The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 BlogviewThe Saker Archive
Elections to the Russian Duma in 2016
Relevant or a waste of time and money?
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
shutterstock_353942375

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Judging by the reactions in the western corporate media, the 2016 elections to the Russian Duma are basically a non-event: evil Putin kept his “grip on power,” all the parties in the Duma are basically under his control and no real opposition was allowed to emerge. Even in Russia, there are some who agree, but for different reasons. They say that everybody knew that United Russia (the party of Putin and Medvedev) would win no matter what and that the entire election was therefore a rather boring event. Actually, there is some truth in all of the above, but it also completely misses the point.

Problem number one: Russia ain’t Switzerland

The single most important thing to understand about Russia is that she is not a western or European country. If the Ukie nationalists like to say that “the Ukraine is Europe”, then I would paraphrase them and say that “Russia is Asia” (the Ukies agree with that, by the way). This is not quite true, in reality Russia is Russia, but it is much closer to the truth than most observers care to admit. In the case of elections, for example, Russia is much more like Japan: she has that mandatory external veneer of democracy, but in reality, the Russian people’s attitude to authority and power is much more similar to the attitude of the Japanese: they understand that the real power and authority in Russia (or Japan) does not really depend on election results and that the real centers of power in these countries are either vested in individuals (such as Putin or the Emperor), or in informal groups of people (state security and business people in Russia, old families and industrialists in Japan).

That does not make elections irrelevant, however, far from it. They are, in fact, a key way to get a sense of public opinion and, depending on the outcome, they can send a very powerful message to those who “have ears to hear”.

Problem number two: the real opposition in Russia is not in the Duma, it is in the Kremlin

There is a lot of truth to the accusation that the Duma is just a rubber-stamping club and that all of the parties which made it into the Duma (United Russia, Communists, Liberal Democrats and Fair Russia) are pro-Putin. They are! But that misses the point. The real point is that while United Russia is generally pro-Putin and pro-Medvedev, the other three are very strongly anti-Medvedev, anti-Russian government and, especially, anti-the economic-financial ministers of the Medvedev government. The truth is, the real opposition to Putin is precisely that, the economic-financial ministers of the Medvedev government and all the factions which they represent: bankers, IMF-drones, corrupt businessmen from the 1990s who hate Putin because he does not allow them to steal like in the past, all the ex-Nomenklatura and their kids who made a killing in the 1990s and whose heart is in the West, the Atlantic Integrationists à la Kudrin who are basically “Washington consensus types” and who hate the Russian people for voting for Putin. That is the real opposition and that opposition is far more dangerous than the US and NATO combined. And for that opposition the result of the elections was a crushing defeat. Why?

Because besides the hyper-official “power party” United Russia, all the other parties in the Duma are far more anti-capitalist and anti-American than Putin. For the Empire, “United Russia” is as good as it will ever get. Any alternative will be far, far worse.

As for the overtly pro-US political parties (like PARNAS or Iabloko), they barely got 3% together, way less than the minimum of 5% (for each party) that they needed to get into the Duma. This basically confirms what I have always said: there are no real pro-US forces in Russia, none.

What does this all mean? Simple:

The Russian people got a rubber-stamping Duma, which is exactly what they wanted!

Maybe this is not great in terms of “democracy”, but in terms of real “people power” this is a fantastic result.

What about the turnout? Does the roughly 48% (provisional figure) participation indicate that the boycott proclaimed by some liberals worked? Hardly. For one thing, this level of participation is actually pretty good, similar to what Swiss parliamentary elections typically score. Furthermore, a lot of United Russia voters were so sure of their overwhelming victory that they did not even bother to vote. Had they shown up the United Russia score would have been even bigger.

What about fraud? Yes, there were instances, but since the new system makes it possible for every citizen to monitor every single polling station live, they were rapidly caught and dealt with. To its great chagrin, even the OSCE had to give these elections a “mixed review” which in plain English translates into “oh shit, we ain’t got nothing!”.

Conclusions:

These elections were a huge personal victory for Vladimir Putin. Conversely, they are a major faceplant for the Atlantic Integrationists and the AngloZionist Empire. This was also the ultimate proof that the idiotic western plan to destabilize Putin by means of economic sanctions has had the exact opposite effect, thank you: the Russians have circled their wagons around their President and the mood in Russia is one of extreme resolve.

ORDER IT NOW

There is one risk for Putin here, but it is minor. The electoral system in Russia means that while the United Russia party got something in the range of 54% of the votes, it will take 343 seats out of 450, giving it a comfortable absolute majority. Some observers say that if things do not go well and if the economic crisis does not get better, the Kremlin (both Putin and Medvedev) will not be able to blame it all on the Duma. This is true, but this is also no big deal. First, both Putin and Medvedev can always blame the West for everything even when, like in the case of the frankly idiotic economic policies of the Russian government, even if, in reality, it is the Russian government which is entirely responsible for the crisis and when the West’s sanctions are having only a minor effect on the situation. But far more relevantly, United Russia is not really-really Putin’s party. His *real* party is not a party at all, but rather a movement, the All-Russia People’s Front or “ONF” (I described that organization and its role here). Should things get really tough or should the Atlantic Integrationists try to overthrow Putin during, say, an extraordinary United Russia Congress, Putin would just have to turn the ONF into a regular political party, blame the 5th column for the attempt at regime change and crack down on his opponents with the full support of the Russian people.

The truth is simple: Putin personally and the interests he represents have never been more powerful than today. The overwhelming majority of the Russian people are fully behind the Kremlin and the writing on the wall for the Empire is simple: “Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch’intrate”!

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Russia, Vladimir Putin 
Hide 27 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Renoman says:

    America, Hillary’s fagnation, Russia’s got stones!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /tsaker/elections-to-the-russian-duma-in-2016/#comment-1578068
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. […] Written by TheSaker; Originally appeared at TheUnzReview […]

    Read More
  3. Andrei says:

    What’s that with labelling countries “Europe” and “Asia” depending on political conjecture? Spain must have been North African under Franco, Lukashenko injected the Mongol gene into Belarusians, and Nazi Germany was clearly Central Asian – the Huns, man. Well, at least Turkey has stopped being Europe a few years ago, but who knows, it may always return.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    What’s that with labelling countries “Europe” and “Asia” depending on political conjecture?
     
    From Roger Scraton to David Hackett Fischer (see his The Great Wave for example) West is defined as largely a Christianity's realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment. The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo--is not West, is an ideological one. I would dare to say that today Russia is more "west" than West itself and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia--all this talk is absolutely meaningless, especially against the background of Western Europe enjoying its very "western"-based cultural "enrichment" by means of rape, murder, chaos and inevitable betrayal of it by "elites" into thorough Islamization. I already see how very "western" Europe will remember fondly the times of Polish plumbers. The "West" is dead. United States is not West anymore either.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. […] Written by TheSaker; Originally appeared at TheUnzReview […]

    Read More
  5. 5371 says:

    Watching Russia hold a multiparty election will always be like watching a guy who almost killed himself with drink take a couple of sips from a glass of dry white wine at a social event.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
    True to a certain degree. Yet, current Russian political discourse in important sense of expressing will of the people is more "western" than it is in Europe. As per freedom of expression and of the political views, Russia is on the order of magnitude freer than Western Europe.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @5371
    Watching Russia hold a multiparty election will always be like watching a guy who almost killed himself with drink take a couple of sips from a glass of dry white wine at a social event.

    True to a certain degree. Yet, current Russian political discourse in important sense of expressing will of the people is more “western” than it is in Europe. As per freedom of expression and of the political views, Russia is on the order of magnitude freer than Western Europe.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. This was very informative.

    Thank you.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  8. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @Andrei
    What's that with labelling countries "Europe" and "Asia" depending on political conjecture? Spain must have been North African under Franco, Lukashenko injected the Mongol gene into Belarusians, and Nazi Germany was clearly Central Asian - the Huns, man. Well, at least Turkey has stopped being Europe a few years ago, but who knows, it may always return.

    What’s that with labelling countries “Europe” and “Asia” depending on political conjecture?

    From Roger Scraton to David Hackett Fischer (see his The Great Wave for example) West is defined as largely a Christianity’s realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment. The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo–is not West, is an ideological one. I would dare to say that today Russia is more “west” than West itself and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia–all this talk is absolutely meaningless, especially against the background of Western Europe enjoying its very “western”-based cultural “enrichment” by means of rape, murder, chaos and inevitable betrayal of it by “elites” into thorough Islamization. I already see how very “western” Europe will remember fondly the times of Polish plumbers. The “West” is dead. United States is not West anymore either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivan K.
    From Roger Scraton

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, - including being blindly anti-Russian.

    West is defined as largely a Christianity’s realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment.

    Of course, this contradicts his anti-Russian stance.
    He is actually a pretty obscure fellow. His public responses to his readers and listeners were always rather odd. And then he deleted them. The duality of his brilliant discernment on one hand, and his complete passing over the Western aggressions on the other hand, demands an explanation. And the most compelling one is - rigid ideological obedience.
    His visits behind the Iron Curtain for giving lectures? You can bet he was an agent of British intelligence.

    I would dare to say that today Russia is more “west” than West itself

    Russia would do well to abandon that bollocks of democracy (as well as the opposite bollocks of superficial imitation of bygone ages).

    and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia–all this talk is absolutely meaningless,

    Yes. ... If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. Please Saker no more Putin deification, it is aberrant how you twist facts to show Putin always coming on top. To engage in this new ceasefire charade is a huge mistake, you don’t play chess with people’s lives, they are not pawns on a board.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  10. Ivan K. says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    What’s that with labelling countries “Europe” and “Asia” depending on political conjecture?
     
    From Roger Scraton to David Hackett Fischer (see his The Great Wave for example) West is defined as largely a Christianity's realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment. The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo--is not West, is an ideological one. I would dare to say that today Russia is more "west" than West itself and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia--all this talk is absolutely meaningless, especially against the background of Western Europe enjoying its very "western"-based cultural "enrichment" by means of rape, murder, chaos and inevitable betrayal of it by "elites" into thorough Islamization. I already see how very "western" Europe will remember fondly the times of Polish plumbers. The "West" is dead. United States is not West anymore either.

    From Roger Scraton

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, – including being blindly anti-Russian.

    West is defined as largely a Christianity’s realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment.

    Of course, this contradicts his anti-Russian stance.
    He is actually a pretty obscure fellow. His public responses to his readers and listeners were always rather odd. And then he deleted them. The duality of his brilliant discernment on one hand, and his complete passing over the Western aggressions on the other hand, demands an explanation. And the most compelling one is – rigid ideological obedience.
    His visits behind the Iron Curtain for giving lectures? You can bet he was an agent of British intelligence.

    I would dare to say that today Russia is more “west” than West itself

    Russia would do well to abandon that bollocks of democracy (as well as the opposite bollocks of superficial imitation of bygone ages).

    and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia–all this talk is absolutely meaningless,

    Yes. … If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, – including being blindly anti-Russian.
     
    Thanks for correction. Yes, exactly him. He may be anti-Russian but his definition of the West is solid, to put it mildly. Defining roots of Western Civilization in God of Israel, Roman Law and Greek Culture is correct. Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a "west". Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most--behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture. All three elements Scruton lists are not just present but omnipresent in Russian people. Having an "Asian" streak in European people doesn't make them Asian. But all this opens a whole another discussion on the meaning of the West today. As Robert Reilly correctly states: modern "West" (that is Western Europe and US) is almost at the point of no return in its cancerous process of de-Hellenization. He IS correct. Viewed from these positions--Russia IS NOT the "West" and thank God for that. Today, Russians are, as I already mentioned, on the order of magnitude freer people than Germans or Dutch. Fvorite West's shtick of rationality is, frankly, a preposterous claim--it is dead.

    Yes. … If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.
     
    You may start with reviewing math, physics, chemistry and, say, geography standard textbooks starting from the 7th grade of Soviet public schools starting somewhere from late 1950s. USSR was the most educated country in the world by 1960s. It was the most read country too.

    Try also this:

    https://www.amazon.com/What-Ivan-Knows-Johnny-Doesnt/dp/4871876993

    Those could be very good primers. Knowing actual history of the Soviet Union could also help but that will require breaking some very rigid stereotypes. Knowing USSR of 1960s through 1980s is altogether beyond the grasp of Western scholarship which exists on the foundation of views of Soviet dissidents and people who "sold" to them what they wanted to hear. The impact of the Great Patriotic War is totally beyond the grasp of the West. Most (not all) of what is written on Cold War in the West is Clansiesque BS. Start watching Soviet cinematography which produced such masterpieces as Bondarchuk's War And Peace and Klimov's Come And See, among very many. My point is: there is no grasp of Russian culture (high and low) and with it of the Russian state in the West, bar some minor exceptions who have very little influence in policy-setting circles. But let me put it this way: for many assertive "westerners" visiting State Hermitage, Christ The Savior Cathedral or Piskarevskoye Cemetery could be a very humbling experience to put it mildly and an impetus (for many) for questioning their "westernism".

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @Ivan K.
    From Roger Scraton

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, - including being blindly anti-Russian.

    West is defined as largely a Christianity’s realm and as a space which in different ways and times was subjected to the ideas of Enlightenment.

    Of course, this contradicts his anti-Russian stance.
    He is actually a pretty obscure fellow. His public responses to his readers and listeners were always rather odd. And then he deleted them. The duality of his brilliant discernment on one hand, and his complete passing over the Western aggressions on the other hand, demands an explanation. And the most compelling one is - rigid ideological obedience.
    His visits behind the Iron Curtain for giving lectures? You can bet he was an agent of British intelligence.

    I would dare to say that today Russia is more “west” than West itself

    Russia would do well to abandon that bollocks of democracy (as well as the opposite bollocks of superficial imitation of bygone ages).

    and then again, without understanding of a real impact of WW II and Soviet times in Russia–all this talk is absolutely meaningless,

    Yes. ... If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, – including being blindly anti-Russian.

    Thanks for correction. Yes, exactly him. He may be anti-Russian but his definition of the West is solid, to put it mildly. Defining roots of Western Civilization in God of Israel, Roman Law and Greek Culture is correct. Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a “west”. Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most–behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture. All three elements Scruton lists are not just present but omnipresent in Russian people. Having an “Asian” streak in European people doesn’t make them Asian. But all this opens a whole another discussion on the meaning of the West today. As Robert Reilly correctly states: modern “West” (that is Western Europe and US) is almost at the point of no return in its cancerous process of de-Hellenization. He IS correct. Viewed from these positions–Russia IS NOT the “West” and thank God for that. Today, Russians are, as I already mentioned, on the order of magnitude freer people than Germans or Dutch. Fvorite West’s shtick of rationality is, frankly, a preposterous claim–it is dead.

    Yes. … If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.

    You may start with reviewing math, physics, chemistry and, say, geography standard textbooks starting from the 7th grade of Soviet public schools starting somewhere from late 1950s. USSR was the most educated country in the world by 1960s. It was the most read country too.

    Try also this:

    https://www.amazon.com/What-Ivan-Knows-Johnny-Doesnt/dp/4871876993

    Those could be very good primers. Knowing actual history of the Soviet Union could also help but that will require breaking some very rigid stereotypes. Knowing USSR of 1960s through 1980s is altogether beyond the grasp of Western scholarship which exists on the foundation of views of Soviet dissidents and people who “sold” to them what they wanted to hear. The impact of the Great Patriotic War is totally beyond the grasp of the West. Most (not all) of what is written on Cold War in the West is Clansiesque BS. Start watching Soviet cinematography which produced such masterpieces as Bondarchuk’s War And Peace and Klimov’s Come And See, among very many. My point is: there is no grasp of Russian culture (high and low) and with it of the Russian state in the West, bar some minor exceptions who have very little influence in policy-setting circles. But let me put it this way: for many assertive “westerners” visiting State Hermitage, Christ The Savior Cathedral or Piskarevskoye Cemetery could be a very humbling experience to put it mildly and an impetus (for many) for questioning their “westernism”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a “west”. Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most–behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture
     
    Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context. It is in essence a semi-Western country, despite having produced a high culture equal to that of any Western country.

    It is ironic that because Russia, unlike Western Europe, cherishes its own culture (therefore including of course the Western aspects of its culture), it better preserves aspects of Western culture within itself, than does most of the actual West preserve Western culture. This is obvious to anyone who has visited Russia.* But it's not quite the same as saying that "Russia is more “west” than West itself."

    *I remember seeing the Napoleon ballet in the Kremlin once. The theater was full of young soldiers in dress uniform, and their dressed up dates. This sort of thing was once common in the actual West, but not anymore.
    , @Philip Owen
    As an employer of the results of 1950's and 60's Russian education, I do not entirely agree with your comments, particularly geography which was quite restrained by political considerations so far as I can tell. Maths, physics, chemistry, languages (especially safe 19th C literature) maybe.

    And 30 years too late to meet the English Football Hooligans.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. AP says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, – including being blindly anti-Russian.
     
    Thanks for correction. Yes, exactly him. He may be anti-Russian but his definition of the West is solid, to put it mildly. Defining roots of Western Civilization in God of Israel, Roman Law and Greek Culture is correct. Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a "west". Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most--behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture. All three elements Scruton lists are not just present but omnipresent in Russian people. Having an "Asian" streak in European people doesn't make them Asian. But all this opens a whole another discussion on the meaning of the West today. As Robert Reilly correctly states: modern "West" (that is Western Europe and US) is almost at the point of no return in its cancerous process of de-Hellenization. He IS correct. Viewed from these positions--Russia IS NOT the "West" and thank God for that. Today, Russians are, as I already mentioned, on the order of magnitude freer people than Germans or Dutch. Fvorite West's shtick of rationality is, frankly, a preposterous claim--it is dead.

    Yes. … If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.
     
    You may start with reviewing math, physics, chemistry and, say, geography standard textbooks starting from the 7th grade of Soviet public schools starting somewhere from late 1950s. USSR was the most educated country in the world by 1960s. It was the most read country too.

    Try also this:

    https://www.amazon.com/What-Ivan-Knows-Johnny-Doesnt/dp/4871876993

    Those could be very good primers. Knowing actual history of the Soviet Union could also help but that will require breaking some very rigid stereotypes. Knowing USSR of 1960s through 1980s is altogether beyond the grasp of Western scholarship which exists on the foundation of views of Soviet dissidents and people who "sold" to them what they wanted to hear. The impact of the Great Patriotic War is totally beyond the grasp of the West. Most (not all) of what is written on Cold War in the West is Clansiesque BS. Start watching Soviet cinematography which produced such masterpieces as Bondarchuk's War And Peace and Klimov's Come And See, among very many. My point is: there is no grasp of Russian culture (high and low) and with it of the Russian state in the West, bar some minor exceptions who have very little influence in policy-setting circles. But let me put it this way: for many assertive "westerners" visiting State Hermitage, Christ The Savior Cathedral or Piskarevskoye Cemetery could be a very humbling experience to put it mildly and an impetus (for many) for questioning their "westernism".

    Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a “west”. Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most–behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture

    Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context. It is in essence a semi-Western country, despite having produced a high culture equal to that of any Western country.

    It is ironic that because Russia, unlike Western Europe, cherishes its own culture (therefore including of course the Western aspects of its culture), it better preserves aspects of Western culture within itself, than does most of the actual West preserve Western culture. This is obvious to anyone who has visited Russia.* But it’s not quite the same as saying that “Russia is more “west” than West itself.”

    *I remember seeing the Napoleon ballet in the Kremlin once. The theater was full of young soldiers in dress uniform, and their dressed up dates. This sort of thing was once common in the actual West, but not anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography - perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.
    , @Andrei Martyanov
    I am not going to bother to refute this concoction you wrote, but I would dare to point out that:

    which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.
     
    It is actually, the combined West which lost this very "full context", that is why it is not the "West" anymore.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. 5371 says:
    @AP

    Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a “west”. Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most–behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture
     
    Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context. It is in essence a semi-Western country, despite having produced a high culture equal to that of any Western country.

    It is ironic that because Russia, unlike Western Europe, cherishes its own culture (therefore including of course the Western aspects of its culture), it better preserves aspects of Western culture within itself, than does most of the actual West preserve Western culture. This is obvious to anyone who has visited Russia.* But it's not quite the same as saying that "Russia is more “west” than West itself."

    *I remember seeing the Napoleon ballet in the Kremlin once. The theater was full of young soldiers in dress uniform, and their dressed up dates. This sort of thing was once common in the actual West, but not anymore.

    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography – perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.

    Read More
    • Agree: Andrei Martyanov
    • Replies: @AP

    perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.
     
    Not a bad time. Better than the 21st, from the perspective of cultural "development," a term that may not apply for the 21st.
    , @AP

    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography – perpetually stuck in the early 19th century
     
    This was Samuel Huntington's view of Russia btw:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=Iq75qmi3Og8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=huntington+russia+civilizations&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiz266m16HPAhUk6YMKHYdSD6oQuwUIHzAA#v=snippet&q=russia%20enl%3Bightenment&f=false
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @AP

    Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a “west”. Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most–behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture
     
    Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context. It is in essence a semi-Western country, despite having produced a high culture equal to that of any Western country.

    It is ironic that because Russia, unlike Western Europe, cherishes its own culture (therefore including of course the Western aspects of its culture), it better preserves aspects of Western culture within itself, than does most of the actual West preserve Western culture. This is obvious to anyone who has visited Russia.* But it's not quite the same as saying that "Russia is more “west” than West itself."

    *I remember seeing the Napoleon ballet in the Kremlin once. The theater was full of young soldiers in dress uniform, and their dressed up dates. This sort of thing was once common in the actual West, but not anymore.

    I am not going to bother to refute this concoction you wrote, but I would dare to point out that:

    which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.

    It is actually, the combined West which lost this very “full context”, that is why it is not the “West” anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Your statement, which is mostly true (there is still some hope for the West - it has not completely died) does not contradict mine.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. AP says:
    @Andrei Martyanov
    I am not going to bother to refute this concoction you wrote, but I would dare to point out that:

    which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.
     
    It is actually, the combined West which lost this very "full context", that is why it is not the "West" anymore.

    Your statement, which is mostly true (there is still some hope for the West – it has not completely died) does not contradict mine.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. AP says:
    @5371
    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography - perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.

    perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.

    Not a bad time. Better than the 21st, from the perspective of cultural “development,” a term that may not apply for the 21st.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. AP says:
    @5371
    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography - perpetually stuck in the early 19th century.

    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography – perpetually stuck in the early 19th century

    This was Samuel Huntington’s view of Russia btw:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=Iq75qmi3Og8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=huntington+russia+civilizations&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiz266m16HPAhUk6YMKHYdSD6oQuwUIHzAA#v=snippet&q=russia%20enl%3Bightenment&f=false

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov
    If you read my phrase from the post above, and I quote:

    The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo–is not West, is an ideological one
     
    This is a direct reference to Huntington's magnum opus. The Clash OF Civilizations, which I do have and read very many times, contains some great insights. It also contains some gaping lapses in Huntington's judgement (which is expected from a person who advocated Vietnam War and founded Foreign Policy magazine, which is a renown Russophobic outlet) and nowhere those mistakes, misjudgements and simple lack of knowledge manifest themselves more than when Huntington writes of Russia. While some Huntington theses were prescient (for Anglo-American public) and his book is a shining example of at least an attempt on honest scholarship (unlike its contemporary Fukuyama's delirium royale') one thing which is by now has an overwhelming empirical evidence it is the fact that "Western" so called "academe" has basically no clue about Russia. Nor any discussion about "western civilization" outside the framework of WW II has any academic or even human meaning. The "West" as Huntington's West does not exist anymore.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @AP

    [Russia was separated from the West by the Mongols and Tatars, and after throwing off the yoke after 2 centuries it developed on its own, missing most of the middle ages and Renaissance, jumping straight into the Enlightenment which it naturally adopted idiosyncratically without the full context.]

    Ah, svidomite historiography – perpetually stuck in the early 19th century
     
    This was Samuel Huntington's view of Russia btw:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=Iq75qmi3Og8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=huntington+russia+civilizations&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiz266m16HPAhUk6YMKHYdSD6oQuwUIHzAA#v=snippet&q=russia%20enl%3Bightenment&f=false

    If you read my phrase from the post above, and I quote:

    The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo–is not West, is an ideological one

    This is a direct reference to Huntington’s magnum opus. The Clash OF Civilizations, which I do have and read very many times, contains some great insights. It also contains some gaping lapses in Huntington’s judgement (which is expected from a person who advocated Vietnam War and founded Foreign Policy magazine, which is a renown Russophobic outlet) and nowhere those mistakes, misjudgements and simple lack of knowledge manifest themselves more than when Huntington writes of Russia. While some Huntington theses were prescient (for Anglo-American public) and his book is a shining example of at least an attempt on honest scholarship (unlike its contemporary Fukuyama’s delirium royale’) one thing which is by now has an overwhelming empirical evidence it is the fact that “Western” so called “academe” has basically no clue about Russia. Nor any discussion about “western civilization” outside the framework of WW II has any academic or even human meaning. The “West” as Huntington’s West does not exist anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    I do not advocate Huntington's POV regarding Russia completely (as I pointed out, Russia is a semi-Western country, not a non-Western one as he argues - your view is that is it fully Western?); he was also wrong in his categorization of Ukraine which unique among Orthodox countries spent centuries as part of the West.

    My response was simply to the absurd idea that what I had written represented being " stuck in the early 19th century" and some kind of Ukrainian thing. Huntington, a non-Ukrainian writing in the latter 20th century, expressed a more extreme view than what I had written.

    As for the West - it still exists, even if abandoned by much but not all of its elite. It is still much too early to write it off. The point of no return is at least a generation or two away.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. AP says:
    @Andrei Martyanov
    If you read my phrase from the post above, and I quote:

    The narrower distinction, such as this (per Huntington): West is what relates to papacy, East, such as Orthodox Civilization with Russia as a core state, is not, ergo–is not West, is an ideological one
     
    This is a direct reference to Huntington's magnum opus. The Clash OF Civilizations, which I do have and read very many times, contains some great insights. It also contains some gaping lapses in Huntington's judgement (which is expected from a person who advocated Vietnam War and founded Foreign Policy magazine, which is a renown Russophobic outlet) and nowhere those mistakes, misjudgements and simple lack of knowledge manifest themselves more than when Huntington writes of Russia. While some Huntington theses were prescient (for Anglo-American public) and his book is a shining example of at least an attempt on honest scholarship (unlike its contemporary Fukuyama's delirium royale') one thing which is by now has an overwhelming empirical evidence it is the fact that "Western" so called "academe" has basically no clue about Russia. Nor any discussion about "western civilization" outside the framework of WW II has any academic or even human meaning. The "West" as Huntington's West does not exist anymore.

    I do not advocate Huntington’s POV regarding Russia completely (as I pointed out, Russia is a semi-Western country, not a non-Western one as he argues – your view is that is it fully Western?); he was also wrong in his categorization of Ukraine which unique among Orthodox countries spent centuries as part of the West.

    My response was simply to the absurd idea that what I had written represented being ” stuck in the early 19th century” and some kind of Ukrainian thing. Huntington, a non-Ukrainian writing in the latter 20th century, expressed a more extreme view than what I had written.

    As for the West – it still exists, even if abandoned by much but not all of its elite. It is still much too early to write it off. The point of no return is at least a generation or two away.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website

    your view is that is it fully Western?

    No, my view is that Scruton’s definition of the West is precise. Other definitions are derivative. Having said that, the definition of the West is irrelevant at this stage anyway, what must be introduced in civilizational lingo is the North-North hemisphere white civilization.

    As for the West – it still exists, even if abandoned by much but not all of its elite. It is still much too early to write it off. The point of no return is at least a generation or two away.

    Let’s put it this way: Western Europe which is not the only embodiment of the West is pretty much done. I don’t think it has a will or energy to fight. Elena Chudinova was prescient in her The Mosque Of Notre-Dame De Paris. European “elites” overwhelmingly are treasonous and degenerate, including physically. The public largely is brainwashed as yesterday’s utter failure of the Day Of Children’s Birth in Italy has shown. Well, let’s face it–they will still organize some demonstrations, protests etc. But it is too late, the problem can not be solved therapeutically, only surgery and European emasculated species once known as men are not ready for it. March of Dutch men in skirts in support of their women is a manifestation of this defeat. Instead of, for starters, finding the rapists and as minimum breaking their knees with baseball bat and then hanging them by genitals on the tree, they march in skirts and in make up.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  21. AP says:

    Let’s put it this way: Western Europe which is not the only embodiment of the West is pretty much done.

    It’s to early to say that. It was finished as the center of the world in 1914. But it is not yet finished. I tend to agree with our mutual internet acquaintance Bardon on this issue. Only about 10% of France is Muslim, and already there is a significant political backlash, as there is in Germany. The response is roughly equal to the problem. If the problem grows, so might the response grow stronger. And in the end, if it comes down to it, will some North Africans ever be a match for truly outraged and activated Europeans? Obviously it would be better for there to be neither a flood of aliens nor the extremism that arises in response to such an invasion…

    And of course this problem has not even been allowed to start in Poland and Hungary, clearly Western countries as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    The response is roughly equal to the problem. If the problem grows, so might the response grow stronger. And in the end, if it comes down to it, will some North Africans ever be a match for truly outraged and activated Europeans?
     
    1. Against contemporary Europeans? I think they will be a match, especially when supported in organizational and tactical sense by already implanted and returning mujaheddin, who had a lot of practice in real combat. Russian proverb of "one beaten is worth two-unbeaten" applies here directly, in case of Western Europe the ratio grows dramatically: 1 to 5 or 7. Small detail, current Russian national soccer team sucks, it is a POS (hopefully on the road to recovery) but even all those "fearsome" English football hooligans had their ass handed to them time after time by massively outnumbered Russian fans. Here is the difference, initial conditioning.

    2. I don't think so that response is equal. As an example, in Sagra and Kondopoga it was equal, including by Russian combat veterans inviting Ramzan Kadyrov and his people to visit Kondopoga. Obviously they didn't. No one in Western Europe is capable of doing this. After inhuman atrocity against poor Lee Rigby in London what happened? Nothing. Right now France has at least 1.5-2.0 million of Muslims who are devout followers of Sharia. Guess three times who will be, when push comes to shove, more ready to die--some humanities-"educated" emasculated loser hipster from Paris, who never held a gun in his life, or the guy who largely is ready to die and not only can use but, most likely, already has some weapons stashed somewhere? European intelligence services are pathetic in a broad sense--the empirical evidence to this effect is overwhelming.

    Now, after having said all that, does my heart bleed, while saying this, for European folks? Absolutely, I wish I am hundred times wrong and I will only be happy to be, but I can not ignore reality anymore. Again, to become "outraged and activated" is not enough, one has to have a very good understanding of what and how to do--this takes time and conditions unlike anything Western Europe has for people to grow balls. One, also, has to have values which are absorbed from the people (nation) which is dear to one. Bearded Conchita Wurst is contemporary European value and that is a reality.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. Andrei Martyanov [AKA "SmoothieX12"] says: • Website
    @AP

    Let’s put it this way: Western Europe which is not the only embodiment of the West is pretty much done.
     
    It's to early to say that. It was finished as the center of the world in 1914. But it is not yet finished. I tend to agree with our mutual internet acquaintance Bardon on this issue. Only about 10% of France is Muslim, and already there is a significant political backlash, as there is in Germany. The response is roughly equal to the problem. If the problem grows, so might the response grow stronger. And in the end, if it comes down to it, will some North Africans ever be a match for truly outraged and activated Europeans? Obviously it would be better for there to be neither a flood of aliens nor the extremism that arises in response to such an invasion...

    And of course this problem has not even been allowed to start in Poland and Hungary, clearly Western countries as well.

    The response is roughly equal to the problem. If the problem grows, so might the response grow stronger. And in the end, if it comes down to it, will some North Africans ever be a match for truly outraged and activated Europeans?

    1. Against contemporary Europeans? I think they will be a match, especially when supported in organizational and tactical sense by already implanted and returning mujaheddin, who had a lot of practice in real combat. Russian proverb of “one beaten is worth two-unbeaten” applies here directly, in case of Western Europe the ratio grows dramatically: 1 to 5 or 7. Small detail, current Russian national soccer team sucks, it is a POS (hopefully on the road to recovery) but even all those “fearsome” English football hooligans had their ass handed to them time after time by massively outnumbered Russian fans. Here is the difference, initial conditioning.

    2. I don’t think so that response is equal. As an example, in Sagra and Kondopoga it was equal, including by Russian combat veterans inviting Ramzan Kadyrov and his people to visit Kondopoga. Obviously they didn’t. No one in Western Europe is capable of doing this. After inhuman atrocity against poor Lee Rigby in London what happened? Nothing. Right now France has at least 1.5-2.0 million of Muslims who are devout followers of Sharia. Guess three times who will be, when push comes to shove, more ready to die–some humanities-”educated” emasculated loser hipster from Paris, who never held a gun in his life, or the guy who largely is ready to die and not only can use but, most likely, already has some weapons stashed somewhere? European intelligence services are pathetic in a broad sense–the empirical evidence to this effect is overwhelming.

    Now, after having said all that, does my heart bleed, while saying this, for European folks? Absolutely, I wish I am hundred times wrong and I will only be happy to be, but I can not ignore reality anymore. Again, to become “outraged and activated” is not enough, one has to have a very good understanding of what and how to do–this takes time and conditions unlike anything Western Europe has for people to grow balls. One, also, has to have values which are absorbed from the people (nation) which is dear to one. Bearded Conchita Wurst is contemporary European value and that is a reality.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Philip Owen
    Have you never heard of Tatu or Verka Serduchka, a "little Russian". Kerkiroff come to that?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. @Andrei Martyanov

    You mean Scruton. For a few years, I followed Scruton closely because he left me a very positive impression. That ended when I realised he is on the ideological wing of Western bloodthirsty imperialism, – including being blindly anti-Russian.
     
    Thanks for correction. Yes, exactly him. He may be anti-Russian but his definition of the West is solid, to put it mildly. Defining roots of Western Civilization in God of Israel, Roman Law and Greek Culture is correct. Zbig Brzezinski is a rabid Russophobe but he states, correctly, that Russian Orthodoxy being an offspring of Byzantium makes it a "west". Russians are fundamentally European people not just in outlook but in what matters most--behavioral matrix which is in the foundation of the culture. All three elements Scruton lists are not just present but omnipresent in Russian people. Having an "Asian" streak in European people doesn't make them Asian. But all this opens a whole another discussion on the meaning of the West today. As Robert Reilly correctly states: modern "West" (that is Western Europe and US) is almost at the point of no return in its cancerous process of de-Hellenization. He IS correct. Viewed from these positions--Russia IS NOT the "West" and thank God for that. Today, Russians are, as I already mentioned, on the order of magnitude freer people than Germans or Dutch. Fvorite West's shtick of rationality is, frankly, a preposterous claim--it is dead.

    Yes. … If you can throw a suggestion of books for learning about that impact, please do.
     
    You may start with reviewing math, physics, chemistry and, say, geography standard textbooks starting from the 7th grade of Soviet public schools starting somewhere from late 1950s. USSR was the most educated country in the world by 1960s. It was the most read country too.

    Try also this:

    https://www.amazon.com/What-Ivan-Knows-Johnny-Doesnt/dp/4871876993

    Those could be very good primers. Knowing actual history of the Soviet Union could also help but that will require breaking some very rigid stereotypes. Knowing USSR of 1960s through 1980s is altogether beyond the grasp of Western scholarship which exists on the foundation of views of Soviet dissidents and people who "sold" to them what they wanted to hear. The impact of the Great Patriotic War is totally beyond the grasp of the West. Most (not all) of what is written on Cold War in the West is Clansiesque BS. Start watching Soviet cinematography which produced such masterpieces as Bondarchuk's War And Peace and Klimov's Come And See, among very many. My point is: there is no grasp of Russian culture (high and low) and with it of the Russian state in the West, bar some minor exceptions who have very little influence in policy-setting circles. But let me put it this way: for many assertive "westerners" visiting State Hermitage, Christ The Savior Cathedral or Piskarevskoye Cemetery could be a very humbling experience to put it mildly and an impetus (for many) for questioning their "westernism".

    As an employer of the results of 1950′s and 60′s Russian education, I do not entirely agree with your comments, particularly geography which was quite restrained by political considerations so far as I can tell. Maths, physics, chemistry, languages (especially safe 19th C literature) maybe.

    And 30 years too late to meet the English Football Hooligans.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. @Andrei Martyanov

    The response is roughly equal to the problem. If the problem grows, so might the response grow stronger. And in the end, if it comes down to it, will some North Africans ever be a match for truly outraged and activated Europeans?
     
    1. Against contemporary Europeans? I think they will be a match, especially when supported in organizational and tactical sense by already implanted and returning mujaheddin, who had a lot of practice in real combat. Russian proverb of "one beaten is worth two-unbeaten" applies here directly, in case of Western Europe the ratio grows dramatically: 1 to 5 or 7. Small detail, current Russian national soccer team sucks, it is a POS (hopefully on the road to recovery) but even all those "fearsome" English football hooligans had their ass handed to them time after time by massively outnumbered Russian fans. Here is the difference, initial conditioning.

    2. I don't think so that response is equal. As an example, in Sagra and Kondopoga it was equal, including by Russian combat veterans inviting Ramzan Kadyrov and his people to visit Kondopoga. Obviously they didn't. No one in Western Europe is capable of doing this. After inhuman atrocity against poor Lee Rigby in London what happened? Nothing. Right now France has at least 1.5-2.0 million of Muslims who are devout followers of Sharia. Guess three times who will be, when push comes to shove, more ready to die--some humanities-"educated" emasculated loser hipster from Paris, who never held a gun in his life, or the guy who largely is ready to die and not only can use but, most likely, already has some weapons stashed somewhere? European intelligence services are pathetic in a broad sense--the empirical evidence to this effect is overwhelming.

    Now, after having said all that, does my heart bleed, while saying this, for European folks? Absolutely, I wish I am hundred times wrong and I will only be happy to be, but I can not ignore reality anymore. Again, to become "outraged and activated" is not enough, one has to have a very good understanding of what and how to do--this takes time and conditions unlike anything Western Europe has for people to grow balls. One, also, has to have values which are absorbed from the people (nation) which is dear to one. Bearded Conchita Wurst is contemporary European value and that is a reality.

    Have you never heard of Tatu or Verka Serduchka, a “little Russian”. Kerkiroff come to that?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
Current Commenter says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All The Saker Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007