to make a good impression, while senior people don’t need to care.

    If you Prince Charles, you can walk through Harrod’s with mud covered clothes. If you are some kind of unfamous African prince, then probably you should not walk through Harrod’s like that, or people would not know you were a prince, and will assume you are an illegal immigrant. Unknown Africans probably needs to display their status outwardly and wear nice clothes, to not be thrown onto the street. Prince Charles can relax and do what he wants.

    Can be vulgar where appropriate, make no apologies about it

    To the extent a powerful person – like unfortunately many bosses at work,- can be more relaxed, as they wouldn’t pay a penalty for it.

    Peasants have to be more polite near samurais, as the samurai can cut off their arm if the peasant offends them. Samurais don’t have to be polite near peasants, as peasants can’t do anything to them.

    Insist on proper norms and protocols.

    Norms and protocols allow hedgehogs to live together without stabbing each other – it’s a sign of civilized societies with high proportions of the population having some equal legal status. Hence, that Japan or Sweden where even rich people are expected to follow norms and protocols, are more socially calm to live than Lebanon or Brazil, where the rich people can do as they want without penalties.

    Where the elites are allowed by the population, to follow outwardly whatever they feel like, and don’t have to pretend to follow the same rules as ordinary people – then the end result will trend to the atmosphere of the rulers in countries like Lebanon.

    • Agree: Pop Warner
  12. @unit472
    "Doctor" Jill Biden is a mediocrity just like her husband. I don't think you would call a junior college English teacher an 'academic

    Some other charlatans who claim titles.

    Meghan Markle

    Reverend Al Sharpton

    Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Beckow

    Hillary Clinton is trying to say something feminist about Jill Biden – that she is not just a wife of a president, but a professionally successful woman independently of marriage. (I.e. that her use in society is beyond just being a wife to a President).

    Of course, it’s response to her sense of inferiority about women’s status, as it looks like she believes (at least in terms of supporting the current propaganda) the wife of the president is being viewed as having no independent professional status.

    Although American politics became so partisan, that she probably does not care if Trump’s wife viewed only in terms of being wife of the presidential husband.

    • Replies: @Gerard-Mandela
    @Dmitry


    Hillary Clinton is trying to say something feminist about Jill Biden – that she is not just a wife of a president, but a professionally successful woman independently of marriage. (I.e. that her use in society is beyond just being a wife to a President).
     
    Tony Blair, Obama, Clinton - all had wives ( well "wife" for Obama) who were superior in achievement to them in their initial jobs as lawyers , because they all had the same/similar degree. I suspect them becoming politicians has been driven either by severe overcompensation for this fact.

    I suspect that Merkel's husband has never used his d**k - but we can see the same pattern with him - similar degree as Merkel, similar job as her, he overachieves her........she goes into politics.

    None of this applies to Biden - no idea if she is a feminist........and her husband is obviously severely dumb.
  13. When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.

    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there’s also a sign of a more stable power structure.

    Bill Gates does not need you to personally surrender a physical threat against him, and for us to acquiesce to his superior status over us, as an individual. There is a whole weight of the modern state, with its reified monetary system, and ultimately legal system, prisons and police forces, that enforce his superior status over ordinary person. Therefore, his superior status is abstracted, and doesn’t depend on him individually, but on a complex system. People only have to acquiesce to the country’s legal system, and the power hierarchy is included in the contract.

    • Replies: @AltanBakshi
    @Dmitry


    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there’s also a sign of a more stable power structure.
     
    Hah Hitler and Napoleon dressed blandly on purpose, especially when in comparison to Marshals of France or Reichmarschall Hermann Göring. Was there then a more stable power structure? Hitler even bragged about his simple style, but yes there are some rather grandiose portraits of Napoleon, but rarely he dressed in such way. These things are morr dependent on prevailing customs and fashion, than to stability. 17th century European powers were remarkably stable, but still their monarchs dressed like tropical parrots, the leaders of relatively short lived communist regimes dressed very modestly and so on and so on.
    , @Cyrano
    @Dmitry

    I think that also one of the reasons why rulers – especially kings like to wear uniforms – is because they want to display their multidimensional superiority over the mere mortals. Not only are they richer then “ordinary” people (thanks to superior genetics, supposedly), but they possess military talents as well, which legitimizes their rule over the masses. Heck, Prince Charles even likes to wear skirts – to demonstrate that he can make it not only as a king, but as a drag queen too.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    , @Coconuts
    @Dmitry


    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.
     
    How can all of the pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy be explained? Though the queen doesn't rule, she is the frontwoman for the people who do.

    Also, this is too Hobbesian.

    Replies: @Dmitry

  14. @AP
    @Carlo

    Peking?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @utu

    Im not sure if PRC is demanding that other countries call Peking Beijing? In German, Swedish, Spanish and in many other languages its still Peking or Pekin. Also Peking is from the older Wade-Giles system of transliteration to western languages, before that it was called Pechinum or Pequin in western sources. So its quite different case than the name of the Kiev, but I shouldnt written all this, soon there will be a khokhloscrach about all this…

    Maybe Burmas situation is more similar to Ukraines, Rangoon and Yangoon etc..

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    Yes, the Chinese aren't forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incidentally, Beijing remains Пекин in Russian and the Chinese have made no comment on that whatsoever, unlike svidomy with their в Украине/на Украине obsession (and many others).

    Replies: @Eagle Eye, @Kent Nationalist, @jimmyriddle

    , @Mr. Hack
    @AltanBakshi

    Don't worry Altan, looks and smells more like katsaposrach to me? :-)

    , @AP
    @AltanBakshi

    China insists with English (see other post). There is also the matter of Kolkata and Mumbai.

  15. But then WASPs (used to be) tend to be simply but tastefully dressed, but then they are polite and do not swear in public, and would never dream of attending a formal event in basketball jersey, shorts, and rubber sandals. So maybe people are mistaking rich Guidos, Jews, and ethnicities with a penchant for gold chains for WASPs?

  16. @Dmitry
    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.

    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there's also a sign of a more stable power structure.

    Bill Gates does not need you to personally surrender a physical threat against him, and for us to acquiesce to his superior status over us, as an individual. There is a whole weight of the modern state, with its reified monetary system, and ultimately legal system, prisons and police forces, that enforce his superior status over ordinary person. Therefore, his superior status is abstracted, and doesn't depend on him individually, but on a complex system. People only have to acquiesce to the country's legal system, and the power hierarchy is included in the contract.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Cyrano, @Coconuts

    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there’s also a sign of a more stable power structure.

    Hah Hitler and Napoleon dressed blandly on purpose, especially when in comparison to Marshals of France or Reichmarschall Hermann Göring. Was there then a more stable power structure? Hitler even bragged about his simple style, but yes there are some rather grandiose portraits of Napoleon, but rarely he dressed in such way. These things are morr dependent on prevailing customs and fashion, than to stability. 17th century European powers were remarkably stable, but still their monarchs dressed like tropical parrots, the leaders of relatively short lived communist regimes dressed very modestly and so on and so on.

  17. @AltanBakshi
    @AP

    Im not sure if PRC is demanding that other countries call Peking Beijing? In German, Swedish, Spanish and in many other languages its still Peking or Pekin. Also Peking is from the older Wade-Giles system of transliteration to western languages, before that it was called Pechinum or Pequin in western sources. So its quite different case than the name of the Kiev, but I shouldnt written all this, soon there will be a khokhloscrach about all this...

    Maybe Burmas situation is more similar to Ukraines, Rangoon and Yangoon etc..

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Mr. Hack, @AP

    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incidentally, Beijing remains Пекин in Russian and the Chinese have made no comment on that whatsoever, unlike svidomy with their в Украине/на Украине obsession (and many others).

    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    @Anatoly Karlin


    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing ... . This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.
     
    Not quite. "Peking" is the traditional Western name based on the pronunciation in Southern Chinese dialects or old Mandarin. Beijing is the pronunciation in current Mandarin. Similar to how London is known as Londres in French and Spanish reflecting older forms of the city's name.

    Peking University never deigned to adopt the new-fangled spelling although many half-wits in Western academia proudly refer to it as Beijing University.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    , @Kent Nationalist
    @Anatoly Karlin


    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.
     
    Incorrect

    Mr Higgie, who kindly compliments me for being one of the few to hold out against this, says the secret police regime in Peking began to demand the 'Beijing' usage in 1979. The New York Times gave in in 1986 (followed by most other US media soon after). The Guardian did so in 1988, and (of course) the BBC followed in 1990. The old truly independent 'Independent' initially refused, to its credit, saying rightly that it would not be told what to do by the Chinese government. I am not sure when it gave in, but I expect it was after it stopped being independent and had become the rather predictably left-liberal sheet it is now. The London Times held out until 1997, when, according to the Irish Times, (Mr Higgie writes) its Peking correspondent was summoned to the Foreign Ministry and told that co-operation would be withdrawn if his newspaper did not adopt the Kowtow name of the PRC capital.

     

    https://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2020/09/the-beijing-kowtow-and-the-mumbai-jumbai-cringe-more-on-the-strange-renaming-of-cities-.html
    , @jimmyriddle
    @Anatoly Karlin

    And it is still Peking University for some reason.

  18. The reason that the King of Sweden or Netherlands does not wear a military uniform anywhere like it is 1910 is because of political reasons, but then the Netherlands and Sweden was as civilized a place in 1910 as it is today. As for a samurai killing a farmer, is it like a navy captain choosing to beach his ship, he has the authority to do so, but he better has a very very good explanation for it. And no, I woke up on the wrong side of bed today is not considered a good explanation.

  19. Eagle Eye says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    Yes, the Chinese aren't forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incidentally, Beijing remains Пекин in Russian and the Chinese have made no comment on that whatsoever, unlike svidomy with their в Украине/на Украине obsession (and many others).

    Replies: @Eagle Eye, @Kent Nationalist, @jimmyriddle

    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing … . This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Not quite. “Peking” is the traditional Western name based on the pronunciation in Southern Chinese dialects or old Mandarin. Beijing is the pronunciation in current Mandarin. Similar to how London is known as Londres in French and Spanish reflecting older forms of the city’s name.

    Peking University never deigned to adopt the new-fangled spelling although many half-wits in Western academia proudly refer to it as Beijing University.

    • Replies: @Europe Europa
    @Eagle Eye

    I think that is the crux of the issue, the Chinese government is quite paranoid about anything that would give Cantonese (or any other "dialect") any sort of prestige or credibility above or on par with Mandarin.

    Mandarin and Cantonese are to all intents and purposes different languages in their spoken form, as different as French and Italian or Dutch and German. Written Chinese is more or less the same, but also there are specific Cantonese characters that if used would make it quite difficult for a non-Cantonese speaker to read.

    The Chinese government is clearly not prepared to let any part of China have any pretence of having their own independent language and culture, presumably out of fear it would lead to separatist movements.

    I think they're also particularly paranoid about Cantonese because of the number of Cantonese, and also because the Cantonese would naturally gravitate to Hong Kong rather than Beijing for obvious geographic and cultural reasons.

  20. PHD = piled higher and deeper

    acutely for education PHDs.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    @prime noticer

    She doesn't have a PhD, she has an EdD, which is a different degree. This is part of the joke, I think. Education is such a lame field that they created their own terminal degree with its own lame requirements.

    That said, Jill Biden's defense of her husband on the campaign trail was admirable, and her work teaching at community colleges, while not impressive from the point of view of scholarship, is not inherently anything to be embarrassed about.

  21. The true elite, always produce types that are relatively freer from convention, because they are completely secure, and have nothing to strive for. The English elite, would produce the most wonderful eccentrics, who were not afraid to be perfectly themselves.

    All of us are, deep down, pretty weird and eccentric. We are all freaks. It is fear of social shame that makes us suppress ourselves and act “normal”. One of the saddest things, is to see a bunch of middle class people in a bar on a Friday night, too scared to be relaxed, and all worried about what the next person thinks of them.

    When I was younger and sillier, I too had a bit of this strivey stupidity in me. But there were times, when I was suddenly struck by the sheer silliness of trying so hard to impress strangers, and obey social convention, and the gloominess and inhibition it led to. We were there to have fun, but everyone was serious, grim, miserable, and afraid. I would suddenly relax, stop caring, stop striving, drop my ambitions and goals, and a feeling of pure freedom, lightness, and happiness would course through me, as well as a great compassion for mankind, who didn’t understand, and took nonsense seriously. It was at times like this, that let me see what life could truly be like, when you are free, and was the seed of my mature life philosophy (and, incidentally, made girls like me much more lol).

    One of the most wonderful thing about the old English culture, was its tolerance of eccentricity. But that could only be, in a society with a secure, landed aristocracy, and clear social rules. On a secure foundation, freedom can flourish.

    The aspirational middle classes, have status anxiety and take the social rules very seriously indeed. They are generally an unhappy, unfree lot.

    The lower classes, who have nothing to hope for, are like the elite relatively free and cheerful, not taking societies conventions seriously.

    True high culture, depends on this feeling of security, which allows your true personality to unfold freely, and your true intellectual path, to be followed wherever it may lead. Today, if you advance a slightly original idea or challenge convention, a horde of petty minds and weak personalities will descend upon you and try and shut you up. Immediately, a Confederacy Of Dunces is formed, and swarms you with a thousand petty bee stings.

    In a society where no one has security, no one is free to follow their insights. Try getting a grant for an unconventional idea. Try getting published. Try mentioning it even to the horde of petty minds.

    This is why originality and creativity has declined so greatly in our time. And will not be recovered any time soon, much less in China under the CCP lol.

    Taoism and Zen, were magnificent techniques to free one from the repression of social convention, because it was understood that while social convention provides security, it can kill the spirit.

    However, freedom of spirit, originality, and the freedom to be yourself, unfold against a background of clear social rules. The finest flowers of liberalism depend on a deep foundation of conservatism. Ironically, today, there is too much anarchy to provide the secure foundation upon which people can feel safe enough to be original and creative – themselves.

    So the first order, is to establish a new clear set of social rules – a stupid and unintelligent conservatism that will be the bedrock of society. And absolute economic security for at least some part of society- preferably all, but at least some.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @AaronB

    "So the first order, is to establish a new clear set of social rules – a stupid and unintelligent conservatism that will be the bedrock of society. And absolute economic security for at least some part of society- preferably all, but at least some."

    Gertrude Stein, of all people, supported Petain and fascism in general (a great scandal recently) on exactly those grounds. Freedom for avant-garde experimentation requires a secure social structure. As you say (and as De Toqueville intuited) complete "freedom" produces conformity, as no one knows what to do, and so follows what everyone else does and says.

    "Notre Dame des Fascistes: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, & the Joy of Collaboration"
    https://counter-currents.com/2020/08/notre-dame-des-fascistes-1/

    Replies: @AaronB

  22. @AltanBakshi
    @AP

    Im not sure if PRC is demanding that other countries call Peking Beijing? In German, Swedish, Spanish and in many other languages its still Peking or Pekin. Also Peking is from the older Wade-Giles system of transliteration to western languages, before that it was called Pechinum or Pequin in western sources. So its quite different case than the name of the Kiev, but I shouldnt written all this, soon there will be a khokhloscrach about all this...

    Maybe Burmas situation is more similar to Ukraines, Rangoon and Yangoon etc..

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Mr. Hack, @AP

    Don’t worry Altan, looks and smells more like katsaposrach to me? 🙂

  23. @unit472
    "Doctor" Jill Biden is a mediocrity just like her husband. I don't think you would call a junior college English teacher an 'academic

    Some other charlatans who claim titles.

    Meghan Markle

    Reverend Al Sharpton

    Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman

    Replies: @Dmitry, @Beckow

    …Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman

    But Vindman is planning security operations against Russia and under Biden he could get a top role. The enemies are shaking (with laughter).

    Any Empire that has the likes of Vindman doing their strategy is in trouble. The human morphology has its faults, but face and body still speak to us: Biden’s says ‘pre-natal alcohol syndrome‘, Jill Biden’s says “I want to please my teachers!“, and Hunter is a druggie sociopath.

    None of them worries me as much as that morphologically quasi-human Colonel Vindman who was presented at some hearing as a ‘national security‘ something-or-other. Vindman looks like a short-order cook who plays with shiny medals for fun and could gender change on us in between cheeseburgers. How is that scaring the enemies?

    • LOL: Mikhail
    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Beckow

    Russians joke that if Russian or Chinese Army encounters the US Army of fags, lesbians, and trannies, they would all die (of laughter).

  24. Plato and Aristotle never got their PhDs. Nor did Archimedes. Euclid- neither. Aristarchus … nothing.

    When you think of it, they’ve been cheated. Swedish academy ignored them, too.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @Bardon Kaldian

    There was a Soviet joke that in dark tsarist times there was only one writer in Tula region – Tolstoy, whereas now there are more than 200 members of the writers’ union.

    , @James O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    All this would be resolved if we went back to Plato's standards. Over the entrance to the academy, "Let no one ignorant of geometry enter" . That is to say, mathematics. Of course, Plato took knowledge of Greek for granted. Up to the turn of the last century, college admission required competence in both. (Eventually medical schools dropped Greek for chemistry and such, so no foul. Medical students like Celine would write lovely dissertations on topics in medical history).

    The point is, if you have strict standards going in, you're less likely to have a classroom full of bullshit artists. Today, not so much. I went to a third rate college in Canada, but everyone (but one) on my department's faculty had a PhD from Toronto and most also had a Licentiate from the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, so they had to know French, German, Latin and Greek --- before getting accepted in the program. At that point they presumably knew what's what.

    They were of the same generation as the Frankfurters, who were even more fearsomely educated. Horkheimer's thought was based on Schopenhauer, not Marx -- who, himself, wrote his dissertation on Democritus. They were right to think American "culture" was a joke, and that their students were empty vessels ready to be filled. No wonder we lost the culture wars.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

  25. Are insufferable about “keeping up appearances” like Hyacinth Bucket (“it’s Bouquet”).

    A young ( ish ) Russian Nationalist quotes from a fairly obscure BBC social comedy from the early 1990s ( 1990-95 ) Keeping Up Appearances. At best, he was at primary school when it appeared. For my sins, I did see it as an adult. It was a mildly amusing piece, which I only bothered to watch occasionally. Worst still, its writer, Roy Clarke, was responsible for that crime against comedy, Last of the Summer Wine. The BBC ran it for 37 years!

    So a really odd reference. Not that you will explain. It’s probably confidential !

  26. @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    Yes, the Chinese aren't forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incidentally, Beijing remains Пекин in Russian and the Chinese have made no comment on that whatsoever, unlike svidomy with their в Украине/на Украине obsession (and many others).

    Replies: @Eagle Eye, @Kent Nationalist, @jimmyriddle

    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incorrect

    Mr Higgie, who kindly compliments me for being one of the few to hold out against this, says the secret police regime in Peking began to demand the ‘Beijing’ usage in 1979. The New York Times gave in in 1986 (followed by most other US media soon after). The Guardian did so in 1988, and (of course) the BBC followed in 1990. The old truly independent ‘Independent’ initially refused, to its credit, saying rightly that it would not be told what to do by the Chinese government. I am not sure when it gave in, but I expect it was after it stopped being independent and had become the rather predictably left-liberal sheet it is now. The London Times held out until 1997, when, according to the Irish Times, (Mr Higgie writes) its Peking correspondent was summoned to the Foreign Ministry and told that co-operation would be withdrawn if his newspaper did not adopt the Kowtow name of the PRC capital.

    https://hitchensblog.mailonsunday.co.uk/2020/09/the-beijing-kowtow-and-the-mumbai-jumbai-cringe-more-on-the-strange-renaming-of-cities-.html

    • Agree: utu
  27. I don’t like being called ‘Dr. Razboynik’, but as songbird mentions, it’s important to have some conventions and not be overly familiar as it makes for a polite society. Russian language has the perfect solution where you’re called by the first and second name by someone who wants to maintain enough distance. Unfortunately very few people speak Russian around me these days so I don’t get called ‘Blatnoi Vor’evich’ very often.

  28. @Dmitry
    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.

    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there's also a sign of a more stable power structure.

    Bill Gates does not need you to personally surrender a physical threat against him, and for us to acquiesce to his superior status over us, as an individual. There is a whole weight of the modern state, with its reified monetary system, and ultimately legal system, prisons and police forces, that enforce his superior status over ordinary person. Therefore, his superior status is abstracted, and doesn't depend on him individually, but on a complex system. People only have to acquiesce to the country's legal system, and the power hierarchy is included in the contract.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Cyrano, @Coconuts

    I think that also one of the reasons why rulers – especially kings like to wear uniforms – is because they want to display their multidimensional superiority over the mere mortals. Not only are they richer then “ordinary” people (thanks to superior genetics, supposedly), but they possess military talents as well, which legitimizes their rule over the masses. Heck, Prince Charles even likes to wear skirts – to demonstrate that he can make it not only as a king, but as a drag queen too.

    • Replies: @James O'Meara
    @Cyrano

    Speaking of drag queens, here's the leader of the anti-Francis homophobes:

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UWu7flw-OCw/VGJM15ZCqcI/AAAAAAAAj8k/x6STMGfTopY/s1600/Burke_Green_Cropped.jpg

    Replies: @cortesar

  29. @AP
    @Carlo

    Peking?

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @utu

    Kolkata?

    • Agree: AP
  30. @Eagle Eye
    @Anatoly Karlin


    Yes, the Chinese aren’t forcing anybody to convert to Beijing ... . This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.
     
    Not quite. "Peking" is the traditional Western name based on the pronunciation in Southern Chinese dialects or old Mandarin. Beijing is the pronunciation in current Mandarin. Similar to how London is known as Londres in French and Spanish reflecting older forms of the city's name.

    Peking University never deigned to adopt the new-fangled spelling although many half-wits in Western academia proudly refer to it as Beijing University.

    Replies: @Europe Europa

    I think that is the crux of the issue, the Chinese government is quite paranoid about anything that would give Cantonese (or any other “dialect”) any sort of prestige or credibility above or on par with Mandarin.

    Mandarin and Cantonese are to all intents and purposes different languages in their spoken form, as different as French and Italian or Dutch and German. Written Chinese is more or less the same, but also there are specific Cantonese characters that if used would make it quite difficult for a non-Cantonese speaker to read.

    The Chinese government is clearly not prepared to let any part of China have any pretence of having their own independent language and culture, presumably out of fear it would lead to separatist movements.

    I think they’re also particularly paranoid about Cantonese because of the number of Cantonese, and also because the Cantonese would naturally gravitate to Hong Kong rather than Beijing for obvious geographic and cultural reasons.

  31. @Morton's toes
    To be fair she is married to a drooling guy who will soon have his arm tied to his wheelchair to restrain his jacking off so why not cut her a little slack.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Joe Paluka

    In the spirit of S. Sailer’s “Hunter S. Biden” thread elsewhere:

    Indeed: “KNOW YOUR DOPE FIEND. YOUR LIFE MAY DEPEND ON IT! You will not be
    able to see his eyes because of Tea-Shades, but his knuckles will be white from inner tension and
    his pants will be crusted with semen from constantly jacking off when he can’t find a rape victim.
    He will stagger and babble when questioned. He will not respect your badge. The Dope Fiend
    fears nothing. He will attack, for no reason, with every weapon at his command – including
    yours. BEWARE. Any officer apprehending a suspected marijuana addict should use all necessary
    force immediately. One stitch in time (on him) will usually save nine on you. Good luck.” —
    The Chief

  32. All true, but expressed at greater detail in the indispensable Paul Fussell, Class: A Guide Through the American Status System (New York: Summit Books, 1983), esp. Chapter 7, “‘Speak, That I May See Thee.’”

  33. @AaronB
    The true elite, always produce types that are relatively freer from convention, because they are completely secure, and have nothing to strive for. The English elite, would produce the most wonderful eccentrics, who were not afraid to be perfectly themselves.

    All of us are, deep down, pretty weird and eccentric. We are all freaks. It is fear of social shame that makes us suppress ourselves and act "normal". One of the saddest things, is to see a bunch of middle class people in a bar on a Friday night, too scared to be relaxed, and all worried about what the next person thinks of them.

    When I was younger and sillier, I too had a bit of this strivey stupidity in me. But there were times, when I was suddenly struck by the sheer silliness of trying so hard to impress strangers, and obey social convention, and the gloominess and inhibition it led to. We were there to have fun, but everyone was serious, grim, miserable, and afraid. I would suddenly relax, stop caring, stop striving, drop my ambitions and goals, and a feeling of pure freedom, lightness, and happiness would course through me, as well as a great compassion for mankind, who didn't understand, and took nonsense seriously. It was at times like this, that let me see what life could truly be like, when you are free, and was the seed of my mature life philosophy (and, incidentally, made girls like me much more lol).

    One of the most wonderful thing about the old English culture, was its tolerance of eccentricity. But that could only be, in a society with a secure, landed aristocracy, and clear social rules. On a secure foundation, freedom can flourish.

    The aspirational middle classes, have status anxiety and take the social rules very seriously indeed. They are generally an unhappy, unfree lot.

    The lower classes, who have nothing to hope for, are like the elite relatively free and cheerful, not taking societies conventions seriously.

    True high culture, depends on this feeling of security, which allows your true personality to unfold freely, and your true intellectual path, to be followed wherever it may lead. Today, if you advance a slightly original idea or challenge convention, a horde of petty minds and weak personalities will descend upon you and try and shut you up. Immediately, a Confederacy Of Dunces is formed, and swarms you with a thousand petty bee stings.

    In a society where no one has security, no one is free to follow their insights. Try getting a grant for an unconventional idea. Try getting published. Try mentioning it even to the horde of petty minds.

    This is why originality and creativity has declined so greatly in our time. And will not be recovered any time soon, much less in China under the CCP lol.

    Taoism and Zen, were magnificent techniques to free one from the repression of social convention, because it was understood that while social convention provides security, it can kill the spirit.

    However, freedom of spirit, originality, and the freedom to be yourself, unfold against a background of clear social rules. The finest flowers of liberalism depend on a deep foundation of conservatism. Ironically, today, there is too much anarchy to provide the secure foundation upon which people can feel safe enough to be original and creative - themselves.

    So the first order, is to establish a new clear set of social rules - a stupid and unintelligent conservatism that will be the bedrock of society. And absolute economic security for at least some part of society- preferably all, but at least some.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    “So the first order, is to establish a new clear set of social rules – a stupid and unintelligent conservatism that will be the bedrock of society. And absolute economic security for at least some part of society- preferably all, but at least some.”

    Gertrude Stein, of all people, supported Petain and fascism in general (a great scandal recently) on exactly those grounds. Freedom for avant-garde experimentation requires a secure social structure. As you say (and as De Toqueville intuited) complete “freedom” produces conformity, as no one knows what to do, and so follows what everyone else does and says.

    “Notre Dame des Fascistes: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, & the Joy of Collaboration”
    https://counter-currents.com/2020/08/notre-dame-des-fascistes-1/

    • Replies: @AaronB
    @James O'Meara

    Thanks.

    And yes. Freedom, requires a sense of security. Things today, are too uncertain, to allow for freedom. Too much freedom, is as bad as too much repression.

    The two societies that produced the most wonderful eccentrics, and original characters, are England and Japan, island nations with complex and strict social rules. But really France, Germany, and Italy, in some periods, also did. And Russia, under the Czar.

    Complete freedom is the death of freedom. Complete anything is the death of that thing. Things thrive in contrast and opposition.

    The consummation that is devoutly to be wished for, is for a stupid conservatism to put an end to our current culture wars. On the broad back of stupidity, intelligence will flourish.

    The mass of people, will always be stupid, and afraid of originality. But might this not be the precondition for culture, for the happy few, for originality?

    In Buddhism, a Saint is likened to a lotus flower, which rises in purity and beauty from a swamp. In Buddhism, the swamp is necessary if you will have the saint.

  34. @Cyrano
    @Dmitry

    I think that also one of the reasons why rulers – especially kings like to wear uniforms – is because they want to display their multidimensional superiority over the mere mortals. Not only are they richer then “ordinary” people (thanks to superior genetics, supposedly), but they possess military talents as well, which legitimizes their rule over the masses. Heck, Prince Charles even likes to wear skirts – to demonstrate that he can make it not only as a king, but as a drag queen too.

    Replies: @James O'Meara

    Speaking of drag queens, here’s the leader of the anti-Francis homophobes:

    • Replies: @cortesar
    @James O'Meara

    That thing looks like something that could save Western Civilization from its imminent and inevitable fall

  35. @James O'Meara
    @AaronB

    "So the first order, is to establish a new clear set of social rules – a stupid and unintelligent conservatism that will be the bedrock of society. And absolute economic security for at least some part of society- preferably all, but at least some."

    Gertrude Stein, of all people, supported Petain and fascism in general (a great scandal recently) on exactly those grounds. Freedom for avant-garde experimentation requires a secure social structure. As you say (and as De Toqueville intuited) complete "freedom" produces conformity, as no one knows what to do, and so follows what everyone else does and says.

    "Notre Dame des Fascistes: Gertrude Stein, Bernard Faÿ, & the Joy of Collaboration"
    https://counter-currents.com/2020/08/notre-dame-des-fascistes-1/

    Replies: @AaronB

    Thanks.

    And yes. Freedom, requires a sense of security. Things today, are too uncertain, to allow for freedom. Too much freedom, is as bad as too much repression.

    The two societies that produced the most wonderful eccentrics, and original characters, are England and Japan, island nations with complex and strict social rules. But really France, Germany, and Italy, in some periods, also did. And Russia, under the Czar.

    Complete freedom is the death of freedom. Complete anything is the death of that thing. Things thrive in contrast and opposition.

    The consummation that is devoutly to be wished for, is for a stupid conservatism to put an end to our current culture wars. On the broad back of stupidity, intelligence will flourish.

    The mass of people, will always be stupid, and afraid of originality. But might this not be the precondition for culture, for the happy few, for originality?

    In Buddhism, a Saint is likened to a lotus flower, which rises in purity and beauty from a swamp. In Buddhism, the swamp is necessary if you will have the saint.

  36. I always tell my grad students that PhD does not make anyone smarter than they were without it, and its absence does not make anyone dumber than s/he is. This is a good illustration of the fact. I will use it as a glaring example of its truth.

  37. @Beckow
    @unit472


    ...Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman
     
    But Vindman is planning security operations against Russia and under Biden he could get a top role. The enemies are shaking (with laughter).

    Any Empire that has the likes of Vindman doing their strategy is in trouble. The human morphology has its faults, but face and body still speak to us: Biden's says 'pre-natal alcohol syndrome', Jill Biden's says "I want to please my teachers!", and Hunter is a druggie sociopath.

    None of them worries me as much as that morphologically quasi-human Colonel Vindman who was presented at some hearing as a 'national security' something-or-other. Vindman looks like a short-order cook who plays with shiny medals for fun and could gender change on us in between cheeseburgers. How is that scaring the enemies?

    Replies: @AnonFromTN

    Russians joke that if Russian or Chinese Army encounters the US Army of fags, lesbians, and trannies, they would all die (of laughter).

  38. @Bardon Kaldian
    Plato and Aristotle never got their PhDs. Nor did Archimedes. Euclid- neither. Aristarchus ... nothing.

    When you think of it, they've been cheated. Swedish academy ignored them, too.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @James O'Meara

    There was a Soviet joke that in dark tsarist times there was only one writer in Tula region – Tolstoy, whereas now there are more than 200 members of the writers’ union.

  39. @Dmitry
    @unit472

    Hillary Clinton is trying to say something feminist about Jill Biden - that she is not just a wife of a president, but a professionally successful woman independently of marriage. (I.e. that her use in society is beyond just being a wife to a President).

    Of course, it's response to her sense of inferiority about women's status, as it looks like she believes (at least in terms of supporting the current propaganda) the wife of the president is being viewed as having no independent professional status.

    Although American politics became so partisan, that she probably does not care if Trump's wife viewed only in terms of being wife of the presidential husband.

    Replies: @Gerard-Mandela

    Hillary Clinton is trying to say something feminist about Jill Biden – that she is not just a wife of a president, but a professionally successful woman independently of marriage. (I.e. that her use in society is beyond just being a wife to a President).

    Tony Blair, Obama, Clinton – all had wives ( well “wife” for Obama) who were superior in achievement to them in their initial jobs as lawyers , because they all had the same/similar degree. I suspect them becoming politicians has been driven either by severe overcompensation for this fact.

    I suspect that Merkel’s husband has never used his d**k – but we can see the same pattern with him – similar degree as Merkel, similar job as her, he overachieves her……..she goes into politics.

    None of this applies to Biden – no idea if she is a feminist……..and her husband is obviously severely dumb.

  40. @Bardon Kaldian
    Plato and Aristotle never got their PhDs. Nor did Archimedes. Euclid- neither. Aristarchus ... nothing.

    When you think of it, they've been cheated. Swedish academy ignored them, too.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @James O'Meara

    All this would be resolved if we went back to Plato’s standards. Over the entrance to the academy, “Let no one ignorant of geometry enter” . That is to say, mathematics. Of course, Plato took knowledge of Greek for granted. Up to the turn of the last century, college admission required competence in both. (Eventually medical schools dropped Greek for chemistry and such, so no foul. Medical students like Celine would write lovely dissertations on topics in medical history).

    The point is, if you have strict standards going in, you’re less likely to have a classroom full of bullshit artists. Today, not so much. I went to a third rate college in Canada, but everyone (but one) on my department’s faculty had a PhD from Toronto and most also had a Licentiate from the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, so they had to know French, German, Latin and Greek — before getting accepted in the program. At that point they presumably knew what’s what.

    They were of the same generation as the Frankfurters, who were even more fearsomely educated. Horkheimer’s thought was based on Schopenhauer, not Marx — who, himself, wrote his dissertation on Democritus. They were right to think American “culture” was a joke, and that their students were empty vessels ready to be filled. No wonder we lost the culture wars.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    @James O'Meara

    I haven't read Horkheimer, although I think of all Frankfurters Benjamin will survive (as an aesthetician); Fromm too, as a popular humanist philosopher, a sort of benign Marxist-Freudian self-help author & Wittfogel as a sociologist & historian. Adorno only in his aphorisms (as far as his musicology goes, I am clueless, for me this is terra incognita). His magnum opus is as bad as Heidegger's & equally sterile.

    One shouldn't be too harsh on contemporary youth. From what I've seen, they are simply
    clueless, spending their time on FB, Twatter, Instagram.... For illustration- they, most of them, have never heard of movies made before the 1990s or so, even "classics" from, say, the 50's to the 80's.

  41. @AltanBakshi
    @AP

    Im not sure if PRC is demanding that other countries call Peking Beijing? In German, Swedish, Spanish and in many other languages its still Peking or Pekin. Also Peking is from the older Wade-Giles system of transliteration to western languages, before that it was called Pechinum or Pequin in western sources. So its quite different case than the name of the Kiev, but I shouldnt written all this, soon there will be a khokhloscrach about all this...

    Maybe Burmas situation is more similar to Ukraines, Rangoon and Yangoon etc..

    Replies: @Anatoly Karlin, @Mr. Hack, @AP

    China insists with English (see other post). There is also the matter of Kolkata and Mumbai.

  42. Credentialism is one of the major diseases of the age, goes much further than the senile Jo’ wife, much further than the cretins that sign their twitter or blog’s post with PhD
    Once I witnessed the sorry state of a company (120 employees in total) which had 32 (thirty two)VPs in the following order of the credential level
    Vice-President
    Senior-Vice President
    Executive Vice President
    Senior Executive Vice-President

    The other time in a bar a woman, when I asked her what she did for living, answered me “I am a Senior Executive”
    For a moment I thought the long dreaded moment of my execution has finally come
    “And you”? she asked me
    Oh me, I am a Senior Power Point Specialist, I responded

    Burn it all to the ground, every last one piece of it

    • LOL: Rich
  43. @James O'Meara
    @Cyrano

    Speaking of drag queens, here's the leader of the anti-Francis homophobes:

    https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UWu7flw-OCw/VGJM15ZCqcI/AAAAAAAAj8k/x6STMGfTopY/s1600/Burke_Green_Cropped.jpg

    Replies: @cortesar

    That thing looks like something that could save Western Civilization from its imminent and inevitable fall

  44. @Morton's toes
    To be fair she is married to a drooling guy who will soon have his arm tied to his wheelchair to restrain his jacking off so why not cut her a little slack.

    Replies: @Peter D. Bredon, @Joe Paluka

    Just give him a wig to play with and push his wheelchair into the corner so he can enjoy his last years of sniffing.

  45. @Anatoly Karlin
    @AltanBakshi

    Yes, the Chinese aren't forcing anybody to convert to Beijing to Peking. This is something undertaken by Western linguistics authorities in line with the changeover to pinyin.

    Incidentally, Beijing remains Пекин in Russian and the Chinese have made no comment on that whatsoever, unlike svidomy with their в Украине/на Украине obsession (and many others).

    Replies: @Eagle Eye, @Kent Nationalist, @jimmyriddle

    And it is still Peking University for some reason.

  46. @Anatoly Karlin
    Please keep off topic posts to the current Open Thread.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

    Commenting rules. Please note that anonymous comments are not allowed.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    According to a guest on Tucker Carlson’s 12/14 Fox News show, The NYT refers to Stein as “Dr.”, while not being so strident with that title when mentioning Ben Carson, who is a very accomplished MD, unlike Stein’s education related doctorate.

    The very same guest said that AP typically only uses “Dr.” when referring to those with a medical degree.

    Should having a doctorate give people the permission to blatantly lie like pro-Clinton/Ioffe/Tanden, Evelyn Farkas, whose PC fallacious Tweets have seen no punitive action from Twitter?

  47. @James O'Meara
    @Bardon Kaldian

    All this would be resolved if we went back to Plato's standards. Over the entrance to the academy, "Let no one ignorant of geometry enter" . That is to say, mathematics. Of course, Plato took knowledge of Greek for granted. Up to the turn of the last century, college admission required competence in both. (Eventually medical schools dropped Greek for chemistry and such, so no foul. Medical students like Celine would write lovely dissertations on topics in medical history).

    The point is, if you have strict standards going in, you're less likely to have a classroom full of bullshit artists. Today, not so much. I went to a third rate college in Canada, but everyone (but one) on my department's faculty had a PhD from Toronto and most also had a Licentiate from the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, so they had to know French, German, Latin and Greek --- before getting accepted in the program. At that point they presumably knew what's what.

    They were of the same generation as the Frankfurters, who were even more fearsomely educated. Horkheimer's thought was based on Schopenhauer, not Marx -- who, himself, wrote his dissertation on Democritus. They were right to think American "culture" was a joke, and that their students were empty vessels ready to be filled. No wonder we lost the culture wars.

    Replies: @Bardon Kaldian

    I haven’t read Horkheimer, although I think of all Frankfurters Benjamin will survive (as an aesthetician); Fromm too, as a popular humanist philosopher, a sort of benign Marxist-Freudian self-help author & Wittfogel as a sociologist & historian. Adorno only in his aphorisms (as far as his musicology goes, I am clueless, for me this is terra incognita). His magnum opus is as bad as Heidegger’s & equally sterile.

    One shouldn’t be too harsh on contemporary youth. From what I’ve seen, they are simply
    clueless, spending their time on FB, Twatter, Instagram…. For illustration- they, most of them, have never heard of movies made before the 1990s or so, even “classics” from, say, the 50’s to the 80’s.

  48. My father, a Magyar emigre has always found Gorka’s behavior quite embarrassing. It should be noted, Anatoly, that the Gorka clan has a long history in Hungary as provincial magistrates of some esteem, one even being the provisional governor of the Szekely lands during the springtime of nations.

    Like most of the ancestral civil service families, the Soviets expelled his parents in 1956 — but one doesn’t debase themselves quite as thoroughly as he did without sincere intent.

    Either way, a longer and more prestigious line than the Clintons.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Supply and Demand

    If one has to choose, Farkas is arguably more obnoxious.

  49. @Dmitry
    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.

    When rulers can historically stop wearing the shiny objects (even retire their jewels and golden crowns to museums), there's also a sign of a more stable power structure.

    Bill Gates does not need you to personally surrender a physical threat against him, and for us to acquiesce to his superior status over us, as an individual. There is a whole weight of the modern state, with its reified monetary system, and ultimately legal system, prisons and police forces, that enforce his superior status over ordinary person. Therefore, his superior status is abstracted, and doesn't depend on him individually, but on a complex system. People only have to acquiesce to the country's legal system, and the power hierarchy is included in the contract.

    Replies: @AltanBakshi, @Cyrano, @Coconuts

    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.

    How can all of the pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy be explained? Though the queen doesn’t rule, she is the frontwoman for the people who do.

    Also, this is too Hobbesian.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
    @Coconuts

    It depends on the historical stage.

    I visited Windsor Castle last year. My personal impression (if you can filter away the tourists and 19th century additions), was of an atmosphere of how I imagine should be a "fortified complex" of a Mexican drug cartel.

    There is the mixture of expensive objects and weapons, piled into the central fortress room - money and violence stockpiled in the same space. Then on the walls, intimidating portraits of warlords of the past. If you are able to project your mind to 500 years ago, this site might still has an intimidating atmosphere, like to trespass to a fortified complex of Los Zetas or Gulf Cartel.

    It's interesting to see the transitions in portraits of the British Royal family.

    It seems to my eyes, that around the 17th century, they stop presenting themselves like intimidating Mafia leaders. (Although Henry VIII still has an appearance of gypsy king).

    By King James I (of UK), the monarchy evolves to a much softer presentation of gentle hipsters, and the
    visual presentation matches his policies.


    pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy
     
    Since "Glorious Revolution", they became only a symbolic Kyoto aristocracy (de jure but not de facto rulers), and their sovereignty is a symbolic and spiritualized one.


    -


    Appearance and style also could transform from intimidating mafia lord, to show horse. And in the 21st century, they will likely intermarry with the Kardashians, and become even more accessible.

    Presentation of symbolic royalty by second half of 20th century - Prince Charles.

    https://i.imgur.com/n2vijF6.jpg

    By comparison, the Henry VII - who was famous for extortion, "protection rackets", and consolidation of power.

    https://i.imgur.com/E97esvo.jpg
    Here with his son - gypsy king Henry VIII
    https://i.imgur.com/jOiowA9.jpg

    But soon after, by Jacobean England (early 17th century), monarch has converted into a gentle hipster, famous for sponsorship of art and literature.

    https://i.imgur.com/PIrkZqa.jpg

    Replies: @Wielgus

  50. This is my comment from Sailer’s post:

    Someone made the point on Twitter earlier this year that Biden was chosen as Obama’s running mate partly because he was a dumb white guy. The logic being that dumb white guys would be less put out by an articulate, “uppity” black(ish) candidate if a dumb white guy was waiting in the wings. It made sense to me.

    Joe might not be very smart, but he was probably smart enough to work this out. It would explain why the whole Biden family are hypersensitive about intelligence and academic credentials.

  51. Excuse me, fellas, and you too Mr. Karlin,

    But Doctor of Education Jill Biden, OUR new First Lady, did not insist on anyone addressing her by her title and/or other signs of respect until the WSJ writer, a certain Joseph Epstein, in his article, went out of his way to insult her, not just with dissing the Dr. title, but other dismissive snides and gender-specific insults as well. What is his excuse? What was his need or compulsion to do this? Insecure masculinity? Envy? Did she insult him at some party or political rally? Is he a Fake Newser? A Trump bend-over-and-drop-your-drawers-er? I don’t see anyone here, including Mr. Karlin, mentioning this. I do see plenty of piling on though. C’mon, MEN. Be Better.

    Bugs

    • Replies: @Astuteobservor II
    @Bugs

    Woah. If true, we all fell for the trap by Epstein.

  52. @edward manfredonia
    This may not be on topic- but since someone mentioned Al Sharpton.

    I like Jesse Jackson. Everyone called him Reverend Jesse Jackson- while most people knew that he was "shtupping" (hope my Yiddish spelling is acceptable) his staff. "Shakedown Jesse," and I referred to him as "Shakedown Jesse" before the book, was paying for abortions for his staff while lambasting white America.

    Regardless, my favorite title is the self-proclaimed "Bishop," of which there are hundreds in New York City. One Bishop appoints his son or daughter as a "Bishop" so that the shakedown of African-Americans can continue unabated.

    When I was writing for a "Black" newspaper, I met an individual from African. This man's father was a prominent religious clergyman. This African immigrant, who was proficient in computer tech, spoke to me. He told me that his father had to study Hebrew and Greek to become a clergyman and then he made an observation. His father could quote in Hebrew and Greek and this was not uncommon. But in America these self-proclaimed religious leaders, who were born in the United States, were unable to speak proper English.

    I hope that I am not straying too far from the topic.

    Thank you.

    Edward Manfredonia

    Replies: @Bugs, @songbird

    What? No white reverends to dis? Coincidence that all objects of your derision are African? Please, some equal time here.

  53. @edward manfredonia
    This may not be on topic- but since someone mentioned Al Sharpton.

    I like Jesse Jackson. Everyone called him Reverend Jesse Jackson- while most people knew that he was "shtupping" (hope my Yiddish spelling is acceptable) his staff. "Shakedown Jesse," and I referred to him as "Shakedown Jesse" before the book, was paying for abortions for his staff while lambasting white America.

    Regardless, my favorite title is the self-proclaimed "Bishop," of which there are hundreds in New York City. One Bishop appoints his son or daughter as a "Bishop" so that the shakedown of African-Americans can continue unabated.

    When I was writing for a "Black" newspaper, I met an individual from African. This man's father was a prominent religious clergyman. This African immigrant, who was proficient in computer tech, spoke to me. He told me that his father had to study Hebrew and Greek to become a clergyman and then he made an observation. His father could quote in Hebrew and Greek and this was not uncommon. But in America these self-proclaimed religious leaders, who were born in the United States, were unable to speak proper English.

    I hope that I am not straying too far from the topic.

    Thank you.

    Edward Manfredonia

    Replies: @Bugs, @songbird

    I always thought there was something really off about people saying “Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.” Even not considering the plagiarism, and the man’s numerous shortcomings, it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called “doctor” on top of it.

    • Replies: @AnonFromTN
    @songbird


    it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called “doctor” on top of it.
     
    There are precedents. E.g., Goebbels was “Dr. Goebbels”. Would have had a holiday if the Nazis won the war.

    Replies: @songbird

    , @Wyatt
    @songbird

    Joggers really like titles because they enjoy the sense of importance and prominence it gives them, regardless of whether the title was well earned or just bestowed. It's kind of like how chimps and bonobos have their hierarchies and pecking orders, but they earn that through violence and gang attacks. Social status is a source of power. Women are a lot like this as well, but not to the degree that blacks are as a group.

    "Respek mah titles, white boyah!"

  54. @songbird
    @edward manfredonia

    I always thought there was something really off about people saying "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day." Even not considering the plagiarism, and the man's numerous shortcomings, it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called "doctor" on top of it.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Wyatt

    it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called “doctor” on top of it.

    There are precedents. E.g., Goebbels was “Dr. Goebbels”. Would have had a holiday if the Nazis won the war.

    • Replies: @songbird
    @AnonFromTN

    There were weird things going on with MLK - it was metaphysical. He had been assassinated and was being canonized by white liberals and special-interest blacks who had their own minority, ethnic power, at heart.

    I think it was the sort of thing that required a base diversity that the US had, but that Germany didn't have.

    Anyway, I don't think Goebbels had the necessary personality cult. Maybe, Hitler. But I think Germans were too folk-minded to give everyone in the regime their own holiday.

    Probably a mistake to make a holiday for anyone from the 20th century. Better documentation deals a blow to myth-making.

  55. @AnonFromTN
    @songbird


    it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called “doctor” on top of it.
     
    There are precedents. E.g., Goebbels was “Dr. Goebbels”. Would have had a holiday if the Nazis won the war.

    Replies: @songbird

    There were weird things going on with MLK – it was metaphysical. He had been assassinated and was being canonized by white liberals and special-interest blacks who had their own minority, ethnic power, at heart.

    I think it was the sort of thing that required a base diversity that the US had, but that Germany didn’t have.

    Anyway, I don’t think Goebbels had the necessary personality cult. Maybe, Hitler. But I think Germans were too folk-minded to give everyone in the regime their own holiday.

    Probably a mistake to make a holiday for anyone from the 20th century. Better documentation deals a blow to myth-making.

  56. @songbird
    @edward manfredonia

    I always thought there was something really off about people saying "Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day." Even not considering the plagiarism, and the man's numerous shortcomings, it is really bizarre to assert that he should be given a holiday and called "doctor" on top of it.

    Replies: @AnonFromTN, @Wyatt

    Joggers really like titles because they enjoy the sense of importance and prominence it gives them, regardless of whether the title was well earned or just bestowed. It’s kind of like how chimps and bonobos have their hierarchies and pecking orders, but they earn that through violence and gang attacks. Social status is a source of power. Women are a lot like this as well, but not to the degree that blacks are as a group.

    “Respek mah titles, white boyah!”

  57. @Bugs
    Excuse me, fellas, and you too Mr. Karlin,

    But Doctor of Education Jill Biden, OUR new First Lady, did not insist on anyone addressing her by her title and/or other signs of respect until the WSJ writer, a certain Joseph Epstein, in his article, went out of his way to insult her, not just with dissing the Dr. title, but other dismissive snides and gender-specific insults as well. What is his excuse? What was his need or compulsion to do this? Insecure masculinity? Envy? Did she insult him at some party or political rally? Is he a Fake Newser? A Trump bend-over-and-drop-your-drawers-er? I don't see anyone here, including Mr. Karlin, mentioning this. I do see plenty of piling on though. C'mon, MEN. Be Better.

    Bugs

    Replies: @Astuteobservor II

    Woah. If true, we all fell for the trap by Epstein.

    • Agree: El Dato
  58. @Supply and Demand
    My father, a Magyar emigre has always found Gorka’s behavior quite embarrassing. It should be noted, Anatoly, that the Gorka clan has a long history in Hungary as provincial magistrates of some esteem, one even being the provisional governor of the Szekely lands during the springtime of nations.

    Like most of the ancestral civil service families, the Soviets expelled his parents in 1956 — but one doesn’t debase themselves quite as thoroughly as he did without sincere intent.

    Either way, a longer and more prestigious line than the Clintons.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    If one has to choose, Farkas is arguably more obnoxious.

  59. @Coconuts
    @Dmitry


    When the power structure feels provisional and dependent on acquiescence of people to a more successfully violent person (power ultimately dependent on monkeys hitting each other with pieces of metal), then the rulers still feel need to wear shiny metals, crowns and light reflecting jewels.

    Rulers are indicated by wearing of shiny objects (jewels, jade, diamonds, gold, silver), that would have originally indicated magical powers to people, and perhaps helped to hypnotize you to see the person wearing these objects as having a right to rule over you, beyond the simple threat of violence.
     
    How can all of the pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy be explained? Though the queen doesn't rule, she is the frontwoman for the people who do.

    Also, this is too Hobbesian.

    Replies: @Dmitry

    It depends on the historical stage.

    I visited Windsor Castle last year. My personal impression (if you can filter away the tourists and 19th century additions), was of an atmosphere of how I imagine should be a “fortified complex” of a Mexican drug cartel.

    There is the mixture of expensive objects and weapons, piled into the central fortress room – money and violence stockpiled in the same space. Then on the walls, intimidating portraits of warlords of the past. If you are able to project your mind to 500 years ago, this site might still has an intimidating atmosphere, like to trespass to a fortified complex of Los Zetas or Gulf Cartel.

    It’s interesting to see the transitions in portraits of the British Royal family.

    It seems to my eyes, that around the 17th century, they stop presenting themselves like intimidating Mafia leaders. (Although Henry VIII still has an appearance of gypsy king).

    By King James I (of UK), the monarchy evolves to a much softer presentation of gentle hipsters, and the
    visual presentation matches his policies.

    pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy

    Since “Glorious Revolution”, they became only a symbolic Kyoto aristocracy (de jure but not de facto rulers), and their sovereignty is a symbolic and spiritualized one.

    Appearance and style also could transform from intimidating mafia lord, to show horse. And in the 21st century, they will likely intermarry with the Kardashians, and become even more accessible.

    Presentation of symbolic royalty by second half of 20th century – Prince Charles.

    By comparison, the Henry VII – who was famous for extortion, “protection rackets”, and consolidation of power.
    Here with his son – gypsy king Henry VIII

    But soon after, by Jacobean England (early 17th century), monarch has converted into a gentle hipster, famous for sponsorship of art and literature.

    • Replies: @Wielgus
    @Dmitry

    James VI (as he is in the picture) looks more overdressed and bored with sitting for his portrait than gentle hipster. In fact the portrait was made in Scotland, the Latin inscription calls him "King of Scots", aged 29 and it is 1595. He became king of England as well in 1603.
    His glance also looks a little suspicious and he did in fact regard the Scottish nobility with apprehension and some fear. He had a reputation for timidity as well as bookishness. Five years after this portrait he had a Scottish noble family, the Gowries, executed after alleging that they had tried to kidnap him.

  60. Well is not Kolkota a woke and SJW way of saying Culcutta? Similar to Mumbai and Bombay, or Chennai and Madras.

  61. @prime noticer
    PHD = piled higher and deeper

    acutely for education PHDs.

    Replies: @Chrisnonymous

    She doesn’t have a PhD, she has an EdD, which is a different degree. This is part of the joke, I think. Education is such a lame field that they created their own terminal degree with its own lame requirements.

    That said, Jill Biden’s defense of her husband on the campaign trail was admirable, and her work teaching at community colleges, while not impressive from the point of view of scholarship, is not inherently anything to be embarrassed about.

  62. Her name is Dr. Jill Biden.

    So glad Mrs. Clinton didn’t become president.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    @Chrisnonymous


    So glad Mrs. Clinton didn’t become president.
     
    In a round about way she arguably did. K. Harris isn't much different than her. You think Biden has great staying power? BTW, he hired Neera Tanden, who said that she wanted him to run for the purpose of showing how good Hillary is.

    Biden is the closest thing to a modern day Hindenburg. No offense to the latter.

  63. @Carlo
    "Are insufferable about “keeping up appearances” like Hyacinth Bucket (“it’s Bouquet”)."
    Can we say that this also relates to a gay country somewhere insisting on how every language on Earth should spell its capital's name? Real countries, sure of their own identity, don't do this.

    Replies: @AP, @El Dato

    The one named after that 2020 infection, “Coof”?

  64. You know, the ONE THING that’s no longer being done in politicxx is actual problem solving. It’s all Kindergarten-level bullshit, scratching, shitting, vomiting, “TEACHER!!” calls and awkward fights and about 80% of those present can’t even tie their own shoelaces.

    Her name is Dr. Jill Biden. Get used to it.

    The one who larps as a Bene Gesserit witch but without the skills and internal monologue is right: It’s an immense advancement for the cause of women worldwide for AMERIWOMAN to be allowed to bear the title of Doctor. Where else in the whole world is that allowed?

  65. @Chrisnonymous

    Her name is Dr. Jill Biden.
     
    So glad Mrs. Clinton didn't become president.

    Replies: @Mikhail

    So glad Mrs. Clinton didn’t become president.

    In a round about way she arguably did. K. Harris isn’t much different than her. You think Biden has great staying power? BTW, he hired Neera Tanden, who said that she wanted him to run for the purpose of showing how good Hillary is.

    Biden is the closest thing to a modern day Hindenburg. No offense to the latter.

  66. @Dmitry
    @Coconuts

    It depends on the historical stage.

    I visited Windsor Castle last year. My personal impression (if you can filter away the tourists and 19th century additions), was of an atmosphere of how I imagine should be a "fortified complex" of a Mexican drug cartel.

    There is the mixture of expensive objects and weapons, piled into the central fortress room - money and violence stockpiled in the same space. Then on the walls, intimidating portraits of warlords of the past. If you are able to project your mind to 500 years ago, this site might still has an intimidating atmosphere, like to trespass to a fortified complex of Los Zetas or Gulf Cartel.

    It's interesting to see the transitions in portraits of the British Royal family.

    It seems to my eyes, that around the 17th century, they stop presenting themselves like intimidating Mafia leaders. (Although Henry VIII still has an appearance of gypsy king).

    By King James I (of UK), the monarchy evolves to a much softer presentation of gentle hipsters, and the
    visual presentation matches his policies.


    pageantry that still surrounds the British monarchy
     
    Since "Glorious Revolution", they became only a symbolic Kyoto aristocracy (de jure but not de facto rulers), and their sovereignty is a symbolic and spiritualized one.


    -


    Appearance and style also could transform from intimidating mafia lord, to show horse. And in the 21st century, they will likely intermarry with the Kardashians, and become even more accessible.

    Presentation of symbolic royalty by second half of 20th century - Prince Charles.

    https://i.imgur.com/n2vijF6.jpg

    By comparison, the Henry VII - who was famous for extortion, "protection rackets", and consolidation of power.

    https://i.imgur.com/E97esvo.jpg
    Here with his son - gypsy king Henry VIII
    https://i.imgur.com/jOiowA9.jpg

    But soon after, by Jacobean England (early 17th century), monarch has converted into a gentle hipster, famous for sponsorship of art and literature.

    https://i.imgur.com/PIrkZqa.jpg

    Replies: @Wielgus

    James VI (as he is in the picture) looks more overdressed and bored with sitting for his portrait than gentle hipster. In fact the portrait was made in Scotland, the Latin inscription calls him “King of Scots”, aged 29 and it is 1595. He became king of England as well in 1603.
    His glance also looks a little suspicious and he did in fact regard the Scottish nobility with apprehension and some fear. He had a reputation for timidity as well as bookishness. Five years after this portrait he had a Scottish noble family, the Gowries, executed after alleging that they had tried to kidnap him.

  67. To add to the foregoing comment, James encouraged the idea of the Divine Right of Kings, which led to disaster for his son Charles I though not for himself. He was neither gentle nor a hipster.

    The portrait of Henry VII with two of his advisers is a later one and does not reflect how Henry would have liked to be seen. The advisers, Empson and Dudley, made themselves unpopular because of the heavy taxes they imposed, and although they were good for the royal exchequer Henry VIII had them executed in 1510, not long after becoming king. It was an early sign of Henry VIII’s ruthlessness and capriciousness but the executions pleased many.

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