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Data impresario Zach Goldberg (“PhD student/Wokeness Studies scholar”) has assembled a series of graphs collating the results of several polls of American attitudes to Corona.

There’s nothing particularly unexpected. It confirms other polls (e.g. PEW, SurveyUSA) showing a large partisan divide in attitudes towards Corona. Democrats anxious, angry, depressed, and skeptical about Trump’s ability to handle the epidemic, whereas our girl leaves conservatives unflustered.

However, there was one particularly amusing item – a test of coronavirus general knowledge, broken down by race.

That B/W Corona-g gap at 0.8 d, reliable as always! 😉

However, contrary to the usual pattern, Whites do better than Asian-Americans. Care to guess why?

Here’s the list of questions:

Any guesses?

***

***

Asians answered 1b, in the mistaken belief that experts recommend wearing masks.

And it is indeed what Asian experts are telling people.

Unfortunately, Asian-Americans didn’t account for US “experts” from the CDC and the Surgeon-General to multiple MSM outlets running a disinformation campaign about the efficacy of masks.

On this question, Asians (50%) not only did “worse” than Whites (77%), but Blacks (55%) and Hispanics (52%) as well.

 
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  1. Please keep off topic posts to the current Open Thread.

    If you are new to my work, start here.

  2. Mask-wearing has got to hit automatic facial ID hard. I’m thinking that it just wouldn’t work on a large population, like a whole city, province, or country.

    There’s a lot of civilian uses of it which now seem to be dysfunctional in China, like payment applications.

    Of course, it is my theory that Europeans are more averse to wearing masks because they are less group-selected, and so more in need of the information that the face supplies – emotional signals. Perhaps, this would also have to do with the level of self-domestication.

    • Replies: @utu
    Sure it must be in genes.

    Anti-mask law
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-mask_law

    United Kingdom - For a century, covering or blacking one's face was a criminal act that could lead to the death penalty; the Black Act was repealed in 1823.

    United States - New York State's anti-mask law was enacted in 1845, to provide for public safety after disputes between landlords and tenants.

    Many anti-mask laws date back to the mid-20th century, when states and municipalities passed them to stop the violent activities of the Ku Klux Klan, whose members typically wore hoods of white linen to conceal their identities.
    , @Kim
    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.
  3. @songbird
    Mask-wearing has got to hit automatic facial ID hard. I'm thinking that it just wouldn't work on a large population, like a whole city, province, or country.

    There's a lot of civilian uses of it which now seem to be dysfunctional in China, like payment applications.

    Of course, it is my theory that Europeans are more averse to wearing masks because they are less group-selected, and so more in need of the information that the face supplies - emotional signals. Perhaps, this would also have to do with the level of self-domestication.

    Sure it must be in genes.

    Anti-mask law
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-mask_law

    United Kingdom – For a century, covering or blacking one’s face was a criminal act that could lead to the death penalty; the Black Act was repealed in 1823.

    United States – New York State’s anti-mask law was enacted in 1845, to provide for public safety after disputes between landlords and tenants.

    Many anti-mask laws date back to the mid-20th century, when states and municipalities passed them to stop the violent activities of the Ku Klux Klan, whose members typically wore hoods of white linen to conceal their identities.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    Not enforced in the time of antifa head busters, of course.
    , @songbird
    In a way, I am partial to a law and order explanation because that might be connected to self-domestication, and anyway culture can be influenced by genes. Like, where would masks be more dangerous? Probably a place where personal firearms were permitted and common, or where you could once buy a Tommygun in the mail. Probably in a place that had a large number of Africans. (but neither of these apply as much to Europe)

    However, I don't think the explanation that it was the KKK withstands scrutiny. Surgical masks don't hide the full face. And the point of anti-mask laws is mainly about crowds acting together to do illegal things or individuals hiding their identity, while doing illegal things. In other words, if there's a situation where you want to see their face, and they are hiding it. Just think of Halloween - most people aren't psychologically worried about 7 year-olds wearing masks and coming to their front door. Or, for that matter, the old lady on the bus, wearing a mask.

    There are many people who wear masks in the West fairly regularly, seemingly in imitation of Asians. (Perhaps, for rational reasons, like avoiding sickness, so as to not affect their working ability). They aren't arrested, and I don't think that people were being arrested in the West in 1918 for wearing masks during the Spanish flu epidemic.
  4. It confirms other polls (e.g. PEW, SurveyUSA) showing a large partisan divide in attitudes towards Corona. Democrats anxious, angry, depressed, and skeptical about Trump’s ability to handle the epidemic, whereas our girl leaves conservatives unflustered.

    I wonder how much of this is the “natural” position of the two parties and how much is purely due to Trump’s initial skeptical response. Like, in the hypothetical alternate reality where Trump’s tweets on the subject were noncommittal or perfectly in line with the mainstream view, would this pattern still hold? Or would Republicans actually be the more concerned group?

    I can see both ways. On one hand, GOP voters tend to see government restrictions of any form (like quarantines) as some kind of vast Illuminati conspiracy to utterly destroy their cherished ‘freedom’ once and for all. Plus, it came from China which is generally a target of Republicans.

    On the other hand, Corona really does serve as a giant F U to the whole concept of globalism, emphasizing the need for both economic self-sufficiency and control over international movement. Also, “prepper” subcultures (some members of whom are genuinely intelligent, but just highly risk-averse) tend to lean to the right. And most importantly imo, Coronavirus should (barring other factors) have a far greater impact on urban areas than rural ones. These points strike me as slightly stronger than the “skeptic” ones.

    So I personally think the partisan divide is 100% attributable to Trump, if not slightly more (i.e., if not for him it would tilt the other way a bit.)

    Edit: polls from places like Italy where the positions were reversed might help answer the question, albeit in an uncontrolled, non-conclusive way.

  5. @songbird
    Mask-wearing has got to hit automatic facial ID hard. I'm thinking that it just wouldn't work on a large population, like a whole city, province, or country.

    There's a lot of civilian uses of it which now seem to be dysfunctional in China, like payment applications.

    Of course, it is my theory that Europeans are more averse to wearing masks because they are less group-selected, and so more in need of the information that the face supplies - emotional signals. Perhaps, this would also have to do with the level of self-domestication.

    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    • LOL: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    There's a solution for everybody.

    https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/MZ4AAOSwvp5ZiiFA/s-l400.png
    , @songbird

    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.
     
    That's an interesting idea.
    , @Catdomnj
    Lol, like putting a blanket on a pancake.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    There's some truth to this.
  6. @Kim
    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    There’s a solution for everybody.

    [MORE]

  7. @utu
    Sure it must be in genes.

    Anti-mask law
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-mask_law

    United Kingdom - For a century, covering or blacking one's face was a criminal act that could lead to the death penalty; the Black Act was repealed in 1823.

    United States - New York State's anti-mask law was enacted in 1845, to provide for public safety after disputes between landlords and tenants.

    Many anti-mask laws date back to the mid-20th century, when states and municipalities passed them to stop the violent activities of the Ku Klux Klan, whose members typically wore hoods of white linen to conceal their identities.

    Not enforced in the time of antifa head busters, of course.

  8. So is it the beard or the gun that is supposed to indicate low IQ? I am guessing people say its the gun, which really just means Karlin is now believing in full on SJW narratives.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @Realist
    It is quite obvious Karlin set up this loaded article to promote his position...it is totally useless.

    On the other hand he has Ted Kaczynski on the right side of the graph.

    , @Erik Sieven
    how about the half open dungarees?
  9. I get my information from Peak Prosperity, so I wear a mask.

    Peak Prosperity has been consistently right. People who were consistently right in the past are more likely to be right in the future.

    Western “experts” have been saying that viruses pass through masks like flies through chicken-wire, but the viruses are actually carried in droplets and theses do get caught by the fibres in a mask.

    Half of the droplets fall to the ground almost immediately. Presumably, they can stick to the soles of you shoes.

    Japan – bow and don’t shakes hands – take their shoes off when they enter a house and wear masks a lot.

    That alone probably accounts for the slowness of its spread in Japan.

    I live in a biggish house in a rural area and have been building up supplies since late January so I am actually enjoying quarantine. I am getting lots done around the house and garden and trying to crack the Greek language once and for all by listening to the audiobook of the Greek edition of Dale Carnegie.

    My wife and I are considering making a three-month quarantine an annual event.

    • Replies: @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?
  10. What is the theoretically correct answer to #5?

    — YES — There are multiple firms beginning vaccine clinical trials.
    — NO — There are no vaccines available to the public.
    _____

    The answer to #6 is clear cut. A flu shot gives 0% protection to WUHAN-19.

    Do flu shots protect against the flu? Experts pick the most likely influenza strain(s) well before flu season begins. If those experts choose poorly….

    PEACE 😷

  11. @22pp22
    I get my information from Peak Prosperity, so I wear a mask.

    Peak Prosperity has been consistently right. People who were consistently right in the past are more likely to be right in the future.

    Western "experts" have been saying that viruses pass through masks like flies through chicken-wire, but the viruses are actually carried in droplets and theses do get caught by the fibres in a mask.

    Half of the droplets fall to the ground almost immediately. Presumably, they can stick to the soles of you shoes.

    Japan - bow and don't shakes hands - take their shoes off when they enter a house and wear masks a lot.

    That alone probably accounts for the slowness of its spread in Japan.

    I live in a biggish house in a rural area and have been building up supplies since late January so I am actually enjoying quarantine. I am getting lots done around the house and garden and trying to crack the Greek language once and for all by listening to the audiobook of the Greek edition of Dale Carnegie.

    My wife and I are considering making a three-month quarantine an annual event.

    take their shoes off when they enter a house

    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    • Replies: @22pp22
    Many of us do, many of us don't. We all should. Where are you from?
    , @sudden death
    At this point, shoes ideally should be not only taken off, but also disinfected everytime carefully, as it is more than likely that it were stepped on someones spit in the streets or droplets from someones sneeze/cough has landed on a surface of your shoes. Shoes with strings are also bad idea during pandemic.
    , @reiner Tor
    I enter the house in my shoes and take them off inside, right after entering.
    , @Philip Owen
    Family take their shoes off. Guests tend not to unless asked. Slippers are not as hygenic as Tapichki.
    , @Marshal Marlow
    My family tends to leave their shoes on during the day, but we would tend to remove them once settled in for the evening. But that's just a comfort thing, and we wouldn't think it odd if someone chose to keep their shoes on or off while at home.

    Also, if I were to visit someone's house there's zero expectation that I'd remove my shoes. In fact, it'd be a little bit creepy to do so.
  12. @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    Many of us do, many of us don’t. We all should. Where are you from?

  13. @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    At this point, shoes ideally should be not only taken off, but also disinfected everytime carefully, as it is more than likely that it were stepped on someones spit in the streets or droplets from someones sneeze/cough has landed on a surface of your shoes. Shoes with strings are also bad idea during pandemic.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    The experience in China seems to be that they can always track down who might have infected you. That is to say, no mysterious cases. Almost. Although, I think there might be maybe a handful of cases where you don't know how they got infected, which would suggest things like virus in the dirt in streets, and you just stepped on it.

    Why do I think there might be a small number of "mysterious" cases? Because it is relatively easy to hide and Chinese officials at certain levels may find reasons to cheat. So, this is another case of general distrust.

    But, the point is, in anycase, mysterious cases must have happened really rarely.

    Which means, people should be reasonable. Plus 80% very light symptoms that you don't even need hospital stay. Let us not freak ourselves out. At times when resources are stressful to get, every piece of calmness can be helpful, to the doctors, to the economy, etc.
  14. @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    I enter the house in my shoes and take them off inside, right after entering.

  15. The root cause of the problem is mass immigration, in this case the sheer number of Chinese people who live in other countries, just about every country imaginable. In past decades China used to be seen as a threat precisely because of the threat of lethal viruses, they were seen as unhygienic and as having cruel and bizarre eating habits. They used to be commonly referred to as the “Yellow Peril”, but no one ever calls them that anymore.

    However, in recent years attitudes towards China have completely changed, most people now see them as friendly, industrious people who are “just like us”. They’re even engaged in their own parallel war against Muslims just like the West is, which only confirms in Westerners’ minds just how similar to us the Chinese supposedly are. As a result of this change in attitude, Chinese mass immigration to the West as well as many non-Western countries has increased massively, they are practically everywhere nowadays. In normal times any deadly virus would have been more or less confined to China with minimal deaths elsewhere, but now because the Chinese live everywhere and are welcomed everywhere they bring these lethal viruses with them and the whole world is badly affected in the end.

    • Replies: @Blinky Bill
    https://twitter.com/CarlZha/status/1244511094065876993?s=20
    , @yakushimaru

    The root cause of the problem
     
    The root cause was Adam and Eve eat that damn apple.

    Let us not get lost into "root cause" shall we?

    What you really truly need is to avoid crowds, and for maybe two months keep your life going under such strange circumstances. Stay healthy.

    When it is over, ofc you can push politicians of your country to kick Chinese out. As long as you do it within reasonable bounds, I personally don't find it completely rejectable. I mean, I am Chinese.
  16. @Europe Europa
    The root cause of the problem is mass immigration, in this case the sheer number of Chinese people who live in other countries, just about every country imaginable. In past decades China used to be seen as a threat precisely because of the threat of lethal viruses, they were seen as unhygienic and as having cruel and bizarre eating habits. They used to be commonly referred to as the "Yellow Peril", but no one ever calls them that anymore.

    However, in recent years attitudes towards China have completely changed, most people now see them as friendly, industrious people who are "just like us". They're even engaged in their own parallel war against Muslims just like the West is, which only confirms in Westerners' minds just how similar to us the Chinese supposedly are. As a result of this change in attitude, Chinese mass immigration to the West as well as many non-Western countries has increased massively, they are practically everywhere nowadays. In normal times any deadly virus would have been more or less confined to China with minimal deaths elsewhere, but now because the Chinese live everywhere and are welcomed everywhere they bring these lethal viruses with them and the whole world is badly affected in the end.

  17. On the basis of a case definition requiring a diagnosis of pneumonia, the currently reported case fatality rate is approximately 2%.4 In another article in the Journal, Guan et al.5 report mortality of 1.4% among 1099 patients with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19; these patients had a wide spectrum of disease severity. If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.2

    So the likes of Anthony Fauci is admitting this is kinda sorta Just The Flu while encouraging an ever-growing lockdown.

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2002387

    I haven’t even been saying this “just the flu.” That meme is one you Sinophile doomers invented to disparage those who don’t support the destruction of our livelihoods. And unlike Ron Unz, I never claimed, without a shred of real evidence, that this flu was a “US bioweapon attack.” But Ron has moved on from that claim to surer waters.

    And as for your recent haughty Twitter assault on “political marginals,” in America today, the guidelines stipulate:

    Abortion is essential; church is not.

    That, plus the mask fiasco, is all I need to know about the seriousness of my government. Don’t pretend to be an intellectual if you agree with those guidelines.

    • Replies: @keypusher

    Don’t pretend to be an intellectual if you agree with those guidelines.
     
    You don't understand the sentence from the NEJM you keep quoting. Fauci is saying the fatality rate may be closer to 0.1% than it is to 9-10% or 36%. That statement is consistent with a fatality rate of 1% or 2% or 3% or 4%, but you're treating it like some kind of admission against interest.

    Please find some other article to misinterpret, I'm getting tired of seeing this one.

    , @sudden death
    Just for the reference - 7 days ago there were about 700 coronavirus deaths in the USA total. 7 days later and there were over 900 deaths during last 24 hours. After next 7 days there should be roughly about 3000 official deaths per day from SARS 2.0 in US with the same rate of increase. And this will not be even a peak.
  18. @neutral
    So is it the beard or the gun that is supposed to indicate low IQ? I am guessing people say its the gun, which really just means Karlin is now believing in full on SJW narratives.

    It is quite obvious Karlin set up this loaded article to promote his position…it is totally useless.

    On the other hand he has Ted Kaczynski on the right side of the graph.

  19. The Hispanic race doesn’t exist.

  20. @sudden death
    At this point, shoes ideally should be not only taken off, but also disinfected everytime carefully, as it is more than likely that it were stepped on someones spit in the streets or droplets from someones sneeze/cough has landed on a surface of your shoes. Shoes with strings are also bad idea during pandemic.

    The experience in China seems to be that they can always track down who might have infected you. That is to say, no mysterious cases. Almost. Although, I think there might be maybe a handful of cases where you don’t know how they got infected, which would suggest things like virus in the dirt in streets, and you just stepped on it.

    Why do I think there might be a small number of “mysterious” cases? Because it is relatively easy to hide and Chinese officials at certain levels may find reasons to cheat. So, this is another case of general distrust.

    But, the point is, in anycase, mysterious cases must have happened really rarely.

    Which means, people should be reasonable. Plus 80% very light symptoms that you don’t even need hospital stay. Let us not freak ourselves out. At times when resources are stressful to get, every piece of calmness can be helpful, to the doctors, to the economy, etc.

    • Replies: @sudden death

    Although, I think there might be maybe a handful of cases where you don’t know how they got infected, which would suggest things like virus in the dirt in streets, and you just stepped on it.
     
    China regulary uses the practice of dousing the streets and sidewalks with disinfectants during this pandemic, imho that is exactly indication of widespread potential viral contamination by smeared spit and droplets on the ground.
  21. @Europe Europa
    The root cause of the problem is mass immigration, in this case the sheer number of Chinese people who live in other countries, just about every country imaginable. In past decades China used to be seen as a threat precisely because of the threat of lethal viruses, they were seen as unhygienic and as having cruel and bizarre eating habits. They used to be commonly referred to as the "Yellow Peril", but no one ever calls them that anymore.

    However, in recent years attitudes towards China have completely changed, most people now see them as friendly, industrious people who are "just like us". They're even engaged in their own parallel war against Muslims just like the West is, which only confirms in Westerners' minds just how similar to us the Chinese supposedly are. As a result of this change in attitude, Chinese mass immigration to the West as well as many non-Western countries has increased massively, they are practically everywhere nowadays. In normal times any deadly virus would have been more or less confined to China with minimal deaths elsewhere, but now because the Chinese live everywhere and are welcomed everywhere they bring these lethal viruses with them and the whole world is badly affected in the end.

    The root cause of the problem

    The root cause was Adam and Eve eat that damn apple.

    Let us not get lost into “root cause” shall we?

    What you really truly need is to avoid crowds, and for maybe two months keep your life going under such strange circumstances. Stay healthy.

    When it is over, ofc you can push politicians of your country to kick Chinese out. As long as you do it within reasonable bounds, I personally don’t find it completely rejectable. I mean, I am Chinese.

  22. For me it’s more interesting that the Asians in the US listen to ‘Asian experts’. It’s an indication of how widespread internet news is these days, where everyone can go and get the news from their preferred sources, and also the surprising (to me) cultural non-integration of Asians. I doubt a large number are recent immigrants. I always thought that they were the model minority and would watch American news, etc… since they push themselves and their children to excel in the greater society. Apparently, they still listen to the news from the old countries quite a bit.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
    There are Chinese language news in US, and they lean towards being against China's official stance on maybe everything.
  23. Toly, please excuse my 85 IQ here, but I’m not sure I understand the idealogical difference between the guys represented by the picutre on the left and the one on the right. They both think the end is nigh, right?

    • Replies: @Thomm

    but I’m not sure I understand the idealogical difference between the guys represented by the picutre on the left and the one on the right. They both think the end is nigh, right?
     
    Actually, the guy on the right is not an accurate picture. That is just the basic working class guy. The typical 70-IQ WN wigger looks very different than that. Remember that about 40% of WN wiggers are gay.
  24. @utu
    Sure it must be in genes.

    Anti-mask law
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-mask_law

    United Kingdom - For a century, covering or blacking one's face was a criminal act that could lead to the death penalty; the Black Act was repealed in 1823.

    United States - New York State's anti-mask law was enacted in 1845, to provide for public safety after disputes between landlords and tenants.

    Many anti-mask laws date back to the mid-20th century, when states and municipalities passed them to stop the violent activities of the Ku Klux Klan, whose members typically wore hoods of white linen to conceal their identities.

    In a way, I am partial to a law and order explanation because that might be connected to self-domestication, and anyway culture can be influenced by genes. Like, where would masks be more dangerous? Probably a place where personal firearms were permitted and common, or where you could once buy a Tommygun in the mail. Probably in a place that had a large number of Africans. (but neither of these apply as much to Europe)

    However, I don’t think the explanation that it was the KKK withstands scrutiny. Surgical masks don’t hide the full face. And the point of anti-mask laws is mainly about crowds acting together to do illegal things or individuals hiding their identity, while doing illegal things. In other words, if there’s a situation where you want to see their face, and they are hiding it. Just think of Halloween – most people aren’t psychologically worried about 7 year-olds wearing masks and coming to their front door. Or, for that matter, the old lady on the bus, wearing a mask.

    There are many people who wear masks in the West fairly regularly, seemingly in imitation of Asians. (Perhaps, for rational reasons, like avoiding sickness, so as to not affect their working ability). They aren’t arrested, and I don’t think that people were being arrested in the West in 1918 for wearing masks during the Spanish flu epidemic.

  25. @Kim
    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    That’s an interesting idea.

  26. People who sit at home all day and look at their phones all day have convinced themselves that this is the end of the world.

    People who still have to work to make money and go out everyday still have a perspective that isn’t completely guided by the media have a different view.

    Maybe you people who sit at home all day and still get checks are smarter on average than those of us who actually work, have kids, provide for our families, etc. But…. Where are all the dead people?

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    14 days from infection to enough symptoms to get tested. 25 days from becoming a case to death. Give it time.
  27. @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    Family take their shoes off. Guests tend not to unless asked. Slippers are not as hygenic as Tapichki.

  28. @Cash
    People who sit at home all day and look at their phones all day have convinced themselves that this is the end of the world.

    People who still have to work to make money and go out everyday still have a perspective that isn't completely guided by the media have a different view.

    Maybe you people who sit at home all day and still get checks are smarter on average than those of us who actually work, have kids, provide for our families, etc. But.... Where are all the dead people?

    14 days from infection to enough symptoms to get tested. 25 days from becoming a case to death. Give it time.

    • Replies: @Cash
    According to Karlin mortality is the most in the first few days.
  29. @Truth
    Toly, please excuse my 85 IQ here, but I'm not sure I understand the idealogical difference between the guys represented by the picutre on the left and the one on the right. They both think the end is nigh, right?

    but I’m not sure I understand the idealogical difference between the guys represented by the picutre on the left and the one on the right. They both think the end is nigh, right?

    Actually, the guy on the right is not an accurate picture. That is just the basic working class guy. The typical 70-IQ WN wigger looks very different than that. Remember that about 40% of WN wiggers are gay.

    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
    • Troll: neutral
  30. @Philip Owen
    14 days from infection to enough symptoms to get tested. 25 days from becoming a case to death. Give it time.

    According to Karlin mortality is the most in the first few days.

    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    Ventilators keep the dead breathing for 10-12 days.
  31. @blatnoi
    For me it's more interesting that the Asians in the US listen to 'Asian experts'. It's an indication of how widespread internet news is these days, where everyone can go and get the news from their preferred sources, and also the surprising (to me) cultural non-integration of Asians. I doubt a large number are recent immigrants. I always thought that they were the model minority and would watch American news, etc... since they push themselves and their children to excel in the greater society. Apparently, they still listen to the news from the old countries quite a bit.

    There are Chinese language news in US, and they lean towards being against China’s official stance on maybe everything.

  32. @Kim
    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    Lol, like putting a blanket on a pancake.

  33. @neutral
    So is it the beard or the gun that is supposed to indicate low IQ? I am guessing people say its the gun, which really just means Karlin is now believing in full on SJW narratives.

    how about the half open dungarees?

  34. @Kim
    Asians have flat faces. So masks are more comfortable.

    There’s some truth to this.

  35. @Cash
    According to Karlin mortality is the most in the first few days.

    Ventilators keep the dead breathing for 10-12 days.

  36. @Korenchkin

    take their shoes off when they enter a house
     
    Wait, do Westerners not do this?

    My family tends to leave their shoes on during the day, but we would tend to remove them once settled in for the evening. But that’s just a comfort thing, and we wouldn’t think it odd if someone chose to keep their shoes on or off while at home.

    Also, if I were to visit someone’s house there’s zero expectation that I’d remove my shoes. In fact, it’d be a little bit creepy to do so.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    That’s pretty odd. I don’t like having my shoes on (well, a comfort thing, and also a not making my home dirty thing), and I would consider it rude not taking them off immediately after entering the home when visiting someone. (A not making their home dirty thing.) Sometimes the hosts tell me to just keep my shoes on, but I always consider it to be just a sign of being super polite, and further, something which is usually not even proposed very seriously. (I.e. I expect them to still prefer it that I take off my shoes.) There are a few exceptions when the home is obviously super dirty, like there’s some renovation going on.

    One difference I noticed is the prevalence of slippers in Hungary, whereas in Western Europe people tend to just go without them. But now I’m not sure how prevailing that is in either place. Maybe I just had a too small sample in either place? I personally don’t like slippers, but they are obviously needed for cold floors, so might be an underfloor heating question, whose prevalence has increased earlier in Western Europe. (But I don’t wear slippers wooden or other similar surfaces which are not that cold anyway.)
  37. Mask-wearing is normalized in most Asian countries, and is widespread in flu season and off. Moreover, in China everyone is now required to wear masks in public; this likely applies specifically to the healthy, since those who are infected (as well as their contacts) are swiftly quarantined.

    More to the point, many, if not most, Asian Americans are either ‘fresh off the boat’ and/or maintain close ties to their countries of origin, and they bring this penchant for mask-wearing with them. So, if they think it’s normal and effective, they likely presume that authorities do so as well.

  38. @Marshal Marlow
    My family tends to leave their shoes on during the day, but we would tend to remove them once settled in for the evening. But that's just a comfort thing, and we wouldn't think it odd if someone chose to keep their shoes on or off while at home.

    Also, if I were to visit someone's house there's zero expectation that I'd remove my shoes. In fact, it'd be a little bit creepy to do so.

    That’s pretty odd. I don’t like having my shoes on (well, a comfort thing, and also a not making my home dirty thing), and I would consider it rude not taking them off immediately after entering the home when visiting someone. (A not making their home dirty thing.) Sometimes the hosts tell me to just keep my shoes on, but I always consider it to be just a sign of being super polite, and further, something which is usually not even proposed very seriously. (I.e. I expect them to still prefer it that I take off my shoes.) There are a few exceptions when the home is obviously super dirty, like there’s some renovation going on.

    One difference I noticed is the prevalence of slippers in Hungary, whereas in Western Europe people tend to just go without them. But now I’m not sure how prevailing that is in either place. Maybe I just had a too small sample in either place? I personally don’t like slippers, but they are obviously needed for cold floors, so might be an underfloor heating question, whose prevalence has increased earlier in Western Europe. (But I don’t wear slippers wooden or other similar surfaces which are not that cold anyway.)

    • Replies: @AP
    Most people in Russia have slippers at home, and extra ones for guests. I've almost never seen slippers in America, even in households where people take their shoes off inside.
  39. @yakushimaru
    The experience in China seems to be that they can always track down who might have infected you. That is to say, no mysterious cases. Almost. Although, I think there might be maybe a handful of cases where you don't know how they got infected, which would suggest things like virus in the dirt in streets, and you just stepped on it.

    Why do I think there might be a small number of "mysterious" cases? Because it is relatively easy to hide and Chinese officials at certain levels may find reasons to cheat. So, this is another case of general distrust.

    But, the point is, in anycase, mysterious cases must have happened really rarely.

    Which means, people should be reasonable. Plus 80% very light symptoms that you don't even need hospital stay. Let us not freak ourselves out. At times when resources are stressful to get, every piece of calmness can be helpful, to the doctors, to the economy, etc.

    Although, I think there might be maybe a handful of cases where you don’t know how they got infected, which would suggest things like virus in the dirt in streets, and you just stepped on it.

    China regulary uses the practice of dousing the streets and sidewalks with disinfectants during this pandemic, imho that is exactly indication of widespread potential viral contamination by smeared spit and droplets on the ground.

  40. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    On the basis of a case definition requiring a diagnosis of pneumonia, the currently reported case fatality rate is approximately 2%.4 In another article in the Journal, Guan et al.5 report mortality of 1.4% among 1099 patients with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19; these patients had a wide spectrum of disease severity. If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.2
     
    So the likes of Anthony Fauci is admitting this is kinda sorta Just The Flu while encouraging an ever-growing lockdown.

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2002387

    I haven't even been saying this "just the flu." That meme is one you Sinophile doomers invented to disparage those who don't support the destruction of our livelihoods. And unlike Ron Unz, I never claimed, without a shred of real evidence, that this flu was a "US bioweapon attack." But Ron has moved on from that claim to surer waters.

    And as for your recent haughty Twitter assault on "political marginals," in America today, the guidelines stipulate:

    Abortion is essential; church is not.

    That, plus the mask fiasco, is all I need to know about the seriousness of my government. Don't pretend to be an intellectual if you agree with those guidelines.

    Don’t pretend to be an intellectual if you agree with those guidelines.

    You don’t understand the sentence from the NEJM you keep quoting. Fauci is saying the fatality rate may be closer to 0.1% than it is to 9-10% or 36%. That statement is consistent with a fatality rate of 1% or 2% or 3% or 4%, but you’re treating it like some kind of admission against interest.

    Please find some other article to misinterpret, I’m getting tired of seeing this one.

  41. @reiner Tor
    That’s pretty odd. I don’t like having my shoes on (well, a comfort thing, and also a not making my home dirty thing), and I would consider it rude not taking them off immediately after entering the home when visiting someone. (A not making their home dirty thing.) Sometimes the hosts tell me to just keep my shoes on, but I always consider it to be just a sign of being super polite, and further, something which is usually not even proposed very seriously. (I.e. I expect them to still prefer it that I take off my shoes.) There are a few exceptions when the home is obviously super dirty, like there’s some renovation going on.

    One difference I noticed is the prevalence of slippers in Hungary, whereas in Western Europe people tend to just go without them. But now I’m not sure how prevailing that is in either place. Maybe I just had a too small sample in either place? I personally don’t like slippers, but they are obviously needed for cold floors, so might be an underfloor heating question, whose prevalence has increased earlier in Western Europe. (But I don’t wear slippers wooden or other similar surfaces which are not that cold anyway.)

    Most people in Russia have slippers at home, and extra ones for guests. I’ve almost never seen slippers in America, even in households where people take their shoes off inside.

  42. @John Burns, Gettysburg Partisan

    On the basis of a case definition requiring a diagnosis of pneumonia, the currently reported case fatality rate is approximately 2%.4 In another article in the Journal, Guan et al.5 report mortality of 1.4% among 1099 patients with laboratory-confirmed Covid-19; these patients had a wide spectrum of disease severity. If one assumes that the number of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic cases is several times as high as the number of reported cases, the case fatality rate may be considerably less than 1%. This suggests that the overall clinical consequences of Covid-19 may ultimately be more akin to those of a severe seasonal influenza (which has a case fatality rate of approximately 0.1%) or a pandemic influenza (similar to those in 1957 and 1968) rather than a disease similar to SARS or MERS, which have had case fatality rates of 9 to 10% and 36%, respectively.2
     
    So the likes of Anthony Fauci is admitting this is kinda sorta Just The Flu while encouraging an ever-growing lockdown.

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2002387

    I haven't even been saying this "just the flu." That meme is one you Sinophile doomers invented to disparage those who don't support the destruction of our livelihoods. And unlike Ron Unz, I never claimed, without a shred of real evidence, that this flu was a "US bioweapon attack." But Ron has moved on from that claim to surer waters.

    And as for your recent haughty Twitter assault on "political marginals," in America today, the guidelines stipulate:

    Abortion is essential; church is not.

    That, plus the mask fiasco, is all I need to know about the seriousness of my government. Don't pretend to be an intellectual if you agree with those guidelines.

    Just for the reference – 7 days ago there were about 700 coronavirus deaths in the USA total. 7 days later and there were over 900 deaths during last 24 hours. After next 7 days there should be roughly about 3000 official deaths per day from SARS 2.0 in US with the same rate of increase. And this will not be even a peak.

    • Replies: @sudden death
    well, yesterday was April 7th, and US had "just" 30 deaths short of 2000, so the rate of increase has indeed slowed somewhat. But yet it still not even a peak.
  43. @sudden death
    Just for the reference - 7 days ago there were about 700 coronavirus deaths in the USA total. 7 days later and there were over 900 deaths during last 24 hours. After next 7 days there should be roughly about 3000 official deaths per day from SARS 2.0 in US with the same rate of increase. And this will not be even a peak.

    well, yesterday was April 7th, and US had “just” 30 deaths short of 2000, so the rate of increase has indeed slowed somewhat. But yet it still not even a peak.

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