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A Few Initial Short Thoughts on the Murder of the Russian Ambassador to Ankara
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Okay, so tonight we have the name of the assassin, it is Mevlut Mert Aydintas, a 22 year old policeman who had been recently fired following the anti-Gulenist crackdown of Erdogan against the forces which had attempted to overthrow him recently. We also have a very useful video of the murder.

That video of the attack also shows something very important: the only shots fired are those fired by the assassin. See for yourself:

What this means is one of two things:

Version 1: there was nobody in charge of security at this exhibition

Version 2: the room where this murder happened was considered ‘safe/sterile’ because it was inside an outer security perimeter which we don’t see in this video.

I find version 2 far more likely. That would also explain why and how Mevlut Mert Aydintas so easily got it: he simply flashed his police ID and was let through.

When such an event occurs it is also important to ask cui bono – whom does it benefit?

Erdogan? No.

I see absolutely no imaginable reason why Erdogan would want the Russian Ambassador murdered in Ankara, but I can easily imagine a long list of reasons why he would not want that to happen at all. Some will correctly say that the fall of Aleppo is a humiliating defeat for Turkey and Erdogan, and I agree. But I would remind everybody that Erdogan clearly had a deal going with the Russians and the Iranians when he moved his forces across the border and occupied northern Syria. There is *no way* he would have risked such a move against the will of Moscow and Tehran. So what was this deal? We will probably never know, but it clearly included a provision which limited Turkey’s actions to a narrow strip in the north. If that hypothesis is correct, then Aleppo would have to be considered outside the “Turkish sphere of interest” in Syria, at least by the tripartite Turkish-Iranian-Russian understanding. Did Erdogan know that Aleppo would fall and would fall so fast? Probably not. It appears that Erdogan got outmaneuvered by the Russians and the Iranians. But he most definitely had better options to retaliate against the liberation of Aleppo than to have the Russian Ambassador murdered in Ankara. The fact is that the Turks did precious little when Aleppo was liberated, at most they helped the Russian evacuate part of the “good terrorists”.

Even if Erdogan is a lunatic, he is smart enough to understand that if he has the Russian Ambassador murdered in Ankara NATO will do nothing to protect him and that the Russians can fire a cruise missile right into his bedroom window. Erdogan might be crazy, but he is clearly not *that* crazy.

Finally, let’s remember the disastrous consequences for Turkey following the shooting down of the Russian SU-24 and the fact that, by numerous corroborated accounts, the Russian intelligences services saved Erdogan, probably literally, by warning him of the coup against him.

So, for all these reasons, Erdogan is not on my current list of suspects. Never say never, new facts might come to light, especially with a maniac like Erdogan, but right now I will assume that he has nothing to do with what happened.

Daesh & Co? Maybe.

Well, it is rather obvious that the Daesh & Co. had an extremely long list of reasons to want to kill a high profile Russian official. So yes, they sure had the motive. Considering how successful radical Islamist extremists have been at penetrating the Turkish deep (and not so deep) state, Daesh and Co. also had the means. As for the opportunity, the video above clearly shows that not only did Mevlut Mert Aydintas have the time to shoot the Russian Ambassador many times (I counted 9 shots), but after that he still had the time to just stand there and scream all sorts of slogans about Syria, Aleppo and God. While we don’t know all the details yet, this is already very strong evidence that security at this event was dismal.

Gulen, the CIA, Obama & Co? Maybe.

Yes, they are also on my list of suspects. The Gulenists have nothing to lose, the CIA has gone crazy with anger and fear at the election of Trump, and the Obama Administration is full of angry, offended, deeply vindicative and otherwise plain nasty characters who would love to trigger a new crisis between Russia and Turkey or make the Russian pay in some way for humiliating the AngloZionist Empire in Aleppo. Keep in mind that this is exactly how the CIA always kills foreign dignitaries: by subcontracting the murder to a local fanatic so as to preserve what they call “plausible deniability”.

During the Cold War the Soviets and the Americans had an unwritten understanding that “we don’t kill each other”. It was never formally mentioned or otherwise acknowledged, but I assure you that it was real: neither side wanted an open ended escalation of assassinations and counter-assassinations. But today’s CIA is a pathetic joke compared to the CIA of the Cold War, and with hodge-podge of mediocre dimwits now in the Executive branch I would not put it past some idiot in Langley to approve of the murder of a Russian Ambassador. Besides, if the Americans were crazy and reckless enough to attempt to overthrow Erdogan, why would they not try to murder a Russian Ambassador?

What about the lone gunman hypothesis?

ORDER IT NOW

Well, it is impossible to prove a negative. Mevlut Mert Aydintas did lose his job in a recent purge, he did have police credentials and his actions on the video seem to be a textbook example of the kind of fanatical behavior a lone nutcase would display. So yes, it is possible that Mevlut Mert Aydintas acted alone. After all, all he needed was a gun and a police ID. Let’s see what the Turks, and the Russians, find out about him. Still, I doubt it. That kind of personality is usually identified by state sponsoring terrorism and then activated when needed. My gut tells me that he did not just act alone. Somebody probably used Mevlut Mert Aydintas.

Painful questions

Here I really hope that I am wrong, but if I want to be honest I have to admit that I am completely unable to find an excuse of the lax security around Ambassador Andrey Karlov. And I am not referring to the Turks here, I am referring to the Russian security services. Here is why.

Even if we assume that the Turks had told the Russians that they had established a ‘safe/sterile’ perimeter around the exhibit and that the general public would not be let in, the footage shows what appears to be only a few guests, there is no excuse for the Russian not to have at least one bodyguard in the immediate proximity to the Ambassador. Turkey is not only a country at war, but Russia is a party to that war, the Takfiris have made a very long list of threats against Russia and, finally, Turkey is a country which has suffered from terrorism for years and which has just suffered a bloody attempted coup. In a country like that a top official like an Ambassador should have been protected by an entire group of bodyguards, but in this case there was clearly nobody. Oh sure, the Russian can blame the Turks for having set up a crappy perimeter, but as professionals they should know that the Turks are already having extreme difficulties in dealing with their own terrorists and that following the massive purges the security services are in a state of chaos. Would one bodyguard have made a difference?

Yes, possibly. Probably in fact.

From the video it appears that Mevlut Mert Aydintas was standing about 5 meter behind Ambassador Karlov when he opened fire. Apparently, not a single of the shots hit the Ambassador’s head. If Ambassador Karlov had been wearing a flack jacket or any other type of body armor he would have probably survived that first volley of bullets (unless one hit the cervicals). One single bodyguard could then have easily killed Mevlut Mert Aydintas and evacuated the ambassador to safety. Evidently Karlov was not wearing any kind of body armor that day. Why? He did not have a single bodyguard next to him. Why? No Russian voices are heard on the video, so there appears to have been no Russian security anywhere near the ambassador. Why?

Normally, ambassadors are a very easy target. Everybody knows them, their routine is public and, contrary to what many seem to think, most of them have no security detail. I am absolutely amazed that more ambassadors are not killed regularly. In high risk countries, however, ambassadors are normally protected, especially ambassadors representing countries involved in a war or who are likely targets of terrorist attacks. True, as a rule, the Russians, including diplomats, tend to be more brave/reckless (pick the term) than their western counterparts: they don’t scare easy and they like to show that they are not afraid. But that kind of attitude needs to be kept in check by professionals.

Frankly, it makes me angry to see how many Russians have been killed by that lax attitude towards personal risk and security. Yes, it is very noble to be courageous, but to die killed by a manic is also plain dumb. I would feel much better if Russian officials and politicians would be a little less courageous and a little more careful. Because what happened today begs the question: who will it be the next time?

Conclusions

What happened today is a tragedy made twice as painful by the fact that it could probably have been avoided. The Turkish security services will probably arrest overnight pretty much anybody and everybody Mevlut Mert Aydintas has ever met, and they will get lots of confessions. I am pretty sure that they will share a lot of that data with the Russians, if only to show how sorry they are. Alas, both the Turks and the Russians have an long tradition of secrecy and we might never find out who, if anybody, really was behind Mevlut Mert Aydintas.

The only thing I am sure of is that Putin will do nothing harsh regardless of who is behind this murder. If it is the Takfiris, then the people involved will die in the next couple of years. If the CIA is involved, however, the Russians will be much more careful and might chose to act in a very different way, possibly through the next Administration. The murder of Ambassador Karlov will not succeed in derailing the Russian and Iranian efforts at getting some kind of a regional solution to the war in Syria, nor will it change the Russian determination to prevent the AngloZionst Empire of turning Syrian into yet another Takfiristan.

As for Russia and Turkey, as long as Erdogan remains in power they will continue to try to collaborate against the odds and in spite of deep and fundamental differences. Neither Russia nor Turkey, which have fought each other in twelve wars, have any other option.

(Republished from Vineyard of the Saker by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Russia, Turkey 
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  1. utu says:

    “Well, it is impossible to prove a negative. ”

    Could somebody give me an example of a negative that is impossible to be proven. I keep hearing this cliche being repeated thoughtlessly by many.

    Read More
    • Agree: antipater_1
    • Replies: @Exudd1
    The one that comes to mind is the persistent and impossible American demand, preceding its invasion and war on the Iraqi nation, that Saddam Hussian prove that he was NOT hiding WMDs in the Iraqi dessert.
    , @Exudd1
    The one that immediately comes to mind is the persistent and impossible American demand, preceding its invasion and war on the Iraqi nation, that Saddam Hussian prove that he was NOT hiding WMDs in the Iraqi desert.
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  2. Some initial thoughts, on watching the video:

    1.) the cameraman makes good and sure his wide shot is in focus before beating his retreat, notwithstanding there’s a crazed gunman some five feet in front of him, and

    2.) whatever security force there may be on site, in a full fifty seconds after multiple shots are fired not one of them takes the initiative to actually show up.

    And for your bonus point, the gunman stands around for those fifty seconds, just waiting for someone to come and shoot him. Can you say “false flag”? Maybe not. But I could film a more believable “assassination” in my sleep.

    Read More
  3. Max Payne says:

    Jesus. It costs like $150 USD to hire a bodyguard in Turkey for a day. Come on Russia, just dish out some cash to your ambassadors if you don’t want to supply the personnel.

    On a side note: looks like terrorist season just rolled in. Ankara, Berlin, Cairo… I think there might be a few more before the years end.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
    Of course there will be more terrorism, things are not going according to the globalist's plan. With enough terror causing chaos the sheeple will scream, "Please protect me", and the 'security' infrastructure already in place will accomplish what was desired to begin with.

    Wasn't it David Rockefeller who said, "We shall have global government whether by consent or by conquest"?
  4. If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.

    Killing an Ambassador is a major event and is an act of war. Allowing to happen is no better.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RobinG
    "If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey."

    You see, if we wait long enough, even QM will contribute something rational. Question is, why didn't Saker pick up on this? Probably not a problem to get a weapon, but surely they would have confiscated his badge. Well, maybe he didn't need one. Maybe there was no perimeter. Karlov, it is said, was known for eschewing security.

    But why doesn't Saker, the religious expert, address why a Gulen adherent supports the Takfiris of DAESH? (Or was that 'Aleppo' business a cover, and he just wanted trouble for Erdogan?) Is Gulen as anti-Assad as Erdogan? Maybe this is obvious, but how about some benevolence for us uninformed.
    , @Jim Christian

    Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.
     
    That's a laugh. Turkey is wild, wild West. I have associates with family that are military in the Navy that were on liberty in Istanbul when they were accosted by retard Muslims on the pier. Some of these U.S. sailors had hoods pulled over their heads and were punched, kicked and pissed on, all under gunpoint right under the eyes of U.S. Navy Shore Patrol, held at bay by Turks with guns. A NATO "ally", Turkey permitted these mutts to hassle our guys over there, even while "welcoming" them to do port visits. Those in the town said every citizen there carried handguns and/or AK-47's slung over their shoulders.

    Turks are filthy assholes all on their own, Muslim or no. These are people better off abandoned by the U.S. and NATO and the U.N. frankly, because they're mentally unstable and when you deal with assholes like this, you risk shit like what happened with the Russian ambassador every single day. Turk's greatest contribution to humanity would be if they were nuked out and the entire population eliminated.

    Turks are some seriously fucked up assholes. Consort with them at your own risk. They don't give two fucks. They may be the lowest, most treacherous, backstabbing and filthy piece of humanity there is. Shame on the Russians for leaving their guy uncovered.

  5. Exudd1 says:
    @utu
    "Well, it is impossible to prove a negative. "

    Could somebody give me an example of a negative that is impossible to be proven. I keep hearing this cliche being repeated thoughtlessly by many.

    The one that comes to mind is the persistent and impossible American demand, preceding its invasion and war on the Iraqi nation, that Saddam Hussian prove that he was NOT hiding WMDs in the Iraqi dessert.

    Read More
  6. Exudd1 says:
    @utu
    "Well, it is impossible to prove a negative. "

    Could somebody give me an example of a negative that is impossible to be proven. I keep hearing this cliche being repeated thoughtlessly by many.

    The one that immediately comes to mind is the persistent and impossible American demand, preceding its invasion and war on the Iraqi nation, that Saddam Hussian prove that he was NOT hiding WMDs in the Iraqi desert.

    Read More
  7. Greg Bacon says: • Website

    This reeks of an inside job. Not only did the alleged shooter gain access with a gun, he was able to spout BS while standing over the dead ambassador. Where in hell was the security detail and why didn’t they wound him, instead of doing the cardinal rule of assassinations, kill the assassin so he/she can’t talk.

    As for suspects, John Kirby of the US State Department had threatened Russia with sending their people home in body bags, ditto for Horse face. And Dear Leader made threats against Russia for upsetting their wonderful war against Syria.

    Read More
  8. RobinG says:
    @Quartermaster
    If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don't think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.

    Killing an Ambassador is a major event and is an act of war. Allowing to happen is no better.

    If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.”

    You see, if we wait long enough, even QM will contribute something rational. Question is, why didn’t Saker pick up on this? Probably not a problem to get a weapon, but surely they would have confiscated his badge. Well, maybe he didn’t need one. Maybe there was no perimeter. Karlov, it is said, was known for eschewing security.

    But why doesn’t Saker, the religious expert, address why a Gulen adherent supports the Takfiris of DAESH? (Or was that ‘Aleppo’ business a cover, and he just wanted trouble for Erdogan?) Is Gulen as anti-Assad as Erdogan? Maybe this is obvious, but how about some benevolence for us uninformed.

    Read More
  9. One fact that should be corrected is that he was not fired or purged for being a Gulenist. It is established that was on active duty, after just two hours of the incident, with screenshots from the actual database of police forces, and with all ID data. May be he is a Gulenist, may be not but the fact remains. As a side note, he had joined the force after the Gulenists and Erdogan broke up. It is another well known fact that without a reference from the ruling AKP circles (read “radical islamic NGOs and such”) it would have been very very difficult for him to be accepted, if not impossible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Avery
    {It is established that was on active duty, after just two hours of the incident, }

    You mean two house before the attack he was on active duty.
  10. anonymous says:

    The assassin is dead so no information will be forthcoming from him. The Turks will just spin this to their greatest advantage. Another round of crackdowns and purges against those unenthusiastic about Erdogan with him posturing as the great and noble leader. Does anyone really believe the Turks would actually lay out the facts as they know them? They’re not in the truth reporting business, they’re in the what’s good for them business.

    Read More
  11. Avery says:
    @TurkishCitizen
    One fact that should be corrected is that he was not fired or purged for being a Gulenist. It is established that was on active duty, after just two hours of the incident, with screenshots from the actual database of police forces, and with all ID data. May be he is a Gulenist, may be not but the fact remains. As a side note, he had joined the force after the Gulenists and Erdogan broke up. It is another well known fact that without a reference from the ruling AKP circles (read "radical islamic NGOs and such") it would have been very very difficult for him to be accepted, if not impossible.

    {It is established that was on active duty, after just two hours of the incident, }

    You mean two house before the attack he was on active duty.

    Read More
  12. Svigor says:

    Gulen, the CIA, Obama & Co? Maybe.

    Seems a bit loony.

    Keep in mind that this is exactly how the CIA always kills foreign dignitaries: by subcontracting the murder to a local fanatic so as to preserve what they call “plausible deniability”.

    What’s the going rate for assassination of an ambassador, with suicide-by-cop for dessert? The guy made no attempt to escape, clearly wanted to die a martyr. You don’t “contract” that sort of thing.

    Let’s be honest, here: it’s more likely that the Russians assassinated their own ambassador (false flag! false flag! false flag!), than the CIA did it. High-profile assassinations of political figures is way more the Russians’ style.

    You Russian shills are a hoot.

    Here I really hope that I am wrong, but if I want to be honest I have to admit that I am completely unable to find an excuse of the lax security around Ambassador Andrey Karlov. And I am not referring to the Turks here, I am referring to the Russian security services. Here is why.

    Because it’s dumb to leave your ambassador unprotected in a nutcas country like Turkey, that’s why.

    From the video it appears that Mevlut Mert Aydintas was standing about 5 meter behind Ambassador Karlov when he opened fire. Apparently, not a single of the shots hit the Ambassador’s head. If Ambassador Karlov had been wearing a flack jacket or any other type of body armor he would have probably survived that first volley of bullets (unless one hit the cervicals). One single bodyguard could then have easily killed Mevlut Mert Aydintas and evacuated the ambassador to safety. Evidently Karlov was not wearing any kind of body armor that day. Why? He did not have a single bodyguard next to him. Why? No Russian voices are heard on the video, so there appears to have been no Russian security anywhere near the ambassador. Why?

    False flag! False flag! False flag!

    The Russians killed their own ambassador! The Russians killed their own ambassador! The Russians killed their own ambassador!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sean c
    You dont contract with the actual assassin, but with the radical group he is with. Basically the CIA would be paying the leader or create the group themselves and then order the true believers around. You can see this here in the US when they bust terrorist rings or groups like the black panthers its always some sort of paid government agent leading them.
  13. Svigor says:

    Could somebody give me an example of a negative that is impossible to be proven. I keep hearing this cliche being repeated thoughtlessly by many.

    Santa Claus does not exist.
    The Easter Bunny does not exist.
    The Emerald City is not a real place.

    This is why innocent until proven guilty is a thing.

    Read More
  14. Svigor says:

    And for your bonus point, the gunman stands around for those fifty seconds, just waiting for someone to come and shoot him. Can you say “false flag”? Maybe not. But I could film a more believable “assassination” in my sleep.

    Which is why it’s almost certainly an actual assassination, and “truth is stranger than fiction” is a thing. Reality seldom falls as neatly into place as fiction.

    Read More
  15. Svigor says:

    If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.

    This guy was almost certainly a jihadist nut, which is why he stuck around waiting for his martyrdom, and might even be why he was purged.

    Getting a second ID is as easy as “losing” your first ID.

    But hey, he was probably only a jihadist, with every reason to do something like lose his ID and tuck it away for a rainy day (say, to be copied by his homeboy the jihadi forger), what do I know?

    Going armed in Turkey is as easy as strapping on your gun. It may get you caught in the long run, but I doubt it’s any harder to violate that law for a day in Turkey, than it is in many places around the world.

    I feel like an idiot, explaining the simple stuff in these threads. Nobody else bothers.

    Read More
  16. Svigor says:

    Hey, Saker says the Russians tipped Erdogan off about the coup attempt; that means the coup attempt was a Russian operation! It was all Putin’s master plan to bring Turkey into their orbit.

    Read More
  17. Svigor says:

    This reeks of an inside job. Not only did the alleged shooter gain access with a gun, he was able to spout BS while standing over the dead ambassador. Where in hell was the security detail and why didn’t they wound him, instead of doing the cardinal rule of assassinations, kill the assassin so he/she can’t talk.

    As for suspects, John Kirby of the US State Department had threatened Russia with sending their people home in body bags, ditto for Horse face. And Dear Leader made threats against Russia for upsetting their wonderful war against Syria.

    It reeks of an inside job, but the suspects are all US gov’t employees.

    So you’re saying Karlov was the AMERICAN ambassador to Turkey???

    Read More
  18. @Max Payne
    Jesus. It costs like $150 USD to hire a bodyguard in Turkey for a day. Come on Russia, just dish out some cash to your ambassadors if you don't want to supply the personnel.

    On a side note: looks like terrorist season just rolled in. Ankara, Berlin, Cairo... I think there might be a few more before the years end.

    Of course there will be more terrorism, things are not going according to the globalist’s plan. With enough terror causing chaos the sheeple will scream, “Please protect me”, and the ‘security’ infrastructure already in place will accomplish what was desired to begin with.

    Wasn’t it David Rockefeller who said, “We shall have global government whether by consent or by conquest”?

    Read More
  19. alexander says:

    Interesting thoughts, Saker,

    I am curious why the ambassador chose an “art exhibition” as a venue to give a speech.

    Is there any background on that ?

    Was the exhibit designed around a specific motif that lent itself to the ambassadorship attending ?……were proceeds from the sales going to sponsor a specific cause ?

    Does anyone know what he was planning to say ?

    Also, I am curious to find out if its true that no previous Russian ambassador had ever been assassinated since 1829 .

    Does anyone know if that is not the case ?

    As of writing this, there seems to have been a second shooting of a Russian ambassador, this time in Moscow.

    No Russian ambassadors assassinated in nearly two centuries….then in the space of twenty four hours, two are found shot.

    Somebody seems to be sending a message.

    Since ambassadors signify “diplomacy” and by extension “peace”,then wouldn’t the simplest interpretation of these killings be that whomever is responsible does not want diplomacy, peace or good relations with Russia ?

    Isn’t that the clearest message being sent ?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Concerned Citizen
    The motif of the art gallery was "Russia as seen by the Turks", that's why he was there. As part of the improving Russian- Turkish relations.
  20. jeremy says:

    You say 9 shots. If you watch carefully you see the ambassador is still alive and (barely) moving while the assassin makes his speech (check out one of his arms)

    As the audience moves out you hear a final shot – I assume a coup-de-grace

    Read More
  21. Sean c says:
    @Svigor

    Gulen, the CIA, Obama & Co? Maybe.
     
    Seems a bit loony.

    Keep in mind that this is exactly how the CIA always kills foreign dignitaries: by subcontracting the murder to a local fanatic so as to preserve what they call “plausible deniability”.
     
    What's the going rate for assassination of an ambassador, with suicide-by-cop for dessert? The guy made no attempt to escape, clearly wanted to die a martyr. You don't "contract" that sort of thing.

    Let's be honest, here: it's more likely that the Russians assassinated their own ambassador (false flag! false flag! false flag!), than the CIA did it. High-profile assassinations of political figures is way more the Russians' style.

    You Russian shills are a hoot.

    Here I really hope that I am wrong, but if I want to be honest I have to admit that I am completely unable to find an excuse of the lax security around Ambassador Andrey Karlov. And I am not referring to the Turks here, I am referring to the Russian security services. Here is why.
     
    Because it's dumb to leave your ambassador unprotected in a nutcas country like Turkey, that's why.

    From the video it appears that Mevlut Mert Aydintas was standing about 5 meter behind Ambassador Karlov when he opened fire. Apparently, not a single of the shots hit the Ambassador’s head. If Ambassador Karlov had been wearing a flack jacket or any other type of body armor he would have probably survived that first volley of bullets (unless one hit the cervicals). One single bodyguard could then have easily killed Mevlut Mert Aydintas and evacuated the ambassador to safety. Evidently Karlov was not wearing any kind of body armor that day. Why? He did not have a single bodyguard next to him. Why? No Russian voices are heard on the video, so there appears to have been no Russian security anywhere near the ambassador. Why?
     
    False flag! False flag! False flag!

    The Russians killed their own ambassador! The Russians killed their own ambassador! The Russians killed their own ambassador!

    You dont contract with the actual assassin, but with the radical group he is with. Basically the CIA would be paying the leader or create the group themselves and then order the true believers around. You can see this here in the US when they bust terrorist rings or groups like the black panthers its always some sort of paid government agent leading them.

    Read More
  22. Gavrilo says:

    Where’s the blood? Just askin’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @alexander
    Yes, Gavrillo,

    Where IS the blood ?

    It seems, also, that the ambassadors left shirt lapel gets blown open upon one of the shots being fired through his upper back....as though the force of the bullet pushing through his body propels it open......but no explosive splatter of blood from the exit wound....just a strong gush of air (?).


    I am not an expert on these things...but I would imagine with so many shots fired at such close range, it would produce at least one small splatter (or drop) of blood somewhere.


    It does present itself as a "bloodless" crime scene, doesn't it ?.... Somehow strangely " pre-sanitized" for public release.
  23. @Quartermaster
    If the killer had been fired/purged, why did he have Police ID? Why was he armed? I don't think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.

    Killing an Ambassador is a major event and is an act of war. Allowing to happen is no better.

    Why was he armed? I don’t think just anyone can go armed in Turkey.

    That’s a laugh. Turkey is wild, wild West. I have associates with family that are military in the Navy that were on liberty in Istanbul when they were accosted by retard Muslims on the pier. Some of these U.S. sailors had hoods pulled over their heads and were punched, kicked and pissed on, all under gunpoint right under the eyes of U.S. Navy Shore Patrol, held at bay by Turks with guns. A NATO “ally”, Turkey permitted these mutts to hassle our guys over there, even while “welcoming” them to do port visits. Those in the town said every citizen there carried handguns and/or AK-47′s slung over their shoulders.

    Turks are filthy assholes all on their own, Muslim or no. These are people better off abandoned by the U.S. and NATO and the U.N. frankly, because they’re mentally unstable and when you deal with assholes like this, you risk shit like what happened with the Russian ambassador every single day. Turk’s greatest contribution to humanity would be if they were nuked out and the entire population eliminated.

    Turks are some seriously fucked up assholes. Consort with them at your own risk. They don’t give two fucks. They may be the lowest, most treacherous, backstabbing and filthy piece of humanity there is. Shame on the Russians for leaving their guy uncovered.

    Read More
  24. alexander says:
    @Gavrilo
    Where's the blood? Just askin'.

    Yes, Gavrillo,

    Where IS the blood ?

    It seems, also, that the ambassadors left shirt lapel gets blown open upon one of the shots being fired through his upper back….as though the force of the bullet pushing through his body propels it open……but no explosive splatter of blood from the exit wound….just a strong gush of air (?).

    I am not an expert on these things…but I would imagine with so many shots fired at such close range, it would produce at least one small splatter (or drop) of blood somewhere.

    It does present itself as a “bloodless” crime scene, doesn’t it ?…. Somehow strangely ” pre-sanitized” for public release.

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  25. Perhaps it’s just a coincidence, but virtually simultaneous to the execution of the Russian ambassador to Turkey the Syrian army located and arrested about two dozen coalition military officers in a basement in now-liberated Aleppo. These appear to be field officers who were in Aleppo training and guiding the resistance.

    The group was mostly Saudi but also includes an Israeli and an American.

    Nothing in politics happens by accident, not even coincidences.

    LF

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  26. Kiza says:

    One thing Saker forgot to mention in these quick thoughts is the timing if this incident – one day before the important meeting on Syria, as if to sabotage this meeting. Putin said as much himself.

    Regarding security, even if the Russian envoy (was he an accredited ambassador or not yet) did not like security, the Western rule is that it is not up to the government official to decide. As a government representative his security is an issue of his government not of his own. Therefore, Russia has to blame itself for this as much as for the shootdown of SU24 bomber. As I wrote at the time about Putin’s comment – it takes a fool to turn his back to an obvious enemy. I would not presume to blame Putin for such outcomes, but on the fringes Russia appears to still suffer from Yeltsin’s malady – chaos, sloppiness and irresponsibility.

    I wish this was a false flag as one persistent idiot here claims. Unfortunately, this is unlikely. My own best guess is that this was organised by the same people who organised SU24 shootdown, both acts used local assets but looked professionally organised. Since 911, the Saudis and CIA appear to have been working well together. The Russians really need to pick up their game, Putin cannot manage everything personally, or many more will keep coming home in body bags, even under the non-confrontational President Trump. The wounded egos on the US and Israeli side will always seek avenues for revenge for Putin’s and Russian successes which wounded them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Parbes
    Putin should start knocking off some of the jihadi-supporting-and-directing U.S./British/Turkish/Saudi/Israeli terror masterminds and their operatives on an individual basis, via covert ops, proxies, unexpected attacks, and staged execution/assassinations - just like THEY are doing to Russians. Besides being the most fitting retaliation and revenge, that would really TERRIFY and incapacitate these scum, who are used to the idea they can do whatever they want with impunity and with no fear of consequences.
  27. Svigor says:

    You dont contract with the actual assassin, but with the radical group he is with. Basically the CIA would be paying the leader or create the group themselves and then order the true believers around. You can see this here in the US when they bust terrorist rings or groups like the black panthers its always some sort of paid government agent leading them.

    You can’t really “contract” people to create martyrs, either. Best you can do is find a group prone to creating them, and pick a target for them, one they already agree on as a suitable target. Basically, you’re paying them to shuffle their target queue for you. Meaning, you’re a second fiddle in the act. You’re colluding, not masterminding.

    Where’s the blood? Just askin’.

    That’s a reasonable question. He was supposedly shot in the back, and he is shown lying on his back, so maybe the blood is beneath him, soaking into his shirt and jacket. The photos were taken moments after he fell. I wouldn’t be surprised if subsequent photos showed a pool of blood around him. He died quickly, so his heart probably stopped pumping early on.

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  28. Svigor says:

    I wish this was a false flag as one persistent idiot here claims.

    Yeah, the constant “false flag” BS from Russia/America-hater shills does get old. Shoe’s on the other foot now, innit? Russia dangled this guy out there. Russia gave him no security. Ergo, Russian false flag, according to Russia/America-hater shill “logic.”

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  29. Parbes says:
    @Kiza
    One thing Saker forgot to mention in these quick thoughts is the timing if this incident - one day before the important meeting on Syria, as if to sabotage this meeting. Putin said as much himself.

    Regarding security, even if the Russian envoy (was he an accredited ambassador or not yet) did not like security, the Western rule is that it is not up to the government official to decide. As a government representative his security is an issue of his government not of his own. Therefore, Russia has to blame itself for this as much as for the shootdown of SU24 bomber. As I wrote at the time about Putin's comment - it takes a fool to turn his back to an obvious enemy. I would not presume to blame Putin for such outcomes, but on the fringes Russia appears to still suffer from Yeltsin's malady - chaos, sloppiness and irresponsibility.

    I wish this was a false flag as one persistent idiot here claims. Unfortunately, this is unlikely. My own best guess is that this was organised by the same people who organised SU24 shootdown, both acts used local assets but looked professionally organised. Since 911, the Saudis and CIA appear to have been working well together. The Russians really need to pick up their game, Putin cannot manage everything personally, or many more will keep coming home in body bags, even under the non-confrontational President Trump. The wounded egos on the US and Israeli side will always seek avenues for revenge for Putin's and Russian successes which wounded them.

    Putin should start knocking off some of the jihadi-supporting-and-directing U.S./British/Turkish/Saudi/Israeli terror masterminds and their operatives on an individual basis, via covert ops, proxies, unexpected attacks, and staged execution/assassinations – just like THEY are doing to Russians. Besides being the most fitting retaliation and revenge, that would really TERRIFY and incapacitate these scum, who are used to the idea they can do whatever they want with impunity and with no fear of consequences.

    Read More
  30. @alexander
    Interesting thoughts, Saker,

    I am curious why the ambassador chose an "art exhibition" as a venue to give a speech.

    Is there any background on that ?

    Was the exhibit designed around a specific motif that lent itself to the ambassadorship attending ?......were proceeds from the sales going to sponsor a specific cause ?

    Does anyone know what he was planning to say ?

    Also, I am curious to find out if its true that no previous Russian ambassador had ever been assassinated since 1829 .

    Does anyone know if that is not the case ?

    As of writing this, there seems to have been a second shooting of a Russian ambassador, this time in Moscow.

    No Russian ambassadors assassinated in nearly two centuries....then in the space of twenty four hours, two are found shot.

    Somebody seems to be sending a message.


    Since ambassadors signify "diplomacy" and by extension "peace",then wouldn't the simplest interpretation of these killings be that whomever is responsible does not want diplomacy, peace or good relations with Russia ?

    Isn't that the clearest message being sent ?

    The motif of the art gallery was “Russia as seen by the Turks”, that’s why he was there. As part of the improving Russian- Turkish relations.

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  31. well, if this really is CIA op and putin finds out about it. if he doesn’t do anything, it will be open season on russian diplomats. so putin has to do something about it.

    so many ifs. hope this wasn’t a CIA op, or it could get ugly.

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  32. martino says:

    please, put google translator, because I dont wright english too well. Aware: google translator changes yes for not, white,for black—etc. CIA disinformation.
    Estimado Saker: En primer lugar es refrescante tener un elemento como usted dando visiones alternativas y presuntamente en profundidad, sobre hechos o futuros de la actualidad internacional, con un poco de presunta inmersion en los asuntos de inteligencia.. Me refiero a intel de los gobiernos, espias. Por los pocos meses que le sigo, y por lo que dice, aunque pro-ruso, parece que estuvo usted en la red occidentl-western, como un empleado, aprendiz,, o nivel x. Es igual (si era usted un activo ruso en occidente o viceversa) Pero todos sus análisis que vengo siguiendo por unos meses, no dan el nivel que se esperaria de un experto en temas militares y de intel. Y menos por uno que se las da de contactos rusos, y al mismo tiempo haber sido activo de la OTAN, y ser rusófilo, ortodoxo, etc. Me da igual que usted viva en Florida, si es verdad porque en este mundo de la desinformacion todo es mentira y media. En la primera parte de su exposicion usted hace rfeferencia al presunto acuerdo rusia siria, iran y turquia, y dice, acertadamente que no sabemos lo que acordaron y nunca lo sabremos.Lo que me gusta de este “acuerdo” Rusia-Turquia. (los otros no cuentan) Es que nadie sabe de qué va, ni siquiera usted, mr. saker., por lo tanto la cia no lo sabe, o las 101 agencias y más americanas (CIA es 101 agencias) A veces me parece que usted, con todo el respeto es un agente provocador. Suelta un chorro, y espera los comentarios que destapan sino otra cosa, la opinion de algun internauta desvelado como yo.Esto da guias de opinion, etc. Si usted es honesto, debo decir que ultimamente estoy decepcionado por l capacidad de los llamados espias o intel., empezando con Gordon Duff de veterans today…. o lo que es más probable es que esto es una operacion de intel, de dos capas (hay mas si necesario) A ver. Que los llamados expertos en Intel. como Duff, o usted, estén navegando en las capas superficiales de las cosas, que todos sabemos (mal, por las fake news), me hace pensar que si usted se cree que todos somos imbéciles. Si , los imbéciles siempre han existido, pero las personas correctas no creo que le compren nada. Sí yo tengo una interpretacion del acuerdo rusia-turquia, del asesinato del embajador, pero no la voy a exponer aqui,para que tú (CIA) lo veas,o si no eres CIA, para que lo vea la CIA, que es lo que hace un agente provocador,Lo siento para el Foro, si es que han dado al translator.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
    May I humbly suggest that you use google translate and then post the resulting English translation? Your comments would probably be read more widely if you did so.
  33. @martino
    please, put google translator, because I dont wright english too well. Aware: google translator changes yes for not, white,for black---etc. CIA disinformation.
    Estimado Saker: En primer lugar es refrescante tener un elemento como usted dando visiones alternativas y presuntamente en profundidad, sobre hechos o futuros de la actualidad internacional, con un poco de presunta inmersion en los asuntos de inteligencia.. Me refiero a intel de los gobiernos, espias. Por los pocos meses que le sigo, y por lo que dice, aunque pro-ruso, parece que estuvo usted en la red occidentl-western, como un empleado, aprendiz,, o nivel x. Es igual (si era usted un activo ruso en occidente o viceversa) Pero todos sus análisis que vengo siguiendo por unos meses, no dan el nivel que se esperaria de un experto en temas militares y de intel. Y menos por uno que se las da de contactos rusos, y al mismo tiempo haber sido activo de la OTAN, y ser rusófilo, ortodoxo, etc. Me da igual que usted viva en Florida, si es verdad porque en este mundo de la desinformacion todo es mentira y media. En la primera parte de su exposicion usted hace rfeferencia al presunto acuerdo rusia siria, iran y turquia, y dice, acertadamente que no sabemos lo que acordaron y nunca lo sabremos.Lo que me gusta de este "acuerdo" Rusia-Turquia. (los otros no cuentan) Es que nadie sabe de qué va, ni siquiera usted, mr. saker., por lo tanto la cia no lo sabe, o las 101 agencias y más americanas (CIA es 101 agencias) A veces me parece que usted, con todo el respeto es un agente provocador. Suelta un chorro, y espera los comentarios que destapan sino otra cosa, la opinion de algun internauta desvelado como yo.Esto da guias de opinion, etc. Si usted es honesto, debo decir que ultimamente estoy decepcionado por l capacidad de los llamados espias o intel., empezando con Gordon Duff de veterans today.... o lo que es más probable es que esto es una operacion de intel, de dos capas (hay mas si necesario) A ver. Que los llamados expertos en Intel. como Duff, o usted, estén navegando en las capas superficiales de las cosas, que todos sabemos (mal, por las fake news), me hace pensar que si usted se cree que todos somos imbéciles. Si , los imbéciles siempre han existido, pero las personas correctas no creo que le compren nada. Sí yo tengo una interpretacion del acuerdo rusia-turquia, del asesinato del embajador, pero no la voy a exponer aqui,para que tú (CIA) lo veas,o si no eres CIA, para que lo vea la CIA, que es lo que hace un agente provocador,Lo siento para el Foro, si es que han dado al translator.

    May I humbly suggest that you use google translate and then post the resulting English translation? Your comments would probably be read more widely if you did so.

    Read More
  34. Svigor says:

    Nosey, c’mon, pay attention! He says at the beginning of the comment that g**gle translate is a CIA op that deliberately mistranslates stuff, to reverse the meaning and spread disinfo. Not like you should need him to tell you, everybody knows that, duh.

    Read More
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