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A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
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When elected chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in 2000, Judge Roy Moore installed in his courthouse a monument with the Ten Commandments that Moses brought down from Mount Sinai carved into it. Told by a federal court his monument violated the separation of church and state, Moore refused to remove it and was... Read More
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By now you must have heard it – Putin is “persecuting the Jehovah's Witnesses” in Russia. Alas, this one is true. Well, this is maybe not nearly as terrible as the Ziomedia makes it sound, but still, a pretty bad and fundamentally misguided policy. Why did the Russian government take such a drastic decision? The... Read More
A View from Without
In today’s irreligious and indeed anti-religious climate the fashion is to dismiss Christianity as crude superstition, and to babble wisely about the separation of church and state. This is unfortunate, and stupid, since Christianity was the heart and soul of as yet the greatest civilization the world has seen. Those who know nothing of it... Read More
As is the habit of my tribe, as Astronomer Royal Sir Martin Rees said when queried about attending Trinity College Chapel, to the village church on a warm December day, the valley lazily misted, the cars parked in the adjoining field sufficient to judge the size of the congregation: a village affair, with no visiting... Read More
San Martin de Porres
My patron saint is Martin de Porres. Wikipedia describes him as “the patron saint of mixed-race people, barbers, innkeepers, public health workers, and all those seeking racial harmony,” all of which is news to me. I had always known Saint Martin as just some black guy, which is curious enough. What was my father thinking?... Read More
What if Christmas is a core value of belief in a personal God who lived among us and His freely given promise of eternal salvation that no believer should reject or apologize for? What if Christmas is the rebirth of Christ in the hearts of all believers? What if Christmas is the potential rebirth of... Read More
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Introduction The term “russophobia” (the hatred and/or fear of things Russian) has become rather popular in the recent years, courtesy of the anti-Russian hysteria of the AngloZionist Empire, but this is hardly a new concept. In his seminal book “Russie-Occident – une guerre de mille ans: La russophobie de Charlemagne à la Crise Ukrainienne” (“The... Read More
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Dear friends, Christ is Risen! I have enjoyed a much needed break, but I could not fully forget about the blog and a few current events. Many of you have asked me for my reaction to the meeting between Patriarch Kirill and Pope Francis but at the time I decided not to comment about it.... Read More
In a recent column Dennis Prager made an acute observation. "The vast majority of leading conservative writers ... have a secular outlook on life. ... They are unaware of the disaster that godlessness in the West has led to." These secular conservatives may think that "America can survive the death of God and religion," writes... Read More
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As the Russian Easter approaches – it will symbolically coincide this year with May Day – it is the right time to speak of a very important recent spiritual event that received too little publicity in the West, but it kept Russia all agog. This was not an Oscar nomination, after all. Two old men,... Read More
What is the connection between personal freedom and rising from the dead? When America was in its infancy and struggling to find a culture and frustrated at governance from Great Britain, the word most frequently uttered in speeches and pamphlets and editorials was not "safety" or "taxes" or "peace"; it was "freedom." Two acts of... Read More
The Pauper, 1894-1895, Theodor Kittelsen. This and other works by Kittelsen have appeared on Norwegian black metal albums. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Black metal is a musical subgenre that grew out of death metal and, more broadly, heavy metal. In general, it pushes certain aspects of this genre to even farther extremes: fast tempos, shrieking vocals, and violent stage acts. Black metal bands can be found almost anywhere—Europe, North America, East Asia, even Indonesia and Israel. In... Read More
Working Together, a Basic "How-To"
[Originally published in 2013] Today I am going to look into the topic of Orthodox and Muslim cooperation, suggest one possible approach to this issue and give a practical example where this could be done immediately and with great benefit for all the parties involved. I consider this post today as the eighth installment of... Read More
The culture war against Christianity is picking up speed. Last week came word Saint Louis University will remove a heroic-sized statue of Fr. Pierre-Jean De Smet S.J. from the front of Fusz Hall, where it has stood for 60 years. The statue depicts Fr. De Smet holding aloft a crucifix as he ministers to two... Read More
"This is a Christian nation," said the Supreme Court in 1892. "America was born a Christian nation," echoed Woodrow Wilson. Harry Truman affirmed it: "This is a Christian nation." But in 2009, Barack Hussein Obama begged to differ: "We do not consider ourselves a Christian nation." Comes now a Pew Research Center survey that reveals... Read More
Night of the Living Dead (1968) - Directed by George Romero "I have always liked the 'monster within' idea. I like to think of zombies as being us. Zombies are the blue-collar monsters." - George Romero The most heinous thing a human can do is eat another human. Fear of cannibalism along with the other... Read More
Collection box for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society circa 1850.  Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Throughout the world, kinship used to define the limits of morality. The less related you were to someone, the less moral you had to be with him or her. We see this in the Ten Commandments. The phrase "against thy neighbor" qualifies the commandment against bearing false witness and, implicitly, the preceding ones against killing,... Read More
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Having long since captured the sympathies of America’s evangelical Christians, Israel’s friends have recently been attempting to show empathy for the persecuted Christian churches of the Arab World in what appears to be a concerted effort to garner support for Tel Aviv’s regional aspirations. Only founded earlier this year, a previously obscure non-profit organization called... Read More
Adam and Eve, Jan Brueghel de Oude en Peter Paul Rubens. Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Did the Christian doctrine of original sin create the guilt cultures of Northwest Europe? Or did the arrow of causality run the other way?
By definition, gene-culture co-evolution is reciprocal. Genes and culture are both in the driver's seat. This point is crucial because there is a tendency to overreact to cultural determinism and to forget that culture does matter, even to the point of influencing the makeup of our gene pool. Through culture, humans have directed their own... Read More
With the recent spate of mass shootings, (at least four high-profile incidents occurring in the U.S. and Canada in the last two weeks), the issues of guns and violence inevitably come up. Naturally, the politically correct wisdom, which is founded on the blank slate (or at least, a bare slate), wants to blame these events... Read More
What is the connection between freedom and rising from the dead? When America was in its infancy and struggling to find a culture and frustrated at governance from Great Britain, the word most frequently uttered in speeches and pamphlets and editorials was not safety or taxes or peace; it was freedom. Two acts of Parliament... Read More
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In his Kremlin defense of Russia's annexation of Crimea, Vladimir Putin, even before he began listing the battles where Russian blood had been shed on Crimean soil, spoke of an older deeper bond. Crimea, said Putin, "is the location of ancient Khersones, where Prince Vladimir was baptized. His spiritual feat of adopting Orthodoxy predetermined the... Read More
Religious zealotry runs rampant in the U.S. military, and among those wishing to deploy it
The connection between America’s wars in the Middle East—and its wars more generally—with the more fundamentalist forms of Christianity in the United States is striking. Opinion polls suggest that the more religiously conservative one is, the more one will support overseas wars or even what many might describe as war crimes. Fully 60 percent of... Read More
Pope Francis' call for a truce notwithstanding, the culture war rages on in America. Last week, a Utah judge struck down part of the state's anti-polygamy law, clearing the way for men to marry multiple spouses. Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer, defrocked for officiating at the same-sex marriage of his son, refused to recant, and joined... Read More
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Christmas is a time of traditions. If you have found time in the rush before Christmas to decorate a tree, you are sharing in a relatively new tradition. Although the Christmas tree has ancient roots, at the beginning of the 20th century only 1 in 5 American families put up a tree. It was 1920... Read More
My video clip of the week, perhaps the year, is this one of Vincent Stewart, a/k/a/ Reverend X, preaching God’s Word. The whole thing is 13 minutes, but here’s a flavor: (1m26s, responding to a phone-in caller): Repeat it after me, bitch. I come in the name of Jesus by the power of the Holy... Read More
Our Church: A Personal History of the Church of England, by Roger Scruton
Thus Rev. Thwackum, the schoolmaster in Tom Jones. That was the 1730s, or about halfway through Roger Scruton's Our Church. The Rev. Thwackum is drawn satirically, but his smugness was well justified. The religious passions of the previous century had subsided or been pushed off to inconsequential border territories in Ireland and the North American... Read More
Both Eric Cantor and Michele Bachmann have extreme religious views. In Cantor's Zionism God expressly desires a piece of land in Middle East be ruled and occupied by Jews. Bachmann's Dominionism asserts that Christians should play a special role in the American Republic. However, the major news outlets have treated their religous beliefs very differently.... Read More
For several weeks now, what one critic has called “the anti-God squad” has been at work attacking Michelle Bachmann, Rick Perry, and other presidential candidates who publically display their Christian values. A torrent of abuse from the New Yorker, New York Times, and Washington Post has caused even the moderate Times columnist Ross Douthat (August... Read More
Jim Kalb’s critique of competing views of modernity is rather thorough, and like him, I find much to criticize in what is dissected. Most of the alternatives posed to the present liberal tyranny, Jim points out, are flawed or unworkable. Glorifying the wills of some superior individuals or an ideal community based on biological similarity... Read More
Reading Larry Auster’s website over the years, I find there is much in his spirited commentaries that I agree with. Larry’s attacks on liberals and neoconservatives, his stress on the enormous overlap between these two only minimally different groups, his focus on the immigration issue, and his critical examination of the government’s war on traditional... Read More
I am now in Moscow, which once again became a holy city, with hundreds of churches and monasteries that were resurrected from ashes for last twenty years. The churches are all different, some gold and baroque paintings in 19th century style, some harking back to Ivan the Grim days, decorated with murals floor to ceiling,... Read More
Matthew Roberts suggests that there are presently two understandings of Christianity on the real right. One is the view taken by youthful neopagans, critically tracing our democratic egalitarian politics and culture back to primitive Christian sources. The pursuers of this fashion are happily reviving Nietzsche’s critique of Christianity, as a particularly long-lasting form of slave... Read More
We often think of Israel as a Jewish state or France a Catholic country. But the United States is more Christian (83%) than Israel Jewish (76%) or France Catholic (65%). There is often talk of a Judeo/Christian heritage, or our multiculturalism. But only 4% of the United States population identifies themselves as part of a... Read More
A Talk at Rhodes Conference, 8-12 October 2009
They say that at a press-conference before departing from Israel, President George W. Bush was asked: “What impressed you most of all in Israel?” The Texan replied: “The Bible in my room. It was in your tongue! Despite the wars and terrorism, you did not begrudge the effort and translated the Holy Bible into Hebrew... Read More
The latest Dan Brown atrocity has hit the silver screen. Though I am myself a lapsed Catholic waiting for the Tridentine Latin mass to return in force before being born again, I find that I am offended whenever someone is out there making a buck by bashing Holy Mother the Church. "Angels and Demons" preceded... Read More
Religion of Peace? — Why Christianity Is and Islam Isn't, by Robert Spencer
A friend of mine who had a thoroughly Roman Catholic education at the hands of the Christian Brothers tells me that the religious component of that education consisted largely of memorizing arguments with which to confound atheists, agnostics, and Protestants. Robert Spencer is not, strictly speaking, a Roman Catholic, though I believe his church is... Read More
Jews are evil, and there is a special place in hell just for them. I’d say to them: Believe whatever you want. Practice whatever you preach. Just stay the hell away from us. Do not rush to denounce me, do not send this piece post-haste to your local branch of ADL or LICRA, do not... Read More
On the many-coloured Hans Buenting Map (1581), our world looks like a flower; its three petals present the three continents of Europe, West Asia, Africa, united by the Holy Land. The map allows for a different reading, too: the flower is the faith of Christ and Our Lady, and the three petals are Islam, Catholicism... Read More
A positive view of fundamentalism
They walk in big and jolly crowds on Jerusalem streets, waving blue-and-white flags and smiling at passers-by; the Christian friends of Israel often arrive in the autumn, during the Tabernacles Feast. This year, too, they came by thousands; cheered up the despondent shopkeepers of Ben Yehuda Street, promised to stand by us, in weather fair... Read More
Big Business and its bottomless appetite for cheap labor are by no means the only pillars of the Open Borders Lobby that has helped flood the country with Third World immigrants. There are also the churches, themselves ever hungry for new members as their own religious liberalism drives away their old members. This week the... Read More
Three incredible days passed in Jerusalem. On Friday night, burial processions carried out the shroud of the Lord from the small ancient church of St James into the parvis of the Holy Sepulchre. Yesterday, tens of thousands of native Christians and pilgrims flocked into the great edifice of the Holy Sepulchre to celegrate the annual... Read More
OK, I've seen Mel Gibson's film The Passion of the Christ and am therefore entitled to pronounce the definitive and final word on a subject over which more ink has already been spilled than cuttlefish can squirt. I have to confess the film did nothing for me religiously and even less aesthetically. It's a well-made... Read More
Understandably, because Paul Gottfried is an editor of The American Conservative and so is John Zmirak, the magazine would not publish this letter to the editor. LRC is, of course, delighted to do so. John Zmirak (in The American Conservative) has written a forceful and timely defense of Mel Gibson's reverential cinematic treatment of The... Read More
How the Passion of the Christ may help bring Peace to the Middle East
In the Return of the King, the Oscar-studded film based on the Tolkien’s fantasy, there is a touching and inspiring moment: at the lowest ebb of struggle, when the Sauron hordes pour in through the breached gates of Gondor, horns announce the arrival of the relieving force. Rohan is coming, and the looting Orks retreat... Read More
The film of Mel Gibson, The Passion, grows into an important, maybe the important event of the year. Even before screening, it caused violent reactions of the American Jewish 'thought police', ADL led by obnoxious Foxman. There are unpleasant rumours (in the New York Times) that Mr Gibson gave in and decided to censor the... Read More
In this season of short days and long nights, the Greeks like their Palestinian Orthodox Christian brothers turn their thoughts - not to neutral 'shopping season', like Americans, not to Lapland, like the West Europeans, but to a small town of Bethlehem in Palestine, where the most profound miracle took place and Eternal Logos was... Read More
In a column for December 23, not yet online, about "the war we're in," Joe Sobran makes a correct point with questionable evidence. Allow me to preface my friendly criticism by noting the obvious. Whatever critical observation I offer is intended to generate useful discussion. My questions do not arise from any negative opinion about... Read More
Back in 1940 the publicly-funded City College of New York offered a professorship to the English philosopher, free-thinker and atheist Bertrand Russell. When news of the appointment got out, prominent local clergymen objected on the grounds that as a "propagandist against religion and morality" Russell would corrupt the youth of the city. (A charge very... Read More
Immanentizing the eschaton.
Heresy? What's that all about? Oh, boy, old Derb has really gone off the deep end now! Not really. I understand of course that "heresy" is not a word bandied about much in the public square nowadays. It's not one I have much use for myself. Scanning my shelves, I see only one book on... Read More
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