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I was recently interviewed by Robert Stark (of The Stark Truth). That interview is up as a podcast here: Robert Stark interviews Jayman - The Stark Truth With Robert Stark Just to get this out of the way, in this interview I didn't cover much new ground. Long-time readers will be familiar with what we... Read More
In my earlier entry (Clannishness – The Series: How It Happened), we saw that the thing that made the difference between WEIRD Northwestern Europeans and their more clannish neighbors was the selective pressures that each underwent during their histories – particularly since the fall of Rome until the present. This era in time established the... Read More
My earlier entry (Clannishness – the Series: Zigzag Lightning in the Brain) established that there are deep distinctions between Northwestern European peoples and most of the rest of the world, and that these differences have a huge impact on the world, including on levels of human development, the strength of democracy and democratic institutions, scientific... Read More
(My reader poll results will have to wait, but rest assured, they're coming.) Yet another terrorist attack in Paris – this year wish I could say I was even remotely surprised – perhaps only at the precise time, and that's all. For this is just another example of what I and so many others have... Read More
Post updated, 9/23/15 9/22/15. See below! This will be the first column in a series on the broad human behavioral dimension dubbed "clannishness" by HBD Chick. I've talked quite about clannishness here, and of course it is the main theme of HBD Chick's blog. For background, see: start here | hbd chick clannishness defined |... Read More
What does it take to make a nation great? What makes a country a great place to live, a healthy society, and a bastion of stability? Various theories and ideas have been put forward, and I think they are all pretty much bunk. I think we can apply a little reductionism here, and conclude that... Read More
Unlike many commenters in this space, I don't particularly lament the secular rise of "universalism" that has occurred in Northwestern European societies (and their derivatives). Indeed, as a Black man, this is especially important to me. Without universalism, slavery may never have ended in the West. Without universalism, my family may never have been able... Read More
Post updated, 7/23/15. See below! At long last, I reach my 200th blog post. It's been a quite a ride! Blogging on human biodiversity – or simply humanity – has taught me a great deal. Since the start, I hoped that I could offer some meager contribution to mankind with this blog. I will continue... Read More
It's been nearly three years since the JayMan has been chugging away on the innerwebs about all this heritable biological impact on human behavior and society. I thought I would leave a quick snapshot of my most time-honored posts here at JayMan's blog. Now this is only for its life on Wordpress. For about the... Read More
Post updated, 9/14/14 6/5/14. See below! In my earlier post on Gregory Clark's work, The Son Becomes The Father, I laid bare the case for the known high heritability of human behavioral traits (including values and attitudes) and life outcomes. As well, equally important, I illustrated the complete absence of shared environment influences on these... Read More
HBD Chick's hypothesis – that long-term mating patterns – specifically, the degree of cousin marriage historically practiced by people influences the selective pressures those people experience, pushing them, over time, towards either clannishness (in the case of long-term inbreeding) or individualism and civic-minded (in the case of long-term outbreeding) – explains a great many things.... Read More
I may have to make "misdreavus" a co-blogger here at some point, considering how I quote him here. But, in defending HBD (Human BioDiversity), he has made a nice basic summary of the reasons why we believe in HBD (that is, overwhelming evidence). This was all in response to social anthropology scholar A. J. West,... Read More
Post updated, 9/13/14. See below! I haven't always made it explicit, but some of you might gather that I am rather hard on most "environmental" explanations. You have inferred correctly. The reason? Several, which I'll review here. The biggest of these? There is no good evidence for the vast majority of them. That's right, there... Read More
Updated, 10/17/15. See below! In this post, I will review Gregory Cochran's "gay germ" hypothesis. I wanted to make an index of Cochran's posts from his and Henry Harpending's blog West Hunter that discuss it. These posts don't seem to all show up under the "Homosexuality" category there, and I wanted links to them to... Read More
Go check out this fantastic post by HBD Chick on HBD and the motivations behind believers and detractors: you and me and hbd | hbd* chick now, i am the LAST person who should criticize anybody for obsessing about any one thing (see: most of this blog), but i’m going to any
Across the United States, there is a general pattern – at least among Whites – of urban dwellers tending to be more liberal and rural dwellers tending to be more conservative. Indeed, this pattern is so pronounced that Steve Sailer managed to produce a now well-known (at least in the HBD-sphere) hypothesis of White American... Read More
My earlier post, Mapping the Road to American Disunion, discussed the apparent high likelihood of increased social and political unrest in America in the coming years – a process which, with the ongoing partisan stand-off in Washington, might well be under way. This was based on the work of Peter Turchin and his field cliodynamics.... Read More
Slate recently featured an article written by Roy F. Baumeister, Do You Really Have Free Will? In it, he claims that human do indeed have free will, something that regular readers will know that I have emphatically argued against. Baumeister doesn't make any supernatural appeals in this article; he does not appeal to some sort... Read More
HBD Chick and I talk about how rates of historic inbreeding have had an important impact on the selective pressures acting on the traits of various peoples living today. We have often used Europe and the Middle East as examples of this, because strong regional variations in historic rates of inbreeding exist in those places.... Read More
Edited, 4/11/15 3/17/14. See below! Blogger "Agnostic" over at Dusk in Autumn has a post up about the regional variation in Germany (Oktoberfest, lederhosen, dirndls and Germany's cultural fault-line). As I've noted in my posts on the American nations (most recently here, see the category here), Germany has been one of the most important countries... Read More
Continuing my on-going series on the regional differences – genetic regional differences – between the different Euro-Americans in the United States and Canada, here I will present a series of maps demonstrating some of the evidence for the existence and significance of these differences, beyond the historical circumstances explored by David Hackett Fischer (DHF) in... Read More
Post updated, 1/14/15. See below! Let me start by once again giving the disclaimer that I am an unapologetic atheist. Of course, I would conclude that being an atheist is the only natural position one can have if one is being a true scientist. Now, that said, I realize that I am only able to... Read More
Edit 2/24/14 [Post updated, see below] Edit 7/20/13: [Post updated as per HBD Chick's comment. See below] The European colonists (mostly British, French, and Germans, with a smattering of other groups) who first settled North America brought with them their distinct "cultural" features that laid the foundation for the persistent regional differences across the U.S.... Read More
Readers here will recall my recital of Greg Cochran's hypothesis that obligate male homosexuality is caused by a pathogenic agent, likely a virus (please see 100 Blog Posts – A Reflection on HBD Blogging And What Lies Ahead: Homosexuality (the “gay germ” hypothesis)). This is by far the most likely explanation for male homosexuality (see... Read More
Post Updated, 10/9/13. See below! Readers coming to my blog from The Atlantic article "The Mystery of Why Portugal Is So Doomed" saw my comment there directing you to my earlier post "A Tale of Two Maps." Matthew O'Brien over at The Atlantic seemed to indicate the poor economic situation in Portugal was somehow mysterious.... Read More
This is my 100th blog post. Upon reaching this milestone, I thought that this would be a great time to take moment to look back at my experience as a blogger in Human BioDiversity (HBD) and share my thoughts on the things to come. 1. The Beginning 2. Fertility 3. Immigration and the economy 4.... Read More
EDIT, 5/30/15: [Post updated with results of new meta-analyses of behavioral genetic studies. See below!] Edit, 1/3/13: [Post updated to reflect additional information provided in the comments. See below and see the comments.] The time has come for a little reminder of the First Law of behavioral genetics. In my final post of 2012, I... Read More
Following my previous post about national corruption, two countries brightly stand out: those are the #1 least corrupt country, Finland, and non-White Japan, a bastion of orderliness in Asia. The nations of the world generally align with HBD Chick's hypothesis, which posits that Northwestern European countries, with their long history of outbreeding (that is, marrying... Read More
(Courtesy Geoffery Miller) This is the perceived level of corruption, by nation, across the globe. The darker the country, the more corrupt it is perceived to be by its inhabitants. One cannot escape how the Northwestern European countries and countries founded by them stand out on this map. This was compiled by Transparency International, see... Read More
(CNN) -- Boys in the United States are starting puberty earlier than ever, according to a new study publishing in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics. In the study, lead author Marcia Herman-Giddens from the University of North Carolina's School of Public Health and her colleagues show that boys are starting to sexually develop... Read More
Post edited, 9/24/2012: See below! Earlier I discussed the origin of modern levels of IQ and the origin of modern ideologies. I noted that both of these things have roots in the societal conditions during the Middle Ages. But what, exactly, about this period led to the evolution of these traits? In this multi-part series,... Read More
Edited, 6/6/13. See below! I'll have much more on this later, but I stumbled across this map, and I thought it was too poignant to ignore: This is a map of the 2010 unemployment rates across Europe, broken down by region, originally found here. I have filled in the unemployment rates of the former Yugoslav... Read More
Edit, 3/13/14 8/24/13: Post updated. See below! This started as an e-mail I wrote to a friend to sum up the important events of the Middle Ages for Europe and the Near East. Then I decided that this was blog post worthy, so here it is: a nice, fairly concise summary of the events of... Read More
I had promised a couple of posts to bring those not necessarily familiar with HBD (i.e., Human BioDiversity) up to speed, but as I've not been getting around to those transitional posts, I've decided to skip that step and go on ahead. So here is my first semi-original contribution to the world of HBD. I'm... Read More
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