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Was Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi murdered inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, and then his body cut up with a bone saw and flown to Riyadh in Gulfstream jets owned by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman?

So contend the Turks, who have video from the consulate, photos of 15 Saudi agents who flew into Istanbul that day, Oct. 2, and the identity numbers of the planes.

Supporting the thesis of either a murder in the consulate or a “rendition,” a kidnaping gone horribly bad, is a Post story that U.S. intel intercepted Saudi planning, ordered by the prince, to lure Khashoggi from his suburban D.C. home back to

Saudi Arabia. And for what beneficent purpose?

If these charges are not refuted by Riyadh, there will likely be, and should be, as John Bolton said in another context, “hell to pay.”

And the collateral diplomatic damage looks to be massive.

Any U.S.-backed “Arab NATO” to face down Iran, with Riyadh as central pillar, would appear dead. Continued U.S. support for the Saudi war in Yemen would now be in question.

The special relationship the crown prince and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, have established could be history.

Congress could cancel U.S. arms sales to the kingdom that keep thousands of U.S. defense workers employed, and impose sanctions on the prince who is heir apparent to the throne of his 82-year-old father, King Salman.

Today, the Saudi prince has become toxic, and his ascension to the Saudi throne seems less inevitable than two weeks ago. Yet, well before Khashoggi’s disappearance in the consulate, Crown Prince Mohammed’s behavior had seemed wildly erratic.

Along with the UAE, he charged Qatar with supporting terrorism, severed relations, and threatened to build a ditch to sever Qatar from the Arabian Peninsula. To protest criticism of his country’s human rights record by Canada’s foreign minister, he cut all ties to Ottawa.

Last year, he summoned Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri to Riyadh, held him for a week, and forced him to resign his office and blame it on Iranian interference in Lebanon. Released, Hariri returned home to reclaim his office.

A professed reformer, Crown Prince Mohammed opened movie theaters to women and allowed them to drive, and then jailed the social activists who had called for these reforms.

Three years ago, he initiated the war on the Houthis, after the rebels ousted a pro-Saudi president and took over most of the country.

And, since 2015, the crown prince has conducted a savage air war that has brought Houthi missiles down on his own country and capital.

Yemen has become Saudi Arabia’s Vietnam.

That our principal Arab ally in our confrontation with Iran, which could lead to yet another U.S. war, is a regime headed by so unstable a character should raise serious concerns about where it is we are going in the Middle East.

Have we not wars already?

Do we not have enough enemies in the region — Taliban, al-Qaida, ISIS, Hezbollah, Hamas, Syria, Iran — to be starting another war?

As for our regional allies, consider.

NATO ally Turkey, which is pressing the case against our Saudi allies, leads the world in the number of journalists jailed. Our Egyptian ally, Gen. al-Sissi, came to power in a military coup, and has imprisoned thousands of dissidents of the Muslim Brotherhood.

While we have proclaimed Iran the “world’s greatest state sponsor of terror,” it is Yemen, where Saudi Arabia intervened in 2015, that is regarded as the world’s great human rights catastrophe.

Moreover, Iran is itself suffering from terrorism.

Last month, a military parade in the city of Ahvaz in the southwest was attacked by gunmen who massacred 25 soldiers and civilians in the deadliest terror attack in Iran in a decade.

And like Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and Libya, Iran suffers, too, from tribalism, with Arab secessionists in its southwest, Baloch secessionists in its southeast, and Kurd secessionists in its northwest.

ORDER IT NOW

The U.S. cannot look aside at a royal Saudi hand in the murder of a U.S.-based journalist in its consulate in Istanbul. But before we separate ourselves from the Riyadh regime, we should ask what is the alternative if the House of Saud should be destabilized or fall?

When Egypt’s King Farouk was overthrown in 1952, we got Nasser.

When young King Faisal was overthrown in Baghdad in 1958, we eventually got Saddam Hussein. When King Idris in Libya was ousted in 1969, we got Qaddafi. When Haile Selassie was overthrown and murdered in Ethiopia in 1974, we got Col. Mengistu and mass murder. When the Shah was overthrown in Iran in 1979, we got the Ayatollah.

As World War I, when four empires fell, testifies, wars are hell on monarchies. And if a new and larger Middle East war, with Iran, should break out in the Gulf, some of the Arab kings, emirs and sultans will likely fall.

And when they do, history shows, it is not usually democrats who rise to replace them.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of a new book, “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

Copyright 2018 Creators.com.

 
• Category: Foreign Policy • Tags: Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia 
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  1. Realist says:

    When the Shah was overthrown in Iran in 1979, we got the Ayatollah.

    You conveniently forgot to mention the Shah was put in place by a 1953 CIA coup.

    • Agree: RVBlake, Giuseppe
    • Replies: @MEexpert
  2. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    This one may set a new record for Mr. Buchanan’s use of pronoun propaganda, cultivating the sense that Americans should literally identify with their rulers.

    “That our principal Arab ally in our confrontation with Iran, which could lead to yet another U.S. war, is a regime headed by so unstable a character should raise serious concerns about where it is we are going in the Middle East.

    Have we not wars already?

    Do we not have enough enemies in the region — Taliban, al-Qaida, ISIS, Hezbollah, Hamas, Syria, Iran — to be starting another war?

    As for our regional allies, consider.”

    Et cetera. He always sounds like he’s advising Uncle Sam.

    When it comes to matters outside his country, “Mr. Paleoconservative” is, in fact, a right-sized imperialist.

  3. Escher says:

    Buy their oil, and leave them alone to do whatever they want to each other.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  4. TTSSYF says:

    Maybe there should be hell to pay, but if there is hell to pay for one U.S.-based journalist being murdered in the consulate, why was there not hell to pay and more for the Saudis when 15 of 19 terrorists who skyjacked four airliners and flew them into buildings or the ground, murdering nearly 3000 civilians on American soil, were Saudi? Why was our response limited to Afghanistan?

    • Agree: Realist
    • Troll: Carroll Price
    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
    , @ariadna
    , @TTSSYF
  5. Renoman says:

    It’s a bottomless pit, the US supports the Saudi’s AND Israel!! The two most hated peoples on the planet. No good will ever come from either relationship and this unending feud with Iran? What the hell has Iran ever done to America or anyone else for that matter? It’s bizarre at best and horribly embarrassing, the USA have become the World’s illiterate hillbillies. Every single Country in the World looks upon them with hate and fear. Stupid stupid stupid!

  6. KenH says:

    It’s tell to get the hell out of the Middle East and leave those nations to their fate even it that means a very bloody sunni-shia sectarian war. Virtually everything we do is at Israel’s behest and for their benefit anyway and it’s high time we kick them to the curb and withdraw all aid.

    With all the regime changing, democratizing, ostensible terror fighting and drone strikes the situation is much more precarious now than right than in the aftermath of the 2001 attacks on the twin towers. Doing nothing would have reaped better results.

    Normally I would condemn the Saudis and Turks for their treatment of journalists but seeing what pathological liars and left wing/anti-white activists most of them are I can’t bring myself to do it and perhaps those two nations are on to something.

  7. Giuseppe says:

    When the Shah was overthrown in Iran in 1979, we got the Ayatollah.

    When the CIA overthrew democratically elected Mossadegh, we got the Shah.

  8. Once again Paddy shows his true imperial lusts
    “If these charges are not refuted by Riyadh, there will likely be, and should be, as John Bolton said in another context, “hell to pay.””

    Why is this anything to do with the US?
    Why is the murderous neocon filth Bolton running his blood-dripping mouth?

  9. Sage wisdom from Pat.

    Something to think about.

    • Replies: @NoseytheDuke
  10. @anonymous

    As much as I appreciate Pat Buchanan in general, I agree with you here, #340. Why get into ANY of these details? That’s been our problem for 70-odd years now. Get us the hell out. If they kill one diplomat, just raise the salary for the next applicant – supply-and-demand – what’s so hard about that?

    BTW, on your use of “pronoun propaganda”, I had thought you were going to mention Mr. Buchanan’s lack of the use of the Royal “She” as applied to countries, as he used to. It’s very old fashioned, but it made me remember whom I was reading, when he wrote like that. “Russia is concerned with HER gas distribution..”, “Iran has not complied with HER blah, blah, so SHE will be …”, etc. How about this one: “America should get HER nose out of the worlds business before SHE gets a royal ass-kicking.”

    Maybe, Pat figures that type of usage does not apply to shitholes.

  11. shamely says:

    Which “friends like these” exactly senile Pat Buchanan?

    Time to start dealing with true elephant-in-the-parlor – Israel.

    Better do it before you move on to that great right-wing nirvana in the sky…

    • Replies: @Sir Launcelot Canning
  12. Anyone assuming that morals and human decency will trump the all-mighty dollar, is sadly mistaken.

  13. Considering the Saudis have bought and paid for US and UK governments several times over, the disappearance/death of this guy will get tepid murmurings of objection and then disappear down the memory hole.

    • Agree: Andrei Martyanov
  14. Yee says:

    Bill Jones,

    “Why is this anything to do with the US?
    Why is the murderous neocon filth Bolton running his blood-dripping mouth?”

    My guess is that this has something to do with the state-owned oil company Saudi Aramco dragging their feet at going to stock market.

    The original plan was to do it in 2018. A few days ago, Aramco’s CEO said not sure if they can be ready at 2020.

    The Saudi could use some pressure…

  15. @shamely

    Pat has been consistently calling out Bibi for years? Is this the first PJB article you have read? I have been reading him for a quarter of a century. This article is about the despicable Saudis.

  16. “Yemen has become Saudi Arabia’s Vietnam.”

    Et tu . . .

    not even close

    • Agree: The Alarmist
  17. Miro23 says:

    Supporting the thesis of either a murder in the consulate or a “rendition,” a kidnaping gone horribly bad, is a Post story that U.S. intel intercepted Saudi planning, ordered by the prince, to lure Khashoggi from his suburban D.C. home back to Saudi Arabia.

    Read that story in the Washington Post and it’s enough to be sure that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is out.

    The Zioglob are probably looking at the failure of their joint effort in Syria, the hopeless Saudi military in Yemen, the failed Aramco flotation and decided to finish with MBS. They still need Saudi Arabia , but maybe there’s a better way for Israel to get Saudi Arabia’s oil for nothing, and postpone the Iran war for a while.

  18. “a regime headed by so unstable a character should raise serious concerns about where it is we are going in the Middle East.”

    So the US and SA have that in common – coo coo leaders. With a bunch of money and a ton of firepower behind them.

    Nice.

  19. @TTSSYF

    You left out the Tooth Fairy and Santa in your comment. Why?

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  20. @Si1ver1ock

    Not so sage though when he refers to al-Qaida and ISIS as enemies when they are actually proxy forces of the US and any real sage would know that.

  21. The links between the very evil House of Saud and the mostly evil UK and USA elites will remain intact. Fortunes have been made through these relationships. And there is the strategic alliance between Israel and the Saudis, and their mutual Shiite enemy in Iran. Even the October 1, 2018 Las Vegas massacre, which appears to be the work of a Wahhabist network from the Philippines, was not enough to sever the ties between the U.S. and the House of Saud. These links are deep and dark, and only a massive geopolitical upheaval will dissolve them.

  22. MEexpert says:
    @Realist

    It also an unfair comparison. The present regime is 1000 times better than the Shah, Saddam, Sisi, etc. There are elections every four years. Women can work, drive, go to moves, etc. To compare Ayatullah to Saddam and Sisi is being dishonest.

    • Agree: Per/Norway
    • Replies: @lavoisier
    , @lavoisier
  23. dearieme says:

    “15 Saudi agents who flew into Istanbul that day”: typical Arab overmanning.

    ” Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi “: I know nothing about poor Mr Khashoggi but I don’t usually mourn at the death of a WP columnist. Should I this time?

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  24. tyrone says:

    The whole thing recorded by an apple watch? 15 MBS bodyguards show up just before ?……boy, that’s some ham-handed wet work,really gives international assassination a bad name ,maybe Bill and Hilary can loan him some of their killers.

  25. @dearieme

    To paraphrase an old lawyer joke:

    Q: What do you call it when a bus full of WP reporters & management goes over a cliff?
    A: A good start.

    Q: What do you call it when two seats were empty?
    A: A shame.

  26. ariadna says:
    @TTSSYF

    @TTSSYF: You must agree that the 9/11 attack by the Saudis should not have come as such a surprise after they attacked USS Liberty and we let them get away with it.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    , @El Dato
  27. TTSSYF says:
    @NoseytheDuke

    You’re disputing the fact that 15 of the 19 skyjacker terrorists were Saudi and that Saudi Arabia was not held to account?

    • Replies: @Per/Norway
  28. TTSSYF says:
    @TTSSYF

    Not sure why my comment merits being deemed that of a troll. The article concerns outrageous actions of the Saudis toward a U.S.-based journalist that appear highly likely to have occurred. My comment merely stated the fact that 15 of the 19 terrorists were Saudi and that, to all outward appearances, the Saudis were never held to account for it.

  29. TTSSYF says:
    @ariadna

    I don’t feel compelled to agree to that or not agree to it. I’m not privy to the information that the intelligence community has. I do, however, recall reading an article about OBL several months prior to 9/11 and about the threat he posed. I also read an article by Dana Rorabacher (sp?) recounting his experiences in Afghanistan in 1979 or thereabouts, in which he was warned to not let the Arab in the nearby big tent know he was American, because if he (OBL) found out, he would kill him.

    But I do agree that we let them get away with the attack on the USS Liberty and that doing so was not good for the long-term.

    • Troll: Rurik
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  30. TTSSYF says:
    @TTSSYF

    How about a reasoned reply? I’d appreciate knowing why you think I’m wrong or a troll.

    • Replies: @tyrone
  31. Gordo says:

    When King Idris in Libya was ousted in 1969, we got Qaddafi.

    C’mon Pat, you know that was the CIA.

  32. lavoisier says: • Website
    @MEexpert

    If you say this over and over again, you might actually believe it.

  33. El Dato says:

    Congress could cancel U.S. arms sales to the kingdom that keep thousands of U.S. defense workers employed

    MUH JOBS!!!

    Congres could cancel!! (Nah, never gonna happen)

    OKAY; WHY are those thousands of people on what can only be described as WELFARE?

    They produce non-useful warcrap (as opposed to useful stuff that the US needs) which is then shipped to the Saudis at preferred prices who, in return, ship dollar containers from the oil trade back to Big Defense. It’s a conveyor belt from the people’s pocket to Big Defense!

    Attached to a promise to buy those treasuries…

    The Untold Story Behind Saudi Arabia’s 41-Year U.S. Debt Secret: How a legendary bond trader from Salomon Brothers brokered a do-or-die deal that reshaped U.S.-Saudi relations for generations.

    It was July 1974. A steady predawn drizzle had given way to overcast skies when William Simon, newly appointed U.S. Treasury secretary, and his deputy, Gerry Parsky, stepped onto an 8 a.m. flight from Andrews Air Force Base. On board, the mood was tense. That year, the oil crisis had hit home. An embargo by OPEC’s Arab nations—payback for U.S. military aid to the Israelis during the Yom Kippur War—quadrupled oil prices. Inflation soared, the stock market crashed, and the U.S. economy was in a tailspin.

    … Simon, better than anyone else, understood the appeal of U.S. government debt and how to sell the Saudis on the idea that America was the safest place to park their petrodollars. With that knowledge, the administration hatched an unprecedented do-or-die plan that would come to influence just about every aspect of U.S.-Saudi relations over the next four decades (Simon died in 2000 at the age of 72).

    The basic framework was strikingly simple. The U.S. would buy oil from Saudi Arabia and provide the kingdom military aid and equipment. In return, the Saudis would plow billions of their petrodollar revenue back into Treasuries and finance America’s spending.

    It took several discreet follow-up meetings to iron out all the details, Parsky said. But at the end of months of negotiations, there remained one small, yet crucial, catch: King Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud demanded the country’s Treasury purchases stay “strictly secret,” according to a diplomatic cable obtained by Bloomberg from the National Archives database.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
  34. El Dato says:
    @ariadna

    > Saudis attack the USS Liberty.

    LOL what even.

    • Replies: @Per/Norway
  35. tyrone says:
    @TTSSYF

    Well ,since you ask ,you made one tinsy winsy mistake concerning the USS Liberty ….. an over- sight I’m sure.

    • Replies: @TTSSYF
  36. TTSSYF says:
    @tyrone

    Oh my God, yes, that definitely was NOT a “tinsy winsy” mistake but rather a colossal one of huge import (albeit made in haste as the clock was ticking on the time left to revise my comment). I can see why you and others were so offended by it…I mean, it’s practically unforgiveable. I bow to your superior knowledge.

    It still doesn’t explain why my questioning our lack of holding the Saudis responsible for 9/11 seems to trigger so many commentors on this website. Just because some of you appear to have a blind, white-hot hatred for (((certain people))) doesn’t mean we shouldn’t hold other people responsible for their evil acts. Bad behavior and holding people accountable for it is not a zero-sum game.

    • Troll: Rurik
    • Replies: @TTSSYF
    , @KA
  37. Jim Given says:
    @anonymous

    Pat Buchanan is used to advising Republicans using arguments that will impress them. He personally favors A Nation Not An Empire; but even if one disagrees, it still follows that many possible government courses of action are totally wrong-headed.

  38. TTSSYF says:
    @TTSSYF

    I’ve read through many of your comments. They are lengthy and interesting. Why don’t you share some of your greater knowledge (or opinions) about 9/11 to enlighten me? I don’t think I’ve lived a life quite like yours, so a lot of what you think is “trolling” may just be ignorance or naivety.

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
    , @Rurik
  39. KA says:
    @TTSSYF

    Mistrial occurs in America all the times . Sometimes that’s what the defendant seeks, engineers, uncovers.Cases are thrown out because of prosecutorial misconduct .

    Before you come down heavily on the Saudis, ask yourself why America refused the offer of the Taliban to have access to the evidence of the culpability of OBL. Ask yourself why America refused to put OBL on trial. Ask yourself why OBL was not caught alive and brought to justice through trial instead of shooting him.
    Tell me how did the post 911 response develop immediately so linearly so smoothly so seamlessly across all the branches of the government and the religious secular organizations and across the entire western block . Why anyone challenging the canard against Taliban hijackers and Saddam never managed to introduce any element of doubts ? Why were those trying silenced,removed,and ridiculed ?

    Why are so many red flags in 911 reports ?
    Why did US government create false videos on OBL?

    The world has moved . It is not the world seen through the 911 anymore . In this world American governemt is as responsible as are the unknown unseen ,invisible ,undocumented ,unproven, non existent / existent hijackers are .

  40. @TTSSYF

    To start with Jamal Khashoggi is not a ‘U.S.-based journalist’. He had U.S. residency and he wasn’t a journalist; except in the modern sense of journalism that covers the truth – with a pillow until it’s dead.

    Your false equivalence that in 9/11 the US failed to take the correct action in one circumstance ; therefore it must never again take the correct action again. Other comments about CIA-inspired foreign government ‘corrections’ are much of the same but of the opposite persuasion, and are no defense.

    And since you invoke 9/11, it ‘s an interesting but little discussed fact Khashoggi was one of the first ‘journalists’ to befriend and support for Osuma binLaden’s version of jihad. Khashoggi conveniently broke from binLaden after 9/11 . . . . well after that event, meeting with binLaden numerous times in Tora Bora.

    Of course Khashoggi was not a Wahabi fundamentalist, but a leader in Moslim Brotherhood, the sect that ‘rode the train of democracy’ in Egypt and Turkey and ‘stepped off when it took them where they wanted’ (phrase from Erdogan). Khashoggi was a shit-stirrer looking to get Saudi out of the US orbit and into the Turk’s and Qatar’s.

    Khashoggi was well regarded by the Western leftists: the Moslim Brotherhood is all about brotherhood (it’s even in it’s name!), peace, and democracy. Until it isn’t of course. Recent Saudi moves toward more freedoms were met by a shitstorm in the western press from Khashoggi demanding they weren’t enough; all freedom must be granted all at once. He then founded the political party Democracy for the Arab World Now (DAWN), applauded by all the correct players like Democracy Now and National Endowment for Democracy, as a political party opposing the Saudi royals.

    Fact is Khashoggi ‘s been a player in destabilizing Saudi since the beginning. He who plays with fire sometimes gets burned.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Rurik
  41. @El Dato

    They’re worse than welfare: they’re federal employees. Welfare is a friggin’ bargain compared to them.

  42. Renoman says:

    Who cares? Move on.

  43. Johann says:
    @anonymous

    I agree with you. After hearing and reading about the Middlle East and US policy for fifty years I am sick and tired of Israel, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Syria etc. etc. . I frankly don’t give a damn about it anymore. Doesn’t the US have enough troubles at home: the drug epidemic , open rioting in the streets, lack of law enforcement , a joke of an educational system and atrocious taxation. Maybe Pat ought to examine his conscience as we Catholics used to say before the age of PF and realize that only the super rich super powerful citizens of DC actually care about and concern themselves about what is going on in the Middle East .

  44. Johann says:
    @anonymous

    I agree with you. After hearing and reading about the Middlle East and US policy for fifty years I am sick and tired of Israel, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Syria etc. etc. . I frankly don’t give a damn about it anymore. Doesn’t the US have enough troubles at home: the drug epidemic , open rioting in the streets, lack of law enforcement , a joke of an educational system and atrocious taxation. Maybe Pat ought to examine his conscience as we Catholics used to say before the age of PF and realize that only the super rich super powerful citizens of DC actually care about and concern themselves about what is going on in the Middle East .

  45. anon[136] • Disclaimer says:
    @hooodathunkit

    1 “Recent Saudi moves toward more freedoms were met by a shitstorm in the western press from Khashoggi demanding they weren’t enough”- Said royals have played right into the US trap. This trap has long been laid and has been allowed to grow. Saudi is now hated by muslims inside and outside for openly working with Israel, for giving the Islamic cover to Trump’s decision to transfer embassy,and for agreeing to the Netanyahu-Kushner plan for Palestinian issue . But the western press tries to explain the hatred against saudi royal is based on anti reform attitude. US allows and has been allowing of anti democratic anti women anti since attitude in Saudi for pure political purposes – 1 those aspects of Saudi society will be used against it if and when need arises 2 those aspect of saudi royal will be used to create cultivate mobilize and use Islamic terrorists 3 those aspect of saudi royal can only be protected and ignored if US oil policy is respected by Saudi and if saudi supports American policy towards recalcitrant regimes like that of Saddam Gaddafi Basher Assad or Iran. That efforts on the part of Saudi include money propaganda and boycotting of those leaders . Creating and giving platform to ‘dissident’ like ‘Khassagi’ is part of the same process to make Saudi capitulate to each and every demands of USA

    2 “Khashoggi was a shit-stirrer looking to get Saudi out of the US orbit and into the Turk’s and Qatar’s”– any reference or any analytical conclusion? Is Qatar out of US? Was Turkey ever ?

    3 “National Endowment for Democracy, as a political party opposing the Saudi royal’.- NED is a US Gov organization . This body is the same that has been trying democracy in Ukraine . It makes no sense for them to try the same “reform” in Saudi when the “reform” is pretty well esatblished that is carrying the US agenda.

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
  46. trudley says:

    “With friends like these” Pat Buchanan – which “friends” in the Mideast (who behave even worse than that wooden top MbS) did you “forget” to mention?

    Are they paying you now to keep them out of your columns?

    Old age, meet the lobby…

    • Replies: @anon
  47. sorry the man was murdered. perhaps some good will come…things like >>Any U.S.-backed “Arab NATO” to face down Iran, with Riyadh as central pillar, would appear dead. Continued U.S. support for the Saudi war in Yemen would now be in question.
    The special relationship the crown prince and President Donald Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, have established could be history.
    Congress could cancel U.S. arms sales to the kingdom that keep thousands of U.S. defense workers employed<<
    pretty sure we can find other jobs for defense workers…..hey!!! maybe we coud look again for a "peace dividend' and fix some infrastructure here at home.

  48. anon[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @trudley

    Are they paying you now to keep them out of your columns?

    You tell me —-

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  49. Rurik says:
    @hooodathunkit

    Fact is Khashoggi ‘s been a player in destabilizing Saudi since the beginning. He who plays with fire sometimes gets burned.

    Wow

    What a staggeringly despicable cretin you are.

    For every human being with their souls still intact, the Saudi regime is a murderous, treacherous, lecherous, open boil oozing its putrid seepage all over the region, and beyond.

    They openly murder honorable dissidents to their depraved, decadent and corrupt ways, and most recently (and apparently) showed their true nature by hacking up a man who most likely had a thousand times the Godliness than anyone from that shitstain of a regime.

    Even as I write this, that murderous abomination to Islam and humanity, is starving an entire nation into brutal submission to its corrupt rule.

    If Khashoggi (or Osama for that matter, who obviously had nothing whatsoever to do with 9/11) were trying to bring sanity to that beleaguered part of the world, then may Allah illuminate their graves with a billion lanterns of Godly light.

    MbS (sniveling servant of Zion, and lickspittle to ZUSA presidents) is not worthy to lick their feet.

    • Replies: @hooodathunkit
  50. @anon

    @anon[136]
    What the media aren’t telling you about Jamal Khashoggi (Spectator) and what Pat Buchanan isn’t telling you either.

    [Khashoggi] … the darling of western commentators on the Middle East. With almost two million Twitter followers, he was the most famous political pundit in the Arab world and a regular guest on the major TV news networks in Britain and the United States. Would the Saudis dare to cause him harm? It turns out that the answer to that question was ‘You betcha.’ . . .

    . . . In the 1970s he joined the Muslim Brotherhood, which exists to rid the Islamic world of western influence. He was a political Islamist until the end, recently praising the Muslim Brotherhood in the Washington Post. He championed the ‘moderate’ Islamist opposition in Syria, whose crimes against humanity are a matter of record.

    For those who are interested in more than WaPo/NYT talking points, author John R. Bradley’s short wiki page is worth it’s references.

  51. @Rurik

    It was Suddam Hussein as a murderer, torturer, horrible person in league with the devil . . . . except . . . what proved worse after he was gone was the Moslim Brotherhood. Higher body count. More depraved torture. Far less freedoms. Etcetera.

    Then it was Hosni Mubarak as a murderer, torturer, horrible person in league with the devil . . . . except . . . what proved worse after he was gone was the Moslim Brotherhood. Higher body count. More depraved torture. Far less freedoms. Etcetera.

    Now it’s the Saudi must be in league with the devil . . . . except . . . what’s proven worse everytime is the Moslim Brotherhood. Higher body count. More depraved torture. Far less freedoms. Everytime.

    And you call that “bringing sanity to a beleaguered part of the world”. Stuff it.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  52. Rurik says:
    @TTSSYF

    I don’t think I’ve lived a life quite like yours, so a lot of what you think is “trolling” may just be ignorance or naivety.

    fair enough

    But Saudi’s did USS Liberty?!

    I mean you’re here at the Unz, a certain familiarity with such issues is sort of de rigueur.

    But supposing you’re just a newbie to all of this, then you can start with the ‘dancing Israelis’, who had their cameras set up and were filming the first plane hitting the towers that day, and then were seen dancing around and ‘high-fiving’ each other and obviously celebrating the horrific slaughter of innocent Americans.

    One may ask, if these Mossad agents knew this was going to happen, (and were there to “document the event”), then it’s fair to wonder just how many Israeli officials also knew. As in obviously Benjamin Netanyahu, who not only was a member of the Likud government and security apparatus, but was also a close friend of ‘lucky Larry’ Silverstein, with whom he was known to speak weekly.

    So the question becomes, why are all these dual-citizen Israelis allowed to hold all these sensitive positions in our government and intelligence agencies, when we all know as a matter of well-established fact that they will, just as they did during the USS Liberty cowardly and treacherous attack ~ mass-murder American citizens at the drop of a hat, if they perceive some benefit to Israel by doing so?

    Why, was a man like Israeli citizen Michael Chertoff, (who was responsible for releasing the Mossad agents quietly back to Israel), chosen to head up the United States Office of Homeland Security?

    Is it possible that there may have been a potential conflict of interest in choosing a man with loyalties to Israel, to protect the American people from another attack from the nation who had already shown a willingness to murder Americans as a false flag crime in order to get Americans to fight their wars for them?

    Eh?

    Start from there, and then find out how many Jewish supremacists (Zionist Jews) who own or control “our” media.

    Once you’ve started down that rabbit hole, and if you possess an honest nature and moral character, then God speed to you on your trip to enlightenment, revelation and truth.

    For me there is nothing on this earth as critically imperative as knowing the truth. However disturbing it may be. I’d rather understand, and fight a fiend who has corrupted the mind, body and soul of my people and nation and civilization…

    than to be yet another one of its cud-chewing chumps, serving it’s demonic agenda in a bovine stupor, as it murders and enslaves and genocides every thing I love and hold dear.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @lavoisier
    , @TTSSYF
  53. lavoisier says: • Website
    @MEexpert

    Khomeini was a great man for sure. In fact it is axiomatic that he was a great and noble man and not a religious fanatic with psychopathic instincts.

    And if you do not understand that, you are not a Middle East expert.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  54. lavoisier says: • Website
    @Rurik

    So the question becomes, why are all these dual-citizen Israelis allowed to hold all these sensitive positions in our government and intelligence agencies??

    If and when we can ask this question in an open forum, and demand from our leaders an answer to this important question, we can begin to start the necessary process of healing our corrupted nation.

    But this question cannot be asked, nor will it be answered, at any future time that I can imagine.

    • Agree: Rurik
  55. Rurik says:
    @hooodathunkit

    your assessments are simplest (idiotic)

    When Saddam was a zio-stooge, and murdering Persians for Zion, he was good to go for the ZUSA.

    But then he stopped murdering Persians and began supporting Palestinians, and so he became inconvenient to Zion and had to go. Duh

    …what proved worse after he was gone was the Moslim Brotherhood

    are you really that stupid?

    Do you suppose that it’s the Muslim Brotherhood running Iraq today?

    Here’s a clue, Iraq (Bagdad) is run from DC (Tel Aviv). The rest of the country is a failed state because the admittedly brutal Saddam was still the best thing they had going.

    Mubarak was also a Zio-stooge, but when the Egyptians had their vaunted ‘democracy’, they elected the Muslim Brotherhood, warts and all. But the Zionists didn’t approve, so they used a military coup to install their quisling El-Sisi. Duh

    Now it’s the Saudi must be in league with the devil . . . . except . . . what’s proven worse everytime is the Moslim Brotherhood. Higher body count. More depraved torture. Far less freedoms. Everytime.

    Since everything you’ve said so far is horseshit, this is just par for the course.

    It’s time for a grass-roots, Arab spring revolution in Saudi Arabia. If it brings the Muslim Brotherhood to power, then nothing could be worse than the corrupt and depraved shitstains running the country (into the ground) now.

    eat that.

  56. then says:
    @anon

    How about THESE friends from one of Buchanan’s finest columns – 2003?:

    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/whose-war/

    “…Suddenly, the Israeli connection is on the table, and the War Party is not amused. Finding themselves in an unanticipated firefight, our neoconservative friends are doing what comes naturally, seeking student deferments from political combat by claiming the status of a persecuted minority group…

    …We charge that a cabal of polemicists and public officials seek to ensnare our country in a series of wars that are not in America’s interests. We charge them with colluding with Israel to ignite those wars and destroy the Oslo Accords. We charge them with deliberately damaging U.S. relations with every state in the Arab world that defies Israel or supports the Palestinian people’s right to a homeland of their own. We charge that they have alienated friends and allies all over the Islamic and Western world through their arrogance, hubris, and bellicosity…

    …They charge us with anti-Semitism—i.e., a hatred of Jews for their faith, heritage, or ancestry. False. The truth is, those hurling these charges harbor a “passionate attachment” to a nation not our own that causes them to subordinate the interests of their own country and to act on an assumption that, somehow, what’s good for Israel is good for America…”

    Is it still “on the table” Pat Buchanan, ready for Iran I – or have you removed it?

  57. Rurik says:
    @lavoisier

    Khomeini was a great man for sure. In fact it is axiomatic that he was a great and noble man and not a religious fanatic with psychopathic instincts.

    I usually agree with you Lavoisier, but I suspect that with your sarcasm, you might be making the perfect the enemy of the good.

    Nothing could have been worse than the Shah. He too, like the House of Saud, was a brutal and corrupt POS.

    There is a metric that is nearly, if not mathematically perfect.

    If a regime is cozy to the Fiend (Zionism as it’s practiced today), then that regime is rotten and corrupt and usually murderous and brutal. (the enemy of its people, IOW)

    Please read about SAVAK and how it was ran by the CIA and Mossad. And known for sadism off the charts.

    I don’t think Iran today has anything like it.

    • Replies: @lavoisier
  58. MBlanc46 says:

    If it happened, it was very naughty. But my concern meter for WaPo “journalists” named Khashoggi is not likely to move far off zero. Turks. Saudis. Iranians. None of them are our friends, or ever will be. Them murdering each other is not my problem.

    • Replies: @ourproblem
  59. @TTSSYF

    i do not know, what i do know is that i find it sad to see there are still people believing the bush/cheney narrative after all these years.

  60. @MBlanc46

    Hmmm, if the “Turks. Saudis. Iranians”… “murdering each other is not” your (and thus the U.S.’s “problem”), should the U.S. at least stop assisting them?

    I mean, where exactly in the U.S, constitution does it require that the U.S. be an accessory to murder in the Levant and Near East – let alone funding a Mideast nation’s snipers to kill and maim protesters from 150 yards?

    If the U.S. has no “problem” , then surely it should not seek to make itself part of one/any?

    Is this not really the “problem” – which you avoid?

  61. TTSSYF says:
    @Rurik

    I also am a seeker of truth (thus, my screen name), even if I don’t always have the courage of my convictions. I’ve spent my career surrounding myself with intelligent people (science and engineering) because I want to enlighten myself. This blog site is no different.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  62. SteveK9 says:

    Another odd article from Pat Buchanan. He recognizes the slaughter in Yemen, but thinks it perfectly natural that we should care a great deal about one Saudi journalist, who for most of his life supported the Saudi family and its system. He also thinks we should be worried that fallen kings were supplanted by … what socialist? Horrors. They may have been strongmen, but not so different from monarchs anyway. Saudi Arabia seems like such an anachronism now, it is hard to believe it will continue for much longer.

  63. Anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:

    The United States completely ignored 4,000 Palestinians massacred and opened up the umbrella by calling them “violent”. The Palestinians are “violent”, because 4,000 Palestinians were killed, but no Israeli was killed.

    So, why can’t they ignore the murder of one journalist? What’s in it for the US to come down on Saudi Arabia because of one journalist?

  64. lavoisier says: • Website
    @Rurik

    Thanks for the compliment. And I normally agree with you too.

    I am quite familiar with what the Shah did and know well the evil that this puppet of the West perpetrated on his own people. I have been fortunate to be close to a large number of Persians over the years and have heard their stories of the horrors that have been imposed on them by their tyrannical leaders.

    These successive regimes have gained power primarily through our own dishonest meddling in their countries.

    But the Islamic regime has not been a friend to the people of Iran either. And in many ways, they have been more cruel and despotic than the Shah ever was.

    I believe Khomeini was pure evil.

    But I agree with you on this point: They are the avowed enemies of the Zionists and hence are marked for destruction.

    We have no dog in this upcoming fight. But if we did, it would have to be with the people of Iran.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  65. Rurik says:
    @TTSSYF

    … I want to enlighten myself. This blog site is no different.

    well then God bless you.

    If I was mistaken about your motivations, then I’m glad that you’re one of us.

    Cheers

  66. Rurik says:
    @lavoisier

    But the Islamic regime has not been a friend to the people of Iran either. And in many ways, they have been more cruel and despotic than the Shah ever was.

    Well Lavoisier, I’m sure it’s repressive, I doubt they treat their dissidents like this..

    The Federation of American Scientists also found it guilty of “the torture and execution of thousands of political prisoners” and symbolizing “the Shah’s rule from 1963–79.” The FAS list of SAVAK torture methods included “electric shock, whipping, beating, inserting broken glass and pouring boiling water into the rectum, tying weights to the testicles, and the extraction of teeth and nails.”[27][28]

    And not only that, but the Shah was aligned with the Fiend – (the zio-regime).

    If the zio-regime were allowed to express itself unfettered, the results would look like Dresden, (the purest expression of its id), and failing that, just look to Gaza or Libya or everywhere else it has wrought its evil.

    I’m sure the mullahs in Iran love power, and are oppressive, but I doubt they hate the Iranian people with a netherworldly psychotic fanaticism, or would love to see them all suffer agonies and death beyond all mortal comprehension.

    The dungeons of SAVAK are just like what was done at Abu Ghraib or now Gitmo.

    The thing about these tortures, and the people who carry them out- is that they are not doing it to get information, no.

    They’re doing it because it amuses them to do it. It gives them pleasure to see the look of inconsolable horror on a mother’s face as her little boy is being sodomized with the cameras rolling as the sounds of her child screaming tear her soul out, and drive her to insanity.

    https://www.salon.com/2004/07/15/hersh_7/

    A more perfect example of the Zionist id – it’s simply hard to come by.

    If they could, I suspect that they’d love, love, love nothing more on this earth than to see every anti-Semite (non-Jew) suffer the same fate. To watch with beaming glee as the hopeless goyim children are raped and brutalized in ways that are benumbing to a non-Zionist, for sheer, incomprehensible cruelty.

    And cruelty for the sake of cruelty.

    Yes, I suspect the Mullahs of Iran are drunk on power, but I hardly imagine that they’d love to see all the children of Iran raped as their parents are driven insane in horrified despair by the screams.

    Whereas I suspect that nothing on this earth could please your common fanatical Jewish supremacist more.

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