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Putin's Biggest Failure

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The Russian 5th column: Chubais, Iudaeva, Dvorkovich, Shuvalov, Nabiullina, Kudrin,  Uliukaev, Siluanov, Medvedev
The Russian 5th column: Chubais, Iudaeva, Dvorkovich, Shuvalov, Nabiullina, Kudrin, Uliukaev, Siluanov, Medvedev

Whatever happens in the future, Putin has already secured his place in history as one of the greatest Russian leaders ever. Not only did he succeed in literally resurrecting Russia as a country, but in a little over a decade he brought her back as a world power capable of successfully challenging the AngloZionist Empire. The Russian people have clearly recognized this feat and, according to numerous polls, they are giving him an amazing 90% support rate. And yet, there is one crucial problem which Putin has failed to tackle: the real reason behind the apparent inability of the Kremlin to meaningfully reform the Russian economy.

As I have described it in the past many times, when Putin came to power in 1999-2000 he inherited a system completely designed and controlled by the USA. During the Eltsin years, Russian ministers had much less power than western ‘advisers’ who turned Russia into a US colony. In fact, during the 1990s, Russia was at least as controlled by the USA as Europe and the Ukraine are today. And the results were truly catastrophic: Russia was plundered from her natural wealth, billions of dollars were stolen and hidden in western offshore accounts, the Russian industry was destroyed, a unprecedented wave of violence, corruption and poverty drowned the entire country in misery and the Russian Federation almost broke up into many small statelets. It was, by any measure, an absolute nightmare, a horror comparable to a major war. Russia was about to explode and something had to be done.

Two remaining centers of power, the oligarchs and the ex-KGB, were forced to seek a solution to this crisis and they came up with the idea of sharing power: the former would be represented by Anatolii Medvedev and the latter by Vladimir Putin. Both sides believed that they would keep the other side in check and that this combination of big money and big muscle would yield a sufficient degree of stability.

I call the group behind Medvedev the “Atlantic Integrationists” and the people behind Putin the “Eurasian Sovereignists”. The former wants Russia to be accepted by the West as an equal partner and fully integrate Russia into the AngloZionist Empire, while the latter want to fully “sovereignize” Russia and then create a multi-polar international system with the help of China and the other BRICS countries.

What the Atlantic Integrationists did not expect is that Putin would slowly but surely begin to squeeze them out of power: first he cracked down on the most notorious oligarchs such as Berezovskii and Khodorkovskii, then he began cracking down on the local oligarchs, gubernatorial mafias, ethnic mobsters, corrupt industry officials, etc. Putin restored the “vertical [axis]of power” and crushed the Wahabi insurgents in Chechnia. Putin even carefully set up the circumstances needed to get rid of some of the worst ministers such as Serdiukov and Kudrin. But what Putin has so far failed to do is to

  • Reform the Russian political system
  • Replace the 5th columnists in and around the Kremlin
  • Reform the Russian economy

The current Russian Constitution and system of government is a pure product of the US ‘advisors’ which, after the bloody crackdown against the opposition in 1993, allowed Boris Eltsin to run the country until 1999. It is paradoxical that the West now speaks of Putin’s despotic presidency when all he did is inherit a western-designed political system. The problem for Putin today is that it makes no sense to replace some of the worst people in power as long as the system remains unchanged. But the main obstacle to a reform of the political system is the resistance of the pro-Western 5th columnists in and around the Kremlin. They also the ones who are still forcing a set of “Washington consensus” kind of policies upon Russia even though it is obvious that the consequences for Russia are extremely bad, even disastrous. There is no doubt that Putin understands that, but he has been unable, at least so far, to break out of this dynamic.

So who are these 5th columnists?

I have selected nine of the names most often mentioned by Russian analysts. These are (in no particular order):

Former First Deputy Prime Minister Anatolii Chubais, First Deputy Governor of the Russian Central Bank Ksenia Iudaeva, Deputy Prime Minister Arkadii Dvorkovich, First Deputy Prime Minister Igor Shuvalov, Governor of the Russian Central Bank Elvira Nabiullina, former Minister of Finance Alexei Kudrin, Minister of Economic Development, Alexei Uliukaev, Minister of Finance Anton Siluanov and Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev.

ORDER IT NOW

This is, of course, only a partial list – the real list is longer and runs deeper in the Russian power structure. The people on this list range from dangerous ideologues like Kudrin or Chubais, to mediocre and unimaginative people, like Siluanov or Nabiullina. And none of them would, by him or herself, represent much of a threat to Putin. But as a group and in the current political system they are a formidable foe which has kept Putin in check. I do believe, however, that a purge is being prepared.

One of the possible signs of a purge to come is the fact that the Russian media, both the blogosphere and the big corporate media, is now very critical of the economic policies of the government of Prime Minister Medvedev. Most Russian economists agree that the real reason for the current economic crisis in Russia is not the falling price of oil or, even less so, the western sanctions, but the misguided decisions of the Russian Central Bank (such as floating the Ruble or keeping the interest rates high) and the lack of governmental action to support a real reform and development of the Russian economy. What is especially interesting is that vocal opponents of the current 5th column now get plenty of air time in the Russian media, including state owned VGTRK. Leading opponents of the current economic policies, such as Sergei Glazev, Mikhail Deliagin or Mikhail Khazin are now interviewed at length and given all the time needed to absolutely blast the economic policies of the Medvedev government. And yet, Putin is still taking no visible action. In fact, in his latest yearly address he as even praised the work of the Russian Central Bank. So what is going on here?

First, and to those exposed to the western propaganda, this might be difficult to imagine, but Putin is constrained simply by the rule of law. He cannot just send some special forces and have all these folks arrested on some kind of charge of corruption, malfeasance or sabotage. Many in Russia very much regret that, but this is fact of life.

In theory, Putin could simply fire the entire (or part) of the government and appoint a different Governor to the Central Bank. But the problem with that is that it would trigger an extremely violent reaction from the West. Mikhail Deliagin recently declared that if Putin did this, the West’s reaction would be even more violent than after the Crimean reunification with Russia. Is he right? Maybe. But I personally believe that Putin is not only concerned about the reaction of the West, but also from the Russian elites, particularly those well off, who generally already intensely dislike Putin and who would see such a purge as an attack on their personal and vital interests. The combination of US subversion and local big money definitely has the ability to create some kind of crisis in Russia. This is, I think, by far the biggest threat Putin his facing. But here also we can observe a paradoxical dynamic:

One one hand, Russia and the West have been in an open confrontation ever since Russian prevented the USA from attacking Syria. The Ukrainian crisis only made things worse. Add to this the dropped prices on oil and the western sanctions and you could say that Putin now, more then ever, needs to avoid anything which could make the crisis even worse.

But on the other hand, this argument can be flipped around by saying that considering how bad the tensions already are and considering that the West has already done all it can to harm Russia, is this not the perfect time to finally clean house and get right of the 5th column? Really – how much worse can things really get?

Only Putin knows the answer to this simply because only he has all the facts. All we can do is observe that the popular discontent with the “economic block” of the government and with the Central Bank is most definitely growing and growing fast, and that the Kremlin is doing nothing to inhibit or suppress such feelings. We can also notice that while most Russians are angry, disgusted and frustrated with the economic policies of the Medvedev government, Putin’s personal popularity is still sky high in spite of the fact that the Russian economy most definitely took a hit, even if it was much smaller than what the AngloZionist Empire had hoped for.

My strictly personal explanation for what is happening is this: Putin is deliberately letting things get worse because he knows that the popular anger will not be directed at him, but only at his enemies. Think of it, is that not exactly what the Russian security services did in the 1990s? Did they not allow the crisis in Russia to reach its paroxysm before pushing Putin into power and then ruthlessly cracking down on the oligarchs? Did Putin not wait until the Wahabis in Chechnia actually attacked Dagestan before unleashing the Russian military? Did the Russians not let Saakashvili attack South Ossetia before basically destroying his entire military? Did Putin now wait until a full-scale Ukronazi attack on the Donbass before opening up the “voentorg” (military supplies) and the “northern wind” (dispatch of volunteers) spigots? Putin’s critiques would say that no, not at all, Putin got surprised, he was sleeping on the job, and he had to react, but his reaction was too little too late and that when he had to take action it was only to fix a situation which had turned into a disaster. My answer to these critiques is simple: so what happened at the end? Did Putin not get exactly what he wanted each time?

I believe that Putin is acutely aware that his real power base is not primarily the Russian military or the security services, but the Russian people. This, in turn, means that for him to take any action, especially any dangerous action, he must secure an almost unconditional level of support from the Russian people. That, in turn, means that he can only take such risky action if and when the crisis is evident for all to see and that the Russian people are willing to have him take a risk and, if needed, pay the consequences. This is exactly what we saw in the case of the reunification of Crimea or the current Russian military intervention in Syria: the Russian people are concerned, they are suffering the consequences of the decision of Putin to take action, but they accept it because they believe that there is no other option.

So there you have it. Either Putin is sleeping on the job, is caught off-guard by each crisis and reacts too late, or Putin deliberately lets a situation worsen until a full-scale crisis is evident at which point he acts with the full knowledge that the Russian people fully support him and while blame him neither for the crisis, nor for the price of decidedly dealing with you.

Pick the version which seems more plausible to you.

What is certain is that so far Putin has failed to deal with the 5th column near and inside the Kremlin and that the situation is rapidly worsening. The recent move by Kudrin to try to get back into the government was a rather transparent use of the pro-5th column media in Russia (and abroad) and it predictably failed. But this shows an increasing self-confidence, or even arrogance, of the Atlantic Integrationists. Something in bound to happen, probably in the near future.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Russia, Vladimir Putin

176 Comments to "Putin's Biggest Failure"

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  1. The Saker wonderfully explains the struggle inside Russia between the Atlantic Integrationists poised toward the Empire and the Eurasian Sovereignists working for a multipolar world. The Saker does it again with penetrating analysis of another complicated situation, making it comprehensible. What a treasure he is for freedom loving people.

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  2. Most Russian economists agree that the real reason for the current economic crisis in Russia is not the falling price of oil or, even less so, the western sanctions, but the misguided decisions of the Russian Central Bank (such as floating the Ruble or keeping the interest rates high) and the lack of governmental action to support a real reform and development of the Russian economy. What is especially interesting is that vocal opponents of the current 5th column now get plenty of air time in the Russian media, including state owned VGTRK. Leading opponents of the current economic policies, such as Sergei Glazev, Mikhail Deliagin or Mikhail Khazin are now interviewed at length and given all the time needed to absolutely blast the economic policies of the Medvedev government.

    Don’t know about “most.” In fact, that’s pretty much BS.

    Less conspiratorial explanation: Interest rates are kept high for the rather prosaic reason of halting runaway inflation; “lack of governmental action to support a real reform and development of the Russian economy” (at least to the extent some people want) is due to the observation that the Soviet experience in that regard was not that successful; while the likes of Glazyev and Delyagin get airtime for the same reason that they always have – i.e., that there is a real diversity of viewpoints in Putin’s Russia, contra Western propaganda.

    What is certain is that so far Putin has failed to deal with the 5th column near and inside the Kremlin and that the situation is rapidly worsening. The recent move by Kudrin to try to get back into the government was a rather transparent use of the pro-5th column media in Russia (and abroad) and it predictably failed.

    This is correct. Kudrin is an egomaniac who thinks he is far brighter than he actually is.

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  3. rampant speculation , too wordy, only 2 mentions of zionism , fake antagonist of the angloshere/usa , yet hypocritically lives in usa and composed this piece in the usa .2/10 . fail. put your money where your mouth is and move to advanced / morally superior russia / iran

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  4. Unfortunately there are more serious problems with this piece than the failure to get Medvedev’s first name right. Like chronology and logic.

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  5. Putin’s biggest failure - Intifada Palestine
    says:
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    […] The Unz Review […]

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  6. “and Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev”

    ^ The article stumbles on that one.

    “I just trust him” -Vladimir Putin on Medvedev:

    http://neurope.eu/article/born-ussr-or-muzhiki-did-it/

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  7. Saker’s analysis reads like the Bible where every paragraph contradicts the previous one. According to Saker Putin’s hands are tied by his concern about the reaction of the West yet at the same time he is challenging them. He is afraid to get rid of some fifth columnists but he has no problem intervening in Syria and throwing a monkey’s wrench into their plans. As far as great leaders are concerned Putin is a midget. According to a poll conducted in 2013 the most popular leader was Brezhnev followed by Lenin and Stalin. My personal favorite is Peter the Great. Putin is a provincial player trying to get into the first league. He tried hard to get Russia accepted into organizations like G7, WTO and others. I still remember his smug, self satisfied grin as he was walking for the first time with the Big Boys. This love affair did not last and the refusal of the West to treat Russia as an equal member is the main reason why Putin has turned to the East. It is not a result of some long term strategy because Putin has none, but of necessity. To say that the fall in oil price has nothing to do with the current dismal state of Russian economy is ludicrous. It is only a matter of time before the Russians direct their anger stemming from current economic misery at Putin. It is all part of a plan for regime change. Will I feel sorry for Putin? No. There is no difference between Putin and the politicians in the West. Putin is not and never was a saviour of the World. As a matter of fact he said as much himself. All he ever cared about was an equal share of the pie. Of course the West is not prepared to share the pie with anybody, least of all with Putin who does not even have the proper breeding.

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  8. Anonymous
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    Your view makes no sense.

    1. He`s powerful & independent enough to annax Crimea & resist NATO, but cannot sack a minister. Yeltsin sacked his entire cabinet on numerous occasions.

    2. Medvedev was the president (ok sharing with Putin) during the S Ossetia crisis.

    3. Russia is either independent of the west or not, would the US really be pressuring the Saudi`s to lower oil prices hurting shale & their ally if they really controlled Russia.

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  9. [It is only a matter of time before the Russians direct their anger stemming from current economic misery at Putin.]

    Is it a matter of time before you hold yourself accountable for the dismal failure of these your predictions? Or will that never happen?

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  10. Hail to Russia’s new Czar Putin – A product of Russian Zionist mafia like Barack Obama. Putin’s political career was built by Russian “Kingmaker” Boris Abramovich Berezovsky, a Jewish oligarch.

    In March 2014, Barack Obama imposed sanctions on several leading Russian oligarchs in response to Vladimir Putin’s action over Crimea and Ukraine. They included oligarchs and officials who are not only close political allies of Russian president Putin, but long-time associates and his best friends. For example, Yuri Kovalchuck, reportedly Putin’s personal banker, Vladimir Yakunin, head of Russian Railways, billionaires Boris Rotenberg and his older brother Arkady, Vladislav Yuryevich Surkov, former Russian deputy prime minister, Sergey Yurievich Glazyev, Putin’s aide and author of 40 books, Leonid Eduardovich Slutskii, member of the State Duma of Russia, Professor Andrey A. Klishas (Moscow University), Ukraine-born Valentina Ivanovna Matviyenko, the highest-ranking female politician in Russia, and former governor of Saint Petersburg and the current Chairman of the Federation Council of the Russian Federation, Dmitryi Olegovich Rogozin, former Russian ambassador at NATO and Yelena Mizulina, a member of the Communist Party – all Jewish.

    http://rehmat1.com/2014/03/22/obama-targets-pro-putin-jew-oligarchs/

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  11. Who is Anatolii Medvedev? Does Saker mean Dmitri Medvedev?

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  12. Fear and fascination | Neoreactive
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    […] down the American imperialists in both Crimea and Syria, The Saker suspects Vladimir Putin is about to purge Russia’s 5th column:One of the possible signs of a purge to come is the fact that the Russian media, both the […]

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  13. What? No mention of capital flight? Yeah…you’re right Saker, that’s probably too complicated. It’s much more likely that it’s a mysterious cabal of powerless or marginalized 5th columnists doing something hidden and too nefarious to explain.

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  14. Your points do NOT refute what he is saying:

    1. “…..cannot sack a minister. Yeltsin sacked his entire cabinet on numerous occasions.”

    That is EXACTLY the point that Saker and others are always making – Yeltsin had the SUPPORT, not the unmitigated venomous hostility, of the Western alliance, since he was in effect a Western puppet, allowing and helping them to loot, deindustrialize, and demilitarize Russia. So of course they and their fifth-columnist oligarch collaborators within Russia did not care too much about his sacking his entire cabinet, since such “sackings” were not likely to constitute any real change in basic policies or outlook. Read again what Saker says: “In theory, Putin could simply fire the entire (or part) of the government and appoint a different Governor to the Central Bank. But the problem with that is that it would trigger an extremely violent reaction from the West. Mikhail Deliagin recently declared that if Putin did this, the West’s reaction would be even more violent than after the Crimean reunification with Russia.”

    2. “Medvedev was the president (ok sharing with Putin) during the S Ossetia crisis.”

    Again exactly – “sharing with Putin” being the operative phrase. Obviously, Putin weighed in on that just a little bit… And anyway, within the power configuration of present-day Russia, Putin and his sovereigntist allies rather command foreign policy, military and internal security affairs, while Medvedev and the “Atlantic Integrationists” seem to be more in control of the financial-economic sphere, as clearly stated by Saker and others. Also, during the Libyan crisis/civil war of 2011, Medvedev seems to have had more of a free hand in deciding policy in favor of not opposing Western intervention and regime change plans – with the disastrous predictable result.

    3. “….would the US really be pressuring the Saudi`s to lower oil prices hurting shale & their ally if they really controlled Russia.”

    Again this shows that you didn’t really read the article carefully. That’s EXACTLY THE POINT – the U.S. do NOT really control Russia at present, because of Putin and his patriotic independentist allies; but they are colluding with a highly-placed fifth column ensconced inside Russia. The whole purpose of crashing oil prices with the Saudis, is to hurt and harm the Russian economy and society in order to knock Putin and his allies out of power and inaugurate Yeltsin Era 2.0.

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  15. To say that Putin is a ‘great leader’ except for the economy is a bit like saying “Emperor” Bokassa and the Central African “Empire” were real instead of the delusion of a megalomaniac. NO country can be a ‘Great Power’ without a powerful industrial and technological base.

    Political power may flow from the barrel of a gun ( or polonium laced tea) for domestic purposes in a thugocracy but, international power and influence cannot exist without economic muscle and Putin has little. He has even squandered Russia’s oil and gas influence by making it the supplier of LAST resort with his premature and clumsy attempts to blackmail Europe.

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  16. Excellent essay/report – thankyou
    5th Col seeks to negate Saker for this exposition; usa seeks same.
    Oh, that usa had more fearless thinker like The S.

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  17. As far as great leaders are concerned Putin is a midget.

    Very few of us here have the depth of knowledge of internal Russian politics to presume criticism of Saker’s fascinating piece. What we can be confident in saying is that the insight we get from Western media is shamefully ignorant and propagandist. We do know with a good level of certainty that Putin is highly regarded by the Russian people – which fact, by the bye, should be contrasted with the popularity of our own leaders. We do know that Putin has faced enormous and concentrated opposition from the West: particularly in the face of the mindless expansion of NATO – all of this he has had the strength to withstand and, in such cases as Georgia, Syria and Ukraine, to vigorously and successfully counteract. We can also admire the steadfastness with which he has attempted to take the diplomatic path wherever possible – at times with considerable effect; scoring spectacular diplomatic victories and even, as in the case of his New York Times piece or his heavily censored interview with Charlie Rose, to use the Western propaganda machine to his own advantage.

    Make no mistake, Putin is an extraordinary leader and stands among the greatest that Russia has known.

    • Agree: Seamus Padraig
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  18. “What is certain is that so far Putin has failed to deal with the 5th column near and inside the Kremlin and that the situation is rapidly worsening. The recent move by Kudrin to try to get back into the government was a rather transparent use of the pro-5th column media in Russia (and abroad) and it predictably failed. But this shows an increasing self-confidence, or even arrogance, of the Atlantic Integrationists. Something in bound to happen, probably in the near future.”

    The Saker

    If we translate the Saker’s well informed analysis to ‘Old English,’ what is suggested is the need for a partial, or a completion, or a renovation of a Socialist Revolution in Russia. Renovation lies at the heart of the -Permanent Revolution- which is the involvement of each new generation of the citizenry, of America, Russia, China, any Nation, in the process of continual Rebirth of healthy happy confident empowered children in a prosperous moral world.

    With advocacy of Nationalizing the State Bank, citizens also controlling the other Banks, re industrializing Russia, a smile appeared on the face of the other Vladimir, the one in the mausoleum. The Marxist rulers of the Soviet Union were not completely incorrect. The Marxist dream was incomplete. Many of their economic initiatives bore some promise, and achieved some success; however, on the vital stage of Human Political Interrelations, they failed utterly.

    The Saker continues:

    “My strictly personal explanation for what is happening is this: Putin is deliberately letting things get worse because he knows that the popular anger will not be directed at him, but only at his enemies. Think of it, is that not exactly what the Russian security services did in the 1990s? Did they not allow the crisis in Russia to reach its paroxysm before pushing Putin into power and then ruthlessly cracking down on the oligarchs?”

    Is the current Vladimir (Putin), actively following a policy of “letting things get worse”? Is that true? I doubt not The Saker. But, is that a wise policy? Nevertheless, that may be the policy. Is not the conventional behavior, one of – waiting for things to get better, (and not allowing them to get worse)? One understands the perception of the Russian Leaders’ strategy of letting the imperialists throw the first punch (they have been doing just that for hundreds of years), and then, countering. Either way, we will know soon, if The Saker is correct. “Something in bound to happen, probably in the near future.”

    After reading the Saker, and the comments that followed, I wonder if the Fifth Columnists within Russia, and the Zionist American Oligarchs, from without, know what the Saker, (and the rest of the Forumers), know? What will happen in the near future? What will they do? They are doing quite a bit – as we speak.

    The Saker asks the Question:

    “But on the other hand, this argument can be flipped around by saying that considering how bad the tensions already are and considering that the West has already done all it can to harm Russia, is this not the perfect time to finally clean house and get right of the 5th column? Really – how much worse can things really get?”

    There is much wisdom in the Saker: he asks the tough questions.

    We must not lose the VISION!

    For the Democratic Republics!

    PJA

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  19. Anatoly,

    You stole my thunder. Great comment.
    In particular, I praise Elvira Nabiullina. She provides a sane alternative to the nutso ideas of Yellen and the other Western bankers. How Saker can lump her in as a Western lackey confounds me.
    After this current bubble bursts, she’ll get the last laugh. To me, she seems a female, Russian version of the great Paul Volcker.

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  20. is due to the observation that the Soviet experience in that regard was not that successful

    It was still “better”, as seemingly endless ability of Russia to withstand de facto robbery for decades testifies, than anything monetarist cabal could ever do in Russia. At least Putin recognized the importance of military-industrial complex, which is the real locomotive of Russian economy, and by economy I mean real economy, that is primarily manufacturing sector. Even a brief review of contemporary Russian MIC contradicts completely your statement about Soviet experience. Enough to take a look at Rostek (or its subdivision KRET) to understand what I am talking about. This is in effect modified “Soviet experience”.

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  21. Can you enumerate some of my failed predictions or is it just another one of your pointless one liners devoid of original idea and substance. You are a prime example of a generation grown up on sound bites fed to them 24 hours a day by MSM. If you have nothing intelligent to say why don’t you just leave the space for those who do.

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  22. The “problems” are not confined to Russia. The western led financial system (of which Russia, China, etc. have bought into for various reasons) is going through a convulsion (the inherent flaws of a debt based currency system not being addressed being one) that likely will destroy it. Putin has neither the position or power AT THIS TIME to materially affect things for the better within Russia or in the Eurasian Economic Union. The convulsion has to play out further and Russia needs to weather the storm as best it can. Once the destruction (markets closed, banking holidays, bail ins, world wide capital and currency controls, soaring precious metal prices, etc.) manifests itself the reformation can START to take place. By then the obviousness of some of the problems will make it easier to make crucial changes. Frankly, until we’re there, a clear idea of what needs to be “done” and who needs to be “done” remains to be seen.

    In the interim, I think that Russia is economically dealing with things as well as can be expected. Buying gold is wise. Floating the ruble was better than the alternative. Defending a ruble rate would have depleted foreign exchange reserves to the benefit of western financial vultures in the exchange markets. The violent swings in the ruble exchange rate (as well as most other currency pairs) will over time immunize (to some extent) domestic producers to dealing with foreign (some very untrustworthy) entities. High inflation within Russia (other countries as well) will make the general public aware of the “deficiencies” in the current financial system and more amenable to the upcoming changes.

    Until this plays out:

    Reform the Russian political system —- “this can be fraught with danger”

    Replace the 5th columnists in and around the Kremlin —- “replace with who….. until the scale of the problem is clear, this may make things worse”

    Reform the Russian economy —- “it will become clearer what reforms are needed and more importantly will be accepted as obvious.”

    Once the Anglo-Zionist led financial system, the “Washington consensus”, etc. is shaken (most likely to the point of destruction), then large scale changes can be attempted. But that system and consensus is going to fight tooth and nail (for reasons that many people and entities will consider good or evil depending on where they stand) to survive.

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  23. The idea of Putin delaying action until he has the Russian people accepting that his proposed action is necessary is plausible but that is hard to believe of his decision to intervene in Syria which you cite as an example. Surely Syria was and remains peripheral to Russians core interests and some sort of success there would be like a national soccer victory or successful landing on an asteroid.

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  24. Do you think he’s wonderful because you are an expert on Russia and you think he is right and expresses your own views well or because, though you rely on him to provide you with understanding of contemporary Russia you trust what he says for some reason? If the latter what reason?

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  25. Georgia is still oriented westwards and cooperates closely with EU and US. Her relations with Moscow are strained and it also continues to seek NATO membership. The outcome in Syria is still in the open. Just the other day I have read Joe Biden saying that if there is not a speedy political settlement the USA together with Turkey will intervene militarily. Ukraine was a total disaster the snatching of Crimea notwithstanding.

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  26. I quoted your failed prediction, which you have been making since your first appearance here, and no doubt ever since you began to express yourself at all in any forum, under whatever name.

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  27. Georgia is still oriented westwards and cooperates closely with EU and US. Her relations with Moscow are strained and it also continues to seek NATO membership. The outcome in Syria is still in the open. Just the other day I have read Joe Biden saying that if there is not a speedy political settlement the USA together with Turkey will intervene militarily. Ukraine was a total disaster the snatching of Crimea notwithstanding.

    Pretty much the CNN and BBC version, yes.

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  28. {..Georgia is still oriented westwards and cooperates closely with EU and US. Her relations with Moscow are strained and it also continues to seek NATO membership…}

    [Georgia hopes over Europe turn to disappointment]

    http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/8edae8fe-fadc-11e4-84f3-00144feab7de.html#axzz3yBae6FiP

    {In September last year, meanwhile, even with the east Ukraine conflict raging, Georgia failed at Nato’s Cardiff summit to win a long-coveted “membership action plan”, or path to joining.}
    {Georgian Dream has stuck to the goal of western integration, but under current prime minister Ikakli Garibashvili has sought in parallel to rebuild relations with Moscow.}

    It will take some time for Georgians to cleanse themselves of the poison the Neocon agent and traitor Saakashvili injected into the republic. And the minute any Georgian idiot does anything serious about allowing NATO into Georgia, it will be dismembered. In 2008 Russian military was in very bad condition. Yet it took them all of 5 days to rout the NATO and Israeli trained and equipped Georgian military. Even then, Russians could have cut Georgia in half, but wisely chose to stop.

    {Just the other day I have read Joe Biden saying that if there is not a speedy political settlement the USA together with Turkey will intervene militarily.}

    Biden is mouthing off another one of his brain f__rts. An invasion by Turks into Syria will be illegal and Turkey cannot invoke NATO Article 5. Russia will welcome the opportunity to avenge the shooting down of Su-24 by incinerating Turkish columns as soon as they cross into Syrian territory.

    {Ukraine was a total disaster the snatching of Crimea notwithstanding.}

    Ukraine has been a total disaster for the Neocons and their Neo-Nazi puppets. Novorossyia is firmly under control of indigenous ethnic Russian patriots. The massive drafts announced by Porkyshenko have been disasters: few Ukrainian young men want die needlessly for a foreign agent. When the time is right, rest of Eastern Ukraine will be liberated. Eventually, Western and Eastern Ukraine will separate.

    And their was no so-called “snatching” of Crimea by Russia.
    Crimea was snatched by Khrushchev and given to Ukraine SSR without the consent of its population. Crimeans voted in a referendum to re-join mother Russia.
    Done deal.
    Next.

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  29. With great resentment I have sifted through the whole pile of your verbal vomit and I have not found a single instance of such a quote. Just in case I somehow missed them could you repeat for the benefit of all some of them.

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  30. I suppose we can only wait and see whose perception of events is closer to the truth. In any case I appreciate the fact that you respond intelligently and without expletives unlike 5371 even though we do not see eye to eye.

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  31. anonymous
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    The Russians have certainly bounced back to an amazing degree from the collapse of just a bit more than two decades ago. Life expectancies for men dropped down into the 50′s which is a staggering statistic, people had fewer children, pensioners became paupers, alcoholism soared, crime gangs formed, people were out of work, Yeltsin actually had tanks shell the parliament in a power play, everything hit rock bottom. It looked like they were about to go under and it was easy to visualize the country breaking down into independent regions. Yet here we are today; they’re back in almost record time, showing that they have some inner resiliency that emerges when needed. Putin was there so certainly deserves much credit. Now Russia has a number of billionaires and a class of wealthy people who have yachts and money in foreign banks. This is an inchoate class that poses a future danger to the state. After all that’s happened in the past hundred years it would be a tragedy for Russian to be turned into just another western-style plutocracy. Those plutocrats-in-waiting have no loyalty, no patriotism, no values in common with the majority, no real country apart from the one they are feeding off at the moment, an actual fifth column. Putin’s last great act would be to find a way to contain this class from gaining ascendancy, now and for the future.

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  32. Out of curiosity, Regnum Nostrum, how old are you?

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  33. It’s right there in comment 9, you feeble simulator.

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  34. “Surely Syria was and remains peripheral to Russians core interests”

    Could you provide some citations that support your conclusion?

    I would be especially interested in your take on energy geopolitics of Syria in relation to economics of the Western backed absolute dictatorships of the “gulf states”.

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  35. “He has even squandered Russia’s oil and gas influence by making it the supplier of LAST resort with his premature and clumsy attempts to blackmail Europe.”

    Could you support your statement with facts? It is clear that you hate viscerally Russian Federation as well as the current RF President, but do you have a respect for facts? Could you present an instance of the RF involvement in blackmailing Europe? If you mean delivery of oil and gas from RF to Europe, then perhaps you need to refresh your knowledge of geography and take a closer look at the location of those pipelines that deliver energy supply fromRussia to western Europe. You might realize that the RF has been trading with Europe via Ukraine, a country where the US have arranged “the most blatant coup d’etat” and this regime change has created many grave complications around the pipeline.
    Have you heard about Russia’s desire to build pipelines to western Europe without crossing Ukraine? Have you also heard that the US are very, very unhappy with this plan because it would make it more difficult for the US to prop the unfortunate state that the US had decided to use as a pawn in a geopolitical game? The new pipeline “.. would deprive Ukraine of about €2bn in gas transit fees — money that the International Monetary Fund or EU would have to make up as part of its burgeoning aid package to Kiev…”
    So much for free market.
    There was a series of hysterics on a part of several east european states that would lose transition fees if the RF builds new pipelines: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-09-11/theyre-making-idiots-us-eastern-europe-furious-west-doing-gas-deals-russian-devils There was even a grand mal seizure over Germany getting “too powerful” if the RF builds a new pipeline on the north: https://www.thetrumpet.com/article/12862.4.0.0/world/energy/gazproms-dangerous-new-nord-stream-gas-pipeline-to-germany
    Is this what you call “attempt to blackmail Europe?”
    Here are the most hilarious declarations by the sworn enemies of the RF (in Poland and Ukraine): “Nord Stream-2, set to start supplying Europe in 2019, completely neglects Polish interests….” Yatsenyuk called the project “anti-Ukrainian and anti-European…”

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  36. Do you realize that the problems that you have listed in your post — the strained relationships between Georgia and Moscow; the slaughter of human beings in the Middle East (including the ongoing conflict in Syria); the sliding of Turkey towards sultanate; and the ongoing tragedy in Ukraine (including the Crimean referendum, the third on a row, which confirmed the peoples desire for greater autonomy from Kiev) — all these problems were spawned by the ziocons’ (US/Israel) hegemonic policies? Why the gloating?

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  37. Rehmat: are there any non Islamic leaders you don’t dislike? Are Golden Dawn and Jobbik also Jobbik also Jewish pawns?

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  38. “It’s right there in comment 9, you feeble simulator.”

    I asked you a simple question, Regnum Nostrum, and that was the answer you gave me. Here is what comment #9 states, in full:

    “9. 5371 says:

    January 24, 2016 at 11:09 am GMT

    [It is only a matter of time before the Russians direct their anger stemming from current economic misery at Putin.]

    Is it a matter of time before you hold yourself accountable for the dismal failure of these your predictions? Or will that never happen?”

    I fail to see any answer to my question in that message, unless it’s one of the numbers. Are you 9 years old? or 24? or 2016 years? or 1109 years? or 5371 years old? Would you like to give a direct answer to my very clear question about how old you are? Your style is very similar to that of another poster, who always tries to give elusive answers to direct questions, when he answers at all.

    BTW what exactly is a “feeble simulator”? It sounds like an insult of sorts, but I can’t figure out what the insult is supposed to be.

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  39. its not just non islamic leaders he dislikes, he thinks most islamic leaders are zionist controlled also. rehmat only liked 2 ppp in this world . 1, his bacha bazi , faults and all . 2 , machmud amadinejad

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  40. Summarizing

    White trash

    “inhuman history” = big and disgusting circus of idiocy, hypocrisy, psychopathy and technology.

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  41. Previous leader of Jobbik had to resign due to his semitic ancestry. Good fodder for the “Jews… Jews? Jews! Jews!” people here.

    I remember that poll. Brezhnev presided over probably the longest period of (albeit stagnant) stability and international weight Russia enjoyed in at least 150 years. Was it is his making? Hardly, but that is what people remember.
    Putin could just appoint Zhirinovsky to something more than the Duma clown and ‘clean house’. What wasted potential he was..

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  42. My comment was as much a question as a tentative assertion or suggestion. I find The Saker quite often sloppy and, in that mode, uninformative and unhelpful. It was in relation to his making the point about Putin getting the people on side and giving the way he got into Syria as an example that I wondered if he could substantiate either Syria’s objective importance to Russia or the Russian people’s belief in its importance. I see the importance to Putin if he wants to be seen as a player and as restoring Russian clout in the world of (a) supporting his ally/client Assad and (b) thwarting America. But I struggle to make a case for anything about Syria being a core interest of anyone concerned for the future welfare of Russians. Can you?

    Possibly there is a case (though hardly one the average Russian could articulate) for a petroleum and natural gas based answer to my doubts. Possibly to do with pipelines as well as market shares.

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  43. Why does the Saker make one wonder whether there is something he knows about and writes reliably about to follow by saying in effect that Russia was “controlled” by the US with the additional egregious context that that Europe and Ukraine are or were also?

    What is he saying which can’t be dismissed as rubbish or gross exaggeration? What is he saying that actually says anything worth saying?

    And if he wants to say only that no European country will launch a war without US approval how useful to understanding anything is that?

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  44. Yeltsin’s biggest mistake was NOT selling state assets to foreigners. Instead he chose to sell to Russians who had no assets. This required the diversion of $10′s of billions of aid given by US, EU , Germany and UK into fake banks that were allowed to create loans that generated massive inflation. The loans were used to buy the assets, even so for kopeks on the rouble. The banks were mostly owned by Jews because clever Jews were excluded from senior government jobs by prejudice so they were in what passed for business jobs in the SU. A sell out to the US would have given the Federal Government funds and an industrial and service base capable of exporting. Multinationals can switch production bases quickly in response to exchange rates. They help to balance the world economy. All those strategic industries full of protected Russian national champions are stuck unable to enter the world economy with the yet unproven case for the SU100 so Russia is unable to take advantage of a reduced exchange rate beyond increasing the volume of raw materials, although not enough to compensate. The idea that Russia was looted by outside interests is bizarre when assessed by the facts. The looting was home grown.

    Anyone who recommends the Mugwump Glazyev as an economist has no understanding of economics. (Mugwump in British English = a person educated beyond his intellect. Glazyev is an extreme example).

    Most of the Putin era reforms were carried out by his first prime minister, Kasyanov. In early 2004, Putin sacked K and the entire cabinet. Medveedev was part of the Putin’s pro Silovik replacement team. Since then, the Silovoks took more and more space until the disaster of the customs blockade against Ukraine in August 2013. This provoked the short lived turnaround over the EU and thus the Maidan and thus the early Berkut killings of three protestors and so on … Since then Russia lost fighting chances of involving Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova in the EEU and keeping them neutral on NATO. The actual result has been to make them irretrievably hostile to Russia. Great diplomacy guys. Meanwhile Russia has declared trade wars on the EU, most of the Anglosphere, Malaysia & Indonesia (they didn’t kowtow to Russia over MH17 so palm oil imports are blocked) and of course Ukraine just in time for an oil price collapse. The surrender of the Orthodox Fascists in the Donbass is obscured by Syria. Syria was not deep strategy. The Baathists were three weeks away from falling. Losing the Donbass and Syria would have destroyed Putin and United Russia (In the poll that 92% approved of Putin’s actions, only 26% wanted to vote for him again as President). Russia is now in the Middle East mess as a bit player desperately crawling to the Gulf Arabs for support. Qatar has been promised a pipeline across Syria. Stopping it was a major factor in Russia’s support for the Baath. This is hardly getting what he wanted – the Ukraine in the EEU.

    Saker is a self hating Orthodox Fascist more than a little out of touch with the bigger reality beyond the Donbass.

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  45. “It is not a result of some long term strategy because Putin has none” Bang on. He does Wait and See maybe with some provocation on the side (Georgia comes to mind).

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  46. He lost Ukraine, Georgia and Moldova and isolated Russia (China doesn’t want Russian goods. Oil’s cheap. The Turkmenistan pipeline was built before allowing Russia to pay for a gas pipe to China). Crimea was smoke.

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  47. All the key decisions were Russian.

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  48. In the end, Putin couldn’t handle defeat in the Donbass and losing Syria. He has still surrendered on the Qatari pipeline as he hasn’t the resources for a long slog but he keeps his political appeal at home. 92% approve his actions. 26% will vote for him.

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  49. You’re a gifted comedy writer–I’ll give you that!

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  50. Saker made his name translating Strelkov’s VK.com page (Russian facebook competitor). Strelkov was the leader of the main Orthodox Fascist group that moved into the Donbass to provoke the war. Beyond reporting the thoughts of the Orthodox Fascist movement (which is strong and important in Russian affairs, particularly as they have been defeated on every front except so far internal PR) there’s not much to Saker.

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  51. Anatoly seems to me much more of a realist (or rather “realpolitiker”?). He shows much less of an inclination to a time-honoured propensity of the “Russian soul” (if anything like that ever existed) for booze-fuelled high-drama. I do remember (fondly) an old Russian lady who escaped the Communist Paradise during the War and ended up in Italy in a transition camp and then at the bottom end of the World. She used to tell me (quote from memory, but I swear not made up: “Ah, I loved Italy and Italians. They were always talking and singing about ‘amore, amore’. Not like us, Russians, for whom everything is a tragedy. And you know why? To give ourselves reasons to drink more”). Well, actually all Russians I personally know and are not a few, are sober, some worringly tea-totallers!

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  52. Well he is one of the rare people commenting on Russia related blogs -especially wrt Syria and Ukraine – who reads as though he knows what he’s writing about and is pretty straight. So would you be so good as to disabuse me of my obviously ignorant naive error and, at the same time, demonstrate your expertise in something more than holding opinions.

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  53. Russia’s vast natural resources have been a blessing and a curse.

    Blessing cuz that stuff can be sold on the world market for easy money.

    But a curse because Russians came to devalue the mind-economy.

    Poles and Germans have far less amount of natural resources, so they had to use their minds and rely more on organization and technology.

    Russians could just suck oil or gas out of the ground or mine for minerals.

    Russian economy based on natural resources encourages either the rise of oligarchs or state control of the economy, and both are not good for the development of a well-educated middle class.

    But then, as the US economy has shown, a nation can be rich in natural resources but still make great strides in advanced economics. America has Rule of Law and a better elite, at least through most of American history. These days, I wonder with globalism and Jewish elite control of a mostly goy nation.

    While Saker is correct to point out that Russia has some bad oligarchs, the bigger problem is that the Russian people lack in character. Indeed, if Russians were high in character, the oligarchs wouldn’t matter so much.

    In Russia, the problem isn’t only that the oligarchs own too much but that the masses have no clue how to make more for themselves. Russians lack work ethic. They are used to being taken care of the state. One could argue that Germans and Nordics also have a welfare-state mentality, but at least those people work hard and honestly and pay into the system before they get from the system. Too many Russians only know how to take.

    [MORE]

    Surely, a social democracy for Swedes and social democracy for Greeks work differently. Swedes will pay into the system, manage the system well, and take from the system. Greeks will dodge taxes, corrupt the system, and loot the system. So, the system will fail.

    The problem of Germany and Nordic nations has been TOO MUCH SUCCESS. Because they’ve run things well, they’ve developed rich stable societies, and they want to share their goodies with the rest of the world. The result? Multi-culti hell. It goes to show that too much success can make people overly compassionate and complacent about the dangers of their do-goody follies.

    Russians aren’t exactly like Greeks, but their character is closer to Greeks than to Nords. They are not honest. They drink too much. They act like childish savages and dance on tables, wrestle with bears, and dive into ice cold freezing water in the middle of winter just to be stupid. They drive like lunatics, as anyone can see in youtube videos. They often act as if their brains are made of potatoes than neurons.

    Take the Eisenstein film IVAN THE TERRIBLE. Ivan is surrounded by hostile boyars, but he gains the trust of the people. And with the people, he finally takes on the boyars and unites Russia. All very good. And it’s good that Putin has cleverly used the media and national symbols to win over the people. But what are these Russian folks like. In IVAN THE TERRIBLE, they are usually acting like loons, making funny faces, growling like bears, tossing stuff about, and acting like childish savages.
    Ivan needs their support, but it’s also exhausting to have such louts and boors as the main support. I mean how would you like to a great leader surrounded by people whose main ability is jumping around like kangeroos and hollering?

    This is why a true Russian Revolution can only happen when the national character is changed among Russians. And this will involve a revamping of the education system, the use of myth, a moral revival, and reinvigoration of the national narrative.
    Putin must really think in terms of the next 100 yrs than next 10 yrs. Russia will always be vulnerable as long as the great majority of Russians remain boorish and loutish.

    Russians need to ask themselves… “Do we want Russia to become a big Prussia or a big Greece?”
    Russians are not genetically inferior to Germans or Poles. It is really a problem of national character. National character isn’t only about national pride. It’s like a nation can be full of national pride but deficient in the individual, social, communal, and moral virtues, habits, manners, and routines that make for a well-run society.
    Cubans under Castro, Venezuelans under Chavez, and Zimbabweans under Mugabe have been filled with nationalism, but they failed to create well-ordered and well-functioning societies.
    One could fault communism in Cuba and socialism in Venezuela. But, capitalist or socialist, the Latins have been lower in national character than the Germanic and Nordics.

    What Russia needs is a Germanic national character and Russian nationalism. That will be a winning formula.

    Also, while it’s true that Jews did suck Russia dry in the 90s, it needs to be why Russians were so vulnerable. While we can blame Yeltsin, the fact is so many Russians were fooled and went along.
    Now, Putin did change Russia around, but it was his doing more than that of his people. In other words, had Putin acted just like Yeltsin and handed over Russia to the globalists on a silver platter, most Russians would likely have just gone along.

    While we need to credit Putin for some good things, in the long run it must be up to the Russian people to prevent the loss of national sovereignty. Russians need to stop relying so much on the strong man. While it is good for a proud nation to have strong leaders, more important is a strong people.

    And the strength of a people isn’t only about nationalism and patriotism or acting tough. It is about ability, skill, morality, values, and etc.

    After all, consider two nations that are alike in most things.

    But…

    One nation has people who are not very aggressive, tough, or nationalistic. But they work hard and are honest, diligent, conscientious, mindful, and etc.

    The other nation has a people who are proud, aggressive, macho, and nationalistic. But they are lazy, corrupt, boorish, slovenly, and etc.

    Which nation will be more powerful?

    A nation of people who don’t act tough but do their job well…

    or

    A nation of people who act tough but don’t do their job well.

    Democratic UK in the first half of the 20th century was a nation of diligent factory workers and shop keepers. People there sipped tea and nibbled on crumpets and even acted sort of ‘gayish’.

    In contrast, Fascist Italy was filled with macho-strutting men full of swagger and tough demeanor and brazen nationalism.

    So, which nation was more powerful? UK of course.
    Even though the greaseballinis were tougher on the exterior, Italians were messy, noisy, oily, and acting like the freak in Lina Wertmuller’s SEVEN BEAUTIES.
    It’s like Negroes act the toughest but create the weakest societies beset with crime and violence because they can’t get their act together.

    Russia will remain a kind of third world nation unless Russians change their ways.
    Third World nations depend mostly on natural resources. Saudis have oil and nothing else. Same with Venezuela. In contrast, an advanced nation like Japan and Germany have an economy even when prices of commodities fall.

    Like the US, it is great that Russia has vast amounts of natural resources. The question is does Russia have something other than natural resources for its economy? If not, the whole economy will face collapse with drop in commodity prices.
    This is the state of third world economies.

    This is why Russia should see sanctions as a good thing. Indeed, Russia should declare that they will make sanctions against Russia and by Russia vis-a-vis the West permanent.
    Unlike most much smaller European nations, Russia can be self-sufficient in almost everything.
    If the Russian way is to sell natural resources in exchange for made goods, Russia will never mature economically. Russia needs to make most of everything if possible and trade among one another. Since most goods are not high-tech, it is doable IF Russians get their mind and act together. Too much of Russian economy has been about selling natural resources to buy all the made stuff from abroad.

    The problem is Russians are not good businessmen and workers.
    Russians should be like the Jorgensons in THE SEARCHERS. The father is a hard-working man, by golly. And the mother was a school teacher, you know. America developed fast because it had plenty of people like the Jorgensens, and you can see them in EMIGRANTS and NEW LAND by Jan Troell.

    Now, take a film like SIBERIADE, surely one of the greatest films ever. But look how Russians work. They are doing silly stuff like chopping down trees for no reason, wrestling with a cougar, fighting all the time, and drinking too much vodka.
    And later, even as USSR has become industrialized, look at all the drinking and partying and acting slovenly. No wonder the guy messes up on the drill, and later the men are utterly unprepared when the oil well blows up and knocks everything down.

    Russians could act like this cuz they had so much land and so many resources. Russians could tell themselves, “if we mess up here, we’ll get some stuff elsewhere.”
    Russians could afford to act this since they have so much land, but it’s a bad mental habit that leads to inefficiency, laziness, lack of focus, and etc.

    In contrast, Japanese are a smaller scrawnier people and live in a tiny nation(compared to Russia) but have a higher GDP.
    I mean it is ridiculous for Russians to let this happen. Russians don’t have lower IQ than the Nippers. But Russians have very low SQ or sense quotient.

    Saker blames Anglo-Zionist economic policy for the mess of the 90s, and there is much truth to that. But if coming under Anglo-Zionist rule automatically leads to economic ruin, how come Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan have done so well, at least economically? And Singapore. And recall that Hong Kong was under Anglo rule while China came under Mao’s rule. China was free of imperialism whereas HK was still an imperial colony. But HK became so rich.
    And look at Europe. Germany lost its sovereignty after WWII. It was under American rule. But it is the fourth biggest economy in the world. And Poland has done pretty well after communism.

    In contrast, eek-it’s-a-Greeks have not done well. And Southern Italians still lag.

    If coming under American globalism is bad for the economy, all those nations should be hurting. But some thrive, some don’t.

    Same goes for Russia. It is true that Jews in US and Russia did use dirty tricks in the 90s to loot the economy. But how were they able to pull off such scheme? Because too many Russians are boorish morons and haven’t a clue. Just think.

    The 90s in Russia is a story of Jewish wickedness but the bigger story is Russian moron-ness. I mean how could any people allow that to happen?
    Also, the oligarchs took advantage because they knew Russians would be too stupid to realize what was happening.

    The fact that we have to credit Putin for saving Russia says a lot for him but nothing about the Russian people who, if not for Putin, would be total whores of the Anglo-Zionist system.

    Also, even if a people become vassals, they can still prosper. Look at all of EU. It’s a vassal of the US, but there’s still lot of prosperity.
    Look at Japan. Look at South Korea and Taiwan. Look at the economic achievements of Vietnam and India. They are still poor but ever since they came under the umbrella of Anglo-Zionism, they’ve grown their economy and WITHOUT dependence mostly on natural resources. India has lots of smart high-tech people.

    But Russia, like Brazil, has decided to rely mostly on natural resources.

    Imagine if Russians in the 90s had the national character of Germans, Japanese, or Anglo-stock folks. Even as Jewish oligarchs were looting the economy, these hypothetical Russians with an alternative national character would have used the freedom and gone to work to build a new economy.
    But how did most Russians act after the fall of communism? They hadn’t a clue as to what to do.
    That is why the Jewish oligarchs had such an easy time stealing stuff. With people that clueless, lazy, and dumb, of course they could run circles around them.

    Remember that China was far poorer in the 80s than Russia at the time. After yrs of Maoism, Chinese economy was a total zero. But given some freedom, Chinese worked hard to change their society very fast.

    While the leeches of the 90s took advantage of Russian weakness, they didn’t create the weakness. It’s like wolves will attack a sick and weakened bear. But it doesn’t necessarily follow that the bear was made sick and weak by the wolves in the first place.
    After 7o yrs of communism and centuries of Czarism and Orthodoxism before that, Russians never developed a culture of individual conscience. Right and wrong was all a matter of authority and doing as told.
    Also, Russian culture of work was formed by (1) necessity and (2) repression than by (1) ideal and (2) incentive. Russians worked because they needed to eat. Russians also worked because they were ordered to.. or else.

    In contrast, in the more advanced parts of Europe and East Asia, there was the belief in work as a virtue in and of itself, an ideal. Also, with the rise of capitalism, there was the allure of work as incentive because you can earn money and buy nice stuff.

    Russian work culture built on necessity is brutish and animalish. Animals hunt and do stuff for needs of basic survival.
    Also, work culture based on repression gets tiresome. The worker feels resentment as he is driven by fear. When Stalin told Russians to do stuff, they had to do it… or else.
    Under a work culture driven by fear, people don’t work unless they feel the sting of whip.

    Russian work culture developed thus. There is no intrinsic respect for work as in the Protestant Work Ethic. And there isn’t much in the way of delayed gratification of incentive: work hard, get paid, and buy good stuff.

    Also, Russian lack disciplined minds. Protestantism simplified Christianity to its core principles. It cultivated a mindset that gets to the point.
    But Russian mindset developed under Byzantine Orthodox culture that is about some guy growing a big beard, bellowing some Godly stuff like Bluto, swinging the incense can around, and staring at a bunch of icons. Now, there’s a lot of cultural glory to the Russian tradition of Christianity, but it doesn’t focus the mind on the essential point of Christianity.

    So, when the Russian mind is confronted with a task or issue, it never gets to the issue. In this, Russians are somewhat like Iranians, the champions of meandering thoughts and problem-solving. Watch some Iranian films, and you realize even sending your spouse out to get a dozen eggs could take the whole day. Not necessarily because the the spouse is lazy but because the trip turns into some byzantine-like adventure about who-knows-what.

    Consider a film like Taste of Cherry. Some Iranian wants to off himself, but he sure turn it into some long-and-winding adventure. Or take Wind Will Carry Us where a bunch of Iranians turn a simple task into an impossible one. One might think the films are like that because Kiarostami is an eccentric director, but in fact, ALL Iranian films are like that. An Iranian is someone who travels around half the world just to get a dozen eggs.
    Russians aren’t that ridiculous, but they have a way of meandering all over the place instead of just getting to the point and doing stuff.

    Anyway, while I’m all for national sovereignty, Russia could have achieved much more economically even in the 90s under Anglo-Zionist vassal-hood IF Russians had better national character.
    I mean compare the Russian Jews and Russian gentiles. Sure, the Russian Jews played loose and did lots of bad stuff. But the fact is they were energetic, competitive, tireless, and etc. In comparison, Russians were like the big lug in OF MICE AND MEN.
    Now, imagine if lots of Russians were like the Jews. Then, Jews would not have been able to fleece the Russians so much.
    But Russians were like deer in the headlights.

    Also, Russians have less excuse in having lost out to Jews so badly.
    In the West, Jews have a huge advantage cuz of the Holocaust Cult. Nasty Jews get away with so much in US and EU cuz it’s taboo to be ‘antisemitic’. But in Russia, being anti-Jewish was okay. And there was no Russian guilt over WWII since Russia whupped the Nazis. So, there was no taboo that prevented Russians from noticing bad Jewish behavior. But most Russians were asleep at the job and utterly blind to what the Jews were doing to them.

    Also, let us suppose that the Jews had NOT looted so much in the 90s. Let’s suppose Yeltsin died in 1992, and Russia was ruled by a true patriot.
    The economy might have been better but not much better because the fact remains that too many Russians were utterly clueless about running a new kind of economy.
    And indeed, they are still clueless because Russia still relies so much on natural resources and oligarchs.

    While oligarchs may be bad, Russian economy will not improve simply by getting rid of them. And it is misguided to use oligarchs as scapegoats for the failure of the Russian economy to diversify. The failure is with Russian people with their bad work culture.
    Indeed, suppose every Russian were a German, Japanese, or Anglo-Americans. I’ll bet many of them would gone to work to build all kinds of small, middle, and big businesses. And oligarchs would invest in them because they would have confidence in their enterprise.
    But how come oligarchs don’t want to invest in the Russian people? Same reason why rich folks don’t want to invest in Detroit.
    Now, Russians aren’t as bad as American blacks, but their work culture isn’t much better than that of Southern Italian greaseballinis.

    So, naturally the oligarchs would prefer to invest their money abroad than in Russia.

    How can this be changed? This will require a new kind of educational culture, spiritual culture, and moral culture.
    Russia needs an educational system that fixes the body and soul before trying to fill it with knowledge.
    It’s like a bucket should be fixed of leaks before being filled with water.

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  54. What planet are you on?

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  55. “Reads as though,” but not really if you’re familiar with the topic at all. I suspect he’s just another ranting Ookraeenian trying to create an alternate reality.

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  56. That is not inconsistent with his having long term goals. Do you think he has any that he tries to shape his policies, decisions and actions to pursue, or even just goals?

    Or would it be possible to say how he would rank the various futures which may result from his decisions and whether he has an ascertainable set of possible scenarios which he manoeuvres toward when possible – and how flexible he may be in accepting different outcomes from those he might rank first in a perfect world (for him) and in which areas of policy and aspiration?

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  57. First of all, you know nothing about economics, so you should stop acting like you do. Inflation in Russia is not a monetary issue but caused by supply side constraints. Historically the post Soviet Russia has suffered from producing too little domestically and importing too big part of everything consumed. This led to a form of inflationary pressure in which the prices became directly dependent on the ruble’s exchange rate — so any drop in ruble’s rate directly push the inflation up. Like I said, it’s not a monetary issue.

    Small Holland is the world’s 2nd largest exporter of agricultural products, with the export in 2013 reaching 80 billion euros. Russia on the other hand the world’s biggest country, and one of the world’s largest importers of agricultural products. That is the legacy of liberal 5th column in Russia — traitors, thieves and criminals who managed to destroy world’s 1st or 2nd largest agricultural business prior to the fall of the Soviet Union, and from a net exporter of agricultural products made an addict who is not able to feed itself having the largest landmass in the world. The only punishment which would fit such a crime against Russian people is death. The penalty for high treason has always been death. But perhaps liberal traitors and turncoats could be taken to working camps to pay their debt to the country first, and then liquidated for their crimes. Yes, that’s the remedy I would prescribe. Do you think you belong to that criminal, corrupt and extremely immoral liberal kind, hm?

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  58. The Saker treated us to another overly schematic, borderline conspiratorial view of events. He projects his own worldview onto Putin. Putin is above all a realpolitik pragmatist. His approach is to cover the bases. His initiatives to the east with things like the Shanghai Co-operation Organization and the Eurasian Economic Union make sense regardless of what’s going on with the west. With the west unwilling to offer decent terms, the eastern option is the only one that makes sense. Fortunately, it’s pretty robust. That same measured, pragmatic approach showed in Putin’s approach to the Iranian nuclear issue, the Syrian situation, and the Ukraine issues. It also showed in Putin’s approach toward relations with Turkey. There is no reason to assume that Putin deliberately seeks some sort of crisis point to rally public support for action.

    It’s silly to conjure up a conspiracy theory over Russia’s economic situation. The impact of falling oil prices is real. So is the impact of sanctions and countersanctions. But time works in favor of structural adjustments such as import substitution and market redirection overcoming those impacts. China has the capital. Russia has the resources and the technology. Chinese demand for Russian armaments is a significant source of foreign exchange. The same cannot be said for the gulf states. Oil prices are now at the point where they are damaging themselves more than Russia. In KSA it’s at a point where it is potentially destabilizing as the foundation of their social contract gets unndercut and the military abcess in Yemen continues.

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  59. I repeat my request to Seamus Padraig to give the referenced detail in place of mere sneer. You claim to know enough to improve on my no doubt naive appreciation of his seeming a lot more knowledgeable than, from memory, you or SP have bothered to prove yourselves. From close acquaintance with a Ukrainian descended dissenter from the Russian propaganda that he listens to, reads and views, I find no reason to think Soarintothesky is Ukrainian or that he is biased or ill-informed. Do you? Is a “-sky” ending to a name much more commonly Ukrainian than Russian? Do you know? Is it his punning pseudonym that you count as evidence?

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  60. XA, being Greek is therefore anti-Turkish so I would guess he would not support. Jobbik however is Turanist, believing that Hungarians are descended from the Turkic peoples. Its leaders have made occasional statements in favor of Islam, and then walked them back.

    I’m mixed on them, at first glance they seem like useful idiots for the left, a second look notes that they turned up the heat on Orban and turned his right-liberal party into a nationalist party. I don’t expect them to ever hold power under their current worldview.

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  61. Who would imagine that Cheney, Bush the lesser, and the whole ziocon industry are Putin’s creation. Bravo! Saturday Night Live should consult you.

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  62. He lost… yes, and the US found the Ukrainian gold, literally.
    Do you know why the US are so hysterical about RF plans to build new pipelines anywhere but in Ukraine? Most likely, the hysterics have something to do with $2billions in transit fee that are currently supporting the swiftly crumbling Ukrainian economy. Neither US not EU feel brotherly love for the ordinary Ukrainians.
    Tell us something about a certain “high moral ground” that the US/EU have reached upon initiating the Middle East slaughter (hello refugees!) and sending everything in Ukraine to plunging (except a gesheft for the “assets” on the top). Mind that Russian Federation has been surviving the traumatic dissolution of the former USSR and a plunder of national resources a la Harvard Boys (the same imbeciles that did nicely the Fed for the Main street expense). What is your gloating about? Enjoying the US(Israel) empire on the march? This does not augur well for the humanity, because the US had been captured by the ruthless profiteers of MIC/finance persuasion. Not long time ago, the US had been hailed “a beacon for all humanity.” Not anymore. Alas.

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  63. And I should also point out that RCB’s interest rate might not be a proof of the liberal 5th column’s work in Russia, for as we all know FOREX market is controlled by derivatives and those who are doing the rigging and controlling part are AngloMurican big banks (owned by the Jews I should point out) like Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Barclays, Deutsche bank, HSBC et. al, so it might be that RCB is forced to keep to rates up in order to attract rubles into saving accounts and thus keep the exchange rate under control as it is under Anglozionist’s attack. But all that is like I said possible because of liberal 5th column work in Russia who were very busy in the 1990′s destroying Russian industry and agriculture, and stealing everything they could under the great theft project called privatization — because that is how it’s done in the West where everything (even the resources as well as strategic industries, which just shows how dim-witted western population really is!) is owned by oligarchs which dumb Westerners are very fond of (they will have the time to ponder about their delusions and hallucinations about how good oligarchs for a society really are pretty soon though!), and afterwards busy sabotaging Russian economy so plenty of room for growth and development has been left, and agriculture is a prime example of that. After President Putin took over Russia in 2000., Russia has experienced probably the biggest growth period in her history, but that growth could have been even higher were the 5th column liberals caged, tried and effectively dealt with.

    That mass of derivatives btw which are controlling the markets, and are also serving as a mask to hide real height of debt and all those “unfunded liabilities,” is now at 1,6 quadrillion dollars and it’s ready to blow off — an event which will represent the fall of the biggest Ponzi scheme in human history! The whole world in eagerly awaiting that moment. And let all hope we all bring justice to liberals everywhere, for it is not only Russia which has suffered by that treacherous filth: every sovereign elements and countries throughout the world have gone through the same, only Russia more so because Anglozionsts were ever so eager to steal and control Russian natural resources! Hopefully a moment will soon come and we shall rise everywhere and exterminate that degenerate, thieving, criminal, corrupt liberal filth thoroughly!

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  64. clearly 5371 was directing the comments to Regnum Nostrum, so why did you reply with venom? Stupid ass sock puppet!

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  65. In case your response about all-mighty Putin was serious, here is some educational material:
    “An August 2012 DIA document declassified by a judge says that Washington, Ankara and the Gulf States were helping to establish a Salafist principality in eastern Syria to pressure Assad and that it could team up with extremists on the Iraqi side of the border to form an Islamic State — the document uses that exact phrase. Then DIA chief Gen. Mike Flynn later told Al Jazeera that this was a “willful decision in Washington,” not the U.S. merely turning a blind eye to what was happening.” https://consortiumnews.com/2016/01/24/can-us-break-with-jihadist-allies/

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  66. “clearly 5371 was directing the comments to Regnum Nostrum, so why did you reply with venom? Stupid ass sock puppet!”

    Well, it was pretty obvious from my message that I was directing my question to Regnum Nostrum: “I asked you a simple question, Regnum Nostrum, and that was the answer you gave me.” Anybody with an ounce of intelligence might have concluded that I simply made a mistake by responding to 5371′s message. The last thing I would want is to offend a first time poster on unz.com or force a regular poster (who obviously lacks balls) to go to the trouble of creating a new screen name in order to respond to my message. It’s very disturbing to realize that there is someone out there who not only lacks balls but lacks even one ounce of intelligence.

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  67. A leftie economist writes:

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/24/litvinenko-murder-putin-russia
    But it was only after Russia’s passing of the 2006 Extremism Law, justifying extra-territorial killings of Russians making allegedly libellous statements about the government, that Vladimir Putin was able to hit back at a man who, days before he was poisoned, had accused him of being both a paedophile and the man behind the assassination of the journalist Anna Politkovskya.

    Owen is judicious. The polonium-210 that poisoned Litvinenko could only come from a state nuclear reactor and could only be given to the FSB with the go-ahead of Putin or his circle.

    Absolutely no doubt it was the FSB types who did for Litvinenko Difficult to believe Putin is really a paedo despite that video of him with the boy. Very unlikely Putin would be so stupid as to order Litvinenko’s killing with such a signature method, (or even Politkovskya’s). but he failed to keep Litvinenko’s former comrades in the FSB under control.

    The rule of law – impartial judgments that can be referred to independent higher courts based on the balance of evidence around clear jurisprudential principles and deliberatively legislated democratic law – is the cornerstone not merely of liberty, but of prosperity and our civilisation. Britain is blessed because it is a rule-of-law society. Russia, for all its military power and abundant resources, is damned because it is not.

    The growing evidence is that economies such as Russia’s or China’s can use command-and-control mechanisms to grow into middle-income per head countries. But to become high-income per capita countries is infinitely harder. All the energies of civil society and workforces have to be harnessed to create great self-standing organisations. These, by developing their own purpose and cultures, can marshal the immense amounts of information that are at the core of the modern economy – and then produce at scale

    Israeli military historian

    Today Putin, …(though whether his support of Assad is really more ill-advised than Obama’s attempts to topple the Syrian president is moot). He has even succeeded in raising the birth rate a little bit. But there still can be no question of reversing the overall demographic decline. Let alone of addressing the most important problem of all, i.e Russia’s chronic inability to produce industrial goods anyone wants to buy.

    The polonium used on Mr Litvinenko was worth “tens of millions of dollars”, but in in practice there is no commercial market for polonium in a form that could be refined into the form that killed Litvinenko; it came from someone who had control of a nuclear facility and used it to deliberately make polonium.

    http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/Issues/2007/January/Polonium210.aspIt’s possible to buy tiny quantities of Po-210 over the internet – but as one of America’s principal suppliers, United Nuclear in New Mexico, state on their website, a poisoner would have to acquire about 15,000 of their ‘needle sources’ to accumulate a toxic amount.

    The above article poses the question “Why use polonium?” I think it is because as it says in Brute Force: Allied Strategy and Tactics in the Second World War , Russians think a sledgehammer is not only ideal for cracking a nut but that cracking nuts is what sledgehammers are made for. Still it was remarkably incompetent and is good reality therapy for those who think real life secret agents are pulling the strings of events.

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  68. O maior fracasso de Putin: não erradicar os conselheiros ocidentais dentro da Rússia. | Dinâmica Global
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  69. Also forgot to mention, some questions you should ask yourselves regarding Russian CB activities: why have RCB not enacted currency controls 2 years ago when the attack on the ruble started but they even made ruble freely floatable instead (making the ruble more easy to attack by those Anglozionist banks and hedge funds who have free-of-cost access to whatever amount of dollars or euros they need for speculative attack)? That would also allow to decrease interest rate as it’s not monetary phenomenon as I stated. Why does RCB state their reserves in dollars instead of rubles or yuans? Why do Russian companies accept dollars and euros for their products? Ask to be paid in rubles, for that will create demand for rubles and strengthen it in return. Sovereign nations are paid in their own currencies, only slaves and vassals accept that of your enemies’! That must be perfectly clear. Don’t accept dollars or euros and there will be no problem. By accepting Anglozionist controlled worthless fiat paper, you only empower them and thus subjugate yourself; it is nothing but parasitizing, so who allows parasite to leech on himself when he is able to defend himself but an agents of that parasite? So, yes, Russian CB is the lair of 5th columnists, and many in the Kremlin are too. Saker is right.

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  70. @What planet are you on?

    The planet Hasbara!

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  71. I think he means great compared to the garbage (that is called national leadership) that comes out of the US and Britain.

    Where George Bush Jr managed to bankrupt the US (after Clinton left it with a treasury surplus) and Obama managed to make the US look weak titty, Putin seems to act like an adult. Putin walks the talk. And thus, being a rarity in the West, that makes him great.

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  72. I don’t know why you all hate on Rehmat. I come to Unz.com because its the only place I can get perspectives which I wouldn’t see in my regular media feed (like Rehmat and Unit472, one an Islamist supremacists and the other willfully covering US-evilness)

    I’m just saying the more the merrier. But Rehmat does get a lot of hate across the forums, more than that Tom_R guy that used to post articles of how the Jewish people control of everything.

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  73. Putin’s Biggest Failure | Counter Information
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  74. When you quote Biden that the US and Turkey WILL intervene militarily in Syria it is important to remember that this applies only if Syria and Russia cannot finish off ISIS alone:

    “Another U.S. official quickly stepped in to clarify Biden’s remarks, saying that the military solution applied only to the Islamic State, as opposed to Syria in its entirety, Reuters reports. The official added that “there is no change in U.S. policy.”

    http://dailycaller.com/2016/01/23/biden-comments-on-military-intervention-in-syria-send-us-officials-scrambling/

    Biden must also know that if Turkey sends in massed troops into Syria it will be to stop the Russian/Syrian and Kurdish/Arabia elimination of the ISIS forces near the Turkish border. I hope you are aware that NATO article 5 does not protect Turkey WHEN their forces are attacked inside Syria. Do you think that Turkey would send in their approximately 400 fighter jets against the Russian the TOR M2 SA 15D Gauntlet, S300 and S400 missiles and SU-/24/25/31 fighter jets? Erdoğan is an egomaniac but hopefully not insane!

    Erdoğan is also aware that Turkey runs on Russian and Iranian natural gas and LPG which would be cutoff in even a simple incident where Turkish troops engaged Syrian or Kurdish/Arabic forces, or heaven forbid Russian special forces.

    Turkey receives 27% of its Russian sourced natural gas from via the Transbalkan pipeline. The remaining natural gas supply comes from Russia-Bluestream (30%), Iran (20%), Azerbajan (10%), Algeria and Nigeria (10%, as LNG), Qatar (2% as LNG), and internal production (1%). Of this total Russia supplies about 30 BCM/year.

    Iran has recently rejected Turkey’s request for an increase in natural gas supplies to make up for this potential Russian gas loss. Furthermore, occasional disruptions of Iranian natural gas flow occur in winter due to harsh winter conditions in Iran and high gas consumption rates in the northern parts of the country. Meanwhile, Iran is building natural gas pipelines to Iraq and Oman to supply their natural gas needs.

    The planned Trans Anatolian Natural Gas Pipeline Project (TANAP) from Azerbajan through Turkey will not be completed before 2018 and would only initially supply 6 BCM of natural gas to Turkey. The current Azerbaijan pipeline cannot supply additional gas, especially in winter.
    Turkey, in panic mode, has just signed a contract with Qatar to supply natural gas, however due to a lack of terminal offloading/storage (total maximum annual capacity of 14 BCM) in Turkey it would be impossible to put most of the gas into Turkey’s gas network. Add to this Turkey has almost no underground natural gas storage (1.9 bcm)!

    While Iraqi Kurdistan is building a natural gas pipeline to Turkey, it will not be ready this year, even if the Kurdish PKK no longer attacks Kurdish gas and oil pipelines in Turkey.

    On top of this, Turkey has declared that it will reduce imports of Russian liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for motor vehicles by 25% in 2016 (LPG is used in most vehicles in Turkey). Turkey somehow expects to make this up with LPG imported from the US…

    Isn’t pipeline geopolitics interesting, much like a Chinese game of GO!

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  75. How did you come about all your “information”. Please provide a few sources so the rest of us can either learn or at least just fact check your information for fun? Otherwise, the readers would conclude that you are a fiction writer in your spare time?

    I cannot resist responding to your non-cited Orthodox fascist comments. While you were at the Maidan riots did you happen to see the CIA backed neo-nazis with their sniper rifles

    https://www.academia.edu/8776021/The_Snipers_Massacre_on_the_Maidan_in_Ukraine

    and riot shields painted with the letters 14 (the fourteen words) and 88 (Heil Hitler)? http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/03/13/fascist-formations-in-ukraine/

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  76. One of the best wrap-ups for the situation in Syria:
    VietnamVet: “Neo-Cons, Multinational Arms Dealers and Israel will do anything to keep the Sunni Shiite holy war on going. Turkey and the Gulf Monarchies are the linchpins. If Turkey seals its border and the flow of oil money stops, the Syrian Sunni rebels will wither on the vine.
    Any realists left in the US government have to be pushing for a negotiated settlement in Geneva to avoid the possible escalation to a world war. But, with so many factions pushing here and there, as Colonel Lang says, right now the Syrian civil war will be settled on the battlefield not in Switzerland.
    Perhaps, a crash of the global economy, the European refugee crisis, or an American electoral revolt electing Donald Trump or Bernie Sanders will overtake events in the Middle East and force a peace settlement.”

    http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/2016/01/syria-sitrep-rebel-defences-crumbling-in-latakia-province.html#comments

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  77. Here is a great article that is an ideological equivalent of a wooden stake going through the ziocons’ treasonous and vampiric hearts: http://original.antiwar.com/justin/2016/01/24/nationalism-and-its-discontents-the-meaning-of-trump/
    “In Buchanan’s view, the militarized universalism was nothing less than treason. Invoking the Founders, he wrote that this globalist fantasy failed “the fundamental test of any foreign policy: Americans will not die for it.” … So what, if not the “benevolent global hegemony” dreamt of by the neocons, would and should Americans fight for? Buchanan’s answer was to quote these stanzas from Lord Macaulay:
    “And how can man die better
    Than facing fearful odds,
    For the ashes of his fathers,
    And the temples of his gods?”
    Buchanan’s answer to Krauthammer’s globalism was a foreign policy of “enlightened nationalism”: “total withdrawal of US troops from Europe,” and a rejection of the idea – nowhere authorized in the Constitution – that the President and/or Congress has the power to sacrifice its sons on the altar of some crazed crusade for “global democracy.”

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  78. Any large country be it Russia, the US or India, has by its nature a three-fold division of attitude towards the outside world. The first are the nativists, who would like to do everything themselves, from industry to culture, the second are the internationalists who sing the praise of international cooperation and trade, the third – the majority – are pragmatic or indifferent to the issues as long as they get by. By calling the Russian internationalists, traitors, you Saker have shown yourself to be incapable of subtle analysis, and should tone down and stick to the field in which you seem to have some expertise; namely the relationship between the Orthodox and the Muslim worlds.

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  79. Putin’s Biggest Failure — The Saker | Information Clearing House | Unz Review | Taking Sides
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  80. solitaire - Occurrences
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  81. annamarina,

    Thanks for your excellent contributions. Your Syrian SITREP may have been summarized at Moon of Alabama. Like your link, the latter has a lot of good comments!

    http://www.moonofalabama.org/2016/01/syria-the-battlefield-negotiations-now-favor-the-syrian-government.html#comments

    My gut feeling is that events in the Middle East will indeed be overtaken by the collapse of the velocity of money and deflation from reductions the money supply+outstanding debt and the subsequent exploding of the derivatives markets. Further information can be found at the Automatic Earth website and Zero Hedge. Meanwhile the collapse of economies in the Middle East and North Africa plus demographics will lead to another 5-10 million refugees into Western Europe. These refugees plus millions of economic migrants from Ukraine (average Ukraine income is 150 EU/month) will collapse the social net of the EU and lead to its long overdue breakup.

    As for the US political situation, from what I read Hillery is toast, based on the FBI case, and Sanders will not be supported by most Super Delegates and the State DNC Chairs who can ignore the Caucasus’ votes. Trump can also be ignored the same way by Republican party insiders.

    Given the corruption in both parties this may lead to Bloomberg becoming the Democratic candidate who can win against the Republican choice, unless Trump runs third party (unlikely), which could lead to the incoming 2017 Republican controlled House of Representatives choosing the next President.

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  82. Avery,

    You may also be interested in the recent comments by Putin on Donbass: “Putin : Transfer of Donbass to Ukraine in the USSR Was Unjustified”

    http://fortruss.blogspot.com/2016/01/putin-transfer-of-donbass-to-ukraine-in.html

    Larchmonter445 has some good background comments following the article.

    Enjoy.

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  83. And may 5th columnists and their ilk habituating crevices across the globe, inherit their just rewards….

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  84. Throwing a baby with the bathwater on some technicalities? The Saker is an invaluable fount of important information that is not allowed to be presented by western MSM. The free thinkers are indebted to the Saker for his service to humanity; he tries to do his best by collecting critically important information and delivering it to the readers.
    By the way, you are very welcome to present your subtle analysis of the situation in Syria and Ukraine.

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  85. I still nurture a hope that deep inside the US government (captured by ziocons) and Pentagon (captured by war profiteers and opportunists), there are groups of able and intelligent American patriots that have been trying to alleviate the worst deeds of the psychopathic hegemonists. This hope, though weak, has been on life support through reading a blog Sic Semper Tyrannis by the honorable Colonel Lang: http://turcopolier.typepad.com
    There are people that have dedicated their lives to serving the United States first and foremost; these people see with bitterness the parasitic bacchanalia of MIC/Fed/zionists on the hapless host of the U.S.

    “…the collapse of economies in the Middle East and North Africa plus demographics will lead to another 5-10 million refugees into Western Europe. These refugees plus millions of economic migrants from Ukraine (average Ukraine income is 150 EU/month) will collapse the social net of the EU and lead to its long overdue breakup.”
    We would not have anticipated these collapses if not the ongoing mad adventures of the US/EU in the Middle East and Ukraine. The U.S. has it easy by having Europe to pay with social discontent and treasure for the U.S.-led illegal wars of aggression and regime changes overseas.

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  86. Your incoherent blathering might be a sign of a serious mental distress alongside showing basic ignorance and understanding of the nature of the “how-the-world-works” so to speak. Any country, or anything else for that matter, has only something called interest “attitude” with the outside world. In this particular case, the oligarchs (but not the people, mind you; that is very important distinction) who control the West ["powers-that-be" Westerners call them, and bestow some demigod attributes upon them (whereas they are nothing but thieves and mass murderers)] have a dream they conjured during the last couple of centuries which is to run and control the world: to centralize power in institutions they have erected (UN, which is to be some sort of a parliament from where they wish to write legislation and laws the whole world must comply with; IMF, which is to be world’s central bank, et al), and on the other hand we have countries like China and Russia (and almost all others in the world regardless of the level of western’s occupation, but those 2 have the power to stand free alone… to resist occupation that is) who wish to be free and do things which are in the interest of their people and national sovereignty (and that Western countries do not do; they all go down the path oligarchs put them on and that path has long ago ceased to be in the interest of the population of those countries, in the interest of their people). So that is dynamic here, Gupta. International, globalist liberal ideology is in the interest of those oligarchs and none else, and nationalist, the true sovereign ideology is in the interest of the people. Trade and cooperation is one thing, subjugation of yourself with liberal ideology is completely another. Russian liberals are all traitors, just like German, Serbian or Austrian liberals are, Gupta. But you Gupta can keep on sucking the City of London’s dick and see where your people will that lead you to. It seems like you haven’t had enough, Gupta: colonization, genocide of millions of Indians through mass starvation and wars on behalf of the City, mass sedation of the people by opium drug, partition of your land and the people by religious lines and on 3 states and, of course, one of the biggest thefts of all time which saw all your gold and silver taken away to London hasn’t been enough for the Indian slaves like Gupta here. You are a good dog Gupta. A very good dog. But should your meditation ever lead you to higher awareness, Gupta, you will find these simple and self-evident truths of mine most compelling. Pray to Shiva, Gupta, to clear your mind… but until the day of your awareness arrives, be a good slave and go fetch me that stick I threw. lol

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  87. “Whatever happens in the future, Putin has already secured his place in history as one of the greatest Russian leaders ever.”

    It is way too early to offer that sort of endorsement. Wait two decades after he is no longer head of Russia, then one can make that assessment.

    “Not only did he succeed in literally resurrecting Russia as a country, but in a little over a decade he brought her back as a world power capable of successfully challenging the AngloZionist Empire”

    
There is observably no such thing as the “AngloZionist Empire”. It’s a made up term.

    “Russia was plundered from her natural wealth, billions of dollars were stolen and hidden in
    western offshore accounts, the Russian industry was destroyed, a unprecedented wave of violence, corruption and poverty drowned the entire country in misery and the Russian Federation almost broke up into many small statelets”

    You do realize that Putin had a major role in these events, right? How do you think he became a billionaire?

    “But what Putin has so far failed to do is to…Reform the Russian political system…Replace the 5th columnists in and around the Kremlin…Reform the Russian economy”

    Again, Putin was part of a corrupt system that enable him to plunder his people while at the same time lionizing “Mother Russia”. He is part of the problem!

    “In theory, Putin could simply fire the entire (or part) of the government and appoint a different Governor to the Central Bank. But the problem with that is that it would trigger an extremely violent reaction from the West. Mikhail Deliagin recently declared that if Putin did this, the West’s reaction would be even more violent than after the Crimean reunification with Russia. Is he right? Maybe. But I personally believe that Putin is not only concerned about the reaction of the West, but also from the Russian elites, particularly those well off, who generally already intensely dislike Putin and who would see such a purge as an attack on their personal and vital interests.”

    So Putin isn’t this “great leader’ after all.

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  88. Interesting [krollchem].

    Thanks for the link.

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  89. Do you know how serious a charge it is to accuse someone of being a traitor?

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  90. Again, could you provide the desirable “subtle analysis” instead of slogans?

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  91. Crimea was already an autonomous region. No one with any knowledge of Crimea takes the referendum under Putin’s auspices seriously. Russia is in the boat it’s in because of Putin.

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  92. The Kaganists would certainly applaud your attitude, but the locals do not agree with you:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26606097

    https://consortiumnews.com/2015/03/22/crimeans-keep-saying-no-to-ukraine/

    https://www.rt.com/news/237837-nuland-ukraine-weapons-propaganda/

    And this is certainly relevant to your position: http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/07/17/from-kosovo-to-crimea-obamas-strange-position-on-referendums/

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  93. Crimea had 2 referendums on the same matter (reunification with their motherland) and in the both cases voted roughly in the same percentages: ~96% for returning. The first one was in 1991. and the other one in 2014. The 2nd one had the observers from over 40 nations and no irregularities were found. There were plenty of irregularities on Scottish independence referendum over a year ago though. Some were even recorded:

    This is how referendums, that most direct expression of the will of the people, are done in the West! Incidentally, Murica, which Westerners call “cradle of democracy today,” has never had such expression of the people’s will! In that “cradle of democracy” machines are counting votes, or rather those writing softwares for the machines.

    And Westerner, Russia is a superpower because of Putin. Weak propaganda you are selling here, degenerate. You must have confused readers here for your fellow average Muricans for you to attempt to lie and shit like that.

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  94. The Faker is one of the worst Kremlin propagandists out there. To summarize, his “analyses” are essentially always wrong.
    I figured The Faker out pretty quickly, after his sudden, vicious turn against Strelkov when the Kremlin decided it did not need Strelkov as a resistance figure anymore.

    For years, Kremlin propagandists such as The Faker and Orlov have propagated this idea that the U.S. economy was about to collapse. But I suppose Orlov has been a huge proponent of peak oil most of his life as well. It turns out the world is awash in oil. But I digress.

    Today, the old Soviet propaganda point that the U.S. economy was about to collapse has proved wrong, once again.

    On the other hand, Russia’s economy is in a free fall. It’s GDP has contracted significantly and industry output fell off a cliff.

    Not to worry… The Faker, who lives in Florida, just as Orlov lives in Boston (strange for guys that keep denouncing an evil empire about to collapse) doubles-down… Why, the free fall of the Russian economy is part of Putin’s cunning plan, a master chess move. Yeah, everything is a Putin master chess move.

    You can’t make this stuff up.

    Good luck to the Russian people. The way things are going, they might feel the shame of seeing their former president balancing at the end of a rope after a trial at The Hague.

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  95. On the ongoing bloodshed in the Middle East: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/24/world/middleeast/us-relies-heavily-on-saudi-money-to-support-syrian-rebels.html?ref=world&_r=0
    “When President Obama secretly authorized the Central Intelligence Agency to begin arming Syria’s embattled rebels in 2013, the spy agency knew it would have a willing partner to help pay for the covert operation. It was the same partner the C.I.A. has relied on for decades for money and discretion in far-off conflicts: the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.” (The same Saudis, you know, that financed 9/11).
    “In the near term, the alliance remains solid, strengthened by a bond between spy masters. Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, the Saudi interior minister who took over the effort to arm the Syrian rebels from Prince Bandar, has known the C.I.A. director, John O. Brennan, from the time Mr. Brennan was the agency’s Riyadh station chief in the 1990s. Former colleagues say the two men remain close, and Prince Mohammed has won friends in Washington with his aggressive moves to dismantle terrorist groups like Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.
    The job Mr. Brennan once held in Riyadh is, more than the ambassador’s, the true locus of American power in the kingdom. Former diplomats recall that the most important discussions always flowed through the C.I.A. station chief.”

    Add to that the unbelievable blindness of the U.S. towards ISIS selling oil to Turkey and Israel. This lucrative process would continue unimpeded if not the Russian Federation bombing of ISIS’ oil tankers. http://www.globalresearch.ca/israel-is-the-main-purchaser-of-isis-oil/5493738

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  96. S-sky’s first paragraph reads like something you’d find in interpretermag. It glosses over the role of western influence in the disaster of the 1990s. Yeltsin’s chief adviser for the economic transition was the American neoliberal ideologue Lawrence Summers. The Russians who made out like bandits were the ones with the inside track to foreign capital that was invited under the rather supine terms advocated by Summers and company. The value of Russia’s productive assets was depressed by the predatory terms dictated as a condition of Russia’s entry into the World Trade Organization.

    S-sky accuses Russia of launching a trade war with the west while completely ignoring the fact that Russia had no choice but to adapt to a sanctions environment if they were not going to cave in completely. The policy of import substitution is inflationary – for now – and as Anatoly Karlin has pointed out, the inflationary aspect has forced interest rates upward. The weak Ruble and the interest rates attract capital, for much the same reasons the high US interest rates and depressed Dollar of the early 1980s attracted the Japanese capital that pulled the US out of that recession. The difference is that the US had a consumption-based recovery while Russia’s objective is recovery based on productive assets. If the west doesn’t like being shut out of Russian markets, they only have themselves to blame.

    S-sky’s third paragraph is a bizarre fantasy that seems loosely woven around Ookraeenian nationalist talking points. Russia is a “bit player” in the mideast. “crawling to the Gulf Arabs for support?” Really?

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  97. If you prefer FauxNews’ presentations of “facts on the ground” this is your choice. For others, the alternative media is the only way to learn about important world events. The Saker blog is highly appreciated for the efforts to deliver the news that the highly controlled MSM stay mum about.
    Do you know a person or organization that are always right with their predictions? For instance, Brooksley Born was right about the dangers of “new financial instruments” while an army of big shots had been trumpeting the exceptional health of the exceptional American economy. And then came the printing press and socialism for the mega-banksters.
    Why such a gloating about the obvious difficulties of the Russian federation and particularly about the troubles in Russian economy? The country had experienced first a dissolution of the former USSR some 25 years ago and then a plunder guided by Harvard Boys (the best and brightest imbeciles). Could it be that your visceral hatred towards The Saker is just an expression of hatred towards everything Russian. Rather disturbing.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/us-economy-2016-here-are-3-important-trends-watch-2245967

    http://www.warcriminalswatch.org

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  98. Put a cock in it, nitwit.

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  99. I prefer neither. Both Faux News and The Faker are liars. They just target different segments of the population.
    I understand that full-time Kremlin propagandists such as yourself, who seem to have endless time on their hands to write long posts in comment sections, play this card of “pick your team”.

    I don’t pick among liars. I support nationalists, especially the dying European kind, wherever they are. And that includes Russians. And by the way, I am sick of the Russian media constantly trashing Western European nationalists who refuse to be genocided through population replacement. Those morons manage to alienate the ONLY people in the world who sided with Russia after Maidan.

    Unfortunately for Russians, they find themselves in the same predicament as we do: they are governed by corrupt, sleazebag politicians.

    I’ve heard so much about all the right things Putin says. I don’t give a crap about a politician’s speeches as they are all liars.

    Tell you what, give us all a heads-up when Putin, who supposedly has the support of 85% of the Russian population, shuts down the Russian Central Bank and/or begins to request tangible goods and/or real currency for Russia’s natural ressources. If he truly is that popular, and given the desperate situation most Russians find themselves economically, it should be a piece of cake.

    But he won’t do it, now, will he? That tells me all I need to know about the guy.

    I can see now what Medvedev meant when he told Obama: I will communicate this to Vlad.

    They are all on the same team. It’s the global ruling elites against the people.

    Obama vs. Putin is just good cop/bad cop at the international level. It’s fake. Just as the left/right divide at the national level is fake.

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  100. Wanna be nazis rather than Fascists. Zak and Strelkov are much closer to Mussolini.

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  101. Who is gloating? I have lived in Russia for long periods over the last 25 years and far beyond the Garden Ring. I employ Russians to help me make my living there. I have Russian friends who don’t speak English.

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  102. Straw men all. Yeltsin did not have a chief adviser. He lurched all over the place.

    You didn’t even pause to read what I wrote about sanctions and customs blockades. When the key events took place, you weren’t watching.

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  103. Thanks for a reply which is both civil and coherent – a pity that it is not the rule on these blogs and that civility is worth remarking on.

    Just for the moment I see your last par as dealing with two different questions. Maybe (if I look) I shall find what seem to be Ukrainian talking points that match those you cite. But there is also the question of truth. Can Russia afford to be more than a bit player in the ME? Maybe it is getting fantastic leverage, particularly for Putin personally, out of a few strategic pinpricks and minor prop ups but, with one caveat, I can’t see it as more than a bit player. The caveat is that Russia needs to devote far less to the comfort of its people than the US and so effectually multiplies its effectiveness and, not least, stamina.
    Apart from the tone I am not sure why Russia’s approach to the Gulf Arabs shouldn’t be derided as one might deride almost all Western countries’approach to Saudi Arabia…

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  104. No. He’s balancing rewards within his team. He hands out rope until the receiver hangs himself. The far right sat and fumed while Medvedev was President. They got their way with the blockade against Ukraine and it spiralled out of control. Medvedeev is back and Shoigu (not part of the Orthodox faction – they mutter he can’t be trusted because he might be Buddhist) is defence minister.Lavrov stays as FM as always. So the key players are now strongly centrist. Sechin might have been PM if the right had succeeded and China hadn’t turned him down.

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  105. Why don’t Fenians get Ukraine? Imagine a country ruled by a larger next door neighbour. There are large estates sending income to very wealthy absentee landlords. The local land agents are pushed to deliver far higher rents than in the Imperial Centre. The language and religion of the peasants is supressed. The Imperialists tell patronizing jokes about them. There is a history of starvation and large scale emigration. A large colony of Imperial nationals was planted and has become the most industrialized area. In this country, at the end of the First World War, the bait of Home Rule stopped the country dividing so that the Eastern (rather than northern) province stayed in to keep a blocking vote for the Union. And yet every Fenian I’ve seen writing supports the Russians?

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  106. It was done to lock the rest of the Ukraine into the USSR. IT was all rather complicated. The Donbass miners (as opposed to the steel workoers and factory workers) were major centre of working class White resistance to the Bolsheviks. Gorlivka in particular provided thousands of volunteers for the White army – hence the later propaganda about Stakhanov and Gorlivka’s support for the Orthodox Fascists). The independent minded Reds in Kiev abandoned independence for home rule because Lenin promised them the Donbass in return for their assistance against the Whites. And even this is a massive simplification.

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  107. So? Doesn’t change a thing.

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  108. Bang on about the Faker. Brilliant nick name by the way. To a lesser extent he did quick about terms to other “leaders” amongst the the Donbass insurgents. Especially the assassinated ones, now the majority of the original leadership. Prudent man Strelkov. There was one promising a march on Rome (err I mean Kiev). I can’t remember if he is still alive. Most of the dead ones opposed Minsk.

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  109. “about turns with” not “about terms to”. slightly blind.

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  110. I’ve been following The Saker over at his own blog for about two and a half years now, and here’s my take:

    1.) His military sitreps are good. A lot of people here whine that he ‘contradicts himself’, but he actually just presents the reader with several possible outcomes, and sometimes he weights their likelihood, and sometimes he doesn’t.

    2.) His cultural analysis is sometimes skewed by his Orthodox reactionism, which tends to reduce a lot of problems between Russia and the west to the tired old trope of ‘Rome vs. Constantinople’.

    3.) We share the same basic sympathies politically, but–I agree with Anatoly Karlin here–some of ideas regarding an alliance between Russia and ‘Islam’ are kind of nutty.

    But all in all, I agree with annamarina: he’s usually worth a read, and his own website is also a good clearing-house for info & opinion from elsewhere.

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  111. You made me smile: Your post was longer than mine, therefore you could be suspected (according to your criteria) of being one of the “full-time propagandists with endless time on their hands to write long posts in comment sections.”
    Please, relax and try presenting your thoughts in a legible manner.

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  112. Incoherent? I made my points concisely. You on other hand loosed verbal diarrhoea.

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  113. Why can’t you answer a simple question without deflection?

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  114. [religion of the peasants is supressed]

    All the peasants in the southwest of the Russian Empire were Orthodox, not Catholic.
    Should be the end of all your bullshit right there.
    But then, every other statement you make – and you make many – is equally false and designed to deceive.
    You’re a real piece of work.

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  115. [And by the way, I am sick of the Russian media constantly trashing Western European nationalists who refuse to be genocided through population replacement.]

    Lying scum like Chaban, Soarintothesky. Regnum Nostrum, et alii multi: “See, we found this article in the Russian media criticising Western European nationalists. Putin is a monster!”

    Me: “Here are plenty other articles in the Russian media which support the nationalists and criticise the invasion.”

    LslCSRNeam: “See, we told you only one point of view could be expressed in the Russian media. Putin is a dictator!”

    Me: “-”

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  116. Największa porażka Putina « Dziennik gajowego Maruchy
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    […] http://www.unz.com/tsaker/putins-biggest-failure/ Wolne tłumaczenie: Gajowy […]

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  117. Sorry to break it to you but Mussolini’s ideology of corporate fascism is dominant both in the NATO countries and the Eurasian SCO:

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article7260.htm

    In your earlier post you appear to favor Ukraine neo-Nazis to corporate fascists. I do not support either, and yes my wife’s uncle spent the war in a Nazi prison of war camp as did her grand uncle for sinking the French deep water fleet.

    I would hope the people of Donbass can choose a future free of the oligarchs, gangsters and the Ukraine Nazis but I doubt this wish will come true. As for Western Ukraine, it is going down a black hole run by war bands. See Simon Black’s excellent older podcast on the beginnings of the deep recession in Ukraine titled “Dulce et Decorum est Pro Patria Mori”

    https://www.sovereignman.com/podcast/podcast-014-dulce-et-decorum-est-pro-patria-mori-14818/

    Many in western Ukraine expected to instantly become as well off as Western Europe. Sorry, but leading economists estimated that it would take a trillion dollars to bring Ukraine up to Western Europe, assuming no mass theft by the ruling oligarchs. Ukraine is bankrupt and corporations in the NATO countries just wanted to plunder it for its resources and discard the common people.

    I would expect that the West will abandon Ukraine and Russia will end up in an association with Eastern and Southern Ukraine based on Game Theory:
    Crisis 2014: A Study of Russian- Western Strategic Interaction

    http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/peps.2015.21.issue-2/peps-2015-0006/peps-2015-0006.xml

    Many millions of Western Ukraine citizens will end up as refugees in Western Europe competing with the 10-20 million Muslims refugees from the Middle East wars that the European governments supported.

    If you take the time to observe the political and social unrest you will realize that the European dream is dying fast and even the nation states are crumbling apart. Sadly, Russia may be the only European civilization to weather this demographic storm provided it can control the borders.

    The future shock is coming fast so try to be prepared for the future rather than dwell on the Russian past.

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  118. Sorry to break it to you but the world is not awash in oil and the energy return on energy invested (EROEI) is declining rapidly. What you see as excess oil is actually financial malinvestment due to low interest rates and the Federal Reserve QE program in support of banks and maximizing of loans.

    Since 2009 the fracking cowboys in the US increased production by about 4.6 mbd while Saudi Arabia raised production another 1.1 mbd. This temporary excess supply will continue as long as the existing wells can produce, although the depletion rate is about 80-90% within three years. Based on production costs of 60-70 US$/barrel the American frackers will lose about 500+ billion in 2016. Previously many frackers bought protection through contracts to sell the oil at about 90 US$/barrel. These protections spread the losses for 2015 but will not save the frackers in 2016.

    Yes ALL oil producing countries, including RUSSIA and the US, are suffering economic contractions due to this short term excess supply. Russia has the advantage of selling some oil, and most natural gas at a prearranged price in a fixed contract, often with a take or pay clause. As such the Russian losses are less than the US frackers who must sell at a loss or in the case of natural gas simply flare it off.

    • Agree: Seamus Padraig
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  119. Największa porażka Putina | f6862
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    […] Saker http://www.unz.com/tsaker/putins-biggest-failure/ […]

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  120. Perhaps there is something in your writing that makes it very difficult to distill what exactly your want to say… I simply suggested to provide the readers with a sample of your subtle analysis of the US/RF conflicts in Syria and Ukraine (since you found that the various articles on the Saker blog lack in subtlety). Still waiting.

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  121. Rzucanie Putinowi kłód pod nogi | ZYGFRYD GDECZYK
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  122. Pro-Western Fifth Columnists in and around the Kremlin – sentinelblog
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    […] Fifth Columnists in and around the Kremlin   by The Saker (Abridged by henrymakow.com) The problem for Putin today is that it makes no sense to replace some of the worst people in power […]

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  123. I like Rehmat. I just think it’s funny that he seems to hate every non Islamic leader.

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  124. “Out of curiosity, Regnum Nostrum, how old are you?”

    I posed this simple question to Regnum Nostrum on January 24 and still haven’t received a response from him. Curiously, he immediately stopped posting any new messages after I posed my question to him, despite being a somewhat active poster after his creation this past December. Even more curious, we have suddenly witnessed the appearance of Soarintothesky on January 25, the very next day. He has now posted a total of 16 messages in the short time of his existence on unz.com. He also likes to bash and criticize The Saker, which just happened to be a specialty of Regnum Nostrum. Another tipoff: the joint appearance of Wizard of Ooze, who seems to comment in response to some of the same messages as Soarintothesky.

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  125. #CentralBanking #Putin’s Biggest Failure: Not Cleaning House! | | truthaholics
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    […] Putin’s Biggest Failure: Not Cleaning House ~ The Saker, The Unz Review, RUSSIA INSIDER, Mon, Jan 25, 2016. […]

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  126. Russia’s roles in defusing the chemical weapons issue in Syria and the nuclear issue with Iran were significant. Russians are also aware that Syria and Iraq are the focal point in the battle against Wahhabi extremists that threaten to destabilize the Caucasus and central Asian regions if they establish establish a base of power outside of the sphere of the gulf states. Russia has a vital interest in aligning with the secular and Shia powers against the Wahhabi. Their interests are directly opposed to the gulf states that want to destroy any secular or Shia opposition to their influence. The foreign ministers of Russia and KSA may meet, smile, and shake hands for the cameras, but I’m pretty sure they’d just as soon kill one another.

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  127. That was an interesting grouping that you have spotted.
    Meanwhile, a popular backlash towards the MSM presstitutes has finally began:

    http://russia-insider.com/en/germany/germans-abandon-major-news-sites-anger-over-slanted-russia-coverage/ri885

    “The US and UK media have been biased in their coverage of Russia, but German media has been far worse… Now it turns out that part of the reason is CIA fiddling with German media outlets… Since the publication of Udo Ulfkotte’s “Gekaufte Journalisten“ in September – now a #1 Amazon bestseller, in which he charges that the CIA regularly bribes top German journalists, himself included, – German readers’ disaffection towards their mainstream media appears to have crossed a point of no return.”

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  128. All the peasants in the southwest of the Russian Empire were Orthodox, not Catholic.

    Oops:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversion_of_Che%C5%82m_Eparchy

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  129. For different (and somewhat more sanguine) view of Russia’s economic picture, here’s Alexander Mercouris: http://russia-insider.com/en/business/upbeat-mood-putin-reviews-economy-his-team/ri12505

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  130. Articles signalés par Philippe Crévieaux – Savoir ou se faire avoir
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  131. A propaganda version of events involving Poles in a small part of one single diocese is supposed to refute my statement? Do you imagine that everyone is as ignorant and stupid as you, svidomite?

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  132. Your typically stupid statement “All the peasants in the southwest of the Russian Empire were Orthodox, not Catholic” was refuted by this example.

    Just another example of your ignorance about the “southwest of the Russian Empire.”

    When in a hole, you naturally chose to dig deeper. It was an eparchy, not “small part of one single diocese” and it involved Rusins, not ethnic Poles. It seems that almost every word you type is an inaccuracy.

    And of course, I didn’t mention the not entirely voluntary conversion of millions of Greek Catholic peasants in the right bank Ukraine and Belarus in the 1830s.

    Always a pleasure highlighting your ignorance, 5371.

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  133. It was the original abduction of Orthodox Christians in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth into the Uniate church which was involuntary, you watery svidomite turd.
    Chelm was one small town so little Ukrainian that it went to Poland in 1945. Rusyn is a term applied to highland people who never had anything to do with it.
    You have the dignity of Poroshenko, the heterosexuality of Lyashko, the integrity of Yatsenyuk and the courage of Saakashvili.

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  134. S-sky’s claim was about the Donbas during the Russian Revolution, not the right bank in the Nineteenth Century. It also didn’t specify whether “the religion of the peasants” was Catholic or Orthodox.

    The Bolsheviks actually saw more of a threat from the Orthodox than from non-Orthodox minorities because the Orthodox establishment was so tightly intertwined with the Czarist establishment. The years of Czarist marginalization of non-Orthodox, particularly Jews, tended to push them towards supporting the Bolsheviks. The guards who held and killed the Czar were ethnic Latvian Catholics. CHEKA wasn’t about to trust Orthodox followers with that task.

    The most heavily Greek Catholic areas of the Ukraine were occupied by Poland as a result of the Polish-Soviet War. That didn’t work out so hot for the Greek Catholics either. The Polonization of the western Ukraine radicalized the Ukrainian nationalist movement.

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  135. It was the original abduction of Orthodox Christians in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth into the Uniate church which was involuntary

    Events that occurred centuries earlier. Do you think conversion to Orthodoxy in the first place was always voluntary? Would that make a hypothetical “reconversion” to pagaism and renunciation of Christianity by force …not by force?

    Your argument is as stupid as usual.

    Chelm was one small town

    The eparchy was based in Chelm, and it covered more than the town.

    You can’t get a single fact right, can you? :-)

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  136. Chelm was not in the southwestern part of the Russian Empire.

    An Eparchy is equivalent to a Roman Catholic Diocese, the next lowest level of hierarchy above the Parish.

    Many of the Parishes reverted back to the Greek Catholic Church in 1905. The Greek Catholic experience under Polish rule wasn’t so peachy either.

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  137. S-sky’s claim was about the Donbas during the Russian Revolution, not the right bank in the Nineteenth Century.

    His comment comparing Ukraine to Ireland was about all of Ukraine, not only the Donbas. The Donbas was where the “large colony of Imperial Nationals” was planted, but not necessarily where the peasants were oppressed.

    The guards who held and killed the Czar were ethnic Latvian Catholics.

    Lithuanians are Catholics, Latvians are mostly Protestants. The Latvian guards, being Bolsheviks, were probably atheists. Did they come from a Catholic minority within Latvia?

    The Polonization of the western Ukraine radicalized the Ukrainian nationalist movement.

    This was certainly a major factor, but not the only one. When the Soviets took over in 1939 they purged western Ukrainian society of most of its moderate leaders (the rest fled). The radical nationalists, already used to underground activity, were harder to catch and survived.

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  138. You know absolutely nothing about the Ukraine, Poland or anything else. You simply copy the first thing you can find from Wikipedia without caring what it says, and lie about its contents.
    You have the dignity of Poroshenko, the heterosexuality of Lyashko, the integrity of Yatsenyuk and the courage of Saakashvili.

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  139. Russia has smart people and should do better economically. While it is easy to blame the “fifth column” for everything, I think one must dig a bit deeper to find the cause of the Russian economic malaise.

    Business is agnostic. Where ever money could be made, capital will go there. It is easy to see that after the break up of the Soviet Union, Russia did poorly compared to the Chinese. Here is what I see as the major differences between the two countries.

    1. The Chinese had a large contingent of overseas Chinese to kick start the economy and a leadership that exploited this fully. Instead of letting them come in all over the country, they set up special economic zones to host the Hong Kong and Taiwanese business people. Focus their meager resources in these zones to build up infrastructure etc. The Russians, on the other hand, did not enjoy this oversea ethnic advantage. They also opened up the whole country before they were ready.

    2. The Chinese focused on something which they had a very big advantage. They had productive labor and they were cheap. So they start at the bottom of the rung with making cloths and toys. The Russians did not enjoy this advantage. In fact, I had recalled some Western article talking about the poor state of Russian farms. It said that they often needed three people for every job because on average, two of the three would be out of commission due to Vodka. The only advantage was weapons(high IQ) and natural resources(large land mass). Indeed, this is what is being exported today.

    3. The Chinese took a lot of initiatives. The entire country is a hot bed of activity. Not all will be economically fruitful, but many industries that sprung seemingly overnight took a lot of people trying and starting companies. While there are some Russians with initiatives, the vast majority of them seems to be very reactive. This might be due to 70 years of communism which robbed entire generation of their motivation, or maybe the culture even precedes communism. Don’t know enough to say. Just my observation.

    4. The Chinese government is more enlightened and understands that you need to bring outsiders in and allow them to make a profit for you to also prosper. They very smartly leverage their market to gain know how and (initially) capital. The Russians are suspicious of outsiders and seem not to be able to leverage the outside knowledge to uplift themselves.

    To have any kind of industry, the people must be productive, willing to work and diligent. If the basic ingredients are there for the firms to exploit, and the environment is conducive, they will come and create the industry. and if the government is far sighted, they can leverage this initial success (in Chins’s case, clothing and toys), into other area of success.

    To sum it up, there are major problems with the culture of the people and government getting in the way of Russian economic growth. Fix these problems and you will see that the “fifth column” is not an issue.

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  140. The Donbas was where the “large colony of Imperial Nationals” was planted, but not necessarily where the peasants were oppressed.

    That bit about ethnic Russians being “planted” in the Donbas, either by the Empire or by the Soviet Union, is a pernicious myth. There’s a rather bizarre theory promoted by some Ukrainian nationalists that there was some ancient Scythian civilization that “true” Ukrainians are descended from, that was displaced in the east by impure mongrels during the rise of the Empire. The Ukraine actually saw the first emergence of the Russian identity, which retreated east instead of expanding west.

    The supposed “planting” of ethnic Russians in the Donbas during the Soviet era was nothing more than economic migration during industrialization. The migrants came from all over, including other parts of the Ukraine. There are communities of ethnic Georgians and Chechens in the Donbas as a result of that same migration.

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  141. Le plus grand échec de Poutine – Le Saker Francophone
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