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Brexit and Austerity: the Toxic Cocktail the Young Can't Escape
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Birmingham is one of the youngest cities in Europe, with almost 40 per cent of its population under the age of 25. As in the rest of Britain, the younger generation believe they are facing greater problems and anxieties than their parents and grandparents.

“I think there is a slight resentment of older people in general, though not on an individual basis,” says Chris Taylor, 29, an accommodation manager living in south Birmingham. “No one hates their nan, but younger people object to the fact that everyone’s nan’s financial interests are very well protected, while other groups have had the hammer [brought down on them].”

The definition of “the younger generation” as a group with the same collective interests has changed radically over the past 40 years. People in their thirties and forties frequently have more in common today with those in their twenties, and even younger, than they do with older age groups when it comes to high rents, insecure employment – and Brexit.

“The stress on younger people is greater than it was before,” says Charlie Mower, 20, a second-year student studying philosophy and politics at Birmingham University. He says it is as if the drawbridge between the generations has been pulled up, leaving the young feeling they have been left outside. “There is uncertainty about housing and jobs, and the teachers themselves are subject to the same uncertainties,” he adds.

Some 80,000 students are studying at universities in Birmingham, which helps explain the low average age. Many say tuition fees are a burden – but less so than the ever-present concern about how to pay the weekly £80-£110 rent for a single room in shared accommodation.

“There are multiple stresses, which include rent, tuition fees, future job prospects and worry about university work itself,” says Mower. “You might get a loan that covers your living costs but not your rent.” This means finding a part-time job, usually in retail or hospitality at the minimum wage or just above. Or, for the better off, looking to their parents for a subsidy.

There are many more people undertaking higher education than ever before, with over 27 per cent of 18-year-olds in England seeking qualifications after A-levels or their equivalent. In 1992 there were 984,000 students aged 18-24 in full-time higher education; by 2016 the number had risen to 1.87 million. This is good news for those who can take advantage of the greater opportunities, but it means that being a university graduate has lost its scarcity value compared to a quarter century ago.

Michael Douglas, 22, a second year student from Wales studying geography and history at Birmingham University, explains how he sees things changing for students compared to their elders’ experience: “They didn’t have to pay [at that time] for student loans and there were more jobs available.” The benefits of higher education have, he believes, been seriously diluted. “Back then, it was ‘get qualifications, get job’, but I don’t think it works that way anymore,” he concludes.

This gap between young and old increasingly shapes the political, social and economic terrain in Britain. It was a widely-publicised feature of the EU referendum in 2016 when age and qualifications were the key factors deciding how people voted, according to a study by YouGov. Under-25s were more than twice as likely to vote to remain in the EU – by a margin of 71 per cent to 29 per cent – than over-65s who voted to leave by 64 per cent to 36 per cent.

The other crucial determinant of whether voters wanted to leave or remain in the EU was educational levels. Some 68 per cent of those with a university education voted to remain and 70 per cent of those with only a GCSE or lower qualification voted to leave. Those in between, who had A-level qualifications, were evenly split on the issue. Of course, wealth and poverty determine to a considerable extent a child’s chances to attend good schools (private or state) and to go on to university, so the referendum reflected – and probably exacerbated – existing social and economic divisions.

The political gap has grown even wider since the 2016 vote, according to a report called Generation Why, based on a poll of 10,000 people by Hanbury Strategy for Onward, a centre-right think tank, and published in April. It concludes that “younger and older voters have always been politically different, but never by this much”.

The “tipping point” age when voters become more likely to vote Conservative than Labour has risen from 47 years old at the time of the general election in 2017 to 51 today. No less than 83 per cent of Conservative voters are over 45, and just 4 per cent of Conservative voters are aged under 25. Labour support is better balanced between the generations, with 53 per cent of its voters over 45 and 47 per cent under that age.

Birmingham is one of the cities in the UK and western Europe that has coped best with globalisation and deindustrialisation, which shattered the local economy in the late 1970s and 1980s.

A central feature of its regeneration was the expansion of universities in the city: Birmingham University alone has 30,000 students and more than 7,000 staff; Birmingham City University has 24,000 students; and Aston University 10,000. The advantages of this are self-evident but the success of universities and financial centres in Birmingham give an exaggerated impression of the degree of change in the city as a whole, and the extent to which it benefits everybody.

In practice, the inner city has been transformed for the better – the streets filled with restaurants and the skyline crowded with cranes. But the outer ring beyond the city centre is largely still made up of white working-class districts, just as in the northeast of England, that have never really recovered from the collapse of low and semi-skilled employment, mostly in the automotive industries, 40 years ago.

ORDER IT NOW

The impact of university expansion is more nuanced than is often imagined. What’s more, universities are not necessarily hives of political radicalism, as is sometimes supposed. Mower, an activist on the left of the Labour Party, says his fellow students “don’t talk very much about Brexit and, when they do, it is mostly a passing reference: they talk more about rent or how much money they have in the bank”.

He says they do talk about, and hugely resent, tuition fees, but he adds that fees are something “you panic about before you go to university and after you leave, but not necessarily when you are there”. This is because there are so many other competing and more immediate problems to be faced, such as paying rent and pressure about academic work.

Politicisation is greater than before the referendum, but Mower says “the assumption that all students are left wing is not true, certainly not in Birmingham compared to Manchester or Sussex”.

Labour grassroots movement Momentum is strong in the city but not in the university. As for Brexit, Mower believes few students are attracted by extreme Leave or extreme Remain positions, but the political impact of the great numbers of students in Birmingham is less than might be supposed because, as in other large university cities, they form a distinct community separate from the rest of the population. “Students have the weird feeling that if something isn’t happening inside the university then it doesn’t exist at all,” he says.

Douglas, two years older than Mower and also at Birmingham University, says: “I voted to leave – for me it was the whole economic aspect of the thing, and I felt that the EU was a bit undemocratic.” He believes new trade deals with America, China, India, Brazil and Australia will produce higher growth and that the EU will “need us as much as we need them”.

No deal might be bad initially, but he believes Britain would be OK once it had done trade deals elsewhere in the world. He does not care much about immigration because he thinks that if immigrants do not come from the EU they will come from elsewhere and are, in any case, good for the economy. Student life is not that easy for him or for others.

“Coming from a poor background,” says Douglas, “I personally wouldn’t be able to go to university if I hadn’t worked when I was younger and saved up money. Because although we get loans and stuff, it isn’t enough to live on. The loan barely gets you by. I got a job to maintain myself.”

He believes the older generation underestimate how much young people understand politics. He used to be against the voting age being lowered to 16 because “they don’t have the full picture of things”, but he has changed his mind because he sees people of this age reading and researching news. He is more impressed than Mower by the politicisation of the young, saying: “because politics is so important to young people these days, the older generation possibly see us as naive, but maybe we’re too aggressive in pushing our views.”

Chris Taylor moved to Birmingham from Coventry three-and-a-half years ago because his girlfriend, now his fiancée, got a job there. He likes it and says the city has got everything one could want. As to why the city voted marginally in favour of leaving the EU (by 50.4 per cent to 49.6 per cent), he says it was a mix of deprivation and opposition to immigration.

“I live in Chelmsley Wood, which is relatively deprived compared to the surrounding area and is a majority white poorer area. They complain about immigration but don’t live with it – classic Leave voter isn’t it?”

He is adamantly in favour of Britain staying in the EU, adding: “I voted for Remain and actively campaigned for Remain, which is the first campaigning I’ve ever done. It was the sensible thing to do. The arguments for leaving were pretty much without merit. The arguments that annoyed me the most were the arguments about the greater economic opportunities outside the European Union, which is categorically not true.”

He does not blame Theresa May for mishandling the negotiations with the EU, in which he believes she did as well as anybody could have done. But he does dislike her for the way, as home secretary, she dealt with international students, with whom his job brings him into constant contact.

“I objected strongly to their mistreatment,” he says. “They still have to pay astonishingly high visa processing fees and the Home Office is ruthlessly profiteering off them, which is shocking.”

He is alarmed by the sheer toxicity and venom of political debate surrounding Brexit, which he suspects is an overspill of the confrontational approach in US politics in recent years. One can see that, he says, in “the kind of vitriol directed at Corbyn and McDonnell; and McDonnell with his comments about never being friends with a Tory”.

Despite this, Taylor describes himself as an optimist. “I am not sure that young people have it that bad in the West Midlands,” he says, pointing to some areas in the city which have “comparatively cheap housing, which is usually the biggest thing for young people”. Even with Brexit, he believes the economy will “get better, it’s just going to get better more slowly”.

But Alex Aitken, 25, the youngest councillor (Labour) on Birmingham Council, has a much bleaker view of the prospects for the young in the city. This is probably because he deals with more significantly impoverished people than Taylor. Representing a largely white working-class ward, he is more conscious of the ongoing impact of austerity in the post-Blair years than of the potential downside or upsides of Brexit.

“I was born and bred in Birmingham with a very working-class, single-parent background,” he says. His mother worked double shifts and the family was just able to get by, despite her falling ill and her grim experience of dealing with the Department for Work and Pensions “to get money just to survive”.

He wanted to become a teacher, he says, “but when I was working part time at Morrisons, I bumped into an old English teacher who said ‘please, please, please don’t become a teacher’ because she said it wasn’t the job she fell in love with 20 years ago because of all the funds being taken out of it.” He discovered all the things he had thought were normal in schools when he was growing up, such as art, were being cut back or had disappeared.

As a councillor, Aitken has seen Birmingham’s budget slashed by £750m since 2010. He says: “Cuts just get passed down, so the government makes the cuts, so the local authority makes the cuts, so the schools make the cuts and families then have to make cuts because they have to provide pens and pencils and toilet paper [for the schools].”

The impact of cuts in school budgets, youth services, Sure Start centres and support for poor parents is not just on children while they are in school.

“I think in the outer city, there’s a big issue with crime,” he says. “There’s a lot of young people getting involved with crime, and when I say young people I don’t mean 18 to 24, I mean 10 to 15-year-olds – and that’s because of an amalgamation of things. You only have to look at the amount of police on our streets compared to eight years ago, and obviously that is a huge, huge factor.

“I was at a meeting with my local police team last week, and for the whole of the ward we have three PCSOs [police community support officers] and one [regular] police officer – and that is the hotspot in the constituency for crime. They work split shifts, so it’s very rare that there’s more than one of them working at a time. They can only be in one place, so lots of people are scared to go down to the shops after dark because of the gangs of kids.”

This social reality for much of the population is often unmentioned during inaccessible Brexit debates about “backstops”, the single market and various forms of customs union. It is conventional wisdom that anger about an unacceptable status quo for young and old alike fuelled the decision to leave the EU, but nothing much has improved for most Leave voters since the referendum almost three years ago.

Aitken, an unenthusiastic Remainer, sees austerity putting unsustainable additional pressure on deprived parents and children, which is already more of a burden than any future threat posed by Brexit. “The people at the bottom in the Blair years were still able to put food on the table because of tax credits, but they can no longer do that,” he says.

“People that you would call the lower middle class or the upper working class are getting to that stage too. Families I know where both parents work are still really struggling. Under the last government, if something went wrong in your life there was always support there for you and you could get back on top.”

But today, if somebody has to leave their job because of illness, a sick child or a family member dying, they often find the necessary state support has disappeared and, according to Aitken, “it’s almost impossible to get back to where you were”.

The age of insecurity is affecting everybody, young and old, but the young are more vulnerable to its effects.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Brexit, Britain 
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  1. Stogumber says:

    Mr. Cockburn is obviously a man with a mission (and at the moment, one single mission): Stop the Brexit!

    • Replies: @atlantis_dweller
  2. The toxic cocktail is real wages lower than 1997 (thanks to mass immigration i.e. cheap labour) , insane house prices (immigration plus money printing), massive student debt. Bugger all to do with Brexit or austerity.

    “Birmingham is one of the cities in the UK and western Europe that has coped best with globalisation and deindustrialisation, which shattered the local economy in the late 1970s and 1980s.”

    The Longbridge car plant closed in 2005!

    “A central feature of its regeneration was the expansion of universities in the city: Birmingham University alone has 30,000 students and more than 7,000 staff; Birmingham City University has 24,000 students; and Aston University 10,000. The advantages of this are self-evident “

    This, including the snazzy accommodation towerblocks at Aston, which look more like yuppie flats, is wholly funded by debt which will never be repaid. The advantages of this are indeed evident to builders, night club owners and student landlords, but not to anyone else.

    “I live in Chelmsley Wood, which is relatively deprived compared to the surrounding area and is a majority white poorer area. They complain about immigration but don’t live with it – classic Leave voter isn’t it?”

    Living in Chelmsley Wood is like living in Hampstead or Wimbledon, only you’re much, much poorer. It’s not like living in Chipping Norton or Chichester. You’ll see immigration every time you walk more than a hundred yards (and your daughter may not be safe on the bus down the Cov Road into Birmingham).

    I’m rapidly coming to the conclusion that Mr Cockburn sees what he wants to see and disregards the rest.

    • Replies: @Verymuchalive
    , @Curmudgeon
  3. @Stogumber

    Well, that’s an insurance against ennui, thus something to envy, or isn’t it.

  4. DaveLee says:

    Birmingham’s young population is overwhelmingly Muslim. Which is the reason that city is f*cked.

  5. DaveLee says:

    “They complain about immigration but don’t live with it – classic Leave voter isn’t it?”

    They complain because theyve seen what it has done to other areas and they dont want it to happening to their hometown. A sort of reverse instinct to how Cockburn supports immigration but doesnt actually want to live with it himself.

    Oh And The effect on The Labour market etc of mass immigration Wont be contained to just The area Where those horrible natives live.

    Given how divisive uncontrolled immigration has been one has to ask why didnt the authorities and political parties seek a democratic mandate for it first?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  6. Sean says:

    The whole of Britain cannot run on foreign students, and they are going to require jobs and housing if they stay on, so it is not an unalloyed boon for the country as a whole –certainly not for those indigenous young people scrambling for scarce resources.

  7. @YetAnotherAnon

    The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection

    A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media

    Cockburn and Judge Nappy are the biggest turds in the website. They are both MSM hacks and are in violation of the website’s mission statement. They should not be here.

    • LOL: Digital Samizdat
    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
  8. @DaveLee

    “They complain because theyve seen what it has done to other areas and they dont want it to happening to their hometown.”

    It’s actually too late for Chelmsley Wood, which was very white 30 years back, but in 2011 was 8.5% minority (mainly black), up from 5.9% in 2001. Must be over 10% now.

    https://www.solihull.gov.uk/Portals/0/InfoandIntelligence/Chelmsley-Wood-Ward-Profile.pdf

  9. Michael Douglas, 22, a second year student from Wales studying geography and history at Birmingham University, explains how he sees things changing for students compared to their elders’ experience: “They didn’t have to pay [at that time] for student loans and there were more jobs available.” The benefits of higher education have, he believes, been seriously diluted. “Back then, it was ‘get qualifications, get job’, but I don’t think it works that way anymore,” he concludes.

    Instead of geographers and historians, what industry needs are medical doctors (up to £100,000/year), Python (up to £98,000/year) and Java programmers (up to £85,000/year), who are even being imported from India.

    The list of Mickey Mouse courses is comical. I kid you not, ‘David Beckham studies’ (Staffordshire University).

    Birmingham is one of the cities in the UK and western Europe that has coped best with globalisation and deindustrialisation, which shattered the local economy in the late 1970s and 1980s.

    Politics (both left and right), incompetence plus an inefficient class-based education system highlighted above wrecked Britannia PLC.

    Compare with Germania AG which is built on a technical skills-focused education system as opposed to Ivy League and Oxbridge snobbery.

    This along with apprenticeships, strong emphasis on applied research and quality, bank equity finance plus part suppliers in the Mittelstand (Middle Stand or small and medium size enterprises) are the bedrock of export brands like Audi, BMW, Porche, Mercedes, VW plus others like Rolls Royce, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini that are German-owned and many more such as Altana, BASF, Bayer, Evonik, Henkel and Hermle.

    As a major goods exporter, Germany consistently runs trade surpluses unlike Britain which became bankrupt in the 1970s after a series of adverse balance of payments (BOP) positions following the loss of export markets to East Asians – when Toyota LandCruisers eclipsed Land Rovers.

    Discovery of oil and gas in the North Sea, which sparked calls for Scottish independence, further harmed British manufacturing through the so-called ‘resource curse’ or Dutch Disease that is typical of Banana Republics.

    The British economy is now basically being propped up by foreign direct investment mostly from the Empire Inc., Russians, Arabs and Asians who own many so-called British brands like the exclusive shop Harrods, Cockburn’s Independent newspaper, automaker Jaguar and Manchester United football (soccer) team.

    Ironically, Brits kick started the Industrial Revolution then lost the competitive edge. Everyone else copied, especially low-cost steel (Henry Bessemer) and railways (George Stephenson). In fact ‘Made in Germany’ has its roots in the UK’s Merchandise Marks Act 1887 that was meant to distinguish alleged inferior German clones of British products. How times have changed.

  10. TG says:

    Yes, well, the one thing that we absolutely cannot mention is the effect of the rich forcing population growth via mass immigration, flooding the market for labor, driving wages down and rents and profits up, and overall stretching resources thin – that we simply cannot mention. That would be racist, and fascist, and LITERALLY HITLER. Because we all know that when we jam in more people without making the necessary investments to accommodate them, this is GUARANTEED to make everyone better off. Therefore if we jam in more people without making the necessary investments to accommodate them, and things go downhill for the working class, it simply cannot be that we jammed in more people without making the necessary investments to accommodate them. No, the problem is not enough austerity. Or too much Austerity. Take your pick, either way is fine, just don’t say that it’s because we jammed in more people without making the necessary investments to accommodate them. Because that’s racist and Not Who We Are (by official edict).

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @animalogic
  11. Rent looms so large as an expense because they are single, with one stream of earned-only income to cover all bills in cases where their parents are not helping them with bills and no tax credits or welfare access unless they’ve birthed something if it’s amything like the USA.

    But these students are kidding themselves about the impact of mass immigration on their potential earnings. In most cases, it does not sound like they are majoring in the few fields that guarantee a decent living.

    At least, they realize that the more people get degrees, the less a degree means.

    Thanks to assortative mating, even when people hold a more market-able degree, high-paying jobs and jobs that just provide a basic living, like government jobs, are mostly concentrated in the households of dual-earner parents who can’t be fired for extreme absenteeism due to their kids if it is anything like America.

    As a result of the crony-parent job network, fewer substantial jobs are available for those seeking to establish new independent households, including degree holders.

    Grandpas and grannies aren’t taking the household-supoorting jobs.

    Dual-high-earner parents are taking two household-supporting jobs per household, then enjoying lots & lots of family-friendly, absenteeism-friendly time off, not just PTO and pregnancy leave but many additional days, weeks and afternoons off that any non parent would be fired and fired quick for.

    Grannies & grandpas are accommodating a lot of this wealth-concentrating assortative mating, providing fawning babysitting services while the dual-earner parents work and play, taking tons of lengthy vacations. When low-wage daycare workers or NannyCam-surveilled babysitters aren’t raising the dual earners kids for them, “retired” grandparent are.

    Retired dual high earners do indeed have two streams of goverment pension income and two 401ks or a 401k and a government pension per household. In the USA, many safe government jobs, including public school teaching, are absolutely dominated by moms with a spousal income.

    Single, childless workers pay into the government pension system like everyone else, but because they are often in the **** jobs, and have one earned-only income stream to cover unaffordable rent and everything else, they can’t save much (if anything).

    Young people need to put their resentment in the proper place.

    The older Xers are getting older, but they faced the same crappy economic situation as the Millennials except in the case of the pampered-to-the-max / dual-high-earner parents in their crony-parent / above-firing jobs.

    The top 20% took it all in the Neoliberal Era.

    A single, childless college grad often ends up in low-wage churn jobs in the USA, never holding a decent-paying job for 5 or more years even when meeting quotas every month and attending work everyday all day, unlike the above-firing moms who miss huge amounts of work while retaining high and low-paying jobs without meeting quotas in many cases.

    The mom in the dual-high-earner household gets a higher SS-retirement check at retirement, whereas the single, childless citizen who held lower-paying jobs with no excused absenteeism gets a lower check that will not cover rent. Nor does she have a spousal retirement check, much less 2 more retirement income streams from non-governmental retirement accounts.

    The average SS-retirement check in the USA is about $1,400 per month, meaning half of all Americans get even less, while rent for a crappy, one-room apartment is between $800 and $900 per month.

    Thanks to the Sixties generation’s revolution in social mores, more and more Westerners will reach retirement single, with no paid-for house—far more than in the days when most mothers never worked in the paid workforce. Fake, womb-productivity-based feminism has a lot of pay-per-birth welfare winners, a lot of crony-corrupt dual-earner winners, a few legit winners and a lot of losers.

    Immigrants, too, work the welfare system often in a different way, using it to maintain traditional households with stay-at-home mothers and sole, male breadwinners that keep traceable income under the welfare programs’ limits

    Here’s what an illegal / legal immigrant with US-born kids, working part time to stay under the earned-income limits for welfare programs gets from government: free food, reduced-cost or free rent, free electricity, monthly cash assistance that increases per child and up to $6,431 in refundable child tax credit cash for the parents to spend as they please.

    Ditto for a single-breadwinner mom, and she does not pay into any of it. She can also get welfare by working temp jobs, dropping the welfare during months when her income goes over the programs’ limits.

    Single-breadwinner parents are not taxed for their pay from government for womb-productive sex, whereas everyone pays into the majoritarian pension program at either 7.65% or 15.3% of every penny earned up to a cap, with the single and childless more likely to pay the higher amount since so many of them end up self-employed due to the cronyism, the cutthroatery and the back-watching among parents in the labor market.

    What old people are doing is what students with help from their parents, welfare-supported single moms and many moms with spousal income that covers their major bills are doing: accepting low wages and part-time hours because of unearned income that covers their major household bills.

    This lets cheapskate employers keep a huge number of part-time workers on standby in case someone quits, while providing almost no one with a substantial, bill-covering job. Because more and more job seekers have unearned income, more and more employers offer this type of crappy, middle-class-killing job.

    This works for those with unearned income for womb productivity, but not for middle-aged and pre-retirement-aged, older and single citizens who have no unearned income streams related to their personal lives.

    A welfare-rigged labor market drives wages down for citizens who lack unearned income.

    Because so many immigrants make extra money by having kid after kid, and getting paid for it by goverment, most of the less-than-stellar students in the less marketable fields are going to face a lot more competition than they think from young—not old—womb-productive immigrants, armed with layers of 100%-free income from goverment due to womb-productive sex.

    Womb-producing, young immigrants don’t pay one red cent into those welfare benefit streams, unlike the pensioners, and they can afford to work for less than new grads due to their multilayered pay for womb-productive sex.

    If England is anything like the USA, immigrants are also legally protected in jobs due to their skin pigmentation hue, making it legally advantageous for employers to hire them and harder for them to fire them, while it’s easy to fire citizens…..for any triviality under the sun (unless they are crony parents).

    What idealistic students will find most shocking is the complete lack of shame among minorites, including immigrants, who hire and retain mostly (or only) people in their own skin-pigmentation group. They’re doing it for their babies—this bold discrimination—so you can’t even critique it in your own country without being called a racist.

    Students need to get real.

    • Replies: @Alden
  12. Alden says:
    @Endgame Napoleon

    Are you gay? Is that why you hate “breeders” as you call parents? Your diatribes against breeders and children sound exactly like the diatribes against breeders and parents where the gay movement started 55 years ago in San Francisco. Only thing you’ve left out is the fact that everybody including childless gays pays taxes for public schools.

  13. Alden says:

    The reason the majority of people with BAs voted to remain is that for the last 50 years, most British college grads had to go to to Europe, mainly Germany to get jobs. They guys got tech jobs, the gals taught English. Even teaching English is drying up as most European school systems start teaching English around 4th grade.

    That’s the main advantage of the EU for the British. British government and business refuses to hire the natives for any kind of job. British government and business prefers the dregs of Africa, Pakistan, India the islands instead of well qualified competent natives. So the college educated natives are forced to go to Europe, America, Canada, the rest of the world for jobs.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  14. A central feature of its regeneration was the expansion of universities in the city: Birmingham University alone has 30,000 students and more than 7,000 staff; Birmingham City University has 24,000 students; and Aston University 10,000. The advantages of this are self-evident

    It’s self-evident that what we have here is nothing more than another massive waste of taxpayer money to produce credentialed morons who merely end up demanding even more of other people’s hard-earned.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  15. I didn’t want to read this article simply because I knew that it would be rubbish. And it didn’t disappoint.

    A load of cherry picked crap

  16. @Verymuchalive

    Cockburn and Judge Nappy are the biggest turds in the website. They are both MSM hacks and are in violation of the website’s mission statement. They should not be here.

    Patrick Cockburn writes for the Independent, which is a left-leaning part of the British MSM. His writing about the Middle East might offer a different perspective, but his views about Britain are wearisome and all too familiar.

    • Replies: @Sean
  17. “… and I felt that the EU was a bit undemocratic.”

    No, the EU is anti-democratic. Don’t walk away from the EU … Run!

  18. M_Young says:

    It’s absolutely amazing how no one…no one…can make the connection between mass immigration and housing prices. It’s like they think immigrants live under toadstools or something.

    • Agree: Sean
    • Replies: @animalogic
  19. Sean says:
    @James N. Kennett

    His writing about the Middle East might offer a different perspective, but his views about Britain are wearisome and all too familiar.

    Two sides of the same coin.

    Look at Corbyn. The same people who support Palestinians want the British to end up like Palestinians in the way the urban proletariat of Birmingham have. Corbyn said there was no upper limit to immigration. The Israel disinvestment movement is led by Jews. Most of politics takes the form of white gentiles taking sides in arguments between Jewish intellectuals. Cockburn’s perspective on the Middle East is we should not mind our own business.

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
  20. Anonymous [AKA "Original Singularity"] says:

    Many white Brummies already consider Birmingham to be “lost” to the rapidly-growing Pakistani/Kashmiri community. Happily, the actual situation is rather more nuanced.

    The Asian community living in the Birmingham area is not monolithic and there are some interesting dynamics which will hopefully challenge the increasingly-chauvinistic fundamentalist and political Islamic perspectives.

    In certain inner city districts of Birmingham, with Small Heath, Sparkhill, Alum Rock and Bordesley Green being perhaps the most obvious examples, full veils are clearly becoming more common, as is the traditional male attire. Consanguineous, arranged marriages proliferate, and many local Asian-background young girls are taken on “holidays” to Pakistan and never return after being married off to often elderly relatives. First cousins regularly marry, but with their grandparents often also first cousins it makes the genetic relationship as close as an uncle to niece pairing.

    Stillbirths and profound mental and physical disabilities blight 10% of Muslim births in the area, and local nurses tell of hidden homes packed with the unfortunate victims of these sick practices. Medical staff also recount how it is taboo to talk about these issues in the local hospitals and surgeries.

    However, there are also more positive developments that challenge the patriarchal and archaic social relations that are forcefully imposed on young immigrants and British-born offspring alike.

    I recently sat as a judge for a public speaking competition in Solihull, an affluent dormitory town to the South of Birmingham. All of the winners were Asian-background Muslim girls. They were impressive speakers and their general intelligence and awareness obvious to the appreciative audience.

    I cannot see these educated young women easily taking the veil when they come of age. They will not accept a lower status than males and will prove to be formidable foes for the Islamic clerics and bastions of male power and privilege.

    Bring it on!

    • Replies: @Leon Haller
  21. @Anonymous

    An interesting comment. Here’s something even more interesting:

    Britain is a WHITE nation. Who cares about these Muslim girls or those? NONE of them belongs in Britain, and eventually, the easiest way to deal with the challenges they pose is to EXPEL EVERY NON-EUROPEAN (NON-WHITE) FROM BRITISH SOIL. The sooner the better.

    100% White nationalism. The only answer to the West’s decline.

    • Replies: @animalogic
  22. anon[320] • Disclaimer says:

    Brexit and Austerity: The Toxic Cocktail the Young Can’t Escape

    i suspect the young whites are more interested in escaping the divershitty that the cockburn types have brought in

  23. @TG

    “No, the problem is not enough austerity. Or too much Austerity. Take your pick, either way is fine, just don’t say that it’s because we jammed in more people without making the necessary investments to accommodate them. ”
    Failure to make the necessary investments to accommodate them. ”
    Such a “failure” is austerity. Spending that can be done & should be done but isn’t done is the essence of neoliberalism. Such spending is not done for multiple reasons.
    That elites do not like or respect the 99% is a good start. Austerity is also a useful in itself; it puts people in their place — it tells them that they deserve to have their lives made increasingly harsh.
    That austerity for a financially sovereign nation is completely unnecessary is the cherry atop their cake. How they must laugh at us!

  24. @Oleaginous Outrager

    Don’t know the UK situation but in Australia tertiary education is one of our biggest export earners (ie foreign fee-paying students) It’s been a very good investment — at least financially. Culturally & socially that investment may be questioned….

  25. @M_Young

    True.
    And a policy failure by government to encourage investment in lower cost private dwellings or in decent public housing are also causes.

  26. @Leon Haller

    There’s a fundamental difference between lowering/ceasing non-white immigration & “expelling” those already there — many of whom are citizens. If you think it would be “easy”, then your definition of “easy” is vastly different to mine.

    • Replies: @Leon Haller
  27. @Sean

    Corbyn said there was no upper limit to immigration.

    Angela Merkel said something similar about Muslim immigration to Germany.

    Politicians of the pro-immigration “mainstream” are in a bind. If they say that our countries can manage with twice as many Muslims as we have now, they know that that figure will be reached within 25 years by new births, arranged marriages, and chain migration alone. If they try to set an achievable cap, it would have to be four times current figures – but they know that the public would find that unacceptable: 20% Muslims in Britain, 40% in France, etc. So they have no choice but to say that there is no upper limit.

    In other words, the upper limit is 100% – complete population replacement.

    Most of politics takes the form of white gentiles taking sides in arguments between Jewish intellectuals.

    This should be the Comment Of The Year!

    Cockburn’s perspective on the Middle East is we should not mind our own business.

    Graeme Morris MP retweeted a video that he believed to show Palestinian children being beaten up by Israeli soldiers. Upon learning that in fact it showed Guatemalan soldiers beating up Guatemalan children, he apologised.

    Logically, this epiphany should induce Morris to take up the cause of human rights in Guatemala. I expect that instead he will continue to highlight the Palestinian cause – because his choices, like those of most politicians, are pre-determined by “Who, whom?”

    • Replies: @anon
  28. @animalogic

    “Easy” vs trying to defeat radical Islam and replace it with some less authentic version among British Muslims so as to facilitate the latter’s cultural assimilation. That task is pure liberal-utopian wishfulness.

    Immigration = invasion by non-military means. Why should one group of people – the racial/national traitors – be permitted to destroy an ancient nation’s demographic ecology and national identity for all time? The more than a few Brits (15-20, roughly) I’ve been privileged to know at different times in my life, going back to the late 1970s, all HATED nonwhite immigration. This was not because they were all White racists (some were by objective standards, all were by today’s you’re-a-racist-if-you’re-not-a-self-hating-White standards), but because thy understood that racial identity is the foundation of nation and civilization, especially Western civilization. They recognized that allowing nonwhite colonists would only a) make it ever more difficult to stop yet more nonwhite colonists in the future, and b) it would, in the most fundamental way imaginable, change the very self-identity of the British, and thus ultimately transform the nation into something alien and (most likely) unpleasant. Has reality not borne out these fears (I would say, worse than any of us imagined)?

    The only answer is the British reconquest of Occupied Britain. If the Nazis had been able to invade and hold the UK, it would have been understood among the British people that the long term goal was to expel the invaders, even if some of them had been born on UK soil, and were citizens of the UK, incorporated within the larger Reich. How is this Third World Invasion and Occupation any morally different? It is not.

    The aliens must be expelled, and returned to their home countries, every last one of them (including the Muslim satrap ruling Londonistan).

    • Replies: @James N. Kennett
  29. @Alden

    “for the last 50 years, most British college grads had to go to to Europe, mainly Germany to get jobs”

    I’m afraid that’s not true. Anecdotally I don’t know a single grad in Germany, although I know two German grads in the UK, both female and going out with relatives. Statistically there are about 100,000 Brits living +in Germany, which would mean 2,000 a year over 50 years.

    At any one time there are 1.8 million UK students at university.

    https://www.hesa.ac.uk/news/11-01-2018/sfr247-higher-education-student-statistics/location

  30. @Leon Haller

    How is this Third World Invasion and Occupation any morally different? It is not.

    The aliens must be expelled, and returned to their home countries, every last one of them (including the Muslim satrap ruling Londonistan).

    The difference is that the “invaders” are mostly here legally, according to laws passed by politicians that were democratically elected.

    Admittedly, our two-party system makes it difficult to overturn a consensus between the main parties; difficult, but not impossible.

    It is still possible to prevent our drift towards an Islamic Republic by ending mass immigration from Muslim countries now. There is no need to expel anybody except illegal immigrants, and terrorists who have dual nationality; and because most voters are on friendly terms with some Muslims, they are not going to vote for mass expulsions anyway.

    • Replies: @Leon Haller
  31. @YetAnotherAnon

    Indeed! How does turning university education into a commodity help anyone. If memory serves me correctly, it was Thatcher who started the process. University was more heavily subsidized on a sliding scale of ability to pay, but one had to “earn” the right to attend academically.

    What the younger types don’t seem to get, is that the older types, who were around when the referendum to join was held, see that however bad it was before entering, it is worse now and understand they were sold a pig with lipstick.

  32. anon[334] • Disclaimer says:
    @James N. Kennett

    In other words, the upper limit is 100% – complete population replacement.

    that’s why they all need to hang, Corbyn included – probably Trump as well

    they are ALL traitors

  33. @James N. Kennett

    But your statement:

    The difference is that the “invaders” are mostly here legally, according to laws passed by politicians that were democratically elected.

    does not address mine:

    Why should one group of people – the racial/national traitors – be permitted to destroy an ancient nation’s demographic ecology and national identity for all time?

    So what if one generation’s political leadership (or even entire population) were a bunch of filthy race traitors? That gives them the right to destroy forever what they were meant to steward? I don’t think so. What happened to Burke’s and Chesterton’s “democracy of the dead” (not to mention, and of those yet unborn)?

    NO the indigenous people of the UK have a moral right and responsibility to expel ALL nonwhites from British soil. Why only nonwhites, and not also non-British whites? Because the latter, being of the same race, can be expected to assimilate (or at least be thought of as assimilable) to British culture and folkways.

    BTW, I don’t care about voting. Questions of fundamental morality do not get resolved by ballots (even ethically) but by bullets. What is right is not a matter of democratic consensus, except perhaps on immediate and trivial issues (what should the speed limit be? how high property taxes? what foreign languages taught in primary schools?). One generation does not have the standing or right to elect to race replace itself for all time. Or if it does, then another generation has equal right to reverse those earlier changes.

    Civil race war is coming to the West, especially Europe. And that’s good news (long term)!

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