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Schoolchildren across the country recently skipped school or walked out of class to rally for new restrictions on our economic and personal liberties in the name of fighting “climate change.” Instead of punishing students for playing hooky to promote a political cause, many teachers and administrators allowed, or even encouraged, students to skip school to attend these events. Public schools have also given students the day off to attend pro-gun control rallies.

The trend toward allowing students to miss school for political protests is an example of how indoctrination in left-wing ideology and politics has replaced actual education in many government schools. Some teachers may have seen their students’ eagerness to show support for authoritarian policies like the “Green New Deal” as confirmation of the teachers’ success in convincing students that the “science is settled” regarding climate change. The truth is that science regarding the causes, extent, and effects of climate change is far from settled. But you won’t learn that in most government schools.

Misleading students on climate change is far from the only, or even the worst, example of how student education is being shortchanged in order to promote socialism and its cousin, cultural Marxism. Government schools in Seattle are implementing a program called “Math Ethnic Studies.” As the title suggests, this replaces traditional mathematics with a curriculum built around the insane idea that math is not an objective truth, but a construct reflecting the interests of society’s dominant economic, social, and racial groups.

Among the questions the students are supposed to ask in this new curriculum are, “how is math manipulated to allow inequality and oppression in society?” and “who’s to say what is right?” In other words, two plus two may or may not equal four depending on one’s group identity.

Students who take this course may not be qualified to become scientists or engineers, but they will be qualified to agitate for expanded welfare and new limits on free speech in the name of “social justice.”

The politicization and dumbing down of government education does have an upside: it is leading more parents to pull their children out of government schools and homeschool instead. Homeschooling allows parents to ensure their children receive a quality education that does not undermine their political or other values.

Parents interested in providing their children with a quality education should consider my homeschooling curriculum. The Ron Paul Curriculum provides students with a well-rounded education that includes rigorous programs in history, mathematics, and the physical and natural sciences. The curriculum also provides instruction in personal finance. Students can develop superior communication skills via intensive writing and public speaking courses. Another feature of my curriculum is that it provides students the opportunity to create and run their own businesses.

The government and history sections of the curriculum emphasize Austrian economics, libertarian political theory, and the history of liberty. However, unlike government schools, my curriculum never puts ideological indoctrination ahead of education.

Interactive forums ensure students are engaged in their education and that they have the opportunity to interact with their peers outside of a formal setting.

I encourage all parents looking at alternatives to government schools — alternatives that provide children with a well-rounded education that introduces them to the history and ideas of liberty without sacrificing education for indoctrination — to go to RonPaulCurriculum.com for more information about my homeschooling program.

(Republished from The Ron Paul Institute by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Political Correctness, Public Schools 
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  1. anarchyst says:

    Here is food for thought, especially for those who support “public education” and rally about the doctrine of “socialization” that they claim is lacking in “homeschooled” children.

    Let’s look at what “public education” has to offer:

    1. Cliques and rampant bullying, quite often the victims of bullying are punished more harshly for fighting back. Many times, bullies are part of a “protected” class–certain racial minorities, jocks, etc. There is strong official disapproval of students making friends outside their grade level. “Peer pressure” is used to push conformity.

    2. Teachers that don’t teach reading writing and arithmetic. Pushing communist principles such as rabid environmentalism, blaming humanity for conditions beyond our control as well as pushing “communitarianism” (“it takes a village”)–actually communism. This also ties in with teacher-recommended feminizing and drugging (mostly boys) to make them “less fidgety” and more compliant–all for the “benefit” of the teacher.

    3. Non-existent moral guidance…the communist concept of “values clarification”, allowing each student to set his own moral standard with no discussion permitted as to guidelines. A student dare not mention God or the Bible in “public school”–not permitted…discussing Islam and Judaism is OK…even field trips to mosques and synagogues are encouraged.

    4. Sex education that normalizes homosexuality, transgenderism and other deviant practices, actually encouraging deviant behavior and downplaying and marginalizing heterosexuality and abstinence.

    5. Insane zero tolerance practices, punishing students for pop-tarts shaped like guns or a student having an “unauthorized aspirin” or plastic butter knife. Of course, abortions and birth control are available without parental notification.

    6. Lockdowns and backpack/locker searches by police utilizing “drug dogs”, getting the upcoming generation used to random unconstitutional searches. Quite often, students are “roughed up” by “school resource officers”…just because they can…Lockdowns should be reserved for prisons–not schools…

    Since these “socialization” practices seem to be the norm in our “public education” systems, parents who send their children to these dysfunctional “indoctrination centers” are guilty of child abuse…

    Children who are homeschooled actually do much better in life as they are comfortable with people of all ages. True socialization takes place outside the classroom…

    • Agree: Liza
  2. Vinnie O says:

    It is useful to remember that the PURPOSE of German “kindergarten” (child garden) was specifically to get young children AWAY FROM THEIR MOTHERS so that their innocent young minds could be filled with Socialist ideas. And that is why kindergartens became so popular among bureaucrats in the US.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  3. Of all the cranks on the far right wing of libertarian nonsense, Ron Paul is the Grandaddy.

    He just spouts illogical and unrealistic nonsense, and of course, never provides any practical examples .

    And of course, he never goes near the problems that would arise from a no regulation education system.

    • Replies: @Realist
  4. The government and history sections of the curriculum emphasize Austrian economics, libertarian political theory, and the history of liberty.

    I’m going to guess that includes ignoring African countries that adopted “free market” policies and remained poor.

    This Libertarian globalist garbage is on the way out.

    It’s been tried, thanks.

  5. African countries that adopted “free market” policies and remained poor

    That’s racist.

    [MORE]

  6. I see the UR is going all in with the funky ad system….

  7. Realist says:

    Homeschoolers Are Educated, Not Indoctrinated

    Sadly a number of homeschoolers are indoctrinated in religion and anti-science.

    • Replies: @Matt07924
    , @anonymous
  8. Realist says:
    @Peter Harris

    And of course, he never goes near the problems that would arise from a no regulation education system.

    One of those problems is many parents are not knowledgeable enough to teach their children what should be taught.

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  9. anarchyst says:
    @Realist

    I see the “publik skool teechers” are out in force.

    “Homeschooling” threatens the public school “status quo”.

    Look at any major public school system in the united States.

    Reading levels, math, and other subjects in the single percentages, less than a third able to read at grade level, while “teachers” cry out for more money.

    We would be better off flushing the tax dollars down the toilet.

    • Replies: @Realist
  10. Realist says:
    @anarchyst

    I am not defending public schools…they are horrible, but homeschooling is not the answer. Private schools are the answer, with choice left to the parents.

  11. @Realist

    And most parents get money for the private school how? Charity will take care of only a fraction. Tuition vouchers provided by the federal and/or state government could do it. Otherwise?

    • Replies: @Realist
  12. @Hippopotamusdrome
    That’s racist.

    Funny but as with liberals they have no other recourse but to scream racist when presented with unwanted facts.

    Rand said that race can’t affect culture so it must be true. So where is the libertarian utopia in Africa? Somalia?

    Once you take away blank slate the libertarian plan falls apart. But even with blank slate it has serious problems like putting complete trust in corporations that prepare your food.

    I really don’t get why anyone still follows this ideology. Maybe someone can explain it.

  13. Realist says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Tuition vouchers provided by the federal and/or state government could do it. Otherwise?

    Well if public schools were eliminated, parents would get a property tax break. My contention is private schools would be run much more efficiently than public schools by eliminating bloated administrative waste. I like the idea of vouchers, but keep them as local as possible to discourage political interference. The key to good education is parental involvement…not homeschooling, but parents becoming aware of what is taught at the schools they have to choose from and the expertise of those teaching. But then if not for the insouciance of many parents…the public schools would not be as screwed up as they are. To my knowledge all public school boards are elected, but the indifference of too many parents allows for political control of public schools. This attitude is also the reason that elected public office holders are corrupt and driving this country to hell.

  14. Matt07924 says:
    @Realist

    @Realist – Any proof to support your statement about indoctrination in religion and anti-science?

    • Replies: @Realist
  15. Realist says:
    @Matt07924

    Any proof to support your statement about indoctrination in religion and anti-science?

    According to the surveys conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics, 91 percent of homeschooling parents are more concerned about the environment of schools and want to offer a religious (64 percent) and/or moral (77 percent) alternative.Oct 1, 2015

    Religion is anti-science.

    • Replies: @Matt07924
  16. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    Every (to my knowledge) homeschooled child or adult that I’ve met has made a positive impression. At least some went to other households for subjects in which that family had a particular interest. Some families shift to institutional schools after the elementary years, when they sense that they otherwise lack the resources to competently teach more technical subjects, or that their child needs to experience institutional life. I think that parents can and should be trusted to get this right, but you would limit them to choosing among governmental licensees, which in rural areas would mean little or no choice.

    What informs your beliefs about homeschooling? Do you and/or a family member work at a school?

    • Replies: @Realist
  17. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    What informs your beliefs about homeschooling?

    According to the surveys conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics, 91 percent of homeschooling parents are more concerned about the environment of schools and want to offer a religious (64 percent) and/or moral (77 percent) alternative.Oct 1, 2015

    Do you and/or a family member work at a school?

    No.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  18. Matt07924 says:
    @Realist

    — What is wrong with parents wanting to offer a religious setting for THEIR children? You are assuming (wrongly so) that there is no religion in government schools. Humans are inherently religious…we have to believe in something…so government schools wipe out God and teach secular humanism. That is still a religion. So…how are parents indoctrinating their children with Christian precepts any different than government schools indoctrinating children with a mindset that humanity is capable of morality and self-fulfillment without belief in God.

    — Such pithy sayings…”religion is anti-science.” How is saying that magical incantation offer any proof? Sort of like saying Tulsi Gabbard is a Russian asset because we say so!

    So…all of these famous scientists (who contributed A LOT) were anti-science because they were religious? Really? C’mon @Realist…you can do a better job this this!!!

    Euler
    Leibniz
    Volta
    Ampere
    Faraday
    Babbage
    Maxwell
    Hertz
    Pasteur
    Joule
    Kelvin
    Thomson
    Marconi
    Carver
    Newton
    Kepler
    Bacon,
    etc….

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Dannyboy
  19. SECULAR home schooling is the future…..
    You can get done in 4 to 6 hours what schools do in 10 hours minus the ghey indoctrination….

  20. Realist says:
    @Matt07924

    What is wrong with parents wanting to offer a religious setting for THEIR children?

    Nothing, but religion is faith and education should be fact.

    Humans are inherently religious…we have to believe in something…

    They would do well to believe in themselves.

    So…how are parents indoctrinating their children with Christian precepts any different than government schools indoctrinating children with a mindset that humanity is capable of morality and self-fulfillment without belief in God.

    It is sad that you have so little faith in humanity. Humans are quite capable of morality and self-fulfillment without belief in God. Like most religious people you seem to be afraid of life and use God as a crutch. You have no self control and use the fear of hell to try and control you baser feelings.

    So…all of these famous scientists (who contributed A LOT) were anti-science because they were religious?

    I notice you didn’t include Galileo. Newton was also an Alchemist (not very scientific). All that you listed were captives of their time, almost everyone was religious at the time they lived. After the discovery of Evolution by Darwin things began to change…of course this is anathema to the religious.

    Here is a list for you…of those who professed a belief in God, yet were responsible for the needless death of hundreds of thousands.

    Woodrow Wilson
    FDR
    Harry Truman (a cousin of mine)
    Lyndon Johnson
    Richard Nixon
    George H. W. Bush
    George W. Bush
    and all their sycophants and enablers.

  21. Dannyboy says:
    @Matt07924

    European Christian Civilization was essentially the birthplace of “science”. The Church was in reality probably the greatest patron of true scientists.

    The Catholic Church had a state of the art observatory, and in fact Jesuits astronomers were correct about several things which Galileo was wrong on.

    This guy is Realist is mostly full of shit..lol

    • Replies: @Realist
  22. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    “The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting and analyzing data related to education in the U.S. and other nations. NCES is located within the U.S. Department of Education and the Institute of Education Sciences.”

    So, no personal experience with homeschooled students?

    Would your preferred system authorize private schools offering “a religious and/or moral alternative,” whatever that means in the context of the NCES survey?

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @Realist
  23. anarchyst says:
    @Realist

    Why is “homeschooling” not the answer?

    Please elaborate…

    • Replies: @Realist
  24. Realist says:
    @Dannyboy

    The Catholic Church had a state of the art observatory, and in fact Jesuits astronomers were correct about several things which Galileo was wrong on.

    The church has never been right about anything to do with science.

    This guy is Realist is mostly full of shit..lol

    Speaking of full of shit…your sentence is nonsensical.

    • Replies: @Dannyboy
  25. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    Why is “homeschooling” not the answer?

    Please elaborate…

    You should read my comments instead asking questions I have already answered.

    Read comments 8, 9, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21,

    • Replies: @anonymous
  26. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    So, no personal experience with homeschooled students?

    Anecdotal evidence is usually useless.

  27. While Dr. Paul correctly assesses what is happening in public schools, he has mid-diagnosed the problem. It is not the teachers who choose the curriculum, it is the state. Local school districts add another layer of politics. The Federal government entered the picture to exert pressure through Supreme Court rulings, even though the Constitution does not grant it the power to do so. There is an old union saying about employers: “They hire what they see in the mirror”. I don’t blame the teachers, they were hired by someone who saw what (s)he liked, and so it goes all the way to the top.
    My late mother-in-law was a teacher and principal, as was my friend’s father. After retiring, they didn’t know each other, but both had similar stories to tell about the crap coming down down, that would curl your hair.
    If the state officials didn’t like what was going on, they would put an end to it.

  28. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    You’ve confused me with another commenter. Again:

    Would your preferred system authorize private schools offering “a religious and/or moral alternative,” whatever that means in the context of the NCES survey?

    I ask because you seem dogmatically hostile to religion, not homeschooling as such.

    • Replies: @Realist
  29. Dannyboy says:
    @Realist

    Thanks for proving you are indeed an idiot…lol

  30. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    I ask because you seem dogmatically hostile to religion, not homeschooling as such.

    I am not hostile to religion, I just don’t see the purpose.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  31. Realist says:
    @anarchyst

    Why is “homeschooling” not the answer?

    Please elaborate…

    You should read my comments instead asking questions I have already answered.

    Read comments 8, 9, 11, 14, 16, 18, 21,

  32. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    For yourself or anyone else, though, right?

    That would explain why you don’t want to answer the question.

    • Replies: @Realist
  33. @Realist

    You know what is totally useless: your idiotic opinions stated as fact.
    You are a liar and a polemicist by nature.
    No one here agrees with you.
    Still, you are free to spout off and we are free to label it the babbling of a deceiver.

    • Replies: @Realist
  34. @anarchyst

    “Children who are homeschooled actually do much better in life…”

    Do you have any historical evidence, by way of a study or some examples that are fact-checked?

  35. @Realist

    My contention is private schools would be run much more efficiently than public schools by eliminating bloated administrative waste.

    As if administrative waste is the source of the problem.

    The key to good education is parental involvement…not homeschooling, but parents becoming aware of what is taught at the schools they have to choose from and the expertise of those teaching. But then if not for the insouciance of many parents…the public schools would not be as screwed up as they are. To my knowledge all public school boards are elected, but the indifference of too many parents allows for political control of public schools.

    Did you miss the part of the article about racist math?

    Government schools in Seattle are implementing a program called “Math Ethnic Studies.” As the title suggests, this replaces traditional mathematics with a curriculum built around the insane idea that math is not an objective truth, but a construct reflecting the interests of society’s dominant economic, social, and racial groups.

    These are not local initiatives, merely brought about because of parental indifference. These are test programs, used to iron out the kinks before they get rolled out nationwide in the next update of Common Core, No Child Left Behind, or whatever garbage name they pick for their new indoctrination initiative. “Math is racist” is already the position of most colleges in South Africa and the more “woke” elements of America’s teacher colleges. Schools that disobey Common Core mandates get funding cuts, and they rarely disobey because teachers are extremely leftist.

    Private schools fall under the same umbrella, and if they disobey too much they get their licence to teach revoked. At various times they’ve put through new rules designed to shut down private schools, such as minimum library size requirements. Private schools are by and large following the same dogma, just slightly more behind the times.

    Students spend ~1500 hours a year in front of their teacher. Do you really think you can counteract that with a 10 minute parent-teacher conference twice a year? Or attending an annual 2-hour PTA conference and hoping to get a 2 minute comment in? By the time a teacher becomes a teacher, they’ve already gone through at least 16 years of indoctrination, and get steady reinforcement through social pressure and seminars. The type of person that wants to become a teacher is the type most trusting of the system in general, the one with the highest misplaced maternal instinct, and the ones that rise to the top in the system are those who never find a man to set them right and hence continually double down on their dogma.

    And even then, they don’t push their ideology with open argumentation, but through steady passive-aggressive emotional appeal. Arguing with them is like trying to grasp jelly. They’ll agree with you in person and then the very next day have your kids singing “This Land is Your Land”, celebrating Kwanzaa, and watching Schindler’s List for history.

    • Replies: @Realist
  36. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    For yourself or anyone else, though, right?

    I don’t see why some are so weak and afraid to need a sky daddy.

    That would explain why you don’t want to answer the question.

    I did answer your question…you just don’t like the answer.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  37. Realist says:
    @steinbergfeldwitzcohen

    You know what is totally useless: your idiotic opinions stated as fact.

    Looks like projection.

    No one here agrees with you.

    Is that suppose to prove me wrong? Or hurt my feelings?

    Still, you are free to spout off and we are free to label it the babbling of a deceiver.

    Yes, you are free to be an idiot.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  38. anarchyst says:

    In many large school districts, many teachers are just as dumb if not dumber than their students. A number of school districts gave their teachers the same tests as given to their students. The teachers could not pass the tests. They later complained that they should have not been required to be “tested”. Their “teachers’ unions” concurred.

  39. Realist says:
    @NobodyKnowsImADog

    You use blockquote to quote me…then you use it to quote the article.

    Private schools fall under the same umbrella, and if they disobey too much they get their licence to teach revoked. At various times they’ve put through new rules designed to shut down private schools, such as minimum library size requirements. Private schools are by and large following the same dogma, just slightly more behind the times.

    It is incumbent on parents to see that this doesn’t happen. But people in this country are lazy and would rather watch America’s Got Talent or Dancing With The Stars than be informed about important issues. That is why this country is so screwed up.

  40. anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    Bad faith and/or troll playing. Third time:

    Would your preferred system authorize private schools offering “a religious and/or moral alternative,” whatever that means in the context of the NCES survey?

  41. The school system from kindergarten all through Grad school is about ultra liberal indoctrination. It is truly sad.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  42. anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:

    I find it interesting that not one commenter on this article is a homeschooling parent. I am one, so let me dispel some illusions.

    First, I am an atheist. The only time religion is discussed in my homeschool is in an historical context, such as the Crusades and the Reformation.

    Second, according to the laws of my state, I am qualified to homeschool my children, and who is anyone here to determine otherwise?

    Third, in my homeschool we cover every subject that is covered in public school. My children are not missing anything. The subjects we cover are covered with far more depth and complexity than in public school. We use college-level texts at the secondary level.

    For science (and yes, I teach real science, not religion-soaked pablum or indoctrination-permeated fodder!), my children make extensive use of mathematics to solve scientific problems and use the dozens of labs they are assigned to prove scientific concepts.

    My kids must read thirty-five books per year that are assigned, and they usually read dozens more books on their own initiative. They’ve read Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Twain, Tolstoy, Steinbeck, de Cervantes, Hugo, Huxley, Orwell, Alcott, Rand, Atwell, Homer, Hawthorne, Paine, Stowe, Sinclair, Fitzgerald, Salinger, Swift, von Goethe, Shelley, London, Bradbury, Lewis, Golding, Solzhenitsyn, Lewis, Vonnegut, Wells, and many others. They’ve read the finest literature ever written. You know what they haven’t read? “Jake Has Two Dads”.

    My kids write dozens of papers every year. My kids do not graduate from homeschool without learning calculus. My kids have gone on more field trips in one year than public school kids go on in their entire span of education. We studied Gettysburg and then went to the battlefield. We studied the Constitution of the United States of America and then went to the National Archives in D.C. to view the actual document. We studied the art of the ancient Egyptians and went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC to look at real artifacts. We studied the immigration wave in the nineteenth century and then went to Ellis Island. Does this sound like a substandard education?

    The most important thing I have taught my children in homeschool is not any one subject. Rather, it is the fact that they are taught to think critically, to make connections between concepts, to make connections between one historical event and another, and to think independently. For example, my children didn’t just study civics. They studied civics, political fiction, historical documents, and current events all at the same time. And they didn’t just study one perspective. For current events, they were given two articles on any subject…one from a leftist perspective and one from the right. They then determined independently which perspective was correct and factual. What public school does that?

    Homeschooling is not for everyone. It takes a great deal of time, quite a bit of money, heaps of initiative, and much responsibility. I like to think that, though I spend $1,000 a year per child on homeschool, I save the taxpayers of my state $11,000 per year per child, because that’s how much it costs the state. You’re welcome, fellow tax mules!

    • Agree: anarchyst
    • Replies: @Peter Harris
    , @Realist
  43. Homeschooled 4 brats. Miserable experience for all, but their mother dumped them on me and I was stuck in an area with deliberately dumbed down schools. Hint, the Gaming industry makes sure that high school dropouts are encouraged. All finished college, none had kids of wedlock, jail time or any of the other normal situations that the single moms regularly produce. Ruined my career, can’t deploy without support and no women want a man that actually takes care of his children. But only a freaking putz can be happy about raising trash. The girls went on to STEM careers, as I made sure that being a liberal arts program was not going to happen, and no one was going to go through what we went through on purpose. I always felt that one can come back from most of life’s disasters, but single parenthood is a ticket to poverty, unless one is a POS stage or absentee parent, and only a fool wants to explain that to St. Peter. And yes, women never have to pay squat for support. So homeschooling was a success, in that the kids believed that education, and even work were privileges (as ways to get out of the house as well). I’d never do it willingly, but the main idea I always had ( and I have graduate degrees), was that it was more trouble to undo a poor education and/or a bad peer group than to learn from scratch at a later date. Anyone that has tried to deal with rescue animals or coached sports has learned that the hard way
    . Therefore even ‘inadequate’ homeschooling is superior to being ‘taught’ by teachers that spend more time flashing cleavage than instructing promising students. Or my favorite were the elementary teachers that felt math was something they didn’t need. Great attitude to instill (and for a parent to have to un-instill before the kids take a math class). Life is tough enough without ‘authority’ figures like that.

  44. @anonymous

    “Third, in my homeschool we cover every subject that is covered in public school.”

    What about science, and all the props needed for a practical science class?
    And what about all the physical education programs, sport, gymnastics, and interschool competition?

    And most importantly, where do you find the time? Are you retired?

    • Replies: @anarchyst
    , @anonymous
  45. anarchyst says:
    @Peter Harris

    “Props” for science are easily procured, most of them having household items equivalents. As to sports and competition, other neighborhood homeschooled children are usually available.
    In many areas, public schools are required to accept homeschool students into their athletic programs.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  46. anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Harris

    Peter, I bought a chemistry curriculum that had all the necessary equipment and pre-measured chemicals. It was expensive, but not difficult. And the labs were fantastic…gas generation, separation of solids by precipitation, creation of thermal gel, serial dilution, distillation, chemical battery to power two LEDs, etc. Physics was even easier…most of those labs involved common household objects, a stopwatch, etc. The only really expensive item for physics was the frictionless cart for the momentum labs, but I got a used one through a homeschool cooperative and saved a bunch of money. Biology requires a microscope, some prepared slides for the mitosis lab, and some items to dissect. I bought a $100 microscope and for dissection I used grocery store organ meats and large insects that the kids captured. Geology used common household objects. You just have to get creative. And I of course bought all the textbooks used. A college level textbook that is three years old costs practically nothing, because they come out with a new edition every three years so the profs who wrote them can wallet-rape the incoming class.

    I find the time by being a stay at home parent, which means we live on one income. It’s difficult to live on one income these days, but not impossible if you adjust your standard of living. It also helps if you are not a slave to debt. 😉 To do homeschooling properly at the secondary level, you need a minimum of three hours of class/lecture time per day per student, and a minimum of three hours of independent work per day per student. So while one kid was doing a science lab with me, the other two were doing their assigned reading. If both parents have to work, one parent can do the class time with the student while the other cooks dinner. It’s just a matter of budgeting what time you have. For some of my homeschooling friends, both parents work, and they rotate the class time according to their schedules. One can do anything with the proper motivation.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  47. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    It is hard to believe you are qualified to teach all the necessary subjects. Your screed sounds like bravado.

  48. If you are reading, Ron Unz, how about putting Dr. Paul’s post in “lights” up top of the site for a change, please? You probably have some kind of numerical algorithm involving clicks on the page and/or comments, and I realize 50 comments is not a lot. However, relative to how much Ron Paul’s columns USUALLY get, it’s a lot!

    Give a Libertarian a break, man.

    Oh, and I of course agree with Dr. Paul yet again (it’s not always, BTW). To Peak Stupidity, homeschooling is a most admirable thing to do, and it’s “Poking the Beast in the eye with a big stick”. Here are: Part 2 and Part 3.

  49. @Realist

    A property tax break is putting it pretty mildly. Where I live, a majority of the property tax money goes to schools, at least that levied on housing. That’s no break, it’s a big freakin’ deal.

    I don’t want to ruin your day by calling you names, Realist, but you sound like a Libertarian in this comment … eeewwwww! I agree though, except for your insistence (not here, but your whole bunch of other comments) that homeschooling is a problem because parents might slip in a bunch of religion. Who cares? It can’t be any worse than the Globohomo religion of the public schools.

    That brings up something else you wrote. I agree that parental involvement can help the public schools somewhat. Guess who are mostly involved, Realist – it’s the Moms. They usually mean well, but women don’t like to get in people’s faces, and they don’t like to be called names. They will go along with all the BS that is IMPOSED from ABOVE in the schools. Anyone who really speaks out against the use of “person” instead of known-sex pronouns (just as a small example from my experience – see K-12 LGBT) will be told he’s being a pain-in-the-ass about nothing and should get on with raising money for the Halloween Carnival, excuse me, that was last year, Fall Carnival.

    What do I mean “IMPOSED from ABOVE”? Next comment ….

    • Troll: Realist
  50. @Realist

    You may be too young to remember when the various State and local governments ran lower education in their States/counties/districts, etc. without any BS out of the US Feral Government. The D-Congress wrote a law in the late 1970’s creating the cabinet-level agency of the Executive Branch, called the Department of Education. It was signed to make it law by President Jimmy Carter, since the teacher’s unions helped elect his ass in 1976.

    Before that, granted there was that “E” in the H.E.W., but there was not the overbearing presence with the top-down programs like “No Child Left Behind”, “Common Core” and all that.

    What I’m saying, Realist, is that the local public schools are NOT really under local control anymore. If the FEDs say “teach this!”, the schools will say “in return for how many new days off, SIR?!”

  51. @anarchyst

    EXCELLENT COMMENT, ANARCHYST! I skimmed through the comments yesterday or so, and I must have not have read this. All those 6 points are valid and are the reason many think of public schooling as child abuse.

    In case this is my last comment for a while based on Mr. Unz’s 4-strikes rule, ;-}, you are right, Vinnie O (below). I remember when Kindergarten was optional, and now governments and teachers are pushing for mandatory “pre-K”. They want the kids earlier and earlier, to where they are too young to understand the non-Socialist common-sense from their parents. Mo money, mo jobs, mo control!

  52. @anarchyst

    You’ve provided short glib responses, that raise more questions.

    How on earth, can you replicate a high school science lab, with a few household items?
    For example, do you have Mercury?

    And you just didn’t adequately answer the question around physical education, competitive sport, the arenas, playing environment and equipment needed for a full program of Sport and physical education, and how you could possibly replicate that for your neighborhood competition with other home-schooled children… if indeed, you had enough local children to undertake a team sport.

    The public school I went to had teachers that were specialised in all subjects.
    Mathematics, English, Social studies which included politics and culture, graphic / digital communications, and other non academic pursuits such as art, sheet metal work, woodworking, fitting and turning/ machining / mechanics, and as I’ve mentioned, physical education and other sports.
    We even had a well resourced music department which had all of the instruments you would find in 32 piece orchestra.
    My parents were working class, so I opted for a cheap instrument, and that was the harmonica.

    My mother was a traditional stay-at-home mum, and despite working part-time occasionally, did not have the resources or the knowledge to homeschool myself and my brothers and sisters.

    Here in Australia, we have a very small population, spread over a huge area, similar to that of the continental United States.
    We have very remote cattle stations, hundreds of kilometres away from the nearest town, and those towns are usually very small with no schools.
    For over 70 years now, we have had a service called School of the Air, where qualified teachers would teach children in their homes on their remote cattle stations, using a radio.
    Even if one of the parents would stay back at the station, they felt that their children’s best interests were left in the hands of a education professional in the School of the Air.

    So getting back to your quote… “Third, in my homeschool we cover every subject that is covered in public school.”

    Clearly, that’s misleading and totally untrue.

    I had the best well-rounded education possible, all provided by a public school, and it stretches credulity, to say the least, when people like yourself, claim they can replicate the same full and well-rounded education in a home environment.

  53. @anonymous

    “One can do anything with the proper motivation.”

    Mmm… maybe, but even if true, without the time and resources, no matter how much motivation you can muster, it will be redundant.

    There are many questions you have left unanswered, and for fear of repeating myself, read my response to anarchyst above… and let’s see if you can answer those questions.

  54. anarchyst says:
    @Peter Harris

    You may have gotten a good education in Australia, but here in the states, most large municipal-run school systems are “bottom of the barrel”.
    “Well-rounded” educations DO exist in the homeschool environment.
    Depending on the “state” to provide a non-biased TRUE education, teaching students HOW to think, rather than WHAT to think is non-existent in the public schools here in the states.
    Regards,

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  55. @anarchyst

    You are blinded by bias, and your appeal to emotion argument is pathetic and irrelevant.
    You didn’t address any of the pertinent questions i put to you, so based on your completely inadequate replies, like your arguments, home based education is too a failure.

    And like your latest post here, it’s just mindless nonsense, where you provide no evidence to back up your opinions

    • Replies: @anarchyst
  56. anarchyst says:
    @Peter Harris

    I don’t have to prove anything to you. Look at the stats for homeschooled students. The results speak for themselves.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  57. @Peter Harris

    For example, do you have Mercury?

    Mercury? How old are you, Mr. Harris? Nowadays, anything the least bit harmful (if swallowed or played with for years straight) or fun will not be found in school anyway. We used to take small pieces of sodium or potassium out of the oil in the bottles, and throw ’em in the toilet. We were just kids having a blast.

    they felt that their children’s best interests were left in the hands of a education professional in the School of the Air.

    That sounds like a cool project you all had, in your time in the remote Outback. What you need to understand, Peter, since you don’t live in America, is that “Education Professionals” are almost all usually-well-meaning nice ladies that were forced to go along with the Big-Ed PC Bullshit during their REQUIRED year or two Master’s Degree “education”. All the Big-Gov, Globohomo agenda is part and parcel to any curriculum. Only some private schools (whose principals and board members have guts) and parents can keep the crap out of the curriculum*.

    .

    * Hmmm .. I wonder if I’ll ever hear back about my grant request from the D.O.E. on my COCK program proposal – that is: Crap Outta the Curriculum – K – 12.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  58. @anarchyst

    Oh, those statistics for homeschooled students you never produced?
    In that case, your argument fails and homeschooling fails too.

  59. @Achmed E. Newman

    My age has nothing to do with the argument, but if you really want to know, I’m in my 30s.
    The periodic table hasn’t really changed much in the last 100 years or so, and your point is?
    We had practical examples of elements that appear on the periodic table, where homeschooling cannot reproduce such a hands on environment.
    We were taught the uses and dangers of mercury, and we were able to study it in the science lab.
    And what did you study in your homeschooled science lab? I’m guessing zero.

    And as for the rest of your post, you just descend into a diatribe of incoherent right wing talking points, which is completely irrelevant to the discussion.

    And tell me, how would you go about giving your homeschooled children a well-rounded physical education program?

    You mentioned crap, but I guess that sums up your entire argument.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  60. Read over, Peter. My point WAS, nobody lets you play with mercury anymore. They don’t even use it in thermostats anymore (and I don’t mean because electronics is better – even before that here was the over-the-center switch action that was kinda lame compared to the bimetal/mercury-switch type) Maybe your science education wasn’t as good as you’re advertising, if you don’t know this – never taken apart a thermostat?

    I thought that was a pretty civil post of mine and not by any means a diatribe. This one might be though, due to your acting like a dick here in the comments to people who don’t agree with your Statist point of view.

    I did not get homeshcooled, and I just told you what we did with the chemicals. We noted well the reactivity of those elements up the left side of the periodic table, with those single-electron out shells. That was before the Mommy-State prohibited a lot of the hands-on stuff. We have not homeschooled yet, but, as Peak Stupidity pointed out in “K-12 LGBT”, it may be time soon. The “demographics” for lack of a word that won’t soil your panties, Peter, of the next school are not as good as the one we’re using now, so that’s another problem.

    Sports leagues, science labs for home-schooled kids, all that, are things that have been around for at least 15 years, based on my experience with a homeschool Mom I knew that long ago. Do you deny that parents can get together and arrange these things in the age of Facebook, Peter? Is it something only a government could possibly do?

    What the fuck is wrong with you? Read people’s comments and LEARN something before you spout off your Statist talking points!

    • Agree: anarchyst
    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  61. @Peter Harris

    Oh, I get it! You’re a public school teacher and you took this all personally. Is that it?

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  62. @Achmed E. Newman

    Still making yourself look gromless, over your Mercury argument?
    Maybe you can lobby the powers that be, to have Mercury removed from the periodic table.
    And maybe then, you’ll have some argument, that wouldn’t now make yourself look so ridiculous.

    Thank God, you are just some idiot living in a basement, and you’re not actually teaching children anything, not even plasticine.

    Iike your revious post, you just go off on a far right-wing diatribe of incoherent drivel.
    And of course, you never back it up with statistical analysis or fact-checked links.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  63. @Achmed E. Newman

    No… not at all.
    I have a science background, but I am no teacher.

  64. @Peter Harris

    Periodic Table
    gromless(?)
    right-wing
    diatribe
    fact-checked links
    plasticine
    (OK, that’s a new one)

    There’s your word cloud. I am in a different cloud from you, Mr. Harris. We have no “gromless” in our alto-cumulus cloud here up above the stupidity of the statists and the fake “conservatives”, here in the Ron Paul Liberty Cloud.

    So long as we can get the comment-count up a bit, maybe Dr. Paul can be featured higher and bigger on the unz main page, as a counterpoint to the Commies.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  65. @Achmed E. Newman

    Still dribbling out the corner of your mouth?
    Perhaps there is medication you can take for that… along with your other psychological ailments.

  66. @Peter Harris

    Keep the comments flowing, Comrade Harris – I’d like to see Dr. Paul get better billing. Oh, did you ever even bother reading his column or learning about his curriculum?

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  67. anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Vinnie O

    You notice Kindergarten includes the word ‘garten’, which is garden in German?

    While the English sent Children into the mines to work, (and fought wars galore), those bellicose Germans came up with all kinds of evil social ideas (I refuse to call them socialist). Even Florence Nightingale went to Germany for training.
    Kindergartens were established to give working class children, who lived in the dank tenements of the working class. an opportunity to play and work in sunny gardens established esp. for them. Fresh air and sunshine, doing educational and interesting things… I am afraid their mothers appreciated having them in that environment for a few hrs every day.
    A certain Dr. Schreber came up with the idea that having garden plots for city workers, so they could spend their spare time in nature, would be good and healthy. Schrebergaerten exist in all German cities to this day and are vastly popular.

  68. Liza says:
    @Realist

    I am not defending public schools…they are horrible, but homeschooling is not the answer. Private schools are the answer, with choice left to the parents

    Private schools are the answer to…what? To a largely disintegrated culture? To country-wide insanity? It’s going to take a hel of a lot more than style of education! Public/private/homeschooling is probably irrelevant.

    I notice that if people disagree in principle with any certain aspect of child rearing (including but not limited to type of schooling), then they will blame just about everything that is problematical or disagreeable about the child (who then might turn into an adult with serious problems – or not) on that thing. They will ignore all the good qualities in the child. I see this every damn day.

    How your kids “turn out” is largely unknowable but I’d say that heredity is a large factor. Schooling is near the bottom of the list.

  69. anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    First of all, do you think children should not get any religious training?
    Does religious training prohibit a good education otherwise?

    I have known a lot of home schooled kids over the years. Only one was, ugh, deprived. But he was bright and became a diesel mechanic and is doing well.
    His slow poke stepfather was exploiting the kid’s labor.
    Every other home schooled kid, and I know at least a dozen, did very well. The last just started college, after graduating from High School with flying colors a year early.

    I know one family that grouped with other home schoolers. A retired math teacher grandpa taught the whole group a few times a week.
    There are online programs . like Khan Academy which I hear is very good.
    What gives you the idea that a homeschooling parent is only passing on what he/she knows?

    A while back at a restaurant at the table next to us. A family with several children. Very well behaved, very nice, I went over and said, I bet you are home schooled. They asked, how can you tell? It was obvious. BTW, I used to work as a substitute teacher and have been around.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
    , @Realist
  70. anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Harris

    That is an asinine comment.
    You make a fool of yourself as good as you can.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  71. @anonymous

    Says somebody who doesn’t have the courage to post their name, and goes under “Anonymous.”

  72. @Liza

    “How your kids “turn out” is largely unknowable but I’d say that heredity is a large factor. Schooling is near the bottom of the list.”

    Yes, I largely agree.
    Have you looked at the epigenetic component of how children develop mentally, psychologically and physically?

  73. @anonymous

    Your whole argument is punctuated by thought bubbles, supposition and meaningless anecdotes, that cannot be verified.

    You publish no statistics or analysis in support your argument about home-based schooling.

    • Agree: Realist
  74. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    First of all, do you think children should not get any religious training?

    It makes no difference to me…I am not religious. The best place for that is at home, church or religion based school…not public school.

    Does religious training prohibit a good education otherwise?

    Yes, but only if it is religiously dogmatic and anti-science.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  75. Realist says:
    @Liza

    Private schools are the answer to…what?

    The premise of this article. Homeschooling is the best way to educate your children.

    To a largely disintegrated culture? To country-wide insanity? It’s going to take a hel of a lot more than style of education! Public/private/homeschooling is probably irrelevant.

    Mostly but not totally irrelevant. My comment was in context to the article.

    How your kids “turn out” is largely unknowable but I’d say that heredity is a large factor. Schooling is near the bottom of the list.

    Yes, my contention is that at least 80% of human traits are DNA determined. But that was not the scope of the article.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  76. @Realist

    A fair point for people who own homes.

    Unfortunately, tens of millions of people don’t own a home and are not going to be able to afford to buy one. Property tax breaks, then, don’t help them come up with money for tuition to educate their children at a private school (even if landlords lowered rents due to the lower property tax, ha ha).

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  77. @Markus Areola

    See your point, but the government schools we know don’t operate anywhere near ten hours per day. The K-5 school in our neighborhood runs less than six and a half hours, including lunch break.

    But whatever number of hours the government school operates, we distrust the system and the people running it, to be sure, and want people empowered to get their kids out of government-owned and government-operated schools en masse.

  78. @Realist

    That’s “supposeD to be.” Good to get the rudiments of English right before calling others idiots.

    • Replies: @Realist
  79. @Realist

    “Yes, my contention is that at least 80% of human traits are DNA determined. But that was not the scope of the article.”

    Well, talk about getting off-topic.
    But seeing as though you raise it, you’re forgetting about epigenetics.

    • Replies: @Realist
  80. @Achmed E. Newman

    I’m happy to discuss the topic, but whenever I have encountered far-right galahs like yourself, you don’t have the intellectual rigour to maintain a rational argument, so you descend into ad hominems and non sequiturs.

    Again, generally speaking, where is your evidence, or Ron Paul’s evidence, either practical or scientific, that shows homeschooling is superior than the alternative?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  81. Realist says:
    @Peter Harris

    Well, talk about getting off-topic.

    I was replying to Lisa’s comment…that’s who brought it up.

    But seeing as though you raise it, you’re forgetting about epigenetics.

    Not at all. Epigenetics is a new study/theory of gene expression and the extent of influence is at this time, unknown. My comment was ‘at least 80%’ which leaves about 20% for other factors…epigenetics being one of them.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  82. Realist says:
    @RadicalCenter

    That’s “supposeD to be.” Good to get the rudiments of English right before calling others idiots.

    My reply was to a commenter who called me a liar. You are injecting yourself into comments that are not directed to you. When you do that you should know the situation…you did not. You choose to berate me for a minor error in spelling…you went out of your way to be an asshole.

  83. @Realist

    Epigenetics is responsible for 100% of cellular expression, but mainstream science is a little slow to catch up.

    • Replies: @Realist
  84. Realist says:
    @Peter Harris

    Epigenetics is responsible for 100% of cellular expression, but mainstream science is a little slow to catch up.

    Of course you know better.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  85. @Peter Harris

    No, you’re NOT happy to discuss the topic. Let me paste in the title of the article, in case your scroll feature is broken: “Homeschoolers Are Educated, Not Indoctrinated”. Got it? Dr. Paul is doing something of an advertisement for his curriculum, granted, but his point, same as a number of the ON-TOPIC comments had, was that the government, aka public schools are indoctrinating kids via this taking off for political causes, slipping in political agendas, etc.

    I’ve seen it myself, Mr. Harris, in ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, for cyrin’ out loud. I just terminated us on one of the reading-comprehension web-sites due to some BS like this (hell, the kid can read 3 levels above anyway, so he’s better off outside – thinking of getting a small fishing boat). If you ever get around to reading the Peak Stupidity post I linked to, you’ll see another small, but illustrative, example of the problem parents have with government schools.

    Now, I started writing to you just in correction of your idea that there’s no way in hell any parents could possibly GET TOGETHER, what, on something like Facebook, email, or the damn telephone, to arrange team sports or that these kids are prohibited from ever using any taxpayer paid for science labs or equipment. My simple point about the mercury, which you made into some stupid digression into the periodic table, was that you can’t do much anymore anyway, with all the OSHA rules, Material Safety Data Sheets, and all that shit that gets in the way of getting things done. It’s a different story at home – you may not have all the equipment, but my 4 year-old understood tire pressure, and now (a few years later) why we put more air in the tires in winter to keep the same pressure. I just explained to him yesterday how low pressure wears the outsides of the tire tread and vice versa for high pressure and then the pros/cons of having the pressure lower or higher than that recommended.

    Now, if that’s too much for you, I’ll come down to your basic Statist assumption. You think everybody is stupid. That they need government to take care of them and keep them from being stupid, seems to be your working assumption. As a matter of fact, it’s government Socialism that makes people stupid and irresponsible. We don’t need government to teach kids, whether we do it via small private schools that evade the heavy hand of Big-Ed or via home-schooling, with lots of help now from the internet.

    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  86. @Realist

    Yes, he was – it all happened out there in the (back of the) Outback, when his government-supplied nanny drove out there each day in her Subaru.

  87. @RadicalCenter

    In anything close to a free market, in the medium and long run, OF COURSE, rents will be lower. I’m not at all saying that one’s landlord will just text you “hey, my taxes went down – your rent is lower now by $400 a month). That’s the very short run. However barring government interference* pretty soon the next guy may think about renting out his garage apt. because it pays off now. Keep in mind, R.C. that property tax on rental property is MUCH higher than on owner-occupied places. The savings will show up in rentals too, soon enough.

    Now, about private schools, they can charge out the ying-yang (and they do!) in places where the demographics make parents want their children out of the public schools badly. Were there more competition, there would assuredly be some low-budget schools that more parents could afford. Low budget does not at all mean worse education. You get a group of parents, rent space in a old strip mall or a few butler-type buildings, get this retired engineer to teach math, get this local writer, some Emily Dickinson wannabe to teach English (you know she needs the money) and KEEP THE RULES DOWN. If you keep the rules down, it becomes a fun and rewarding job for teachers, as opposed to the government school bureacracy. Work out the money on the back-of-an-envelope or in your head sometime, and you’ll see that $10,000 yearly per student is just an outrage. It can be done for 4 grand per kid.

    .

    * The rent control being the most obvious and egregious stupidity of this kind, with the humorous Seinfeld stories of being excited about your long-term neighbors dying off, etc. That’s NY City on TV, but in real life I ran into this. It’s not pretty. People are not going to rent out their place if it doesn’t pay or the risk is too high of it not. It was hard to rent ANYTHING.

  88. @Liza

    Of course, a lot of how your kid turns out is genetic, but ‘Schooling is near the bottom of the list.”? Nah. If the middle school is 60% black, and your kid is not as maturely built as 5′ 8″ 8th graders, then he’s liable to get his ass kicked a lot or at least hate having to spend 6 hours a day in a hell-hole. Whether he can make up the learning that he’ll miss with all the discipline problems taking up most of the day is one thing, but do you want to subject your kids to that, Liza?

    That wasn’t Ron Paul’s point, but the indoctrination was. I theorize that the smarter kids may be worse off, in fact. Rather than just think about the football game and/or fishing, these kids not only CAN read well, but LIKE reading. They will be served the political agenda that is inserted into all the new books (believe me, if you think this is BS, you are like me telling my Dad in the early 1980s – “it’s just a TV show, there’s no agenda.”. Nope he was quite right, it turns out.)

    Of course, you can fight this stuff at home, but by a certain age, the kids are tired of listening to it. They will be indoctrinated until their smart brains will figure out the lies they’ve been fed … that may be in their 20’s, maybe late 30’s, or maybe later. In the meantime, they make wrong decisions based on the feminism, (the new one) the genderbender nonsense, the overt political BS they’ve been fed, until they do learn. That’s a bad way to go through a big portion of adulthood.

  89. Liza says:

    Whether he can make up the learning that he’ll miss with all the discipline problems taking up most of the day is one thing, but do you want to subject your kids to that, Liza?

    To be honest, I never considered the racial background of the other students. I was thinking more of overall school culture (both public & private) going back generations – even where everyone is white. It’s a milder version of the army no matter how loose ‘n’ liberal it appears on the surface in today’s schools. I dislike how school, public or private, take over the whole family. So, homeschooling is better for day-to-day life, but is no guarantee by a long shot. Mine are homeschooled. Without preaching, they think pretty much like their parents! But I give myself no credit for any special efforts.

    I don’t know much about the heredity VS epigenetics, as Peter H. was asking me. At first glance, I think it makes sense. My view, though I am not all that religious, is that God has a plan for everyone and we only think we have a lot of effect on our kids or the trajectory of our own lives. That’s part of the plan – if we thought our efforts had no effect, we’d all kill ourselves now out of hopelessness. So we trudge forward, thinking that such & such was due to our own actions. God made us that way for his own, possibly unknowable, purposes.

    JMO, A.E.N., and thank you for responding and especially for your own thoughts and ideas.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  90. @Achmed E. Newman

    Really, you just unhinged.
    You accuse me of not wanting to talk about the topic, which, if you’ve read my posts, you’ll find that all I wanted to do is talk about this rationally, and provide some science and practical examples to make this argument realistic.

    And here you are, going off topic, with a lot of your own asinine and inane talking points.

    My description of you as unhinged, and your commentary as asinine and inane will most likely see you stamp your foot and claim that I’m just insulting you, but let’s take a look at some of your nonsensical talking points, that raise more questions than answers…

     “It can’t be any worse than the Globohomo religion of the public schools.”

    “Anyone who really speaks out against the use of “person” instead of known-sex pronouns (just as a small example from my experience – see K-12 LGBT) will be told he’s being a pain-in-the-ass about nothing and should get on with raising money for the Halloween Carnival, excuse me, that was last year, Fall Carnival.”

    “It was signed to make it law by President Jimmy Carter, since the teacher’s unions helped elect his ass in 1976.”

    “They want the kids earlier and earlier, to where they are too young to understand the non-Socialist common-sense from their parents. Mo money, mo jobs, mo control!”

    “Hmmm .. I wonder if I’ll ever hear back about my grant request from the D.O.E. on my COCK program proposal – that is: Crap Outta the Curriculum – K – 12.”

    “How old are you, Mr. Harris?”

    “…your acting like a dick here in the comments…”

    “… parents can get together and arrange things through Facebook.”

    “So long as we can get the comment-count up a bit, maybe Dr. Paul can be featured higher and bigger on the unz main page, as a counterpoint to the Commies.”

    “What the fuck is wrong with you? Read people’s comments and LEARN something before you spout off your Statist talking points!”

    “Keep the comments flowing, Comrade Harris – I’d like to see Dr. Paul get better billing.”

    “I’ve seen it myself, Mr. Harris, in ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, for cyrin’ out loud. I just terminated us on one of the reading-comprehension web-sites due to some BS like this (hell, the kid can read 3 levels above anyway, so he’s better off outside – thinking of getting a small fishing boat).”

    “…what, on something like Facebook, email, or the damn telephone, to arrange team sports or that these kids are prohibited from ever using any taxpayer paid for science labs or equipment.”

    “My simple point about the mercury, which you made into some stupid digression into the periodic table, was that you can’t do much anymore anyway, with all the OSHA rules, Material Safety Data Sheets, and all that shit that gets in the way of getting things done.”

    “…but my 4 year-old understood tire pressure…”

    “I just explained to him yesterday how low pressure wears the outsides of the tire tread and vice versa for high pressure and then the pros/cons of having the pressure lower or higher than that recommended.”

    “Now, if that’s too much for you, I’ll come down to your basic Statist assumption.”

    “As a matter of fact, it’s government Socialism that makes people stupid and irresponsible.”

    “…home-schooling, with lots of help now from the internet.”

    “…get this retired engineer to teach math, get this local writer, some Emily Dickinson wannabe to teach English (you know she needs the money)”

    “Work out the money on the back-of-an-envelope or in your head sometime, and you’ll see that $10,000 yearly per student is just an outrage. It can be done for 4 grand per kid.”

    “Nah. If the middle school is 60% black, and your kid is not as maturely built as 5′ 8″ 8th graders, then he’s liable to get his ass kicked a lot or at least hate having to spend 6 hours a day in a hell-hole.”

    “That wasn’t Ron Paul’s point, but the indoctrination was. I theorize that the smarter kids may be worse off, in fact. Rather than just think about the football game and/or fishing, these kids not only CAN read well, but LIKE reading.”

    “They will be served the political agenda that is inserted into all the new books (believe me, if you think this is BS, you are like me telling my Dad in the early 1980s.”

    “That wasn’t Ron Paul’s point, but the indoctrination was.”

    “I theorize that the smarter kids may be worse off, in fact.”

    “Rather than just think about the football game and/or fishing, these kids not only CAN read well, but LIKE reading.”

    “They will be served the political agenda that is inserted into all the new books (believe me, if you think this is BS, you are like me telling my Dad in the early 1980s…”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  91. @Peter Harris

    OK, so let’s see. Taking the sentences out of all the paragraphs and putting them in different order is proof of this unhingement? Why didn’t you read them when they WERE in order? It’s a lot easier. That’s what I did with your comments.

    You took a whole damn day to come up with this retort, Peter? If you really wanted to talk about the topic, you would explain how public schools do not indoctrinate kids, and just refute a few of the points Ron Paul made in his column. All you can come up with is your Statist words to the effect of:

    “YOU CAN’T DO THAT! THE GOVERNMENT MUST RUN THIS! PEOPLE JUST CAN’T GO AROUND TEACHING THEIR OWN CHILDREN AND SHIT! THIS IS HIGHLY IRREGULAR!”

    Don’t worry, Scro, now there are plenty of tards out there living really kick-ass lives. Me ex-wife … retarded … she’s a pilot now.

    • Troll: Peter Harris
    • Replies: @Peter Harris
  92. @Liza

    Thanks for the reply, Liza, and I am in admiration of your homeschooling job. I don’t know what “JMO” stands for, though. “J” for Jesus?

    • Replies: @Liza
  93. anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    >>It makes no difference to me…I am not religious. The best place for that is at home, church or religion based school…not public school.<<

    So what are we talking about?

    • Replies: @Realist
  94. @Achmed E. Newman

    “Don’t worry, Scro, now there are plenty of tards out there living really kick-ass lives. Me ex-wife … retarded … she’s a pilot now.”

    Yep… I need comment no further…

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  95. Realist says:
    @anonymous

    So what are we talking about?

    Read my comments.

  96. @Liza

    Thanks. That shouldn’t have been so hard for me!

    • Agree: Liza
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