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When Duterte Met Abe
Is Japan the America’s Pit Bull or Lap Dog… …or Dog in the Manger?
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As I discuss in my most recent piece for Asia Times, Duterte v. United States: The Empire Slaps Back, I find the US tunnel vision concerning Asian attitudes toward engagement with China puzzling.

The big story in Asia IMO is the smaller powers trying to integrate with the PRC economically while keeping it at arms’ length militarily, but that doesn’t seem to drive the coverage I see. Perhaps as a function of that “salary depends on not understanding” Mark Twain crack, US diplos/generals/journos/wonks seem determined to ignore the centripetal forces at play in Asia with China at their heart.

There’s also a gigantic blind spot in US coverage of the Philippines. If you read the papes, everybody in the Philippines is staring anxiously out at the South China Sea for “Chizilla” to emerge and wreak havoc on a jewel of Pacific democracy.

Actually, if you read my piece, you’ll find that the forces ravaging the Philippines are poverty, inequality, social division, corruption, and the occasional megatyphoon and I have an idea the reason that Fidel Ramos championed Duterte is because he saw him as the one candidate who would focus on domestic issues and not pivot-friendly bullsh*t.

The US story is that the threat of “China rising” must be contained militarily, its economic reach reduced, and Asia should look for a “high standards” trade bloc, TPP, for its growth story instead of canoodling with the Chicoms.

However, I think the CCP read its George Kennan and realized the containment strategy worked on the USSR because the Soviets thought, incorrectly, they could cut it as an autarky. Deng knew different, enabled inward and outward investment, and now we’re looking at not only Asia but much of the world anxious at how Chinese trouble will play out in their own economies.

In my opinion, the US was only able to establish “China threat” as the top element on the Asian FP agenda temporarily, with considerable effort, and only by the active support of pro-US government officials in Japan and the Philippines who were willing to assist in engineering polarizing provocations with the PRC around the Senkakus and Scarborough Shoal.

Now the economic logic of Asian integration i.e. hoovering up the cash the PRC is willing to throw at the region is reasserting itself.

Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar, Vietnam, and now the Philippines are showing via engagement with China that their participation in any US crusade is conditional and equivocal.

These countries are not democratic and human rights garden spots, so I guess the US could summon up some “birds of a feather” grumbling about why the jefes of these regimes are willing to cozy up to dictators instead of joining the crusade to contain, isolate, and degrade the PRC regime (and heroically put their own economic well-being at risk at the same time).

And then there’s this guy:

fist1

That’s Shinzo Abe making nice with Rodrigo Duterte during Duterte’s recent visit to Japan. Actually, making the “iron fist”, the symbol of Duterte’s, shall we say, rather harsh vision of how to make Philippine democracy do the right thing “or I’ll punch the crap outta you. Or worse.”

I just love this picture. I don’t recall seeing it in US coverage of Duterte’s foray into Japan.

US tunnel vision was in full force again, focused on the fact that Duterte said he wanted foreign militaries a.k.a. the US outta the Philippines in two years.

But the big story was, to paraphrase Sherlock Holmes, “the dog that didn’t snarl.” Japan.

Abe reciprocated Duterte’s outreached fist, one might say, with his own, and competed with the PRC in offering various goodies to the Philippines.

Abe’s Japan, as I comment in my Asia Times piece, has a rather multi-jointed agenda.

Japan was in a pretty solid space, securitywise, if it was content to remain a security ward of the United States under the pacifist constitution. But ideology, opportunity, and necessity are driving Japan back into Asia as a security actor.

Abe, a revisionist nationalist (i.e. he rejects the victor’s justice narrative of World War II that Japan did wrong and deserved to be militarily neutered), is piggybacking on the pivot to enable Japan’s re-emergence as a full-fledged Asian power with an extensive network of relationships cum allies in East and South Asia.

China’s rise is an indispensable element in Japan’s rise.

The, let’s face it, hulking and goonish face of PRC regional engagement promotes a search for capable friends, and most Asian countries are pretty happy to have Japan in their corner—and not too upset about Japan’s return to the fray as a full-fledged military power.

Second, after the United States signed on to the “China threat” narrative as the driver for its Asia pivot (something that Kurt Campbell, Hillary Clinton, and Seiji Maehara cahooted on in 2010), the US abandoned the honest broker position it had claimed in previous decades and lined up behind Japan and provided material, operational, and diplomatic support for the expansion of Japan’s military footprint in Asia.

However, I believe that Japanese strategists regard US anti-China resolve as a wasting asset, not just subject to the vagaries of American politics and conflicting economic/fiscal/trade priorities that undercut the containment strategy, but also because the ineluctable logic of Asian growth is sidelining the US as hegemon of the anti-China alliance.

There is likely to come a day when the US faces its Suez moment and admits it’s not ready to fight a war in the west Pacific to protect US interests and sustain US prestige.

That day is unlikely to come under the Clinton administration—which has preemptively committed itself to a policy of sustaining US global pre-eminence through the application of military force as needed—and that, depending on your appetite for combat with the Chicoms 8000 miles from home, is either a good or bad thing.

But the day will probably come and if and when it does, Japan does not want to be standing there helplessly holding its daikon (as it did when Nixon went to China). Instead, it’s going to be militarily strong, probably with a Israel-style covert nuclear weapons capability it will discretely brandish, and with a strong regional network of friends and allies in East Asia.

I think a Japan-centric security regime facing China but complemented by regional economic integration is sustainable; I think a US-centric system based on forestalling economic integration and keeping allies submissive by maintaining a nuclear “umbrella” a.k.a. monopoly is not.

We may de facto be heading towards such a regime, even as the Clinton administration continues its hypernationalist bluster. There’s the nibbling away at the pivot by the smaller and weaker allies, there’s Abe with Duterte and, if I’m reading Paul Krugman’s tea leaves correctly, it appears that President Clinton may give up on TPP as an Obama pipe dream.

Not to say peace and reduced tensions are in the offing for East Asia; particularly, if I was Duterte I’d watch my back as the Clinton administration will probably seek to punish his lese majeste toward the United States much more than the lame-duck Obama administration. And, I imagine the U.S. Navy will demand more of its precious FONOPs in order to provoke the Chinese, hopefully to the point of a confrontation that feeds the security polarization narrative and fattens its budget.

But the general trend seems to be away from Hillary Clinton’s goal of “America’s Pacific Century” toward “The Pacific’s Pacific Century” and I think that’s a pretty good thing.

(Republished from China Matters by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Abe, China, Duterte 
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  1. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    “However, I think the CCP read its George Kennan and realized the containment strategy worked on the USSR because the Soviets thought, incorrectly, they could cut it as an autarky. Deng knew different, enabled inward and outward investment, and now we’re looking at not only Asia but much of the world anxious at how Chinese trouble will play out in their own economies.”

    I must disagree. USSR was not an autarky. In fact, it would have done better as one.

    The thing is USSR had to support, subsidize, and prop up so many of its satellite nations. It had to favor industry in Eastern Europeans nations and suppress its own industry in consumer goods. It bought Cuban sugar at 5 times the international rate. It subsidized oil for Cuba.

    Indeed, Russia would have done better as an autarky. It has the land and resources to do so. But not the will and mindset.

    China is different. Too many people and not enough resources despite vast size.

    At any rate, autarky or not, communism couldn’t produce top-notch consumer goods that could be sold around the world, esp not in competition with US, German, and Japanese products.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Wong
    US consumer goods cannot sell around the world anymore nowadays, all it can do is bombing, killing and howling “We will beat you harder than you have ever been beaten before.” does it mean the US is worse than communism, a parasite or a thug?
    , @Rehmat
    I'm not surprised over your support for the USSR, which produced world-class Jew mass-murderers.

    USSR was, and is, a colonial power like Israel. It kept invading and occupying many European and Muslim-majority Asian countries for empire building and exploiting natural resources of Chechnya, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, etc.

    After the Red Army met Hizbullah in Afghanistan - the USSR went bankrupt and lost most of its European and Asian possessions.

    The Organized Jewry still believe that Jews had nothing to do with the murder of Russian Czar or that Soviet first government was 80-85% Jewish, which even Putin admitted in 2013.

    https://rehmat1.com/2013/06/19/putin-i-smile-to-jews-will-they-smile-back/
    , @Montefrío
    If the principle of subsidiarity ( http://subsidiarityinstitute.blogspot.com.ar/ ) were applied from the bottom up, so to speak, autarky would be possible in many nations. The USSR and PRC both adopted and adapted the "American system" (https://infogalactic.com/info/American_System_(economic_plan) , avoiding the debt trap that strangles the economies of nearly all nations. Granted, taking this step is dangerous and it isn't a global panacea, given the disparity in resources and national capabilities, but if the USA were to take the step...
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  2. Jason Liu says:

    There is of course, the third option. Japan moves away from the west and rejoins Asia under friendly terms. Not as a Chinese vassal or anything, but another Asian nation in the Asian sphere that aligns with Asian interests. Just like old times.

    I for one would like China, Japan and the Philippines in the same corner. That is the vision Chinese and Japanese leaders should have instead of constantly speaking about an inevitable conflict.

    Ultimately the threat to Asian interests (or any other) is the encroaching globalist worldview that emanates from the west. We need to put away our petty tribalism for greater tribalism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marcus
    Don't flips still hate Japs over WW2? And let's not even start with Chinee and Japs
    , @Erik Sieven
    "We need to put away our petty tribalism for greater tribalism." very good point. The important thing is to prevent mass migration from subsaharan Africa and the muslim world to East Asia. Yet the question remains, whether East Asia needs the constant internal struggle to stay fit. Europe did not get the center of the world by working together, but by trying to compete against each other.
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  3. Great analysis, and I hope you’re right about the general trend.

    Also, I can see alt-righters adopting Duterte’s iron fist gesture.

    Read More
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  4. 5371 says:

    Abe has that “How do you do fellow kids?” look about him in the picture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cattle Guard
    Ha. I sent that pic to a couple of friends who are into memes, maybe they can put it to good use. I think it has potential.
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  5. bob sykes says:

    All of the countries around the South China Sea suffered under European and/or American and/or Japanese colonialism. China got all three. Overall, the Japanese were the most vicious, but the US did kill well over 1 million Filipinos to establish its colonial control. That is similar to the Turkish genocide of the Armenians.

    Considering that history, it is hard to see how either Japan or America can be fitted into any sort of regional military and commercial system. I can see the countries in the region forming a relationship that is implicitly anti-American and anti-Japanese.

    Read More
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  6. Joe Wong says:

    The author begs China not to kick the American out of the western Pacific on the basis that a strong presence of the USA will prevent the appearance of a nuclear powered militaristic Japan. Perhaps the author has not figured out that a nuclear powered militaristic Japan is a God sent opportunity for China to get rid of the thorn on its side that has caused it untold amounts of agonies in the last few centuries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marcus
    But China and Japan were never rivals before the late 19th century, the 16th century war over Korea was anomalous.
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  7. Joe Wong says:
    @Anon
    "However, I think the CCP read its George Kennan and realized the containment strategy worked on the USSR because the Soviets thought, incorrectly, they could cut it as an autarky. Deng knew different, enabled inward and outward investment, and now we’re looking at not only Asia but much of the world anxious at how Chinese trouble will play out in their own economies."

    I must disagree. USSR was not an autarky. In fact, it would have done better as one.

    The thing is USSR had to support, subsidize, and prop up so many of its satellite nations. It had to favor industry in Eastern Europeans nations and suppress its own industry in consumer goods. It bought Cuban sugar at 5 times the international rate. It subsidized oil for Cuba.

    Indeed, Russia would have done better as an autarky. It has the land and resources to do so. But not the will and mindset.

    China is different. Too many people and not enough resources despite vast size.

    At any rate, autarky or not, communism couldn't produce top-notch consumer goods that could be sold around the world, esp not in competition with US, German, and Japanese products.

    US consumer goods cannot sell around the world anymore nowadays, all it can do is bombing, killing and howling “We will beat you harder than you have ever been beaten before.” does it mean the US is worse than communism, a parasite or a thug?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Marcus says:
    @Jason Liu
    There is of course, the third option. Japan moves away from the west and rejoins Asia under friendly terms. Not as a Chinese vassal or anything, but another Asian nation in the Asian sphere that aligns with Asian interests. Just like old times.

    I for one would like China, Japan and the Philippines in the same corner. That is the vision Chinese and Japanese leaders should have instead of constantly speaking about an inevitable conflict.

    Ultimately the threat to Asian interests (or any other) is the encroaching globalist worldview that emanates from the west. We need to put away our petty tribalism for greater tribalism.

    Don’t flips still hate Japs over WW2? And let’s not even start with Chinee and Japs

    Read More
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  9. Marcus says:
    @Joe Wong
    The author begs China not to kick the American out of the western Pacific on the basis that a strong presence of the USA will prevent the appearance of a nuclear powered militaristic Japan. Perhaps the author has not figured out that a nuclear powered militaristic Japan is a God sent opportunity for China to get rid of the thorn on its side that has caused it untold amounts of agonies in the last few centuries.

    But China and Japan were never rivals before the late 19th century, the 16th century war over Korea was anomalous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Wong
    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal - all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in "Melissa" - the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don't have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person's, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.
    , @neutral
    The ultimate war goals of that 16th century war was to conquer China (this is clearly stated by the chief architects of the war). The Japanese just happened to get bogged down in Korea to ever reach China proper.
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  10. @5371
    Abe has that "How do you do fellow kids?" look about him in the picture.

    Ha. I sent that pic to a couple of friends who are into memes, maybe they can put it to good use. I think it has potential.

    Read More
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  11. Rehmat says:
    @Anon
    "However, I think the CCP read its George Kennan and realized the containment strategy worked on the USSR because the Soviets thought, incorrectly, they could cut it as an autarky. Deng knew different, enabled inward and outward investment, and now we’re looking at not only Asia but much of the world anxious at how Chinese trouble will play out in their own economies."

    I must disagree. USSR was not an autarky. In fact, it would have done better as one.

    The thing is USSR had to support, subsidize, and prop up so many of its satellite nations. It had to favor industry in Eastern Europeans nations and suppress its own industry in consumer goods. It bought Cuban sugar at 5 times the international rate. It subsidized oil for Cuba.

    Indeed, Russia would have done better as an autarky. It has the land and resources to do so. But not the will and mindset.

    China is different. Too many people and not enough resources despite vast size.

    At any rate, autarky or not, communism couldn't produce top-notch consumer goods that could be sold around the world, esp not in competition with US, German, and Japanese products.

    I’m not surprised over your support for the USSR, which produced world-class Jew mass-murderers.

    USSR was, and is, a colonial power like Israel. It kept invading and occupying many European and Muslim-majority Asian countries for empire building and exploiting natural resources of Chechnya, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, etc.

    After the Red Army met Hizbullah in Afghanistan – the USSR went bankrupt and lost most of its European and Asian possessions.

    The Organized Jewry still believe that Jews had nothing to do with the murder of Russian Czar or that Soviet first government was 80-85% Jewish, which even Putin admitted in 2013.

    https://rehmat1.com/2013/06/19/putin-i-smile-to-jews-will-they-smile-back/

    Read More
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  12. Joe Wong says:
    @Marcus
    But China and Japan were never rivals before the late 19th century, the 16th century war over Korea was anomalous.

    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal – all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in “Melissa” – the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don’t have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person’s, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    What is said is all true. Japanese should have thank the Chinese rather than invaded their country and brutalized them. Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed. This gave the Japanese the chance to industrialize their country and catch up with the West before it too would have fell victim to the West colonialization.

    What is strange is that today's Japanese politicians act as if they were the injured party vis-a-vis China. Tears welled up in the female Japanese defense minister's eyes because she cannot visit the war criminal shrine under pressure from China. Talk about brainwashed and a warp sense of history.
    , @Marcus
    It's true, China and Japan were never rivals before the first Sino-Japanese war. The Japanese shogun acknowledged being a vassal of China (like all China's neighbors did).
    , @Anonymous
    A lot of that stuff is exaggerated and originates in war propaganda, just like the Nazi human lampshade stuff and Saddam Hussein's Iraqi army throwing Kuwaiti babies out of incubators stuff. That's not to say that there weren't terrible war crimes of course.
    , @utu
    Hey Joe Wong, you seem to be addicted to war propaganda porn. Are you partly Jewish by any chance?
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  13. DB Cooper says:
    @Joe Wong
    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal - all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in "Melissa" - the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don't have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person's, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.

    What is said is all true. Japanese should have thank the Chinese rather than invaded their country and brutalized them. Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed. This gave the Japanese the chance to industrialize their country and catch up with the West before it too would have fell victim to the West colonialization.

    What is strange is that today’s Japanese politicians act as if they were the injured party vis-a-vis China. Tears welled up in the female Japanese defense minister’s eyes because she cannot visit the war criminal shrine under pressure from China. Talk about brainwashed and a warp sense of history.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Hey, Joe.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand
     
    Sorry. Can't see any equivalence between whaling and the other things you state. By the way, whale meat is quite tasty. I only eat it occasionally, but it is delicious.

    importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses.
     
    With that, you stray into the territory of ludicrous hypocrisy. The big markets for bits of endangered species are in China (both the PRC and the Republic in Taiwan) and Vietnam.

    Please offer some facts and figures on Japan's insatiable lust for rhino horn.

    It hardly exists.

    You also deny agency to the poachers, truly evil people.
    , @Che Guava
    You carry a very mixed baggage, and don't know much at all.

    Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed.
     
    You have a very strange idea on both points.

    Your first is true until an indefinite point well over a thousand years ago.

    Ever read the tale of Genji?

    If not, you should.

    Sure, there was much back-and-forth after that, in the age of the great lords and shoguns.

    Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy, note that this long preceded the arrival of Commodore Perry and his armada and ultimata.

    To make some connection between Japan and China's suffering in the mid-19th century is utter nonsense.

    Actually, there is a connection, one a moron such as you would not know of. People in the nobility and of letters had some idea of what was happening in China, and were determined to not allow the same kind of process.

    Don't bother posting if you have no knowledge.
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  14. Svigor says:

    Abe, a revisionist nationalist (i.e. he rejects the victor’s justice narrative of World War II that Japan did wrong and deserved to be militarily neutered)

    Agreed. Only “victor’s justice” historians would condemn what the Japs did to the Chinks in WWII. If, like you, the Japs can’t pare “deserve to be militarily neutered” away from “Japan did wrong,” that’s their problem.

    NOBODY deserves to be militarily neutered. Well, except maybe all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn’t they want us gone?).

    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal

    Who gives a shit. You idiots suffered 100x as much from the Mongols. But of course, they’re nobody now, and that’s what really matters…

    After the Red Army met Hizbullah in Afghanistan – the USSR went bankrupt and lost most of its European and Asian possessions.

    After I wiped my arse, I saw a comet. So what? One had nothing to do with the other (p.s., Hizbulla?), despite Mohametean crowing otherwise. Soviets left the commie Afghan regime firmly in control, and it survived well after the Soviets had gone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sam J.
    "...all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn’t they want us gone?)..."

    Then we should go. What exactly are we guarding that's of American interest in Asia?

    I've yet to see anyone posit the idea that Japan might ally with China. I think it's a distinct possibility.
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  15. Marcus says:
    @Joe Wong
    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal - all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in "Melissa" - the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don't have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person's, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.

    It’s true, China and Japan were never rivals before the first Sino-Japanese war. The Japanese shogun acknowledged being a vassal of China (like all China’s neighbors did).

    Read More
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  16. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Joe Wong
    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal - all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in "Melissa" - the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don't have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person's, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.

    A lot of that stuff is exaggerated and originates in war propaganda, just like the Nazi human lampshade stuff and Saddam Hussein’s Iraqi army throwing Kuwaiti babies out of incubators stuff. That’s not to say that there weren’t terrible war crimes of course.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Actually, it what Japan did is probably worse than what is pi locally known.

    The Jews sensationalized what happened to them because..... well they are Jews.

    But a lot of what Japan did is actually worse than what is known.
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  17. Miro23 says:

    Instead, it’s going to be militarily strong, probably with a Israel-style covert nuclear weapons capability it will discretely brandish, and with a strong regional network of friends and allies in East Asia.

    Given average Chinese attitudes to the Japanese I can’t see Japan “discretely brandishing nuclear weapons” which is a truly bizarre idea anyway. Also with the Chinese economy turning down, the CPC would probably welcome a unifying move against Japanese “discrete brandishing”.

    As regards the US, Trump’s “make them pay” message, with some luck, may enable an early US exit from Japan, avoiding a bad entanglement.

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  18. @Anon
    "However, I think the CCP read its George Kennan and realized the containment strategy worked on the USSR because the Soviets thought, incorrectly, they could cut it as an autarky. Deng knew different, enabled inward and outward investment, and now we’re looking at not only Asia but much of the world anxious at how Chinese trouble will play out in their own economies."

    I must disagree. USSR was not an autarky. In fact, it would have done better as one.

    The thing is USSR had to support, subsidize, and prop up so many of its satellite nations. It had to favor industry in Eastern Europeans nations and suppress its own industry in consumer goods. It bought Cuban sugar at 5 times the international rate. It subsidized oil for Cuba.

    Indeed, Russia would have done better as an autarky. It has the land and resources to do so. But not the will and mindset.

    China is different. Too many people and not enough resources despite vast size.

    At any rate, autarky or not, communism couldn't produce top-notch consumer goods that could be sold around the world, esp not in competition with US, German, and Japanese products.

    If the principle of subsidiarity ( http://subsidiarityinstitute.blogspot.com.ar/ ) were applied from the bottom up, so to speak, autarky would be possible in many nations. The USSR and PRC both adopted and adapted the “American system” (https://infogalactic.com/info/American_System_(economic_plan) , avoiding the debt trap that strangles the economies of nearly all nations. Granted, taking this step is dangerous and it isn’t a global panacea, given the disparity in resources and national capabilities, but if the USA were to take the step…

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  19. Rehmat says:

    “The US abandoned the honest broker position it had claimed in previous decades and lined up behind Japan and provided material, operational, and diplomatic support for the expansion of Japan’s military footprint in Asia.”

    United Sates as a imperial and colonial power like its British creator, was never an “honest broker” under pressure from its local lobby groups.

    America has been providing material, operational, and diplomatic support for the expansion of Israel’s occupation decades before it started the process in Japan.

    However, the big difference is that Japanese taxpayers pay the US for those FAVORS, while the same favors for Israel are paid by US taxpayers …..

    Japan is one of the oldest imperialist and cultural nation in the region while Israel is a latest outpost of Western colonization and barbarism.

    Last month, the Israeli propagandist media (The Jewish Daily Forward, NYT, WP, IB Times, People Com., etc.) mourned the death of prince Mikasa, an uncle of the country’s current emperor Akihito, at the age 100……

    https://rehmat1.com/2016/10/30/lobby-mourns-japans-most-jewish-prince/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Another good point from Rehmat.

    However, the big difference is that Japanese taxpayers pay the US for those FAVORS, while the same favors for Israel are paid by US taxpayers …..
     
    As one of the former (and irritated by paying for that), I can never understand why US people never have a problem with throwing thousands of dollars a year to every Jewish man, woman, and child in Israel, *and* to tolerate wholesale theft of intellectual property by Israelis.
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  20. utu says:
    @Joe Wong
    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal - all that Japan stuff was pretty much described in a nutshell by Taylor Caldwell in "Melissa" - the title character had an evil but cloaked father who tried to hide his evil in his pretentious writing.

    The Japanese are naturally a cruel, barbaric and beastly people. You don't have to look very far back in history to see examples of Japanese making slaves of innocent Koreans, forcing sons to rape their mothers and fathers to rape their daughters in Nanjing.

    The Unit 731 of Japanese army in Harbin conducted disgusting human experimentation with mutilation and dismemberment alive, or having their human specimen’s vaginas and rectums skewered with tree branches and iron rods, or their babies bayoneted for practice, or beheading, or experimented on with germs like bubonic plague, malaria, typhoid, syphilis, gonorrhea, or having their blood exchanged with horse blood, or having their limbs exchanged with another person's, and last but not the least, having their bodies cut open without anesthesia. Mind you those human specimen included American, British, Korean, etc. though Chinese were made up the bulk of the specimen.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand and importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses. Never forget Japanese war crimes, the perpetrators of which are routinely worshipped by the Japanese people at the Yasukuni Shrine.

    American betrayed their anti-fascist barbarism war allies and aligned themselves with the cruel, barbaric and beastly unrepentant war criminal Japanese to supress the victims of the unrepentant war criminal Japanese for their global full spectrum dominance ambition and greed. Rewriting history to gloss over the unrepentant war criminal Japanese as a harmless nation of its neighbours is an example showing how deep the American has turned to the dark side of humanity.

    Hey Joe Wong, you seem to be addicted to war propaganda porn. Are you partly Jewish by any chance?

    Read More
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  21. Che Guava says:
    @DB Cooper
    What is said is all true. Japanese should have thank the Chinese rather than invaded their country and brutalized them. Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed. This gave the Japanese the chance to industrialize their country and catch up with the West before it too would have fell victim to the West colonialization.

    What is strange is that today's Japanese politicians act as if they were the injured party vis-a-vis China. Tears welled up in the female Japanese defense minister's eyes because she cannot visit the war criminal shrine under pressure from China. Talk about brainwashed and a warp sense of history.

    Hey, Joe.

    This cruelty lives on today in the form of needlessly hunting endangered whales in the absence of any market demand

    Sorry. Can’t see any equivalence between whaling and the other things you state. By the way, whale meat is quite tasty. I only eat it occasionally, but it is delicious.

    importing the horns of nearly-extinct white rhinoceroses.

    With that, you stray into the territory of ludicrous hypocrisy. The big markets for bits of endangered species are in China (both the PRC and the Republic in Taiwan) and Vietnam.

    Please offer some facts and figures on Japan’s insatiable lust for rhino horn.

    It hardly exists.

    You also deny agency to the poachers, truly evil people.

    Read More
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  22. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    A lot of that stuff is exaggerated and originates in war propaganda, just like the Nazi human lampshade stuff and Saddam Hussein's Iraqi army throwing Kuwaiti babies out of incubators stuff. That's not to say that there weren't terrible war crimes of course.

    Actually, it what Japan did is probably worse than what is pi locally known.

    The Jews sensationalized what happened to them because….. well they are Jews.

    But a lot of what Japan did is actually worse than what is known.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    All of the bad things are known, you only have to read a little deeply and widely.

    Sure, our current polity keeps them hidden as much as they can.

    Then again, firebombings in many cities (one of my favourite drinking spots still has the scorch marks in the floor), the first nuclear bombings ... I could continue. Now, who did those things?

    On a lighter note, the Mitsubishi Zero was among the finest engineering achievements of the age.
    , @Anonymous
    Actually, the sensationalized accounts originate in Allied war propaganda, not simply "the Jews".

    The most sensationalized accounts regarding Japan are in China, and originate in war propaganda there. What is "locally known" in China are the most sensationalized accounts, much of which was just propaganda.
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  23. Che Guava says:
    @Rehmat
    "The US abandoned the honest broker position it had claimed in previous decades and lined up behind Japan and provided material, operational, and diplomatic support for the expansion of Japan’s military footprint in Asia."

    United Sates as a imperial and colonial power like its British creator, was never an "honest broker" under pressure from its local lobby groups.

    America has been providing material, operational, and diplomatic support for the expansion of Israel's occupation decades before it started the process in Japan.

    However, the big difference is that Japanese taxpayers pay the US for those FAVORS, while the same favors for Israel are paid by US taxpayers .....

    Japan is one of the oldest imperialist and cultural nation in the region while Israel is a latest outpost of Western colonization and barbarism.

    Last month, the Israeli propagandist media (The Jewish Daily Forward, NYT, WP, IB Times, People Com., etc.) mourned the death of prince Mikasa, an uncle of the country’s current emperor Akihito, at the age 100......

    https://rehmat1.com/2016/10/30/lobby-mourns-japans-most-jewish-prince/

    Another good point from Rehmat.

    However, the big difference is that Japanese taxpayers pay the US for those FAVORS, while the same favors for Israel are paid by US taxpayers …..

    As one of the former (and irritated by paying for that), I can never understand why US people never have a problem with throwing thousands of dollars a year to every Jewish man, woman, and child in Israel, *and* to tolerate wholesale theft of intellectual property by Israelis.

    Read More
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  24. Che Guava says:
    @Anonymous
    Actually, it what Japan did is probably worse than what is pi locally known.

    The Jews sensationalized what happened to them because..... well they are Jews.

    But a lot of what Japan did is actually worse than what is known.

    All of the bad things are known, you only have to read a little deeply and widely.

    Sure, our current polity keeps them hidden as much as they can.

    Then again, firebombings in many cities (one of my favourite drinking spots still has the scorch marks in the floor), the first nuclear bombings … I could continue. Now, who did those things?

    On a lighter note, the Mitsubishi Zero was among the finest engineering achievements of the age.

    Read More
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  25. Alden says:

    Sterling Seagraves is an Asian expert. His book Golden Warriors is an account of the hundreds of billions of dollars worth of loot Japan stole from every bit of Asia it occupied before and during WW2.

    Golden Warriors is available on PDF.

    It’s a little known but important part of Japanese history. Seagraves doesn’t interpret why Japan looted, he just recounts what happened. A reader can only conclude that Japan entered WW2 mostly for loot whether it won or lost.

    Contrast the almost 100 billion reparations Germany has paid to Israel with the fact that Japan has never been pressured to return what it stole during the war, let alone reparations for the destruction and deaths.

    Conventional wisdom is that Japan’s post war prosperity is a combination of American aid, low tariffs for Japanese exports to America and extraordinarily high Japanese tariffs on any imports, and of course Japanese “hard work and social cohesion.

    But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan’s thefts during the war.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    "But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan’s thefts during the war."

    I did not read the book but read its long review at London review of Books. Most of the loot went to Americans/CIA and Ferdinand Marcos. I do not question the loot but I question its alleged role in Japan's economic growth after WWII.
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  26. Che Guava says:
    @DB Cooper
    What is said is all true. Japanese should have thank the Chinese rather than invaded their country and brutalized them. Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed. This gave the Japanese the chance to industrialize their country and catch up with the West before it too would have fell victim to the West colonialization.

    What is strange is that today's Japanese politicians act as if they were the injured party vis-a-vis China. Tears welled up in the female Japanese defense minister's eyes because she cannot visit the war criminal shrine under pressure from China. Talk about brainwashed and a warp sense of history.

    You carry a very mixed baggage, and don’t know much at all.

    Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed.

    You have a very strange idea on both points.

    Your first is true until an indefinite point well over a thousand years ago.

    Ever read the tale of Genji?

    If not, you should.

    Sure, there was much back-and-forth after that, in the age of the great lords and shoguns.

    Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy, note that this long preceded the arrival of Commodore Perry and his armada and ultimata.

    To make some connection between Japan and China’s suffering in the mid-19th century is utter nonsense.

    Actually, there is a connection, one a moron such as you would not know of. People in the nobility and of letters had some idea of what was happening in China, and were determined to not allow the same kind of process.

    Don’t bother posting if you have no knowledge.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    "Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy"

    Modern economy? Really? How so?

    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.
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  27. utu says:
    @Alden
    Sterling Seagraves is an Asian expert. His book Golden Warriors is an account of the hundreds of billions of dollars worth of loot Japan stole from every bit of Asia it occupied before and during WW2.

    Golden Warriors is available on PDF.

    It's a little known but important part of Japanese history. Seagraves doesn't interpret why Japan looted, he just recounts what happened. A reader can only conclude that Japan entered WW2 mostly for loot whether it won or lost.

    Contrast the almost 100 billion reparations Germany has paid to Israel with the fact that Japan has never been pressured to return what it stole during the war, let alone reparations for the destruction and deaths.

    Conventional wisdom is that Japan's post war prosperity is a combination of American aid, low tariffs for Japanese exports to America and extraordinarily high Japanese tariffs on any imports, and of course Japanese "hard work and social cohesion.

    But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan's thefts during the war.

    “But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan’s thefts during the war.”

    I did not read the book but read its long review at London review of Books. Most of the loot went to Americans/CIA and Ferdinand Marcos. I do not question the loot but I question its alleged role in Japan’s economic growth after WWII.

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    Seagrave is (or was) a neckbearded loony with no more credibility than Ladislas Farago (remember him?)
    , @Alden
    I read the book, not just a review in the left wing anti American anti British pro Muslim and African immigration pro destruction of European culture and peoples London Review of Books.

    I do remember that there are stories in the book about millions in gold buried in the Phillipines but nothing about the loot being found.

    I don't remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot.
    I read the London Review of Books. All its reviews and articles are skewed hard left.
    I read the hard left Guardian as well.

    I don't believe a word in either publication or in any American newspaper or in any of the so called quality intellectual American publications such as Atlantic, New Republic, Harper's The Reporter, The Nation etc.
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  28. DB Cooper says:
    @Che Guava
    You carry a very mixed baggage, and don't know much at all.

    Historically a people of nobody living at the fringe of civilization with a primitive social structure, it is China that bear the full brunt of Western imperialism leaving Japan unscathed.
     
    You have a very strange idea on both points.

    Your first is true until an indefinite point well over a thousand years ago.

    Ever read the tale of Genji?

    If not, you should.

    Sure, there was much back-and-forth after that, in the age of the great lords and shoguns.

    Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy, note that this long preceded the arrival of Commodore Perry and his armada and ultimata.

    To make some connection between Japan and China's suffering in the mid-19th century is utter nonsense.

    Actually, there is a connection, one a moron such as you would not know of. People in the nobility and of letters had some idea of what was happening in China, and were determined to not allow the same kind of process.

    Don't bother posting if you have no knowledge.

    “Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy”

    Modern economy? Really? How so?

    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava

    You can still traces of it today if you are observant.
     
    Senseless sentence with the lost verb. You may well be one of those remnant traces, albeit from another place.
    , @Anon
    There is a point here, despite silly phrasing- what constitutes a modern economy, and could you (you here being "Che Guava"- or anyone else, of course) say why Japan's was quite so? Mass production? Interchangeable parts? Advanced credit and/or joint-stock schemes? Money(!)?

    Though, really, what would traces of a primitive economy be? I can make no sense of that statement even with blanks filled in.

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  29. Well. There will not be a Clinton administration thank God.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Amen.
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  30. Michelle says:

    “Clinton Administration”, bwaa haa haaa!!!

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  31. neutral says:
    @Marcus
    But China and Japan were never rivals before the late 19th century, the 16th century war over Korea was anomalous.

    The ultimate war goals of that 16th century war was to conquer China (this is clearly stated by the chief architects of the war). The Japanese just happened to get bogged down in Korea to ever reach China proper.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marcus
    I agree, but that's one war in 2900 years before the first Sino-Japanese war. China's only external threats were from the west and north. Japan was considered (if considered at all) as a vassal, like Korea.
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  32. Sam J. says:
    @Svigor

    Abe, a revisionist nationalist (i.e. he rejects the victor’s justice narrative of World War II that Japan did wrong and deserved to be militarily neutered)
     
    Agreed. Only "victor's justice" historians would condemn what the Japs did to the Chinks in WWII. If, like you, the Japs can't pare "deserve to be militarily neutered" away from "Japan did wrong," that's their problem.

    NOBODY deserves to be militarily neutered. Well, except maybe all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn't they want us gone?).

    Japanese is an unrepentant war criminal
     
    Who gives a shit. You idiots suffered 100x as much from the Mongols. But of course, they're nobody now, and that's what really matters...

    After the Red Army met Hizbullah in Afghanistan – the USSR went bankrupt and lost most of its European and Asian possessions.
     
    After I wiped my arse, I saw a comet. So what? One had nothing to do with the other (p.s., Hizbulla?), despite Mohametean crowing otherwise. Soviets left the commie Afghan regime firmly in control, and it survived well after the Soviets had gone.

    “…all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn’t they want us gone?)…”

    Then we should go. What exactly are we guarding that’s of American interest in Asia?

    I’ve yet to see anyone posit the idea that Japan might ally with China. I think it’s a distinct possibility.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    We do pay. The US military presence is very expensive for the Japanese taxpayer.

    No other 'ally' pays as much. It is much like a gangland protection racket.
    , @DB Cooper
    Samuel Huntington in his book "The Clash of Civilizations" did posit such a possibility, that Japan bandwagon with China.
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  33. neutral says:

    Most that read Unz will have come across the word “cuckservative”, however when it comes to Japanese nationalists, cuckservative is simply not strong enough to describe them. Here you have a nation that had nuclear bombs dropped on it, had its empire destroyed, reduced to puppet regime that is forced to host US military bases – and their biggest beef is with China ??? Clearly they are not real nationalists. I have seen stories of Japanese “ultra-nationalists” wanting to return the Kurile islands to Japan (pretty wimpish demands from supposed ultras), I have yet to come across stories of real nationalists in Japan, real as in wanting revenge against ones enemies. I have asked this question in supposed tough talking Japanese online forums (that is hard to find), this is such a taboo topic, that I have yet to get an answer, they have been cowed to such meekness regarding this topic that its even worse than Germans are regarding talking about jews.

    Also, I am not trying argue the who is wrong or right here, or the virtue/immorality of nationalism, I am simply making the observation that being a nationalist that is FOR a regime that destroyed your nation like no other does not make sense in terms of nationalism.

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  34. 5371 says:
    @utu
    "But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan’s thefts during the war."

    I did not read the book but read its long review at London review of Books. Most of the loot went to Americans/CIA and Ferdinand Marcos. I do not question the loot but I question its alleged role in Japan's economic growth after WWII.

    Seagrave is (or was) a neckbearded loony with no more credibility than Ladislas Farago (remember him?)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    I've read 3 of Seagraves books. His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history. His book about the networks and expansion of the Chinese diaspora all over the world is factual.

    I live in California and have observed how the Chinese have taken over San Francisco and the San Gabriel Valley of S California. Seagraves books shouldn't be dismissed as lunacy.
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  35. Che Guava says:
    @DB Cooper
    "Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy"

    Modern economy? Really? How so?

    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.

    You can still traces of it today if you are observant.

    Senseless sentence with the lost verb. You may well be one of those remnant traces, albeit from another place.

    Read More
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  36. @Jason Liu
    There is of course, the third option. Japan moves away from the west and rejoins Asia under friendly terms. Not as a Chinese vassal or anything, but another Asian nation in the Asian sphere that aligns with Asian interests. Just like old times.

    I for one would like China, Japan and the Philippines in the same corner. That is the vision Chinese and Japanese leaders should have instead of constantly speaking about an inevitable conflict.

    Ultimately the threat to Asian interests (or any other) is the encroaching globalist worldview that emanates from the west. We need to put away our petty tribalism for greater tribalism.

    “We need to put away our petty tribalism for greater tribalism.” very good point. The important thing is to prevent mass migration from subsaharan Africa and the muslim world to East Asia. Yet the question remains, whether East Asia needs the constant internal struggle to stay fit. Europe did not get the center of the world by working together, but by trying to compete against each other.

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  37. Che Guava says:
    @Sam J.
    "...all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn’t they want us gone?)..."

    Then we should go. What exactly are we guarding that's of American interest in Asia?

    I've yet to see anyone posit the idea that Japan might ally with China. I think it's a distinct possibility.

    We do pay. The US military presence is very expensive for the Japanese taxpayer.

    No other ‘ally’ pays as much. It is much like a gangland protection racket.

    Read More
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  38. DB Cooper says:
    @Sam J.
    "...all the Japs I heard quoted on NPR the other day, saying that Trump is bad Bad BAD for wanting to make the Japs pay their own way (if the Japs are paying the freight as they said, why wouldn’t they want us gone?)..."

    Then we should go. What exactly are we guarding that's of American interest in Asia?

    I've yet to see anyone posit the idea that Japan might ally with China. I think it's a distinct possibility.

    Samuel Huntington in his book “The Clash of Civilizations” did posit such a possibility, that Japan bandwagon with China.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    The Chinese always called Japan Monkey Island as in monkey see, monkey do.

    Much of Japanese culture, industry etc was copied from China which is not surprising considering China's size and population.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Actually, it what Japan did is probably worse than what is pi locally known.

    The Jews sensationalized what happened to them because..... well they are Jews.

    But a lot of what Japan did is actually worse than what is known.

    Actually, the sensationalized accounts originate in Allied war propaganda, not simply “the Jews”.

    The most sensationalized accounts regarding Japan are in China, and originate in war propaganda there. What is “locally known” in China are the most sensationalized accounts, much of which was just propaganda.

    Read More
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  40. Alden says:
    @utu
    "But Seagraves shows that much of the capital for investment came from Japan’s thefts during the war."

    I did not read the book but read its long review at London review of Books. Most of the loot went to Americans/CIA and Ferdinand Marcos. I do not question the loot but I question its alleged role in Japan's economic growth after WWII.

    I read the book, not just a review in the left wing anti American anti British pro Muslim and African immigration pro destruction of European culture and peoples London Review of Books.

    I do remember that there are stories in the book about millions in gold buried in the Phillipines but nothing about the loot being found.

    I don’t remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot.
    I read the London Review of Books. All its reviews and articles are skewed hard left.
    I read the hard left Guardian as well.

    I don’t believe a word in either publication or in any American newspaper or in any of the so called quality intellectual American publications such as Atlantic, New Republic, Harper’s The Reporter, The Nation etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    You can read it here: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v25/n22/chalmers-johnson/the-looting-of-asia

    You stated: "I don’t remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot."

    In the review:

    "Once the gold was in their vaults, the banks would issue certificates that are even more negotiable than money, being backed by gold itself. With this seemingly inexhaustible source of cash, the CIA set up slush funds to influence politics in Japan, Greece, Italy, Britain and many other places around the world. For example, money from what was called the ‘M-Fund’ (named after Major-General William Marquat of MacArthur’s staff) was secretly employed to pay for Japan’s initial rearmament after the outbreak of the Korean War, since the Japanese Diet itself refused to appropriate money for the purpose. "

    Anyway there is a possibility that your memory does not serve you right.
    , @Rehmat
    YES darling, you're paid to read 'London Review of Books' because it's a Zionist propaganda filth site for Israel.

    You would never see a review of "The Leadership of Muhammad", a book authored by the British Royal Force officer, John Adair .......

    https://rehmat1.com/2010/11/18/the-leadership-of-muhammad-a-book-review/
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  41. Alden says:
    @DB Cooper
    Samuel Huntington in his book "The Clash of Civilizations" did posit such a possibility, that Japan bandwagon with China.

    The Chinese always called Japan Monkey Island as in monkey see, monkey do.

    Much of Japanese culture, industry etc was copied from China which is not surprising considering China’s size and population.

    Read More
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  42. Alden says:
    @5371
    Seagrave is (or was) a neckbearded loony with no more credibility than Ladislas Farago (remember him?)

    I’ve read 3 of Seagraves books. His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history. His book about the networks and expansion of the Chinese diaspora all over the world is factual.

    I live in California and have observed how the Chinese have taken over San Francisco and the San Gabriel Valley of S California. Seagraves books shouldn’t be dismissed as lunacy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Yamato is the correct transliteration , and nobody knows for sure where it was.

    I favour the idea that it was in southern Kyushu. There are many keyhole tombs, an Imperial tomb in a cave.

    When Genji is exiled in the course of the tale, that area is where he lives in exile, while missing the brighter lights of the capital.

    The Chinese Chronicles of Wei also support the idea.

    They have an earlier version of the name, Yamadaikoku (邪馬台国), which as written means something like
    evil or wrong horse-stand kingdom, and report of a princess or queen Himiko (卑弥呼) which means horrible voice or announcer, caller. The 'ko' is not the character for child, as was often the case for the Imperial family and nobility women before the 1860s, but exploded into common use since that time, but the one meaning to call.

    I will add, that the Wei chronicler was trying to transliterate, since what now is Japan did not yet have a widespread system of writing (some claim an earlier script, but I have never seen any real evidence of it).

    The choice of Kanji with bad meanings may just have been Chinese arrogance; it may also have been to reflect genuine
    impressions. I favour the latter.

    The Wei account was also, it seems, of Kyushu.

    Some sources like to argue that we should read the characters as 'Yamatokoku', although they have little basis for the 'to', I suspect they are correct in making the connection from there to the semi-mythical 大和 (Yamato) kingdom ... and from there to the collapse of Paekche or Kudara and the trading confederation in what is now the southernmost part of the Korean peninsula, their escape to Japan in the fifth century, and establishing a nobility that was 40% Paekche, 20% Chinese, 20% earlier arrivals from Shin'rya, corresponding to the northern west coasts of what are now the Koreas, and 20% native Japanese. These are not invented figures, I have them from a census in an old account.

    The current Emperor is hated by the extreme right and all too many ordinary people for acknowledging his Korean ancestry. For anyone who studies the history, it is obvious.
    , @Che Guava

    His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history.
     
    You are a moron, you may as well write about Tokyo Disneyland and how much you love dressing up in a Donald Duck costume.

    Seagrave, bs artist, but I doubt that he produced your bullshit.

    You manage two errors in two words with 'Yamoto Dynasty', pretty high score, two errors in two words, you get 0 for your test score.

    Firstly, there is no claim for the existence of such a dynasty, and such a dynasty never existed.

    You also mis-spell yamato as yamoto, further demonstrating your status as an idiot.

    Excuse the timing,

    Must sleeping,
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  43. Marcus says:
    @neutral
    The ultimate war goals of that 16th century war was to conquer China (this is clearly stated by the chief architects of the war). The Japanese just happened to get bogged down in Korea to ever reach China proper.

    I agree, but that’s one war in 2900 years before the first Sino-Japanese war. China’s only external threats were from the west and north. Japan was considered (if considered at all) as a vassal, like Korea.

    Read More
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  44. utu says:
    @Alden
    I read the book, not just a review in the left wing anti American anti British pro Muslim and African immigration pro destruction of European culture and peoples London Review of Books.

    I do remember that there are stories in the book about millions in gold buried in the Phillipines but nothing about the loot being found.

    I don't remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot.
    I read the London Review of Books. All its reviews and articles are skewed hard left.
    I read the hard left Guardian as well.

    I don't believe a word in either publication or in any American newspaper or in any of the so called quality intellectual American publications such as Atlantic, New Republic, Harper's The Reporter, The Nation etc.

    You can read it here: http://www.lrb.co.uk/v25/n22/chalmers-johnson/the-looting-of-asia

    You stated: “I don’t remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot.”

    In the review:

    “Once the gold was in their vaults, the banks would issue certificates that are even more negotiable than money, being backed by gold itself. With this seemingly inexhaustible source of cash, the CIA set up slush funds to influence politics in Japan, Greece, Italy, Britain and many other places around the world. For example, money from what was called the ‘M-Fund’ (named after Major-General William Marquat of MacArthur’s staff) was secretly employed to pay for Japan’s initial rearmament after the outbreak of the Korean War, since the Japanese Diet itself refused to appropriate money for the purpose. ”

    Anyway there is a possibility that your memory does not serve you right.

    Read More
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  45. Biff says:
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  46. Che Guava says:
    @Alden
    I've read 3 of Seagraves books. His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history. His book about the networks and expansion of the Chinese diaspora all over the world is factual.

    I live in California and have observed how the Chinese have taken over San Francisco and the San Gabriel Valley of S California. Seagraves books shouldn't be dismissed as lunacy.

    Yamato is the correct transliteration , and nobody knows for sure where it was.

    I favour the idea that it was in southern Kyushu. There are many keyhole tombs, an Imperial tomb in a cave.

    When Genji is exiled in the course of the tale, that area is where he lives in exile, while missing the brighter lights of the capital.

    The Chinese Chronicles of Wei also support the idea.

    They have an earlier version of the name, Yamadaikoku (邪馬台国), which as written means something like
    evil or wrong horse-stand kingdom, and report of a princess or queen Himiko (卑弥呼) which means horrible voice or announcer, caller. The ‘ko’ is not the character for child, as was often the case for the Imperial family and nobility women before the 1860s, but exploded into common use since that time, but the one meaning to call.

    I will add, that the Wei chronicler was trying to transliterate, since what now is Japan did not yet have a widespread system of writing (some claim an earlier script, but I have never seen any real evidence of it).

    The choice of Kanji with bad meanings may just have been Chinese arrogance; it may also have been to reflect genuine
    impressions. I favour the latter.

    The Wei account was also, it seems, of Kyushu.

    Some sources like to argue that we should read the characters as ‘Yamatokoku’, although they have little basis for the ‘to’, I suspect they are correct in making the connection from there to the semi-mythical 大和 (Yamato) kingdom … and from there to the collapse of Paekche or Kudara and the trading confederation in what is now the southernmost part of the Korean peninsula, their escape to Japan in the fifth century, and establishing a nobility that was 40% Paekche, 20% Chinese, 20% earlier arrivals from Shin’rya, corresponding to the northern west coasts of what are now the Koreas, and 20% native Japanese. These are not invented figures, I have them from a census in an old account.

    The current Emperor is hated by the extreme right and all too many ordinary people for acknowledging his Korean ancestry. For anyone who studies the history, it is obvious.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Malla
    The origins of the Japanese are controversial and I agree that the Chinese and Japanese are similar people in looks and IQ as well as have similarity in culture (which they share with the Koreans, Tibetans, Mongols and Vietnamese and other North Easters) but there are some key differences between the Japanese and the Chinese. The Japanese are on average more honest, polite, civilized and orderly people than the Chinese who are more polite, civilized and orderly than say the Indians. There is much less corruption in Japanese society then the Chinese and in many ways the Japanese resemble North West Europeans if compared to the Chinese. And this has been true for centuries.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iVMbp5-bJAM

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Japanese+Red+Lights+and+Beer

    Many decades ago an American had written a book (I forgot the name and author) about the cheating and scheming common in China as against the more honest 'Teutonic' Japanese and this was written in the 1930s though he agreed that the Northern Chinese were more honest and 'more Japanese like' than the more 'Indian like' Southern Chinese. He lamented the fact that China was more popular in the USA (and India was more popular still even though Indians were even more dirtier, dishonest and lazier than the Chinese) and he blamed dumb Christian missionaries for this. It seems political correctness is quite old and the missionaries perfected this art before the libtards got to it.

    These differences have even been observed by European traders from as early as the 1700s about how the Japanese were more honest in trade, fast and orderly while in China things took time and there was a lot of cheating.
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  47. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @DB Cooper
    "Under the Tokugawa shogunate, Japan developed quite a modern economy"

    Modern economy? Really? How so?

    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.

    There is a point here, despite silly phrasing- what constitutes a modern economy, and could you (you here being “Che Guava”- or anyone else, of course) say why Japan’s was quite so? Mass production? Interchangeable parts? Advanced credit and/or joint-stock schemes? Money(!)?

    Though, really, what would traces of a primitive economy be? I can make no sense of that statement even with blanks filled in.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Your post is incomprehensible.

    Abe is a moron who started his political career with revanchist comics abt. 40 years ago.

    From a born to rule family.

    Even his party does not trust him. However, they are happy for the electoral success.
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  48. Tapp says: • Website

    Abe is the real traitor here.

    Read More
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  49. Che Guava says:
    @Quercusalba
    Well. There will not be a Clinton administration thank God.

    Amen.

    Read More
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  50. Che Guava says:
    @Anon
    There is a point here, despite silly phrasing- what constitutes a modern economy, and could you (you here being "Che Guava"- or anyone else, of course) say why Japan's was quite so? Mass production? Interchangeable parts? Advanced credit and/or joint-stock schemes? Money(!)?

    Though, really, what would traces of a primitive economy be? I can make no sense of that statement even with blanks filled in.

    Your post is incomprehensible.

    Abe is a moron who started his political career with revanchist comics abt. 40 years ago.

    From a born to rule family.

    Even his party does not trust him. However, they are happy for the electoral success.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    If English is not your first language, you get a pass.

    I'll restate.

    "DB Cooper" has a point in comment #28. He asks you to define your term "modern economy". Please do so. If you do not, comment #26, while doubtless containing great wisdom, cannot be fully understood.

    Despite making a point of value, "DB Cooper" makes a confusing statement:


    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.
     
    Even if the last sentence is changed to

    You can still see traces of it today if you are observant.
     
    it is not helpful because it is not clear what "traces" of a primitive society are present in Japan but not elsewhere, nor is it clear what, if these "traces" exist, they would mean, since all societies were "primitive" at some point.

    Restatement over.

    Note that I have, in addition to restating the sentence, explained my implications in the last sentence of comment #47. This was done for greater clarity.

    I did not mention Abe, parties, elections, revanchism, or comics, either directly or by implication.

    Please feel free to ask for help if you have any trouble comprehending this comment. I would be glad to assist.

    RSDB

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  51. Che Guava says:
    @Alden
    I've read 3 of Seagraves books. His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history. His book about the networks and expansion of the Chinese diaspora all over the world is factual.

    I live in California and have observed how the Chinese have taken over San Francisco and the San Gabriel Valley of S California. Seagraves books shouldn't be dismissed as lunacy.

    His book about the Yamoto Dynasty is standard Japanese history.

    You are a moron, you may as well write about Tokyo Disneyland and how much you love dressing up in a Donald Duck costume.

    Seagrave, bs artist, but I doubt that he produced your bullshit.

    You manage two errors in two words with ‘Yamoto Dynasty’, pretty high score, two errors in two words, you get 0 for your test score.

    Firstly, there is no claim for the existence of such a dynasty, and such a dynasty never existed.

    You also mis-spell yamato as yamoto, further demonstrating your status as an idiot.

    Excuse the timing,

    Must sleeping,

    Read More
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  52. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Che Guava
    Your post is incomprehensible.

    Abe is a moron who started his political career with revanchist comics abt. 40 years ago.

    From a born to rule family.

    Even his party does not trust him. However, they are happy for the electoral success.

    If English is not your first language, you get a pass.

    I’ll restate.

    “DB Cooper” has a point in comment #28. He asks you to define your term “modern economy”. Please do so. If you do not, comment #26, while doubtless containing great wisdom, cannot be fully understood.

    Despite making a point of value, “DB Cooper” makes a confusing statement:

    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.

    Even if the last sentence is changed to

    You can still see traces of it today if you are observant.

    it is not helpful because it is not clear what “traces” of a primitive society are present in Japan but not elsewhere, nor is it clear what, if these “traces” exist, they would mean, since all societies were “primitive” at some point.

    Restatement over.

    Note that I have, in addition to restating the sentence, explained my implications in the last sentence of comment #47. This was done for greater clarity.

    I did not mention Abe, parties, elections, revanchism, or comics, either directly or by implication.

    Please feel free to ask for help if you have any trouble comprehending this comment. I would be glad to assist.

    RSDB

    Read More
    • Replies: @DB Cooper
    "You can still see traces of it today if you are observant."

    What I mean is that none of Japan's past impresses upon us that this is a people with a glorious past. The imperial palace of Japan for example looks unexceptional compare to the residence of a rich Chinese merchant of old. Contrast it with the Forbidden City of China and there is no comparison in terms of grandeur. Traditional Japanese household has a minimalist feel, by necessity rather than by design, I am sure. If you notice traditional Japanese household does not have chairs. People just sits on the floor. It doesn't have beds either. People sleep on the floor on pieces of straw mats they called the Tatami. Parts of Japanese diets consists of raw fish. This is what I mean by you can still see traces of it [primitiveness] if you are observant.
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  53. DB Cooper says:
    @Anon
    If English is not your first language, you get a pass.

    I'll restate.

    "DB Cooper" has a point in comment #28. He asks you to define your term "modern economy". Please do so. If you do not, comment #26, while doubtless containing great wisdom, cannot be fully understood.

    Despite making a point of value, "DB Cooper" makes a confusing statement:


    I am not saying they were cave man eating grass, but their society was pretty primitive. You can still traces of it today if you are observant.
     
    Even if the last sentence is changed to

    You can still see traces of it today if you are observant.
     
    it is not helpful because it is not clear what "traces" of a primitive society are present in Japan but not elsewhere, nor is it clear what, if these "traces" exist, they would mean, since all societies were "primitive" at some point.

    Restatement over.

    Note that I have, in addition to restating the sentence, explained my implications in the last sentence of comment #47. This was done for greater clarity.

    I did not mention Abe, parties, elections, revanchism, or comics, either directly or by implication.

    Please feel free to ask for help if you have any trouble comprehending this comment. I would be glad to assist.

    RSDB

    “You can still see traces of it today if you are observant.”

    What I mean is that none of Japan’s past impresses upon us that this is a people with a glorious past. The imperial palace of Japan for example looks unexceptional compare to the residence of a rich Chinese merchant of old. Contrast it with the Forbidden City of China and there is no comparison in terms of grandeur. Traditional Japanese household has a minimalist feel, by necessity rather than by design, I am sure. If you notice traditional Japanese household does not have chairs. People just sits on the floor. It doesn’t have beds either. People sleep on the floor on pieces of straw mats they called the Tatami. Parts of Japanese diets consists of raw fish. This is what I mean by you can still see traces of it [primitiveness] if you are observant.

    Read More
    • LOL: Che Guava
    • Replies: @Malla
    Before the industrial revolution, prosperity of empires depended primarily on agriculture and China has huge amount of land well watered by rivers. Indeed it has fertile land as big as all of Japan well supplied with water in it's Han parts. Compared to that Japan is mostly mountainous, the largest plain arable land is the region near Tokyo. Thus the Chinese (who are a collection of many kingdoms combined to form the Han and are thus more heterogeneous than the Japanese) could tax more wealth and build big huge empire complexes as compared to the Japanese. If you would have placed the Japanese in the land of China and sent the Chinese away to some other place as an experiment, the Yamato would have built a empire just as rich or even richer than the Chinese.
    It is in the industrial revolution that the Japanese sped ahead of the Chinese in overall wealth and even today has a much higher standard of living than China.
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  54. Rehmat says:
    @Alden
    I read the book, not just a review in the left wing anti American anti British pro Muslim and African immigration pro destruction of European culture and peoples London Review of Books.

    I do remember that there are stories in the book about millions in gold buried in the Phillipines but nothing about the loot being found.

    I don't remember anything in the book about America getting any of the loot.
    I read the London Review of Books. All its reviews and articles are skewed hard left.
    I read the hard left Guardian as well.

    I don't believe a word in either publication or in any American newspaper or in any of the so called quality intellectual American publications such as Atlantic, New Republic, Harper's The Reporter, The Nation etc.

    YES darling, you’re paid to read ‘London Review of Books’ because it’s a Zionist propaganda filth site for Israel.

    You would never see a review of “The Leadership of Muhammad”, a book authored by the British Royal Force officer, John Adair …….

    https://rehmat1.com/2010/11/18/the-leadership-of-muhammad-a-book-review/

    Read More
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  55. Malla says:
    @DB Cooper
    "You can still see traces of it today if you are observant."

    What I mean is that none of Japan's past impresses upon us that this is a people with a glorious past. The imperial palace of Japan for example looks unexceptional compare to the residence of a rich Chinese merchant of old. Contrast it with the Forbidden City of China and there is no comparison in terms of grandeur. Traditional Japanese household has a minimalist feel, by necessity rather than by design, I am sure. If you notice traditional Japanese household does not have chairs. People just sits on the floor. It doesn't have beds either. People sleep on the floor on pieces of straw mats they called the Tatami. Parts of Japanese diets consists of raw fish. This is what I mean by you can still see traces of it [primitiveness] if you are observant.

    Before the industrial revolution, prosperity of empires depended primarily on agriculture and China has huge amount of land well watered by rivers. Indeed it has fertile land as big as all of Japan well supplied with water in it’s Han parts. Compared to that Japan is mostly mountainous, the largest plain arable land is the region near Tokyo. Thus the Chinese (who are a collection of many kingdoms combined to form the Han and are thus more heterogeneous than the Japanese) could tax more wealth and build big huge empire complexes as compared to the Japanese. If you would have placed the Japanese in the land of China and sent the Chinese away to some other place as an experiment, the Yamato would have built a empire just as rich or even richer than the Chinese.
    It is in the industrial revolution that the Japanese sped ahead of the Chinese in overall wealth and even today has a much higher standard of living than China.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. Malla says:
    @Che Guava
    Yamato is the correct transliteration , and nobody knows for sure where it was.

    I favour the idea that it was in southern Kyushu. There are many keyhole tombs, an Imperial tomb in a cave.

    When Genji is exiled in the course of the tale, that area is where he lives in exile, while missing the brighter lights of the capital.

    The Chinese Chronicles of Wei also support the idea.

    They have an earlier version of the name, Yamadaikoku (邪馬台国), which as written means something like
    evil or wrong horse-stand kingdom, and report of a princess or queen Himiko (卑弥呼) which means horrible voice or announcer, caller. The 'ko' is not the character for child, as was often the case for the Imperial family and nobility women before the 1860s, but exploded into common use since that time, but the one meaning to call.

    I will add, that the Wei chronicler was trying to transliterate, since what now is Japan did not yet have a widespread system of writing (some claim an earlier script, but I have never seen any real evidence of it).

    The choice of Kanji with bad meanings may just have been Chinese arrogance; it may also have been to reflect genuine
    impressions. I favour the latter.

    The Wei account was also, it seems, of Kyushu.

    Some sources like to argue that we should read the characters as 'Yamatokoku', although they have little basis for the 'to', I suspect they are correct in making the connection from there to the semi-mythical 大和 (Yamato) kingdom ... and from there to the collapse of Paekche or Kudara and the trading confederation in what is now the southernmost part of the Korean peninsula, their escape to Japan in the fifth century, and establishing a nobility that was 40% Paekche, 20% Chinese, 20% earlier arrivals from Shin'rya, corresponding to the northern west coasts of what are now the Koreas, and 20% native Japanese. These are not invented figures, I have them from a census in an old account.

    The current Emperor is hated by the extreme right and all too many ordinary people for acknowledging his Korean ancestry. For anyone who studies the history, it is obvious.

    The origins of the Japanese are controversial and I agree that the Chinese and Japanese are similar people in looks and IQ as well as have similarity in culture (which they share with the Koreans, Tibetans, Mongols and Vietnamese and other North Easters) but there are some key differences between the Japanese and the Chinese. The Japanese are on average more honest, polite, civilized and orderly people than the Chinese who are more polite, civilized and orderly than say the Indians. There is much less corruption in Japanese society then the Chinese and in many ways the Japanese resemble North West Europeans if compared to the Chinese. And this has been true for centuries.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Japanese+Red+Lights+and+Beer

    Many decades ago an American had written a book (I forgot the name and author) about the cheating and scheming common in China as against the more honest ‘Teutonic’ Japanese and this was written in the 1930s though he agreed that the Northern Chinese were more honest and ‘more Japanese like’ than the more ‘Indian like’ Southern Chinese. He lamented the fact that China was more popular in the USA (and India was more popular still even though Indians were even more dirtier, dishonest and lazier than the Chinese) and he blamed dumb Christian missionaries for this. It seems political correctness is quite old and the missionaries perfected this art before the libtards got to it.

    These differences have even been observed by European traders from as early as the 1700s about how the Japanese were more honest in trade, fast and orderly while in China things took time and there was a lot of cheating.

    Read More
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PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007