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How Russia Should Deal with the “Pilban Syndrome” (PBS)
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A reader, SunriseState, has recently posted the following question in the comments section: “what would you say is the most optimal Russian strategy vs Poland?“. When I read it I thought “now that is an interesting question indeed!”. Today I will try to answer it, going step by step.

First, a diagnosis.

There is a Polish syndrome. We can ascribe all sorts of causes for it, some will describe the Poles as heroic victims, others as greedy hyenas, but for our purposes we don’t even need to dwell into history to list a series of symptoms which, when taken together, we could call the “Polish Syndrome”:

  1. Phobia (hatred and fear) for Russia and everything Russian.
  2. A strong desire to be “part of the West” (as opposed to an imaginary “despotic Asia”) while in reality having little or nothing in common with the said “West”
  3. A deep and bitter resentment at having been militarily defeated over and over again and a subsequent hope for a grandiose revanche.
  4. A deep seated inferiority complex towards both the East and the West as lyrically expressed in the Ukrainian sloganlet us drown the Poles in Russian and Jewish blood!“.
  5. A dream of finally submitting the Orthodox Church to the Papacy (or, in its latest iteration, to “consecrate Russia to the immaculate heart of Mary“)
  6. A deep insecurity about itself resulting in a neverending policy of finding external allies, including Hitler, to take on the “big guy”.
  7. A willingness to say anything and do anything to get the external ally to extend protection, threaten Russia or, even better, participate in a long-awaited “march on Moscow”.

Again, whether this is a result of centuries of Russian oppression, imperialism, violence and persecutions or the result of the Papist ideology makes absolutely no difference for our purposes.

Also, when we look at the various symptoms of our “Polish Syndrome” we immediately see that it is not unique to Poles or Poland – the Ukrainians, especially the western Ukrainians, display all the same characteristics as their Polish neighbors (as do the Balts, but they are too small, weak and irrelevant to be included here). The syndrome we are looking at is therefore not really a “Polish” one, but an East European one, but calling it “East European” would also be incorrect. So, for our purposes, I will simplify and call it the “Pilban Syndrome” (PBS) in honor of the two “great heroes” of the Polish and West Ukrainian nationalists: Jozef Pilsudski and Stepan Bandera.

Second, a prognosis

Friends, the Pilban Syndrome is here to stay. For one thing, we are dealing with a syndrome with deep historical roots. Second, years of Communist rule followed by a sudden collapse of the Soviet Empire gave this syndrome a huge boost. Third, the AngloZionist Empire, especially in its current position of rapid decline, will allocate a great deal of resources to keep the PBS alive and well. Finally, the abject failure of the AngloZionist policies in the Ukraine and the subsequent civil war will probably lead to a break-up of the Ukraine, in one form or another, and that will also greatly contribute to the vitality of the PBS. I would also add that while right now Poland is enjoying a much hoped for “minute of fame” (being useful to the Empire against Russia) this pipe dream will also come crashing down sooner rather than later, and that inevitable collapse with also result in a sharp rise of the PBS. Bottom line is this: the PBS is here to stay and Russians would be naive in the extreme to hope that it will just vanish.

Third, a warning

There is nothing, absolutely nothing which the Russians could do to try to minimize the severity of the PBS. It is absolutely crucial to understand that the PBS is deeply ideological in its nature and causes. To think that some kind of action (short of collective national suicide, of course) would appease those suffering from PBS is delusional. The Ukrainian case, in particular, will show that even if Russians give them loans, credits, favorable trade terms, security guarantees, etc. the Ukrainian nationalists will see that as a devious plan to try to entrap or otherwise deceive the Ukrainians. If tomorrow the Kremlin decided to send truckloads of gold to the Ukraine or Poland, they would accept it, of course, but as soon as the last truck crossed the border the Polish and Ukrainian nationalists would resume their usual mantras about “Poland/the Ukraine not perishing yet” (they both have these paranoid words in their essentially similar national anthems) along with their usual policies.

Fourth, the big question

The big question is this: how do you deal with such hate-filled lunatics when they are your neighbors? From a Russian point of view, these neighbors are constantly shifting their position on a spectrum roughly ranging between “minor pain in the ass” to “existential threat”, so this is nothing trivial. If history has taught the Russians anything is that every single time Russia was weak the Poles invaded. Every time. The Ukrainian case is very different, since there never was any “Ukrainian state” in history. However, since the Ukrainian nationalists display exactly the same PBS symptoms as their Polish brothers, we can assume that they too will wait for Russia to be weak (for whatever reason) to attack; in fact, the current *official* statements of the leaders of the Nazi junta in Kiev more or less promise to do exactly that). Russia has tried all sorts of strategies with Poland, ranging from outright partitioning, to the granting of special rights, to a naive hope that a common stance against Nazi Germany would yield some degree of, if not brotherhood, then at least civil neighborly relations. They all failed. Clearly, a new approach is needed.

Fifth, the obvious solution

Okay so we have established that the PBS is incurable, that it is here to stay, that the Russians cannot meaningfully affect it and that past policies have all failed. So what does that leave? It leaves one obvious solution:

Do nothing. Have no policy. Give up. Ignore them. Bypass them.

The first principle of medicine is “above all do no harm”. I will argue here that any Russian policy towards PBS suffering states will do harm and only make things worse. However, doing absolutely nothing will yield huge advantages for Russia. Think of it. Doing nothing

  1. Gives the Polish and Ukrainian nationalists the least excuses to focus on an imaginary external threat and forces them to have to look inside, at their own internal problems. Considering that we are dealing hate-filled ideologues and deluded politicians, they will all turn on each other like rats in a cage.
  2. Makes it possible for Russia to combine a pragmatically efficient stance with a morally correct one: no matter how hate filled and delusional Polish and Ukrainian nationalists are, it is not for Russians to judge them, educate them or otherwise deny them their freedom to live in whatever manner they choose to. Let them build the society they want, let them keep on barking at Russia like a small dog would do behind the “NATO fence”, and let them pursue their “western dream” to their heart’s content.
  3. Makes it possible for Russia to allocate much needed resources where it matters, where Russian money, sweat and blood can yield a real return on investment. Ignoring the PBS-states will initially cost Russia some money, true, but in the mid-to-long term it will save Russian billions of Rubles.

However, when I say “do nothing” I refer only to policies which actually involve expectations that if Russia does “X” the Polish or Ukrainian nationalists will do “Y”. An example such mistaken policies would be to expect the Poles to buy Russian LNG gas if Russia offers better prices. It ain’t gonna happen – give it up, Vlad!

What Russia must do, as a condition of the “do nothing” policy, is to craft a new policy towards PBS states composed exclusively of unilateral actions. What do I mean by that?

ORDER IT NOW

First, Russia must secure her own security in military, economic and political terms. Russians must look at PBS states the way the Dutch look at the North Sea: they know that if their dams break, the waters of the North Sea will immediately break and submerge a large part of the Dutch territory. Dutch flood control never assumes that the waters of the North Sea will act differently, that somehow they could be convinced to not flood. No, for the Dutch it is simple to the extreme: if our levees break, the North Sea will flood us. And, here is the key, the Dutch don’t resent the North Sea for that. Same for Russians: they should not resent the Polish or Ukrainian nationalists, they just need to make darn sure that the Russian levees (the Russian armed forces) don’t break, that’s all.

Second, Russia must completely de-couple her economy from any PBS state. Yes, this is also what the nationalists want. So let’s give it to them! Let’s bring the Russian trade and investment into PBS states to exactly zero. Modern technologies make it very simple to bypass these countries and the North Stream is the best proof that Russia and Germany can do business together without involving the crazies between them. To those who would say that this sounds extreme, I would reply that if Russia had not allowed Polish Air Force Tu-154 to fly to Smolensk all the crazy shit we witness today would not have happened. Why interact with somebody who will always blame you for everything? This makes no sense. I would even withdraw Russian representations from these countries and kick their diplomats out of Russia (have the Swiss to be the representatives, like the USA with Iran or Cuba). Why? Because if tomorrow the Polish ambassador to Moscow is killed while crossing at a dangerous intersection or slips in his bath tub, the Poles will immediately declare that the “KGB” (does not exist since 1991 but nevermind that) has killed him. Who needs this kind of crap? Nobody I think. So I say decouple everything which can possibly be de-coupled, give the nationalists their dream and let Russia enjoy some much needed peace and quiet on her western borders.

Third, keep non-governmental ties open. Cultural ties, small business kind of trade, tourism, etc. There is no need to build any walls (besides, the Ukrainians and Latvians are already doing that, if not very effectively), or be nasty in any way to the regular Poles or Ukrainians. If on the government level Russia should always maintain a “thanks, but we are not interested” stance, on the human level Russia should remain open and welcoming to the Polish and Ukrainian people. The truth is that there are still some mentally sane Poles and Ukrainians who clearly see through the ideological nonsense of their leaders and who far from being russophobic often have a real appreciation for things Russian. Why make them pay for the behavior of their leaders? Russia would be much better off trying to do her utmost to make these people feel welcome in Russia and to show that her stance towards the PBS infected nationalists does not extend to mentally sane people. However, Russia also needs to stop pretending that all is well and for that she needs to officially declare that henceforth her policy towards PBS-regimes will be no policy at all.

Conclusion

I think that what I am suggesting is simple, straightforward, cheap, safe, morally correct and eminently doable. Yes, of course, to some degree this will be undiplomatic since it will require to officially acknowledge that Russia does not want to deal with PBS-infected regimes at all. Since I am not a diplomat (thank God!) I can say something here which Russian diplomats really cannot: most Russian feel a deep sense of disgust and contempt for the Polish and Ukrainian nationalists and it is high time that Russian diplomat and decision makers stop pretending otherwise.

For centuries the Russian leaders have always looked at the West as the most important strategic direction and that is understandable as objective geographic and economic factors of that time made the West far more important than the South or the East (and nevermind the North). But this is changing right now, very rapidly. In truth, both the EU and the US are increasingly becoming irrelevant to Russia whose future is in the South, the East and even the North. The good news is that Putin and his key ministers all see this (and this is why, unlike what we saw in the West, for Russia the big events of the G20 was Putin’s meeting with Xi). Central Asia, the Middle-East, the Indian sub-continent, China, Siberia and the Arctic – these are the regions were the future of Russia will be decided and where Russian is investing most of her human and material resources. One thing the Ukrainian nationalists are absolutely correct about: while geographically located in what is considered “Europe” the Russian nation (as opposed to the Russian ruling elites) is much closer to her neighbors in the South and East than to the so-called “West”. It is high time for the Russian people to return to their real, historical, home: the immense Eurasian landmass.

If we look at the internal components of the AngloZionist Empire, then we can see that for Russia the USA will continue to matter the most, then the European Union, but already much less, and then the PBS-states which are basically irrelevant to Russia. Russia can therefore *easily* afford to comprehensively ignore the PBS-states as long as she keeps her military strong enough to deal with any possible attack or military provocation coming from the West (which the Russian military can easily do).

One more thing: it is a sad reality that the USA are becoming more and more PBS-infected, courtesy of the Neocons and their visceral russophobia (UN Nikki has just declared“we can’t trust Russia and we won’t ever trust Russia.”). Clearly, the USA is no Poland and Russia cannot afford to simply ignore them. But as long as this is done carefully, progressively and, above all, quietly, Russia can, and should, begin decoupling herself not only from the USA as such, but from the entire US-controlled international financial system moving her assets and investments towards the obvious alternative: China and the rest of the Eurasian landmass.

In conclusion, I will say that what I outline above is what I think is already happening before your eyes. Not as much as I wish, not as fast as I wish, but it is happening, the fastest with the Ukraine, the slowest with the USA. But it is happening. And thank God for that!

IMPORTANT NOTE: When I speak of the Ukraine, I am referring only to the Nazi-occupied Ukraine, not Novorussia or Crimea. Those I consider as Russian people and land.

(Republished from The Vineyard of the Saker by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Poland, Russia, Ukraine 
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  1. Cyrano says:

    Amen to everything you said, Saker. I agree 100%. The Polaks are talented b*tt kissers. It’s funny how they find kissing Russian b**ts objectionable, while kissing the western ones they find full of virtue. If anything they should be against kissing both of these entities behinds. That shows total lack of dignity and I think that they are disgrace to the Slavic family.

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    • Agree: Felix Keverich
    • Replies: @DarkEyes
    Exactly what I am thinking about the PILBAS countries and Russians "responses".
    Russia has indeed already started to avoid the Balts concerning its ferry services to Germany and Scandinavia and of course the direct North Stream 2 connection with Germany to avoid Ukraine, Poland with the Balts and not so long ago the building of the famous bridge between Russian mainland and its Crimea.

    I like the style and the way Russian Federation is "responding" to their PILBAS syndrome.
    It is a natural way of neglecting.

    Thank you very much, Saker, for your explanations of what is going on between PILBAS and Russia.
    Nothing. Good.
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  2. utu says:

    It seems that Trump’s Warsaw speech touched a nerve among all sorts of Russkies. Let’s start the Hate Poland Fest.

    In Russia, whatever be the appearance of things, violence and arbitrary rule is at the bottom of them all. Tyranny rendered calm by the influence of terror is the only kind of happiness which this government is able to afford its people. Marquis de Custine

    I do not believe I am exaggerating in affirming that the empire of Russia is a country whose inhabitants are the most miserable on earth, because they suffer at one and the same time the evils of barbarism and of civilization. Marquis de Custine

    You know what is your problem? You have nothing to offer except for the brute force. Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected but all you have managed is to be feared. No country, no people you ever conquered accepted your culture or your language. For right or wrong reason they always felt superior to you. Do you ever ask yourself why? You haven’t managed to Russify anybody. As soon as you did not look or was weak everybody regurgitated and spat out whatever you fed them by force. Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    I judged the Poles by their enemies. And I found it was an almost unfailing truth that their enemies were the enemies of magnanimity and manhood. If a man loved slavery, if he loved usury, if he loved terrorism and all the trampled mire of materialistic politics, I have always found that he added to these affections the passion of a hatred of Poland. She could be judged in the light of that hatred; and the judgment has proved to be right. G. K. Chesterton

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    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?
     
    Hey, Finland should not be grouped with these losers! Its level of Russophoia is only moderate by European standards, and not enough to diagnose the PBS. The Finns are smart, pragmatic people, who understand the value of economic cooperation with Russia.

    When you consider the fact that Estonia+Latvia+Lithuania+Georgia have like 8 million people between them, and the Ukraine is only represented by its Western part, the list of our "archenemies" does not look all that impressive.
    , @Andrei Martyanov

    Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected
     
    LOL. By modern West? God save Russia from such "blessings". Dude, in reality (if you are Finn) just buy the ticket go to St.Petersburg, Moscow, Golden Ring or go to Sochi--enjoy your time there. You can not even imagine how modern Russia doesn't care about what West thinks about her. Believe me, she will continue to fly into space, go to Bolshoi or Mariinka, visit Hermitage and Tretyakovka, ah yes, built state-of-the-art weapon systems, to make sure West's "love" and "respect" are never again are experienced by Russian people. All this with or without West--in fact, new Iron Curtain is badly needed. You absolutely are unaware of the overwhelming feeling of contempt and disgust Russians feel towards the combined West. But sure, there are places still, especially in Moscow's uber-liberal Parnassus, where West's opinions and desire to be loved are still alive. Incidentally, those are very same people who helped to draw (with global consequences) caricature of Russia in the West--you can see the results of their "expertise" every day in the news.
    , @5371
    History records that Custine was a flagrant and fantasy-prone faggot, and that Chesterton, an admirable man and writer, knew virtually nothing about Poland.
    , @peterAUS

    Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?
     
    Well…that IS the question, isn’t it.

    You could probably add Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania to the list.
    To a lesser degree Slovenia and Croatia.
    Austria, well....let alone former Eastern Germany (when they dare speaking about it).

    One would almost get an impression “closer you are to them more negative you are about them”.

    I believe that the mutual negativity has DEEP, and for both sides, rather dark reasons.
    There is a rabbit hole there going into really bad places.

    But, I'd agree with Saker here on his practical conclusion.
  3. How about a public campaign along the lines of, “Hey, we’re just not that into you any more” ?

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  4. When I speak of the Ukraine, I am referring only to the Nazi-occupied Ukraine, not Novorussia or Crimea. Those I consider as Russian people and land.

    Saker’s idiocy continues. Ukraine is an independent country and ceased to “the Ukraine” long ago, no matter Saker’s fantasies about a “Nazi occupied” Ukraine. Saker needs to go home to the country he shills so loudly for, but where he is afraid to live.

    The only Nazi occupied country in Eurasia has its capital in Moscow and occupies portions of Ukraine.

    There are good historical reasons not to trust Russia. Ukraine is already under attack from Putinist Russia, and Russia has given good reason to Poland to hate and distrust them.

    You can keep telling your lies, Saker, but there are many that will call you on them.

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    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    ... and ceased to “the Ukraine” long ago
     
    Why is it that only loser countries have this compulsive inclination to demand changes to the English language to satiate their own complexes?
    , @Thirdeye
    Ukraine is "an" (singular) independent country? It's looking more and more like several.
  5. Aedib says:

    Very clever article. It graphically illustrates the envy-disease common among Pollaks toward their hated Russian big brother.
    PilBan syndrome is a really funny name for the disease.

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  6. @utu
    It seems that Trump's Warsaw speech touched a nerve among all sorts of Russkies. Let's start the Hate Poland Fest.

    In Russia, whatever be the appearance of things, violence and arbitrary rule is at the bottom of them all. Tyranny rendered calm by the influence of terror is the only kind of happiness which this government is able to afford its people. Marquis de Custine
     

    I do not believe I am exaggerating in affirming that the empire of Russia is a country whose inhabitants are the most miserable on earth, because they suffer at one and the same time the evils of barbarism and of civilization. Marquis de Custine
     
    You know what is your problem? You have nothing to offer except for the brute force. Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected but all you have managed is to be feared. No country, no people you ever conquered accepted your culture or your language. For right or wrong reason they always felt superior to you. Do you ever ask yourself why? You haven't managed to Russify anybody. As soon as you did not look or was weak everybody regurgitated and spat out whatever you fed them by force. Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    I judged the Poles by their enemies. And I found it was an almost unfailing truth that their enemies were the enemies of magnanimity and manhood. If a man loved slavery, if he loved usury, if he loved terrorism and all the trampled mire of materialistic politics, I have always found that he added to these affections the passion of a hatred of Poland. She could be judged in the light of that hatred; and the judgment has proved to be right. G. K. Chesterton
     

    Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    Hey, Finland should not be grouped with these losers! Its level of Russophoia is only moderate by European standards, and not enough to diagnose the PBS. The Finns are smart, pragmatic people, who understand the value of economic cooperation with Russia.

    When you consider the fact that Estonia+Latvia+Lithuania+Georgia have like 8 million people between them, and the Ukraine is only represented by its Western part, the list of our “archenemies” does not look all that impressive.

    Read More
  7. I am a Polish woman. Some of my family were murdered in Katyn. The oldest brother of a peasant family, my great-uncle was the only one to receive education, became an army officer, and was killed as part of an operation to murder the Polish intelligentsia.
    My Father, a little boy in 1939, remembers the horror of the Soviet troops marching through the village. The rape, the theft and destruction they left behind, was like nothing the German troops ever did. A German doctor once gave my Father a block of chocolate for being brave during a painful medical procedure. My Grandpa turned to the Germans for fear that my Father would die without medical help.

    I love Russian literature, music and film.
    I do not love soviet monuments in my country – monuments of gratitude to the Soviet army. Would love Poland to live in peace with Russia. I appreciate Putin’s restoration of Christianity in that beautiful land.

    Stop your hateful propaganda, please.

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    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    The rape, the theft and destruction they left behind, was like nothing the German troops ever did.
     
    And that is why The Saker is correct in his prescription. With all my love for Polish culture, the author is right--let Poles be Poles and it is a consensus in Russia now that not a single Russian soldier ever should step on Polish soil. That is why Iron Curtain is needed, those Poles who do appreciate Russia and do not suffer from the very real PBS syndrome they will always be greeted in Russia with open arms. But, I think, at this stage Poland should concentrate on removing and destroying all memorials to Soviet/Russian rapists, thieves, low-lives who, in hundreds thousands, died "occupying" Poland from her benevolent Nazi guests, including uncalled for destruction of Auschwitz, Majdanek and other places of cultural enrichment. Moreover, I was calling for years on cutting Russian-Polish trade relations to virtual zero and, it seems, that my (and many others) calls finally have been heard. It has nothing to do with hate, as you put it, but with final arrival of geopolitical and historic (and economic) pragmatism to Russia. Not dealing with Poland (some State Duma's MPs actually call for breaking off diplomatic relations) is the only pragmatic way for Russia. It will be good for both sides. Indeed, in coming years Poland will be a busy bee dealing with acquiring new territories from West Ukraine and with trying to gain leadership in Visegrad Group, so not having Russia occupying Polish elites' mind will be very beneficial. In the end, look what life near Russia did to Poland's Defense Minister;)
  8. @utu
    It seems that Trump's Warsaw speech touched a nerve among all sorts of Russkies. Let's start the Hate Poland Fest.

    In Russia, whatever be the appearance of things, violence and arbitrary rule is at the bottom of them all. Tyranny rendered calm by the influence of terror is the only kind of happiness which this government is able to afford its people. Marquis de Custine
     

    I do not believe I am exaggerating in affirming that the empire of Russia is a country whose inhabitants are the most miserable on earth, because they suffer at one and the same time the evils of barbarism and of civilization. Marquis de Custine
     
    You know what is your problem? You have nothing to offer except for the brute force. Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected but all you have managed is to be feared. No country, no people you ever conquered accepted your culture or your language. For right or wrong reason they always felt superior to you. Do you ever ask yourself why? You haven't managed to Russify anybody. As soon as you did not look or was weak everybody regurgitated and spat out whatever you fed them by force. Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    I judged the Poles by their enemies. And I found it was an almost unfailing truth that their enemies were the enemies of magnanimity and manhood. If a man loved slavery, if he loved usury, if he loved terrorism and all the trampled mire of materialistic politics, I have always found that he added to these affections the passion of a hatred of Poland. She could be judged in the light of that hatred; and the judgment has proved to be right. G. K. Chesterton
     

    Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected

    LOL. By modern West? God save Russia from such “blessings”. Dude, in reality (if you are Finn) just buy the ticket go to St.Petersburg, Moscow, Golden Ring or go to Sochi–enjoy your time there. You can not even imagine how modern Russia doesn’t care about what West thinks about her. Believe me, she will continue to fly into space, go to Bolshoi or Mariinka, visit Hermitage and Tretyakovka, ah yes, built state-of-the-art weapon systems, to make sure West’s “love” and “respect” are never again are experienced by Russian people. All this with or without West–in fact, new Iron Curtain is badly needed. You absolutely are unaware of the overwhelming feeling of contempt and disgust Russians feel towards the combined West. But sure, there are places still, especially in Moscow’s uber-liberal Parnassus, where West’s opinions and desire to be loved are still alive. Incidentally, those are very same people who helped to draw (with global consequences) caricature of Russia in the West–you can see the results of their “expertise” every day in the news.

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    • Agree: Sergey Krieger
    • Replies: @CalDre

    You absolutely are unaware of the overwhelming feeling of contempt and disgust Russians feel towards the combined West.
     
    You are right, as it doesn't exist. Well, of course, in you it does. So if Poles have Pilsudsi/Bandera syndrom, what do you have, Stalinist-Leninist syndrome? LOL, birds of a feather.
  9. @Quartermaster

    When I speak of the Ukraine, I am referring only to the Nazi-occupied Ukraine, not Novorussia or Crimea. Those I consider as Russian people and land.
     
    Saker's idiocy continues. Ukraine is an independent country and ceased to "the Ukraine" long ago, no matter Saker's fantasies about a "Nazi occupied" Ukraine. Saker needs to go home to the country he shills so loudly for, but where he is afraid to live.

    The only Nazi occupied country in Eurasia has its capital in Moscow and occupies portions of Ukraine.

    There are good historical reasons not to trust Russia. Ukraine is already under attack from Putinist Russia, and Russia has given good reason to Poland to hate and distrust them.

    You can keep telling your lies, Saker, but there are many that will call you on them.

    … and ceased to “the Ukraine” long ago

    Why is it that only loser countries have this compulsive inclination to demand changes to the English language to satiate their own complexes?

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    • Replies: @AP
    Is China a loser country for changing Peiking to Beijing? India for Bombay/Mumbai?
    , @CalDre
    In English names do not have articles. It's not "the Pete Smith" or "the Germany".

    But, of course, not being clever in English, you will protest about "the United States" and "the United Kingdom" (but not "the Libya" or "the Spain"). Probably you are smart enough to see that United States and United Kingdom are not names, but descriptions of places? What we really have is "the States" (the 13 states, in particular, which united) and "the Kingdom" (in particular, the 2-3 kingdoms which united).

    So the only one butchering the English language is you and Saker. But everyone knows Saker has Nazi on his brain and cannot get it out, everyone who doesn't like Russians is a Nazi, it's like he's a Russian Jew. Hmmmmm.
  10. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    it is a sad reality that the USA are becoming more and more PBS-infected, courtesy of the Neocons and their visceral russophobia

    Not really. The MSM is certainly hyperventilating but the people are not buying it. Some low-info Clintonites are in the bag but the rest – across of the political spectrum – are getting red-pilled at a tremendous pace. Interestingly enough, It’s the US Right leading the charge this time.

    It’s very hopeful to see so many people managing to de-program themselves after generations of anti-Russian propaganda. The Internet did this, basically. The Poles might get there one day but the language barrier probably makes their Internet smaller.

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  11. JL says:

    Very good article, Russia would be well served to follow the advice it contains. Unfortunately, it seems to relish the role of unrequited lover, constantly holding out hope of a productive relationship until it blows up in her face. We see this with all its Western “partners”.

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  12. Russia has tried all sorts of strategies with Poland, ranging from outright partitioning, to the granting of special rights, to a naive hope that a common stance against Nazi Germany would yield some degree of, if not brotherhood, then at least civil neighborly relations. They all failed.

    Unfair statement!

    In the interwar years, Poland sought an independent path, refusing to toady up to neither Germany nor USSR.

    And keep in mind that it was Trotsky’s Red Army that moved on Poland in the 20s.

    Anyway, when Hitler sought Polish collaboration against the USSR, Poland said No. And Poland also rejected an alliance with Soviets against Germany. In other words, Poland wanted to be left alone. It didn’t want to be drawn into an unnecessary with Germany or Russia. Poles correctly assessed the cretinous character of Hitler and Stalin. If Poles erred, it was in trusting the British and the French to really do anything to defend Poland.

    Hitler plotted with Stalin to invade and divvy up Poland. And Germans and Poles committed horrible war crimes against Poland.

    Also, let’s give the Poles some credit. They’ve been pretty savvy in working the EU system to Polisg benefit while, at the same time,refusing to EU pressures to surrender Polish sovereignty and expose Poland to invasion by Africans and Muslims.

    The real dumb Polac*s are outside Poland, sucking up to globalism and homomania.

    Anyway, Poles need to really wake up.

    Historically, Russia was the enemy while US never was. But today, Russia has no ill will against Poland whereas the Jewish-controlled US — JEWS HATE POLES — wants to Afro-Islamo-homo-ize Poland.
    Current US is an experiment in degeneracy that sees all nations as guinea pigs of globalism.

    Modern technologies make it very simple to bypass these countries and the North Stream is the best proof that Russia and Germany can do business together without involving the crazies between them.

    Poland is 1000x saner than current Germany.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thirdeye

    In the interwar years, Poland sought an independent path, refusing to toady up to neither Germany nor USSR.
     
    Poland was too busy toadying up to their British and French sugar daddies to bother toadying up to weaker Germany and the Soviet Union - or even being somewhat neighborly towards them. That sure came back to bite them in the ass though. Refer to item #6 in The Saker's prognosis of PBS.
  13. 5371 says:
    @utu
    It seems that Trump's Warsaw speech touched a nerve among all sorts of Russkies. Let's start the Hate Poland Fest.

    In Russia, whatever be the appearance of things, violence and arbitrary rule is at the bottom of them all. Tyranny rendered calm by the influence of terror is the only kind of happiness which this government is able to afford its people. Marquis de Custine
     

    I do not believe I am exaggerating in affirming that the empire of Russia is a country whose inhabitants are the most miserable on earth, because they suffer at one and the same time the evils of barbarism and of civilization. Marquis de Custine
     
    You know what is your problem? You have nothing to offer except for the brute force. Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected but all you have managed is to be feared. No country, no people you ever conquered accepted your culture or your language. For right or wrong reason they always felt superior to you. Do you ever ask yourself why? You haven't managed to Russify anybody. As soon as you did not look or was weak everybody regurgitated and spat out whatever you fed them by force. Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    I judged the Poles by their enemies. And I found it was an almost unfailing truth that their enemies were the enemies of magnanimity and manhood. If a man loved slavery, if he loved usury, if he loved terrorism and all the trampled mire of materialistic politics, I have always found that he added to these affections the passion of a hatred of Poland. She could be judged in the light of that hatred; and the judgment has proved to be right. G. K. Chesterton
     

    History records that Custine was a flagrant and fantasy-prone faggot, and that Chesterton, an admirable man and writer, knew virtually nothing about Poland.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    History records that Custine was a flagrant and fantasy-prone faggot, and that Chesterton, an admirable man and writer, knew virtually nothing about Poland.
     
    That is why they would fit US Department Of State's Russia's expert positions perfectly. I believe Michael McFaul is a living proof of that.
  14. @Dorota Mosiewicz-Patalas
    I am a Polish woman. Some of my family were murdered in Katyn. The oldest brother of a peasant family, my great-uncle was the only one to receive education, became an army officer, and was killed as part of an operation to murder the Polish intelligentsia.
    My Father, a little boy in 1939, remembers the horror of the Soviet troops marching through the village. The rape, the theft and destruction they left behind, was like nothing the German troops ever did. A German doctor once gave my Father a block of chocolate for being brave during a painful medical procedure. My Grandpa turned to the Germans for fear that my Father would die without medical help.

    I love Russian literature, music and film.
    I do not love soviet monuments in my country - monuments of gratitude to the Soviet army. Would love Poland to live in peace with Russia. I appreciate Putin's restoration of Christianity in that beautiful land.

    Stop your hateful propaganda, please.

    The rape, the theft and destruction they left behind, was like nothing the German troops ever did.

    And that is why The Saker is correct in his prescription. With all my love for Polish culture, the author is right–let Poles be Poles and it is a consensus in Russia now that not a single Russian soldier ever should step on Polish soil. That is why Iron Curtain is needed, those Poles who do appreciate Russia and do not suffer from the very real PBS syndrome they will always be greeted in Russia with open arms. But, I think, at this stage Poland should concentrate on removing and destroying all memorials to Soviet/Russian rapists, thieves, low-lives who, in hundreds thousands, died “occupying” Poland from her benevolent Nazi guests, including uncalled for destruction of Auschwitz, Majdanek and other places of cultural enrichment. Moreover, I was calling for years on cutting Russian-Polish trade relations to virtual zero and, it seems, that my (and many others) calls finally have been heard. It has nothing to do with hate, as you put it, but with final arrival of geopolitical and historic (and economic) pragmatism to Russia. Not dealing with Poland (some State Duma’s MPs actually call for breaking off diplomatic relations) is the only pragmatic way for Russia. It will be good for both sides. Indeed, in coming years Poland will be a busy bee dealing with acquiring new territories from West Ukraine and with trying to gain leadership in Visegrad Group, so not having Russia occupying Polish elites’ mind will be very beneficial. In the end, look what life near Russia did to Poland’s Defense Minister;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Aedib
    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2. I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.
  15. @5371
    History records that Custine was a flagrant and fantasy-prone faggot, and that Chesterton, an admirable man and writer, knew virtually nothing about Poland.

    History records that Custine was a flagrant and fantasy-prone faggot, and that Chesterton, an admirable man and writer, knew virtually nothing about Poland.

    That is why they would fit US Department Of State’s Russia’s expert positions perfectly. I believe Michael McFaul is a living proof of that.

    Read More
  16. Talha says:

    If history has taught the Russians anything is that every single time Russia was weak the Poles invaded. Every time.

    Dag yo! I knew about their performance at the Siege of Vienna, but did not know this – them Poles be straight up thuggs!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=i+didn%27t+choose+the+thug+life&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwio7arY84HVAhUFz2MKHd6BBjUQ_AUICigB&biw=1344&bih=774

    Read More
  17. Aedib says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    The rape, the theft and destruction they left behind, was like nothing the German troops ever did.
     
    And that is why The Saker is correct in his prescription. With all my love for Polish culture, the author is right--let Poles be Poles and it is a consensus in Russia now that not a single Russian soldier ever should step on Polish soil. That is why Iron Curtain is needed, those Poles who do appreciate Russia and do not suffer from the very real PBS syndrome they will always be greeted in Russia with open arms. But, I think, at this stage Poland should concentrate on removing and destroying all memorials to Soviet/Russian rapists, thieves, low-lives who, in hundreds thousands, died "occupying" Poland from her benevolent Nazi guests, including uncalled for destruction of Auschwitz, Majdanek and other places of cultural enrichment. Moreover, I was calling for years on cutting Russian-Polish trade relations to virtual zero and, it seems, that my (and many others) calls finally have been heard. It has nothing to do with hate, as you put it, but with final arrival of geopolitical and historic (and economic) pragmatism to Russia. Not dealing with Poland (some State Duma's MPs actually call for breaking off diplomatic relations) is the only pragmatic way for Russia. It will be good for both sides. Indeed, in coming years Poland will be a busy bee dealing with acquiring new territories from West Ukraine and with trying to gain leadership in Visegrad Group, so not having Russia occupying Polish elites' mind will be very beneficial. In the end, look what life near Russia did to Poland's Defense Minister;)

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2. I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2
     
    Absolutely. That is why Saker is correct here unifying two, Pilsudski's and Bandera's, syndrome in one--because Poles and Ukrainians are genetic twins in their approach to the outside world. In fact, they deserve each-other. So, it will be very interesting to observe their bilateral dynamics in coming years. I am being absolutely sincere, not a iota of a pose, when proposing eradication, bar some inevitable religious institutions, of anything Russian related in Poland. In the end, everyone knows that Auschwitz was liberated by Private Ryan and Obama's grand-uncle (yes, he stated it, however mistakenly).

    I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.
     
    This is not even a wholly Polish thing, this was written for them in Imperial General Staff and MI-6 under supervision of famous fairy tales author Sir Winston Churchill, PM of self-proclaimed guarantors of Polish sovereignty, granted that it fell on Red Army shoulders to clear Poland from Nazis and did cost this Red Army by different estimates 700 000 casualties--that is two times more than Great Britain lost throughout whole WW II. Obviously, this beaten to death shtick of "deliberate stop" by the Red Army prior to Warsaw uprising (it was conveyed several times by Soviet side not to rush and coordinate--but this fact is unimportant, of course) doesn't pass a smell test for any knowledgeable in warfare person, but once one takes a look at the "glorious" line of British falsi..ahem "historians" such as late John Keegan (a rabid Russo-phobe) , or a facade for British Intel WW II delirium such as Rezun (aka Victor Suvorov), not to mention Red Army's 3 quadrillion German women rape-specialist Anthony Beavor--one should not be surprised with anything. It has to be, in this case, stated that American WW II historiography, while still suffering from the same affliction common to Anglo-American 20th century view of itself, is on the order of magnitude, not least through superb publications of US Army's General Staff and Command College, not to mention historians of a truly global caliber such as Glantz, House, in the end, sometimes superb David Eisenhower, is more professional (and objective) when speaking about WW II. I still have somewhere, recorded on VHS, late 1990s superb History Channel documentary mini-series made under US Army's auspice: Hitler's Deadliest Mistake. It was the first time that I saw prime time (not in book) TV tribute to Soviet people and the Red Army. By then most Soviet war-time archives were opened for almost a decade.

    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever. Not under any circumstances other than open war on Russia, and even then--there are ways to avoid large combined arms operations on Polish territory. Poland is not worth a single Russian life.

    , @CalDre

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population
     
    Don't tell me - Stalin told you so!
  18. dearieme says:

    “a common stance against Nazi Germany”: aha, so the post is satire after all.

    Read More
  19. @Aedib
    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2. I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2

    Absolutely. That is why Saker is correct here unifying two, Pilsudski’s and Bandera’s, syndrome in one–because Poles and Ukrainians are genetic twins in their approach to the outside world. In fact, they deserve each-other. So, it will be very interesting to observe their bilateral dynamics in coming years. I am being absolutely sincere, not a iota of a pose, when proposing eradication, bar some inevitable religious institutions, of anything Russian related in Poland. In the end, everyone knows that Auschwitz was liberated by Private Ryan and Obama’s grand-uncle (yes, he stated it, however mistakenly).

    I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.

    This is not even a wholly Polish thing, this was written for them in Imperial General Staff and MI-6 under supervision of famous fairy tales author Sir Winston Churchill, PM of self-proclaimed guarantors of Polish sovereignty, granted that it fell on Red Army shoulders to clear Poland from Nazis and did cost this Red Army by different estimates 700 000 casualties–that is two times more than Great Britain lost throughout whole WW II. Obviously, this beaten to death shtick of “deliberate stop” by the Red Army prior to Warsaw uprising (it was conveyed several times by Soviet side not to rush and coordinate–but this fact is unimportant, of course) doesn’t pass a smell test for any knowledgeable in warfare person, but once one takes a look at the “glorious” line of British falsi..ahem “historians” such as late John Keegan (a rabid Russo-phobe) , or a facade for British Intel WW II delirium such as Rezun (aka Victor Suvorov), not to mention Red Army’s 3 quadrillion German women rape-specialist Anthony Beavor–one should not be surprised with anything. It has to be, in this case, stated that American WW II historiography, while still suffering from the same affliction common to Anglo-American 20th century view of itself, is on the order of magnitude, not least through superb publications of US Army’s General Staff and Command College, not to mention historians of a truly global caliber such as Glantz, House, in the end, sometimes superb David Eisenhower, is more professional (and objective) when speaking about WW II. I still have somewhere, recorded on VHS, late 1990s superb History Channel documentary mini-series made under US Army’s auspice: Hitler’s Deadliest Mistake. It was the first time that I saw prime time (not in book) TV tribute to Soviet people and the Red Army. By then most Soviet war-time archives were opened for almost a decade.

    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever. Not under any circumstances other than open war on Russia, and even then–there are ways to avoid large combined arms operations on Polish territory. Poland is not worth a single Russian life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever.

    Make the 'Tomb of the Unknown Rapist' a thing of the past.

    The funny thing about the unhinged Russian patriotardism on display is that it's coming mostly from expats. The Saker, based in Florida, I believe, and before that Geneva and Paris, but somehow never anywhere in Russia itself, bears a striking resemblance to the Ukrainian expat blowhard nationalists of Canada. Instead of Pilban syndrome we need an examination of angry overcompensating 'nationalists' who refuse to ever live in the country they claim loyalty to.

  20. Matra says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2
     
    Absolutely. That is why Saker is correct here unifying two, Pilsudski's and Bandera's, syndrome in one--because Poles and Ukrainians are genetic twins in their approach to the outside world. In fact, they deserve each-other. So, it will be very interesting to observe their bilateral dynamics in coming years. I am being absolutely sincere, not a iota of a pose, when proposing eradication, bar some inevitable religious institutions, of anything Russian related in Poland. In the end, everyone knows that Auschwitz was liberated by Private Ryan and Obama's grand-uncle (yes, he stated it, however mistakenly).

    I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.
     
    This is not even a wholly Polish thing, this was written for them in Imperial General Staff and MI-6 under supervision of famous fairy tales author Sir Winston Churchill, PM of self-proclaimed guarantors of Polish sovereignty, granted that it fell on Red Army shoulders to clear Poland from Nazis and did cost this Red Army by different estimates 700 000 casualties--that is two times more than Great Britain lost throughout whole WW II. Obviously, this beaten to death shtick of "deliberate stop" by the Red Army prior to Warsaw uprising (it was conveyed several times by Soviet side not to rush and coordinate--but this fact is unimportant, of course) doesn't pass a smell test for any knowledgeable in warfare person, but once one takes a look at the "glorious" line of British falsi..ahem "historians" such as late John Keegan (a rabid Russo-phobe) , or a facade for British Intel WW II delirium such as Rezun (aka Victor Suvorov), not to mention Red Army's 3 quadrillion German women rape-specialist Anthony Beavor--one should not be surprised with anything. It has to be, in this case, stated that American WW II historiography, while still suffering from the same affliction common to Anglo-American 20th century view of itself, is on the order of magnitude, not least through superb publications of US Army's General Staff and Command College, not to mention historians of a truly global caliber such as Glantz, House, in the end, sometimes superb David Eisenhower, is more professional (and objective) when speaking about WW II. I still have somewhere, recorded on VHS, late 1990s superb History Channel documentary mini-series made under US Army's auspice: Hitler's Deadliest Mistake. It was the first time that I saw prime time (not in book) TV tribute to Soviet people and the Red Army. By then most Soviet war-time archives were opened for almost a decade.

    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever. Not under any circumstances other than open war on Russia, and even then--there are ways to avoid large combined arms operations on Polish territory. Poland is not worth a single Russian life.

    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever.

    Make the ‘Tomb of the Unknown Rapist’ a thing of the past.

    The funny thing about the unhinged Russian patriotardism on display is that it’s coming mostly from expats. The Saker, based in Florida, I believe, and before that Geneva and Paris, but somehow never anywhere in Russia itself, bears a striking resemblance to the Ukrainian expat blowhard nationalists of Canada. Instead of Pilban syndrome we need an examination of angry overcompensating ‘nationalists’ who refuse to ever live in the country they claim loyalty to.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    Make the ‘Tomb of the Unknown Rapist’ a thing of the past.
     
    Your level of "culture", certainly, shows. But I believe it is you who are very angry. I assume you are a Pole? If you are--then you just made my case stronger.
  21. @Matra
    Having said all that: yes, NO Russian soldier in Poland, ever.

    Make the 'Tomb of the Unknown Rapist' a thing of the past.

    The funny thing about the unhinged Russian patriotardism on display is that it's coming mostly from expats. The Saker, based in Florida, I believe, and before that Geneva and Paris, but somehow never anywhere in Russia itself, bears a striking resemblance to the Ukrainian expat blowhard nationalists of Canada. Instead of Pilban syndrome we need an examination of angry overcompensating 'nationalists' who refuse to ever live in the country they claim loyalty to.

    Make the ‘Tomb of the Unknown Rapist’ a thing of the past.

    Your level of “culture”, certainly, shows. But I believe it is you who are very angry. I assume you are a Pole? If you are–then you just made my case stronger.

    Read More
  22. ussr andy says:

    can’t we all just get along?

    most-important-graph.gif

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  23. AP says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    ... and ceased to “the Ukraine” long ago
     
    Why is it that only loser countries have this compulsive inclination to demand changes to the English language to satiate their own complexes?

    Is China a loser country for changing Peiking to Beijing? India for Bombay/Mumbai?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    In principle, yes. However, while I don't know the specific wrt India, at least China's changes make linguistic sense, in that the change was part of the transition from the Wade-Giles to the more logical pinyin system of Romanization, which both Chinese and foreign students of Chinese use frequently.

    There is no version of the Ukrainian language in the Latin alphabet, so demanding Kyiv over Kiev (let alone Kharkiv over Kharkov) is about as ridiculous as demanding Moskva over Moscow/Moskau.
  24. @AP
    Is China a loser country for changing Peiking to Beijing? India for Bombay/Mumbai?

    In principle, yes. However, while I don’t know the specific wrt India, at least China’s changes make linguistic sense, in that the change was part of the transition from the Wade-Giles to the more logical pinyin system of Romanization, which both Chinese and foreign students of Chinese use frequently.

    There is no version of the Ukrainian language in the Latin alphabet, so demanding Kyiv over Kiev (let alone Kharkiv over Kharkov) is about as ridiculous as demanding Moskva over Moscow/Moskau.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    There is no version of the Ukrainian language in the Latin alphabet, so demanding Kyiv over Kiev (let alone Kharkiv over Kharkov) is about as ridiculous as demanding Moskva over Moscow/Moskau.
     
    It seems to be not strictly an indicator of loserdom, but simply a phenomenon of locals or natives taking over, typical in a post-colonialist context, and dropping the old colonists' names (though most former colonies are unsuccessful countries to various degrees). Russia simply never had such a situation. Some non-loser examples - in Europe, Slovakia's capital was known as Pressburg for centuries before the Slavs took over and changed the English-language name to the native Slavic one, Vilnius Wilno, etc. Western Europe has been more stable.

    I prefer the wikipedia standard - a well-established commonly used name in English such as Kiev continues to be used, more obscure ones in the Anglo world (such as Kharkov/Kharkiv, or Dnipropetrovsk/Dnipro) can change. Lviv is a different case. In the English language, Lviv is strictly the Sovok name of the city, like Karl Marx Stadt or Leningrad. The old Lwow and Lemberg have gone the way of Gdansk or Wilno.
  25. AP says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    In principle, yes. However, while I don't know the specific wrt India, at least China's changes make linguistic sense, in that the change was part of the transition from the Wade-Giles to the more logical pinyin system of Romanization, which both Chinese and foreign students of Chinese use frequently.

    There is no version of the Ukrainian language in the Latin alphabet, so demanding Kyiv over Kiev (let alone Kharkiv over Kharkov) is about as ridiculous as demanding Moskva over Moscow/Moskau.

    There is no version of the Ukrainian language in the Latin alphabet, so demanding Kyiv over Kiev (let alone Kharkiv over Kharkov) is about as ridiculous as demanding Moskva over Moscow/Moskau.

    It seems to be not strictly an indicator of loserdom, but simply a phenomenon of locals or natives taking over, typical in a post-colonialist context, and dropping the old colonists’ names (though most former colonies are unsuccessful countries to various degrees). Russia simply never had such a situation. Some non-loser examples – in Europe, Slovakia’s capital was known as Pressburg for centuries before the Slavs took over and changed the English-language name to the native Slavic one, Vilnius Wilno, etc. Western Europe has been more stable.

    I prefer the wikipedia standard – a well-established commonly used name in English such as Kiev continues to be used, more obscure ones in the Anglo world (such as Kharkov/Kharkiv, or Dnipropetrovsk/Dnipro) can change. Lviv is a different case. In the English language, Lviv is strictly the Sovok name of the city, like Karl Marx Stadt or Leningrad. The old Lwow and Lemberg have gone the way of Gdansk or Wilno.

    Read More
  26. Who would have guessed Powand would be the gutsiest European nation defying both Russia and EU?

    Read More
  27. CalDre says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected
     
    LOL. By modern West? God save Russia from such "blessings". Dude, in reality (if you are Finn) just buy the ticket go to St.Petersburg, Moscow, Golden Ring or go to Sochi--enjoy your time there. You can not even imagine how modern Russia doesn't care about what West thinks about her. Believe me, she will continue to fly into space, go to Bolshoi or Mariinka, visit Hermitage and Tretyakovka, ah yes, built state-of-the-art weapon systems, to make sure West's "love" and "respect" are never again are experienced by Russian people. All this with or without West--in fact, new Iron Curtain is badly needed. You absolutely are unaware of the overwhelming feeling of contempt and disgust Russians feel towards the combined West. But sure, there are places still, especially in Moscow's uber-liberal Parnassus, where West's opinions and desire to be loved are still alive. Incidentally, those are very same people who helped to draw (with global consequences) caricature of Russia in the West--you can see the results of their "expertise" every day in the news.

    You absolutely are unaware of the overwhelming feeling of contempt and disgust Russians feel towards the combined West.

    You are right, as it doesn’t exist. Well, of course, in you it does. So if Poles have Pilsudsi/Bandera syndrom, what do you have, Stalinist-Leninist syndrome? LOL, birds of a feather.

    Read More
  28. CalDre says:
    @Aedib
    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population, but Pollaks want to blame Russia about their suffering during the WW2. I eared a Pollack talking about how Soviets chose to save their own lives and not to die for the Pollaks during the Warsaw uprising, ignoring the fact that Soviet troops were exhausted after moving West nearly 1000 km during the 1944 summer offensive. They think that the duty of a Russian is to die for a Pollak in order to be rewarded with… envy and hate. PBS symptoms manifested as strange thoughts.

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population

    Don’t tell me – Stalin told you so!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Aedib
    Please, educate yourself:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties

    By the way, denying or faking the History is a clear symptom of the PilBan syndrome.
  29. Thirdeye says:
    @Quartermaster

    When I speak of the Ukraine, I am referring only to the Nazi-occupied Ukraine, not Novorussia or Crimea. Those I consider as Russian people and land.
     
    Saker's idiocy continues. Ukraine is an independent country and ceased to "the Ukraine" long ago, no matter Saker's fantasies about a "Nazi occupied" Ukraine. Saker needs to go home to the country he shills so loudly for, but where he is afraid to live.

    The only Nazi occupied country in Eurasia has its capital in Moscow and occupies portions of Ukraine.

    There are good historical reasons not to trust Russia. Ukraine is already under attack from Putinist Russia, and Russia has given good reason to Poland to hate and distrust them.

    You can keep telling your lies, Saker, but there are many that will call you on them.

    Ukraine is “an” (singular) independent country? It’s looking more and more like several.

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  30. CalDre says:
    @Anatoly Karlin

    ... and ceased to “the Ukraine” long ago
     
    Why is it that only loser countries have this compulsive inclination to demand changes to the English language to satiate their own complexes?

    In English names do not have articles. It’s not “the Pete Smith” or “the Germany”.

    But, of course, not being clever in English, you will protest about “the United States” and “the United Kingdom” (but not “the Libya” or “the Spain”). Probably you are smart enough to see that United States and United Kingdom are not names, but descriptions of places? What we really have is “the States” (the 13 states, in particular, which united) and “the Kingdom” (in particular, the 2-3 kingdoms which united).

    So the only one butchering the English language is you and Saker. But everyone knows Saker has Nazi on his brain and cannot get it out, everyone who doesn’t like Russians is a Nazi, it’s like he’s a Russian Jew. Hmmmmm.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    The Argentine, the Netherlands, etc. You are a troll and a retard.
  31. Thirdeye says:
    @Priss Factor
    Russia has tried all sorts of strategies with Poland, ranging from outright partitioning, to the granting of special rights, to a naive hope that a common stance against Nazi Germany would yield some degree of, if not brotherhood, then at least civil neighborly relations. They all failed.

    Unfair statement!

    In the interwar years, Poland sought an independent path, refusing to toady up to neither Germany nor USSR.

    And keep in mind that it was Trotsky's Red Army that moved on Poland in the 20s.

    Anyway, when Hitler sought Polish collaboration against the USSR, Poland said No. And Poland also rejected an alliance with Soviets against Germany. In other words, Poland wanted to be left alone. It didn't want to be drawn into an unnecessary with Germany or Russia. Poles correctly assessed the cretinous character of Hitler and Stalin. If Poles erred, it was in trusting the British and the French to really do anything to defend Poland.

    Hitler plotted with Stalin to invade and divvy up Poland. And Germans and Poles committed horrible war crimes against Poland.

    Also, let's give the Poles some credit. They've been pretty savvy in working the EU system to Polisg benefit while, at the same time,refusing to EU pressures to surrender Polish sovereignty and expose Poland to invasion by Africans and Muslims.

    The real dumb Polac*s are outside Poland, sucking up to globalism and homomania.

    Anyway, Poles need to really wake up.

    Historically, Russia was the enemy while US never was. But today, Russia has no ill will against Poland whereas the Jewish-controlled US -- JEWS HATE POLES -- wants to Afro-Islamo-homo-ize Poland.
    Current US is an experiment in degeneracy that sees all nations as guinea pigs of globalism.

    Modern technologies make it very simple to bypass these countries and the North Stream is the best proof that Russia and Germany can do business together without involving the crazies between them.

    Poland is 1000x saner than current Germany.

    In the interwar years, Poland sought an independent path, refusing to toady up to neither Germany nor USSR.

    Poland was too busy toadying up to their British and French sugar daddies to bother toadying up to weaker Germany and the Soviet Union – or even being somewhat neighborly towards them. That sure came back to bite them in the ass though. Refer to item #6 in The Saker’s prognosis of PBS.

    Read More
  32. Thirdeye says:

    Those anthems of the PBS countries need another stanza after “_____ isn’t dead yet.” “It just smells that way.”

    Read More
  33. @CalDre
    In English names do not have articles. It's not "the Pete Smith" or "the Germany".

    But, of course, not being clever in English, you will protest about "the United States" and "the United Kingdom" (but not "the Libya" or "the Spain"). Probably you are smart enough to see that United States and United Kingdom are not names, but descriptions of places? What we really have is "the States" (the 13 states, in particular, which united) and "the Kingdom" (in particular, the 2-3 kingdoms which united).

    So the only one butchering the English language is you and Saker. But everyone knows Saker has Nazi on his brain and cannot get it out, everyone who doesn't like Russians is a Nazi, it's like he's a Russian Jew. Hmmmmm.

    The Argentine, the Netherlands, etc. You are a troll and a retard.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CalDre
    Obviously I am vastly smarter than you, so if I'm retarded, what does that make you?

    It's not "The Argentine", it's "Argentina" or "The Argentine Republic" (you see, I can even write that without having to add an insult, a tactic which is used by the intellectually insecure, lesser forms of life). "Republic", like "States" and "Kingdom", does have an article, like "the USSR" (your favorite of all places, da? Stalin the Great!)

    "Netherlands" is plural, so it can also take an article. See https://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-argentine-and-ukraine/ . But more importantly, "nether" means "low" (did you know that, you who are so much smarter?) and Lands, is, well, lands, so Netherlands means "The Low Lands". Which exactly follows my rule - a description converted to a proper name.

    Now, when you use the other name for it, not based on a description - it's not "The Holland", or, well, maybe for you it is. Being as you are so very smart.

  34. CalDre says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    The Argentine, the Netherlands, etc. You are a troll and a retard.

    Obviously I am vastly smarter than you, so if I’m retarded, what does that make you?

    It’s not “The Argentine”, it’s “Argentina” or “The Argentine Republic” (you see, I can even write that without having to add an insult, a tactic which is used by the intellectually insecure, lesser forms of life). “Republic”, like “States” and “Kingdom”, does have an article, like “the USSR” (your favorite of all places, da? Stalin the Great!)

    “Netherlands” is plural, so it can also take an article. See https://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-argentine-and-ukraine/ . But more importantly, “nether” means “low” (did you know that, you who are so much smarter?) and Lands, is, well, lands, so Netherlands means “The Low Lands”. Which exactly follows my rule – a description converted to a proper name.

    Now, when you use the other name for it, not based on a description – it’s not “The Holland”, or, well, maybe for you it is. Being as you are so very smart.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oork
    If Netherlands takes an article because it means low lands, then Ukraine, meaning borderland, can also be the Ukraine: The Borderlands.
  35. peterAUS says:
    @utu
    It seems that Trump's Warsaw speech touched a nerve among all sorts of Russkies. Let's start the Hate Poland Fest.

    In Russia, whatever be the appearance of things, violence and arbitrary rule is at the bottom of them all. Tyranny rendered calm by the influence of terror is the only kind of happiness which this government is able to afford its people. Marquis de Custine
     

    I do not believe I am exaggerating in affirming that the empire of Russia is a country whose inhabitants are the most miserable on earth, because they suffer at one and the same time the evils of barbarism and of civilization. Marquis de Custine
     
    You know what is your problem? You have nothing to offer except for the brute force. Like everybody you would like to be loved and respected but all you have managed is to be feared. No country, no people you ever conquered accepted your culture or your language. For right or wrong reason they always felt superior to you. Do you ever ask yourself why? You haven't managed to Russify anybody. As soon as you did not look or was weak everybody regurgitated and spat out whatever you fed them by force. Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    I judged the Poles by their enemies. And I found it was an almost unfailing truth that their enemies were the enemies of magnanimity and manhood. If a man loved slavery, if he loved usury, if he loved terrorism and all the trampled mire of materialistic politics, I have always found that he added to these affections the passion of a hatred of Poland. She could be judged in the light of that hatred; and the judgment has proved to be right. G. K. Chesterton
     

    Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?

    Well…that IS the question, isn’t it.

    You could probably add Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania to the list.
    To a lesser degree Slovenia and Croatia.
    Austria, well….let alone former Eastern Germany (when they dare speaking about it).

    One would almost get an impression “closer you are to them more negative you are about them”.

    I believe that the mutual negativity has DEEP, and for both sides, rather dark reasons.
    There is a rabbit hole there going into really bad places.

    But, I’d agree with Saker here on his practical conclusion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Zenarchy

    You could probably add Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania to the list.
    To a lesser degree Slovenia and Croatia.
     
    In Catholic countries anti-Russian sentiment depends largely on the level of papaist influence.

    That's why in actuality the very catholic Croatia is more anti-Russian than not only Slovenia, but probably even Czech republic despite virtually no experience with Russia (unlike Czechia).
  36. Aedib says:
    @CalDre

    What is really funny is that Germans exterminated 20% of Poland’s population
     
    Don't tell me - Stalin told you so!

    Please, educate yourself:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties

    By the way, denying or faking the History is a clear symptom of the PilBan syndrome.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CalDre
    First you're data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core. Third, I'm vastly more educated than you, which is why I don't believe this Polish propaganda. The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance. And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax, like a huge majority of others who have done so, I don't believe that propaganda for a second. Why don't you educate yourself? Start by watching the video "One Third of the Holocaust" and then I can recommend many more sources, but no doubt you will not since people who talk about "educating yourself" are typically the ones least likely to do it themselves, preferring to regurgitate the stale propaganda they've been fed since birth in their typical condescending, pompous mannerisms.

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.

    And I'm not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.

  37. Stogumber says:

    Well, as a German, I’m a Russophile AND a “Polonophile” (if that word exists) at the same time. Also I have a deep compassion for the young people which had to overcome centuries of dependency, like Latvians or Ukrainians. Basically, I support the position of the Saker: May the governments ignore each other, and may the countries be open and welcoming to small-scale personal contacts. If only the Saker hadn’t mixed this with such a lot of invectives!

    And you mustn’t forget: Even if Russia is really helpful – a resort for Western political refugees -, it’s Poland who leads the good fight against the EU commissariat. So at this moment Poland is even more important for the defence of freedom in Europe.

    Read More
    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @peterAUS

    ...it’s Poland who leads the good fight against the EU commissariat. So at this moment Poland is even more important for the defence of freedom in Europe.
     
    I'd add all members of the Visegrad Group.

    As for Saker and similar Internet personalities, well, he's "Russophile", which means "what is the best for Russia".
    Not for Europe, Germany or whatever else.

    Now, we could wish to believe that those interests overlap/coincide.
    Still....always....."what is the best for Russia".

    But, I'd like to ask a question about Germans.
    Is their silence about a lot of things that bother people of the West result of ignorance (brainwashing) or simple fear of persecution by law?
    Well, also, probably, the fact that in any conversation somebody will sooner or later mention WW1 and especially WW2.

    I know a couple of Germans and I got an impression they know exactly what's going on....just keep quite.

    Like there is a real face; another face is when facing anything public.

    I know a couple of Afrikaners and they have similar attitude.
    Interestingly enough, a couple of Japanese too.

  38. peterAUS says:
    @Stogumber
    Well, as a German, I'm a Russophile AND a "Polonophile" (if that word exists) at the same time. Also I have a deep compassion for the young people which had to overcome centuries of dependency, like Latvians or Ukrainians. Basically, I support the position of the Saker: May the governments ignore each other, and may the countries be open and welcoming to small-scale personal contacts. If only the Saker hadn't mixed this with such a lot of invectives!

    And you mustn't forget: Even if Russia is really helpful - a resort for Western political refugees -, it's Poland who leads the good fight against the EU commissariat. So at this moment Poland is even more important for the defence of freedom in Europe.

    …it’s Poland who leads the good fight against the EU commissariat. So at this moment Poland is even more important for the defence of freedom in Europe.

    I’d add all members of the Visegrad Group.

    As for Saker and similar Internet personalities, well, he’s “Russophile”, which means “what is the best for Russia”.
    Not for Europe, Germany or whatever else.

    Now, we could wish to believe that those interests overlap/coincide.
    Still….always…..”what is the best for Russia”.

    But, I’d like to ask a question about Germans.
    Is their silence about a lot of things that bother people of the West result of ignorance (brainwashing) or simple fear of persecution by law?
    Well, also, probably, the fact that in any conversation somebody will sooner or later mention WW1 and especially WW2.

    I know a couple of Germans and I got an impression they know exactly what’s going on….just keep quite.

    Like there is a real face; another face is when facing anything public.

    I know a couple of Afrikaners and they have similar attitude.
    Interestingly enough, a couple of Japanese too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @hyperbola

    But, I’d like to ask a question about Germans.
    Is their silence about a lot of things that bother people of the West result of ignorance (brainwashing) or simple fear of persecution by law?
     
    Or perhaps Germans (and Japanese) are not so translated into English and therefore you do not hear much about their opinions?

    Or perhaps the "sterotypes" are so strong that Germans are sick and tired of the "conversation"?

    I have been told by Germans about how much they resent being lackeys of the US. I have even heard from WWII soldiers that they would have beaten the American Army if adolf had been able to supply them with chocolate cake (as the US did for its troops).

    If you can speak German, there are MANY sources that are not silent. Something I find interesting is that German public television seems to have much more freedom to condemn the government than (say) the PBS in the USA (or the SBS in Australia?).

    Der moderne Arbeiter
    Festangestellt, Leiharbeiter, Werkvertrag ... ? Die Anstalt bringt Licht ins Dickicht der Anstellungsformen.
    https://www.zdf.de/comedy/die-anstalt/die-anstalt-der-moderne-arbeiter-100.html

  39. CalDre says:
    @Aedib
    Please, educate yourself:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_casualties

    By the way, denying or faking the History is a clear symptom of the PilBan syndrome.

    First you’re data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core. Third, I’m vastly more educated than you, which is why I don’t believe this Polish propaganda. The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance. And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax, like a huge majority of others who have done so, I don’t believe that propaganda for a second. Why don’t you educate yourself? Start by watching the video “One Third of the Holocaust” and then I can recommend many more sources, but no doubt you will not since people who talk about “educating yourself” are typically the ones least likely to do it themselves, preferring to regurgitate the stale propaganda they’ve been fed since birth in their typical condescending, pompous mannerisms.

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.

    And I’m not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Aedib

    First you’re data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core.
     
    If 20% is wrong, also 16% is wrong. The number ranges from 16.93% to 17.22%

    The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance.
     
    I don't care if the "Ban" side of the syndrome defy the claims of the "Pil" side. It is just infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax,
     
    So you considers Polish Jews as no-Polish. That's another indication of the "Ban" side of the disease (probably mixed with the Hitl-loser syndrome).

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.
     
    I don't care about infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And I’m not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.
     
    That’s an ad-hominem fallacy. It just shows your lack of coherent argumentations.
  40. Aedib says:
    @CalDre
    First you're data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core. Third, I'm vastly more educated than you, which is why I don't believe this Polish propaganda. The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance. And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax, like a huge majority of others who have done so, I don't believe that propaganda for a second. Why don't you educate yourself? Start by watching the video "One Third of the Holocaust" and then I can recommend many more sources, but no doubt you will not since people who talk about "educating yourself" are typically the ones least likely to do it themselves, preferring to regurgitate the stale propaganda they've been fed since birth in their typical condescending, pompous mannerisms.

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.

    And I'm not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.

    First you’re data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core.

    If 20% is wrong, also 16% is wrong. The number ranges from 16.93% to 17.22%

    The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance.

    I don’t care if the “Ban” side of the syndrome defy the claims of the “Pil” side. It is just infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax,

    So you considers Polish Jews as no-Polish. That’s another indication of the “Ban” side of the disease (probably mixed with the Hitl-loser syndrome).

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.

    I don’t care about infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And I’m not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.

    That’s an ad-hominem fallacy. It just shows your lack of coherent argumentations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CalDre

    I don’t care if the “Ban” side of the syndrome defy the claims of the “Pil” side. It is just infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.
     
    We've obviously discovered the limits to your intellectual capacity. Name-calling and citing bogus facts. None of the rest of your post makes the least bit of sense, which is what I would expect from a name-caller, who has the gall to accuse others of "ad hominem" attacks. Can't address anything on the merits, just name-calling and (attempted) bullying (you probably are not smart enough to realize you cannot bully over the internet, lol).
  41. oork says:
    @CalDre
    Obviously I am vastly smarter than you, so if I'm retarded, what does that make you?

    It's not "The Argentine", it's "Argentina" or "The Argentine Republic" (you see, I can even write that without having to add an insult, a tactic which is used by the intellectually insecure, lesser forms of life). "Republic", like "States" and "Kingdom", does have an article, like "the USSR" (your favorite of all places, da? Stalin the Great!)

    "Netherlands" is plural, so it can also take an article. See https://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-argentine-and-ukraine/ . But more importantly, "nether" means "low" (did you know that, you who are so much smarter?) and Lands, is, well, lands, so Netherlands means "The Low Lands". Which exactly follows my rule - a description converted to a proper name.

    Now, when you use the other name for it, not based on a description - it's not "The Holland", or, well, maybe for you it is. Being as you are so very smart.

    If Netherlands takes an article because it means low lands, then Ukraine, meaning borderland, can also be the Ukraine: The Borderlands.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CalDre
    Except:

    (1) "nether" means "low" in English, whilst Ukraine means nothing in English (and, yes, we are dealing with the English language)
    (2) "Netherlands" is plural and hence can get an article for that reason (like the Maldives)

    Back when Ukraine was a vassal of Russia, it was called "the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic". Not that it is no longer that, it is just Ukraine. Just like "The Russian Federation" is just "Russia", not "the Russia". If you want to use an article in Russian - oh, wait! llol

    You Russian supremacists are a hoot. It's up to Ukraine to decide its name, not Russians, and this little episode just shows again why Russia is so profoundly loathed by all of its neighbors.

    , @Philip Owen
    Or in older translation, still used in the UK, The March. As in The Welsh Marches, the Brandenburg Mark (German), the Roussilon March (France). A border area where some people are licensed to carry arms. So in grammatical British English it is The Ukraine.

    In the US, the closest might be Territory, as in The Oregon Territory.
  42. CalDre says:
    @Aedib

    First you’re data source claims 16%, not 20%. Second, Wikipedia is NWO propaganda to the core.
     
    If 20% is wrong, also 16% is wrong. The number ranges from 16.93% to 17.22%

    The source of your (wrong) data is the Institute of National Remembrance.
     
    I don't care if the "Ban" side of the syndrome defy the claims of the "Pil" side. It is just infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And they claim, amongst other untruths, 2.8 million Polish Jews killed by Germany. Since I have extensively studied the Holohoax,
     
    So you considers Polish Jews as no-Polish. That's another indication of the "Ban" side of the disease (probably mixed with the Hitl-loser syndrome).

    Not doubting that Germans were draconian/unjust on the Polish resistance, just that the 20% figure is a ludicrous lie.
     
    I don't care about infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    And I’m not a PilBan but you are a Stalinist/Communist.
     
    That’s an ad-hominem fallacy. It just shows your lack of coherent argumentations.

    I don’t care if the “Ban” side of the syndrome defy the claims of the “Pil” side. It is just infighting between two fakers of the WW2 facts.

    We’ve obviously discovered the limits to your intellectual capacity. Name-calling and citing bogus facts. None of the rest of your post makes the least bit of sense, which is what I would expect from a name-caller, who has the gall to accuse others of “ad hominem” attacks. Can’t address anything on the merits, just name-calling and (attempted) bullying (you probably are not smart enough to realize you cannot bully over the internet, lol).

    Read More
  43. CalDre says:
    @oork
    If Netherlands takes an article because it means low lands, then Ukraine, meaning borderland, can also be the Ukraine: The Borderlands.

    Except:

    (1) “nether” means “low” in English, whilst Ukraine means nothing in English (and, yes, we are dealing with the English language)
    (2) “Netherlands” is plural and hence can get an article for that reason (like the Maldives)

    Back when Ukraine was a vassal of Russia, it was called “the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic”. Not that it is no longer that, it is just Ukraine. Just like “The Russian Federation” is just “Russia”, not “the Russia”. If you want to use an article in Russian – oh, wait! llol

    You Russian supremacists are a hoot. It’s up to Ukraine to decide its name, not Russians, and this little episode just shows again why Russia is so profoundly loathed by all of its neighbors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oork

    You Russian supremacists
     
    Don't be so stupid. We're talking about English language usage, and specifically, the weird tendency of people like you to get bent out of shape over how certain native speakers of English use their own language.
    Ngram ("in Ukraine" vs "in the Ukraine") shows "in the Ukraine" to be the overwhelmingly normal usage among English speakers, until about 1990 when a subset of English native speakers created a political issue in the name where one never existed before.

    For your information, I grew up among the Ukrainian diaspora, and native speakers of English or not, everyone said "the Ukraine" before 1990.
  44. peterAUS says:

    ….Russian supremacists……

    That is something Russians will never acknowledge.

    But, Saker is surprisingly honest in his article.

    ..whether this is a result of centuries of Russian oppression, imperialism, violence and persecutions or the result of the Papist ideology makes absolutely no difference for our purposes.

    The only thing that matters is ‘how does that affect Russia’.
    Or simple ‘is this/that good for Russia’.

    I guess that’s the point that most Westerners on ‘alt-sites’, for some reason, just don’t get when dealing with Russians.

    Interestingly enough, ALL get it when dealing with Jews.
    But when dealing with Russians……….

    Go figure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    I do not think that there is a significant Russian suprematism. Not even among some yahoo commenters here. Deep down they just want to be respected. Their egos are hurt and they suffer from various inferiority complex that are often masked by muscle flexing and boasting (very common on this site). With respect to smaller and weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance they can't get why those people do not like and respect them more. Somehow they believe in Soviet propaganda that USSR was a benefactor to those nations.
  45. oork says:
    @CalDre
    Except:

    (1) "nether" means "low" in English, whilst Ukraine means nothing in English (and, yes, we are dealing with the English language)
    (2) "Netherlands" is plural and hence can get an article for that reason (like the Maldives)

    Back when Ukraine was a vassal of Russia, it was called "the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic". Not that it is no longer that, it is just Ukraine. Just like "The Russian Federation" is just "Russia", not "the Russia". If you want to use an article in Russian - oh, wait! llol

    You Russian supremacists are a hoot. It's up to Ukraine to decide its name, not Russians, and this little episode just shows again why Russia is so profoundly loathed by all of its neighbors.

    You Russian supremacists

    Don’t be so stupid. We’re talking about English language usage, and specifically, the weird tendency of people like you to get bent out of shape over how certain native speakers of English use their own language.
    Ngram (“in Ukraine” vs “in the Ukraine”) shows “in the Ukraine” to be the overwhelmingly normal usage among English speakers, until about 1990 when a subset of English native speakers created a political issue in the name where one never existed before.

    For your information, I grew up among the Ukrainian diaspora, and native speakers of English or not, everyone said “the Ukraine” before 1990.

    Read More
  46. utu says:
    @peterAUS

    ....Russian supremacists......
     
    That is something Russians will never acknowledge.

    But, Saker is surprisingly honest in his article.

    ..whether this is a result of centuries of Russian oppression, imperialism, violence and persecutions or the result of the Papist ideology makes absolutely no difference for our purposes.
     
    The only thing that matters is 'how does that affect Russia'.
    Or simple 'is this/that good for Russia'.

    I guess that's the point that most Westerners on 'alt-sites', for some reason, just don't get when dealing with Russians.

    Interestingly enough, ALL get it when dealing with Jews.
    But when dealing with Russians..........

    Go figure.

    I do not think that there is a significant Russian suprematism. Not even among some yahoo commenters here. Deep down they just want to be respected. Their egos are hurt and they suffer from various inferiority complex that are often masked by muscle flexing and boasting (very common on this site). With respect to smaller and weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance they can’t get why those people do not like and respect them more. Somehow they believe in Soviet propaganda that USSR was a benefactor to those nations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Aedib
    The felling on weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance can be positively or negatively channelized.
    I.e. Kazakhstan was able to overcome the Soviet past; it successfully integrated the Slavic minorities and it was able to develop a multi-vector independent policy. Kazakhstan have good relationships with China, USA and Russia. It was one of the poor and underdeveloped nations of the Soviet Union. Now is the richest one. It was able to move forward.
    On the other side, Ukraine was one of the richest (or the richest) republics and now is one of the poorest former SU-states. It was dragged by a toxic mix of hatred/envy toward Russia, oligarchic mafias, Yeltsin-style neoliberalism, and a dystopic re-writing of the history of all the Russias.
  47. Aedib says:
    @utu
    I do not think that there is a significant Russian suprematism. Not even among some yahoo commenters here. Deep down they just want to be respected. Their egos are hurt and they suffer from various inferiority complex that are often masked by muscle flexing and boasting (very common on this site). With respect to smaller and weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance they can't get why those people do not like and respect them more. Somehow they believe in Soviet propaganda that USSR was a benefactor to those nations.

    The felling on weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance can be positively or negatively channelized.
    I.e. Kazakhstan was able to overcome the Soviet past; it successfully integrated the Slavic minorities and it was able to develop a multi-vector independent policy. Kazakhstan have good relationships with China, USA and Russia. It was one of the poor and underdeveloped nations of the Soviet Union. Now is the richest one. It was able to move forward.
    On the other side, Ukraine was one of the richest (or the richest) republics and now is one of the poorest former SU-states. It was dragged by a toxic mix of hatred/envy toward Russia, oligarchic mafias, Yeltsin-style neoliberalism, and a dystopic re-writing of the history of all the Russias.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    "Yeltsin-style neoliberalism" Absolutely not. A lack of progress towards competition in the economy is because there was no Yeltsin style liberalisation. This is simply a mantra of the Russian Far Right to demonize their opponents.
  48. @oork
    If Netherlands takes an article because it means low lands, then Ukraine, meaning borderland, can also be the Ukraine: The Borderlands.

    Or in older translation, still used in the UK, The March. As in The Welsh Marches, the Brandenburg Mark (German), the Roussilon March (France). A border area where some people are licensed to carry arms. So in grammatical British English it is The Ukraine.

    In the US, the closest might be Territory, as in The Oregon Territory.

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  49. @Aedib
    The felling on weaker nations that used to be under Russia and/or USSR dominance can be positively or negatively channelized.
    I.e. Kazakhstan was able to overcome the Soviet past; it successfully integrated the Slavic minorities and it was able to develop a multi-vector independent policy. Kazakhstan have good relationships with China, USA and Russia. It was one of the poor and underdeveloped nations of the Soviet Union. Now is the richest one. It was able to move forward.
    On the other side, Ukraine was one of the richest (or the richest) republics and now is one of the poorest former SU-states. It was dragged by a toxic mix of hatred/envy toward Russia, oligarchic mafias, Yeltsin-style neoliberalism, and a dystopic re-writing of the history of all the Russias.

    “Yeltsin-style neoliberalism” Absolutely not. A lack of progress towards competition in the economy is because there was no Yeltsin style liberalisation. This is simply a mantra of the Russian Far Right to demonize their opponents.

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    • Replies: @Aedib
    It is not necessary to belong to the Russian Far Right to see the catastrophic effects of Yeltsin-style neoliberalism. It is necessary just to look at the implosion of the Russian economy during the 90s and the millions of deaths that produced.
    By the way, I’m not Russian and I’m not a Far Rightist.
    , @hyperbola
    Russian far right???

    Here is a Polish presidential candidate about the "neoliberal robbery" in Russia and Poland.

    Russia - the biggest robbery of the twentieth century
    https://www.polskawalczaca.com/viewtopic.php?t=20332

    This is, of course, forbidden knowledge in the "west", even though the ramifications of the jewish corruption reached even places like Harvard.

    Why Larry Summers lost the presidency of Harvard
    https://mathbabe.org/2012/03/11/why-larry-summers-lost-the-presidency-of-harvard/
  50. Aedib says:
    @Philip Owen
    "Yeltsin-style neoliberalism" Absolutely not. A lack of progress towards competition in the economy is because there was no Yeltsin style liberalisation. This is simply a mantra of the Russian Far Right to demonize their opponents.

    It is not necessary to belong to the Russian Far Right to see the catastrophic effects of Yeltsin-style neoliberalism. It is necessary just to look at the implosion of the Russian economy during the 90s and the millions of deaths that produced.
    By the way, I’m not Russian and I’m not a Far Rightist.

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  51. hyperbola says:
    @peterAUS

    ...it’s Poland who leads the good fight against the EU commissariat. So at this moment Poland is even more important for the defence of freedom in Europe.
     
    I'd add all members of the Visegrad Group.

    As for Saker and similar Internet personalities, well, he's "Russophile", which means "what is the best for Russia".
    Not for Europe, Germany or whatever else.

    Now, we could wish to believe that those interests overlap/coincide.
    Still....always....."what is the best for Russia".

    But, I'd like to ask a question about Germans.
    Is their silence about a lot of things that bother people of the West result of ignorance (brainwashing) or simple fear of persecution by law?
    Well, also, probably, the fact that in any conversation somebody will sooner or later mention WW1 and especially WW2.

    I know a couple of Germans and I got an impression they know exactly what's going on....just keep quite.

    Like there is a real face; another face is when facing anything public.

    I know a couple of Afrikaners and they have similar attitude.
    Interestingly enough, a couple of Japanese too.

    But, I’d like to ask a question about Germans.
    Is their silence about a lot of things that bother people of the West result of ignorance (brainwashing) or simple fear of persecution by law?

    Or perhaps Germans (and Japanese) are not so translated into English and therefore you do not hear much about their opinions?

    Or perhaps the “sterotypes” are so strong that Germans are sick and tired of the “conversation”?

    I have been told by Germans about how much they resent being lackeys of the US. I have even heard from WWII soldiers that they would have beaten the American Army if adolf had been able to supply them with chocolate cake (as the US did for its troops).

    If you can speak German, there are MANY sources that are not silent. Something I find interesting is that German public television seems to have much more freedom to condemn the government than (say) the PBS in the USA (or the SBS in Australia?).

    Der moderne Arbeiter
    Festangestellt, Leiharbeiter, Werkvertrag … ? Die Anstalt bringt Licht ins Dickicht der Anstellungsformen.

    https://www.zdf.de/comedy/die-anstalt/die-anstalt-der-moderne-arbeiter-100.html

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  52. hyperbola says:
    @Philip Owen
    "Yeltsin-style neoliberalism" Absolutely not. A lack of progress towards competition in the economy is because there was no Yeltsin style liberalisation. This is simply a mantra of the Russian Far Right to demonize their opponents.

    Russian far right???

    Here is a Polish presidential candidate about the “neoliberal robbery” in Russia and Poland.

    Russia – the biggest robbery of the twentieth century

    https://www.polskawalczaca.com/viewtopic.php?t=20332

    This is, of course, forbidden knowledge in the “west”, even though the ramifications of the jewish corruption reached even places like Harvard.

    Why Larry Summers lost the presidency of Harvard

    https://mathbabe.org/2012/03/11/why-larry-summers-lost-the-presidency-of-harvard/

    Read More
  53. Zenarchy says:
    @peterAUS

    Look at Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, Georgia. Why people in those countries do not like you and only feel contempt for you?
     
    Well…that IS the question, isn’t it.

    You could probably add Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania to the list.
    To a lesser degree Slovenia and Croatia.
    Austria, well....let alone former Eastern Germany (when they dare speaking about it).

    One would almost get an impression “closer you are to them more negative you are about them”.

    I believe that the mutual negativity has DEEP, and for both sides, rather dark reasons.
    There is a rabbit hole there going into really bad places.

    But, I'd agree with Saker here on his practical conclusion.

    You could probably add Slovakia, Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania to the list.
    To a lesser degree Slovenia and Croatia.

    In Catholic countries anti-Russian sentiment depends largely on the level of papaist influence.

    That’s why in actuality the very catholic Croatia is more anti-Russian than not only Slovenia, but probably even Czech republic despite virtually no experience with Russia (unlike Czechia).

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  54. DarkEyes says:
    @Cyrano
    Amen to everything you said, Saker. I agree 100%. The Polaks are talented b*tt kissers. It’s funny how they find kissing Russian b**ts objectionable, while kissing the western ones they find full of virtue. If anything they should be against kissing both of these entities behinds. That shows total lack of dignity and I think that they are disgrace to the Slavic family.

    Exactly what I am thinking about the PILBAS countries and Russians “responses”.
    Russia has indeed already started to avoid the Balts concerning its ferry services to Germany and Scandinavia and of course the direct North Stream 2 connection with Germany to avoid Ukraine, Poland with the Balts and not so long ago the building of the famous bridge between Russian mainland and its Crimea.

    I like the style and the way Russian Federation is “responding” to their PILBAS syndrome.
    It is a natural way of neglecting.

    Thank you very much, Saker, for your explanations of what is going on between PILBAS and Russia.
    Nothing. Good.

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