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What Harvey Wrought
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Like 9/11, Hurricane Harvey brought us together.

In awe at the destruction 50 inches of rain did to East Texas and our fourth-largest city and in admiration as cable television showed countless hours of Texans humanely and heroically rescuing and aiding fellow Texans in the worst natural disaster in U.S. history.

On display this week was America at her best.

Yet the destruction will not soon be repaired. Nearly a third of Harris County, home to 4.5 million people, was flooded. Beaumont and Port Arthur were swamped with 2 feet of rain and put underwater.

Estimates of the initial cost to the Treasury are north of $100 billion, with some saying the down payment alone will be closer to $200 billion. In inflation-adjusted dollars, the cost of Harvey will exceed that of the Marshall Plan, which rebuilt Europe after World War II.

Though the country has appeared united since the storm hit, it is not likely to remain so. Soon, the cameras and correspondents will go home, while the shelters remain full, as tens of thousands of people in those shelters have only destroyed homes to return to.

When the waters recede, the misery of the evacuees left behind will become less tolerable. Then will come the looters and gougers and angry arguments over who’s to blame and who should pay.

They have already begun. Republicans who balked at voting for the bailout billions for Chris Christie’s New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy ravaged the coast in 2012 are being called hypocrites for asking for swift and massive federal assistance to repair red state Texas.

And whereas George W. Bush soared to 90 percent approval after 9/11, no such surge in support for Donald Trump appears at hand.

Indeed, the sneering and sniping began on his first visit to Texas.

He failed to celebrate the first responders, they said. He failed to hug any of the victims. He failed to show empathy. First lady Melania Trump wore spiked heels boarding Marine One for Texas.

A prediction: The damage done by Harvey — as well as the physical, psychic and political costs — will cause many to echo the slogan of George McGovern in 1972, when he exhorted the country to “come home, America.”

The nation seems more receptive now, for even before Harvey, the media seemed consumed with what ails America.

The New York and D.C. subway systems are crumbling. Puerto Rico is bankrupt. Some states, such as Illinois, cannot balance their budgets. The murder rates are soaring in Baltimore and Chicago. Congress this month will have to raise the debt ceiling by hundreds of billions and pass a budget with a deficit bloated by the cost of Harvey.

And the foreign crises seem to be coming at us, one after another.

Russia is beginning military maneuvers in the Baltic and Belarus, bordering Poland, with a force estimated by some at 100,000 troops — Vladimir Putin’s response to NATO’s deployment of 4,000 troops to the Baltic States and Poland.

The U.S. is considering sending anti-tank missiles to Kiev. This could reignite the Donbass war and bring Russian intervention, the defeat of the Ukrainian army and calls for U.S. intervention.

ORDER IT NOW

In the teeth of Trump’s threat to pour “fire and fury” on North Korea, Kim Jong Un just launched an intermediate-range ballistic missile over Japan. Trump’s answer: U.S. B-1Bs make practice bombing runs near the demilitarized zone. Reports from South Korea indicate that Kim may soon conduct a sixth underground test of an atomic bomb.

War in Korea has never seemed so close since Dwight Eisenhower ended the Korean War with an armistice more than 60 years ago.

Despite the opposition of his national security team, Trump is said to be ready to repudiate the Iranian nuclear deal in October, freeing Congress to reimpose the sanctions lifted by the deal.

This would split us from our NATO allies and, if Iran ignored the new U.S. sanctions or began anew to enrich uranium, force Trump’s hand. Is he, are we as a country, ready for another trillion-dollar war, with Iran, which so many inside the Beltway seem so eager to fight?

The U.S. and Turkey have urged Iraq’s Kurds to put off their nonbinding referendum on independence Sept. 25. The vote seems certain to endorse a separate state. A Kurdistan, seceded from Baghdad, would be a magnet for secession-minded Kurds in Turkey, Syria and Iran, 30 million in all, and present a strategic crisis for the United States.

Along with the steady growth of entitlement spending, the new dollars demanded for defense, the prospect of new wars and the tax cuts the White House supports, Hurricane Harvey should concentrate the mind.

Great as America is, there are limits to our wealth and power, to how many global problems we can solve, to how many wars we can fight and to how many hostile powers we can confront.

The “indispensable nation” is going to have to begin making choices. Indeed, that is among the reasons Trump was elected.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of a new book, “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

Copyright 2017 Creators.com.

 
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  1. I believe that Trump acted and appeared presidential in Texas. For that, he is being demonized, once again, by the MSM.

    As for the calls for wars (by MSM and by the neocons that surround Trump), only one of these is a war that we (US) have legitimately inherited from our past – Korea – which started when the US Army was attacked by North Korea, in June, 1950. Only one of these truly involves a threat of WMDs (nukes) – and that is the threat from the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, aka North Korea), a one-party dictatorship headed by a mad man. For the others, let them all go! We did NOT elect Hillary!

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  2. Grandpa:

    You’re forgetting to take your Alzheimer’s medication. Your reference to Kim Jong-un as a “mad man” is just more MSM poopytalk, which you gladly regurgitate along with your mashed peas.

    The DPRK, in its faceoff with America the Ever Just and Good, is the underdog and always has been. Kim is playing his few cards with a masterful hand: Just the right combination of threat and bluff. Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Quartermaster
    The Nork face off was created by Jong Un's grand daddy when he decided to reunite Korea under his dictatorship. The Norks were always the underdog, if the US had any back bone, but the whining from Pyongyang is just that, whining. If the Kim dynasty had behaved and tended their knitting up north, then the situation the idiot in charge has now would not exist.
    , @Grandpa Charlie
    Eustace says that Kim Jong-un is the underdog and then that "Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy."

    That's the thing right there: which is it: "underdog" presumably independent of the PRC, or, is he a threat whose big brother can kick USA ass at any time? Or is it a shell game - sometimes one but sometimes the other?

    We know that the shell game is rigged ... and I say the only way not to lose a rigged game is not to play.

    "We don't play, Comrade Kim Jong-un, we don't play!"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    Grandpa:

    You're forgetting to take your Alzheimer's medication. Your reference to Kim Jong-un as a "mad man" is just more MSM poopytalk, which you gladly regurgitate along with your mashed peas.

    The DPRK, in its faceoff with America the Ever Just and Good, is the underdog and always has been. Kim is playing his few cards with a masterful hand: Just the right combination of threat and bluff. Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy.

    The Nork face off was created by Jong Un’s grand daddy when he decided to reunite Korea under his dictatorship. The Norks were always the underdog, if the US had any back bone, but the whining from Pyongyang is just that, whining. If the Kim dynasty had behaved and tended their knitting up north, then the situation the idiot in charge has now would not exist.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. A domestic environmental/humanitarian crisis seems like the perfect opportunity for Trump to start walking the talk that got him elected. Start shifting the time, energy, and resources away from fighting foreign wars on behalf of Kiev, the Saudis and Israel, and invest in the US infrastructure. Start putting our tax dollars to work in ways that benefit US Citizens. Congress controls the budget for these things, but Trump can focus public opinion.

    Read More
    • Agree: SolontoCroesus
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  5. RodW says:

    Pat, you forgot to address climate change as the threat that brought all the misery to Texas. Instead of talking about NK which has nothing much to do with climate and weather, you could perhaps think what all the oil has wrought.

    Read More
    • LOL: Rurik
    • Replies: @Wally
    Not that's the laugh I needed.

    The first major storm in 14 years is because of non-existent 'global warming'. Yeah boy.

    NASA Data Proves Trump Right to Exit Paris Climate Accord
    https://www.prisonplanet.com/nasa-data-proves-trump-right-to-exit-paris-climate-accord.html

    One graphic says it all: Who actually paid in to the Paris Green Climate fund?
    https://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/green-climate-fund.jpg

    The Globe Has Not Been Warming . . . So Why Is It Called ‘Global’ Warming?
    http://principia-scientific.org/globe-not-warming-called-global-warming/

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    RodW, I assumed at first this is parody. If so, kudos! If, in the off-chance that you are serious, you have some reading to do. Don't worry, it's pretty easy reading with a lot of humor in there (not as good as your parody, I will admit. I am not worthy!)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Rurik says: • Website

    there are limits to our wealth and power,


    As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man
    There are only four things certain since Social Progress began.
    That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire,
    And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire;

    And that after this is accomplished, and the brave new world begins
    When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins,
    As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn,
    The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!

    Read More
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  7. A Kurdistan, seceded from Baghdad, would be a magnet for secession-minded Kurds in Turkey, Syria

    I think Buchanan has it backward. Turkey intends to herd the Turkish and Syrian Kurds into the newly formed Iraqi Kurdistan (Armenian treatment after WW1).

    Read More
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  8. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    Grandpa:

    You're forgetting to take your Alzheimer's medication. Your reference to Kim Jong-un as a "mad man" is just more MSM poopytalk, which you gladly regurgitate along with your mashed peas.

    The DPRK, in its faceoff with America the Ever Just and Good, is the underdog and always has been. Kim is playing his few cards with a masterful hand: Just the right combination of threat and bluff. Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy.

    Eustace says that Kim Jong-un is the underdog and then that “Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy.”

    That’s the thing right there: which is it: “underdog” presumably independent of the PRC, or, is he a threat whose big brother can kick USA ass at any time? Or is it a shell game – sometimes one but sometimes the other?

    We know that the shell game is rigged … and I say the only way not to lose a rigged game is not to play.

    “We don’t play, Comrade Kim Jong-un, we don’t play!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people's back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico ----
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. Travis says:

    The population of the Houston Metro area has tripled since 1981 thanks to amnesty and the 1990 Immigration Act which increases Legal immigration by over 100%…due to the millions of immigrants flooding Texas they paved over the prairie and wetlands to create suburban sprawl, build low income housing, roads and schools to educate the children of the foreigners. Give credit to the Bushes for making Houston more diverse and vibrant, while expanding the population by 5 million people.

    Back in 1980 Houston was 65% white and today just 15% of its people are white. Today 30% are foreign born , 10% are illegal aliens. We have $150 billion to rebuild the Houston in order to accommodate millions of immigrants yet lack the ability to fund a wall along our border with Mexico.

    Read More
    • Agree: Grandpa Charlie
    • Replies: @ANONYMOUS
    my town is 1500 miles NE of Houston.

    We had no rain, no tornadoes, no wind. A beautiful week, in all.

    But our water lines are 150 years old. Residential water has 3 times the acceptable level of lead.

    And a week ago the water filtration plant failed. Our water is polluted. "Boil Water before drinking, before brushing teeth, before washing vegetables, before washing dishes."

    How do you take a shower in polluted water?

    Got a newborn baby in the family? Do you bathe an infant in bacteria-filled water?

    "Which coffee would you like, sir: Decaf, De-bacteria, or De-Lead?"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Grandpa Charlie
    Eustace says that Kim Jong-un is the underdog and then that "Trump is the one who will have to back down before China sinks his joke of a Navy."

    That's the thing right there: which is it: "underdog" presumably independent of the PRC, or, is he a threat whose big brother can kick USA ass at any time? Or is it a shell game - sometimes one but sometimes the other?

    We know that the shell game is rigged ... and I say the only way not to lose a rigged game is not to play.

    "We don't play, Comrade Kim Jong-un, we don't play!"

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    "US killed 3 million NKorean citizens."

    Proof?
    , @Grandpa Charlie
    anonymous says:

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-
     
    Dear young fart,

    Where do you get that number from - 3 million NKorean citizens?

    How about this? The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.

    Oh but that was the fault of the USA., of course, of course.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/rick-newman/2013/04/12/heres-how-lousy-life-is-in-north-korea
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. ANONYMOUS says: • Disclaimer
    @Travis
    The population of the Houston Metro area has tripled since 1981 thanks to amnesty and the 1990 Immigration Act which increases Legal immigration by over 100%...due to the millions of immigrants flooding Texas they paved over the prairie and wetlands to create suburban sprawl, build low income housing, roads and schools to educate the children of the foreigners. Give credit to the Bushes for making Houston more diverse and vibrant, while expanding the population by 5 million people.

    Back in 1980 Houston was 65% white and today just 15% of its people are white. Today 30% are foreign born , 10% are illegal aliens. We have $150 billion to rebuild the Houston in order to accommodate millions of immigrants yet lack the ability to fund a wall along our border with Mexico.

    my town is 1500 miles NE of Houston.

    We had no rain, no tornadoes, no wind. A beautiful week, in all.

    But our water lines are 150 years old. Residential water has 3 times the acceptable level of lead.

    And a week ago the water filtration plant failed. Our water is polluted. “Boil Water before drinking, before brushing teeth, before washing vegetables, before washing dishes.”

    How do you take a shower in polluted water?

    Got a newborn baby in the family? Do you bathe an infant in bacteria-filled water?

    “Which coffee would you like, sir: Decaf, De-bacteria, or De-Lead?”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. Wally says:
    @RodW
    Pat, you forgot to address climate change as the threat that brought all the misery to Texas. Instead of talking about NK which has nothing much to do with climate and weather, you could perhaps think what all the oil has wrought.

    Not that’s the laugh I needed.

    The first major storm in 14 years is because of non-existent ‘global warming’. Yeah boy.

    NASA Data Proves Trump Right to Exit Paris Climate Accord

    https://www.prisonplanet.com/nasa-data-proves-trump-right-to-exit-paris-climate-accord.html

    One graphic says it all: Who actually paid in to the Paris Green Climate fund?
    The Globe Has Not Been Warming . . . So Why Is It Called ‘Global’ Warming?

    http://principia-scientific.org/globe-not-warming-called-global-warming/

    Read More
    • Replies: @bjondo
    Not familiar with this fund.
    Are the execs former congressmen?
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  13. Wally says:
    @anonymous
    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people's back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico ----

    “US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.”

    Proof?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. @RodW
    Pat, you forgot to address climate change as the threat that brought all the misery to Texas. Instead of talking about NK which has nothing much to do with climate and weather, you could perhaps think what all the oil has wrought.

    RodW, I assumed at first this is parody. If so, kudos! If, in the off-chance that you are serious, you have some reading to do. Don’t worry, it’s pretty easy reading with a lot of humor in there (not as good as your parody, I will admit. I am not worthy!)

    Read More
    • Replies: @RodW
    You obviously kept yourself well amused producing that great compendium of drivel.

    I prefer reading real, sober science about climate change and ocean acidification. It's more persuasive.

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  15. Pat has started to write a bit about finance in this column of his. Kudos! (I am big on kudos this morning – I feel generous.) Maybe, after some more reading, cough, cough, zerohedge.com, cough, he may understand that the money is everything. You can’t be beyond broke and REMAIN a strong country – we are living off the past still – both resources and reputations.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  16. bjondo says:
    @Wally
    Not that's the laugh I needed.

    The first major storm in 14 years is because of non-existent 'global warming'. Yeah boy.

    NASA Data Proves Trump Right to Exit Paris Climate Accord
    https://www.prisonplanet.com/nasa-data-proves-trump-right-to-exit-paris-climate-accord.html

    One graphic says it all: Who actually paid in to the Paris Green Climate fund?
    https://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/green-climate-fund.jpg

    The Globe Has Not Been Warming . . . So Why Is It Called ‘Global’ Warming?
    http://principia-scientific.org/globe-not-warming-called-global-warming/

    Not familiar with this fund.
    Are the execs former congressmen?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. @anonymous
    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people's back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico ----

    anonymous says:

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-

    Dear young fart,

    Where do you get that number from – 3 million NKorean citizens?

    How about this? The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.

    Oh but that was the fault of the USA., of course, of course.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/rick-newman/2013/04/12/heres-how-lousy-life-is-in-north-korea

    Read More
    • Replies: @KA
    What the F* US was doing there anyway ? Why was it threatening to nuke Korea in 1950?
    , @KA
    Bruce Cummings of University of Chicago 2 volume The Origins of the Korean War, and The Korean War: A History are better sources


    US backed quisling erstwhile vassal of Japan when under Japanese occupation Rhee was hated by Koreans . Rhee orchestrated mass murder engaged in killing spree and initiated series of attacks against N Korea . Korean War occupied when South was under American occupation.
    , @anonymous
    dear myopic old fart,

    http://www.newsweek.com/us-forget-korean-war-led-crisis-north-592630
    During the course of the three-year war, which both sides accuse one another of provoking, the U.S. dropped 635,000 tons of explosives on North Korea, including 32,557 tons of napalm, an incendiary liquid that can clear forested areas and cause devastating burns to human skin. (In constrast, the U.S. used 503,000 tons of bombs during the entire Pacific Theater of World War Two, according to a 2009 study by the Asia-Pacific Journal.) In a 1984 interview, Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, claimed U.S. bombs "killed off 20 percent of the population" and "targeted everything that moved in North Korea." These acts, largely ignored by the U.S.' collective memory, have deeply contributed to Pyongyang's contempt for the U.S. and especially its ongoing military presence on the Korean Peninsula.
     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-us-war-crime-north-korea-wont-forget/2015/03/20/fb525694-ce80-11e4-8c54-ffb5ba6f2f69_story.html?utm_term=.14f1b868c63e

    The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

    Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home.
     

    https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/ “The hate, though,” as longtime North Korea watcher Blaine Harden observed in the Washington Post, “is not all manufactured.” Some of it, he wrote, “is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.”

    Forgets as in the “forgotten war.” . . . which has since been conveniently airbrushed from most discussions and debates about the “crazy” and “insane” regime in Pyongyang?

    {snip}

    “What hardly any Americans know or remember,” University of Chicago historian Bruce Cumings writes in his book “The Korean War: A History,” “is that we carpet-bombed the north for three years with next to no concern for civilian casualties.”

    How many Americans, for example, are aware of the fact that U.S. planes dropped on the Korean peninsula more bombs — 635,000 tons — and napalm — 32,557 tons — than during the entire Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War II?

    How many Americans know that “over a period of three years or so,” to quote Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, “we killed off … 20 percent of the population”?

    Twenty. Percent. For a point of comparison, the Nazis exterminated 20 percent of Poland’s pre-World War II population. According to LeMay, “We went over there and fought the war and eventually burned down every town in North Korea.

    Every. Town. More than 3 million civilians are believed to have been killed in the fighting, the vast majority of them in the north.
     
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  18. KA says:
    @Grandpa Charlie
    anonymous says:

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-
     
    Dear young fart,

    Where do you get that number from - 3 million NKorean citizens?

    How about this? The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.

    Oh but that was the fault of the USA., of course, of course.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/rick-newman/2013/04/12/heres-how-lousy-life-is-in-north-korea

    What the F* US was doing there anyway ? Why was it threatening to nuke Korea in 1950?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. KA says:
    @Grandpa Charlie
    anonymous says:

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-
     
    Dear young fart,

    Where do you get that number from - 3 million NKorean citizens?

    How about this? The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.

    Oh but that was the fault of the USA., of course, of course.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/rick-newman/2013/04/12/heres-how-lousy-life-is-in-north-korea

    Bruce Cummings of University of Chicago 2 volume The Origins of the Korean War, and The Korean War: A History are better sources

    US backed quisling erstwhile vassal of Japan when under Japanese occupation Rhee was hated by Koreans . Rhee orchestrated mass murder engaged in killing spree and initiated series of attacks against N Korea . Korean War occupied when South was under American occupation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Grandpa Charlie
    KA,

    You ask "what the F* US was doing there anyway"? And then you cite Cummings' The Origins of the Koreqan War??? Just read what you want others to read: you may or may not agree with everything Cunnings says, but at least you would not need to ask such an out-of-total-ignorance (or disingenuous?) question!

    You are right about the Rhee government, except that while there probably were sorties (or intelligence0-gathering and even smuggling ventures) across the 38th prior to the North's invasion in June 1950 - sorties both into the South from the North and into the North from the South - these activities could never be fairly characterized as a "series of attacks against N Korea." The thing is that the premise of the division of Korea (coming out of FDR's view of Stalin as a "normal" politician) was that Russia would be reasonable after World War II and would cooperate in a reunification not only of Korea but also of Germany and of Iran. As it turned out, USSR (Stalin, at that time) did pull its troops out of the northern half of Iran, but was anything but cooperative either in Germany or in Korea. So that's the origin of the Korea SNAFU.

    (Stalin apparently thought that since he had pulled back from northern Iran, that the US should reciprocate by pulling out of the Korean Peninsula. And, about FDR, it's clear from the record that he had no illusions about continuation of European colonialism in Asia after the war, so if he had been able to look ahead to the situation where USA would find itself trapped in "post-colonial" support of such corrupt dictatorships as Rhee's ... well, he would never have agreed to split Korea in two. What FDR was all about late in WW II - and very late in his life, as it turned out - was just making sure that when troops of the USA and of the USSR met up, they would know where the temporary and necessary jurisdictional lines were to be drawn.)

    My question to you is this: why has USA (and the world) been able to achieve the peaceful reunification of Germany (with all its border problems) but has been stymied and stumped in the peaceful reunification of Korea?

    The answer has very little today to do with strategic bombing of the North that ended immediately after the cease-fire agreement had been clobbered together at Panmunjon - rather the failure of all progress toward reunification is the result of the fact that North Korea has been under the heel of the dictatorial self-enriching dictatorship of the Kim family dynasty ever since Stalin installed the first Kim ruler back before 1950.
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  20. KA says:

    Cold War is back with roles reversed . America is fighting distorted ideological , corrupted , feed back free global war . It has only one thing – blind and unyielding conviction that military power will save the imperial role for perpetuity . While Americans don’t support US , Russians do support Russia . American allies are opportunistic and trying to get the maximum out of the rivalry from both US and Russia . Russian allies are clear headed and harbors no illusion about America .
    Russia is using veto power , military muscle , and energy more effectively and pointedly against US interests .

    America in addition to becoming a relic of the old Cold War inflexibility for a new kind of Cold War . Other countries have left the ideological bandwagon .

    In addition, America like Britain is now being propelled to a repeat of destructive WW2 of 1937 by a lot of Churchill- collectively known as global interventionists.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Grandpa Charlie

    "Cold War is back with roles reversed. America is fighting distorted, corrupted , feed back free global war. It has only one thing – blind and unyielding conviction that military power will save the imperial role for perpetuity." -- KA
     
    Okay. That's a pretty good summary of it (although you could have skipped the PNAC part of it since no one really believes that crap anyway). At least that's a pretty good summary since the "great" Kissinger made his secret trip to Beijing in 1971 to arrange for his 'real politik' surrender of USA to PRC ... and, it seems likely, also to arrange for the New China lobby to take over from the old China Lobby, including regular paychecks to the secret bank accounts of Washington's neocons, including notably Kissinger himself as well as select members if Congress.

    Yet none dare call it treason!
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  21. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Grandpa Charlie
    anonymous says:

    also might be helpful if US admitted to itself, and US presstitutes & (cough) historians informed US citizens that US dropped more tonnes of bombs on North Korea than on Japan in all of WWII; and that US killed 3 million NKorean citizens.

    If only US would stop playing in other people’s back yards,
    and if only foolish old farts like you, gramps, would find yourself a nice ice floe, or maybe a raft in the Gulf of Mexico —-
     
    Dear young fart,

    Where do you get that number from - 3 million NKorean citizens?

    How about this? The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.

    Oh but that was the fault of the USA., of course, of course.

    https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/rick-newman/2013/04/12/heres-how-lousy-life-is-in-north-korea

    dear myopic old fart,

    http://www.newsweek.com/us-forget-korean-war-led-crisis-north-592630
    During the course of the three-year war, which both sides accuse one another of provoking, the U.S. dropped 635,000 tons of explosives on North Korea, including 32,557 tons of napalm, an incendiary liquid that can clear forested areas and cause devastating burns to human skin. (In constrast, the U.S. used 503,000 tons of bombs during the entire Pacific Theater of World War Two, according to a 2009 study by the Asia-Pacific Journal.) In a 1984 interview, Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, claimed U.S. bombs “killed off 20 percent of the population” and “targeted everything that moved in North Korea.” These acts, largely ignored by the U.S.’ collective memory, have deeply contributed to Pyongyang’s contempt for the U.S. and especially its ongoing military presence on the Korean Peninsula.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-us-war-crime-north-korea-wont-forget/2015/03/20/fb525694-ce80-11e4-8c54-ffb5ba6f2f69_story.html?utm_term=.14f1b868c63e

    The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

    Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home.

    https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/ “The hate, though,” as longtime North Korea watcher Blaine Harden observed in the Washington Post, “is not all manufactured.” Some of it, he wrote, “is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.”

    Forgets as in the “forgotten war.” . . . which has since been conveniently airbrushed from most discussions and debates about the “crazy” and “insane” regime in Pyongyang?

    {snip}

    “What hardly any Americans know or remember,” University of Chicago historian Bruce Cumings writes in his book “The Korean War: A History,” “is that we carpet-bombed the north for three years with next to no concern for civilian casualties.”

    How many Americans, for example, are aware of the fact that U.S. planes dropped on the Korean peninsula more bombs — 635,000 tons — and napalm — 32,557 tons — than during the entire Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War II?

    How many Americans know that “over a period of three years or so,” to quote Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, “we killed off … 20 percent of the population”?

    Twenty. Percent. For a point of comparison, the Nazis exterminated 20 percent of Poland’s pre-World War II population. According to LeMay, “We went over there and fought the war and eventually burned down every town in North Korea.

    Every. Town. More than 3 million civilians are believed to have been killed in the fighting, the vast majority of them in the north.

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    • Replies: @Grandpa Charlie
    Dear Yung-Fahr-Ting,

    Well. you have made a kind of show of answering my first question as to where you get your 3 million North Korean deaths number ... or, I guess now you are saying some of those were in the South although the "vast majority" of them in the North. The thing is that you don't have any real basis for that number and even if Cummings gives you that number, he has nothing to base it on! No one knows or can know how many North Koreans died as the result of the strategic bombing of the North prior to the declaration of a cease-fire in 1953. No one can know because (in case you haven't noticed) no information gets out of N. Korea (just as no information gets to anyone in the North from the outside, except maybe for the "royal" Kim family, but they don't share!)

    As for the statement of SAC commander General LeMay, "Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population," it's clear from his statement that he had no idea, he had just a rough off-the-cuff guesstimate. Anyway, you need to understand that LeMay was bragging - advertising the capabilities of SAC. Also, if you read what he says, he's apparently talking about the total effect on the population of N. Korea from all types of USA's military action and even unintended consequences (such as lack of medical care due to destruction of medical facilities). I am thinking that where your (or somebody's) 3 million comes from is LeMay's 20% times the possible population of North Korea at the time, 15 million. In other words, GIGO, but thanks for trying.

    Anyway, you really have about as much of a basis for your 3 million number ("vast majority" in the North) as how many civilians "killed" by USA as have holocausters for their their 6 million number.
    , @Grandpa Charlie
    Yung Fahr Ting has made kind of a show (albeit short of clear and convincing proof) t0 substantiate the claim that USA "killed three million civilian citizens of North Korea." See my rejoinder, above.

    However, Yung Fahr Ting has never even attempted to respond to my other requests, as follows:

    "The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows."

    Or, what about the number of NKoreans who died of starvation between, say, 1970 and today?

    About the quantity of bombs and other ordnance that were dropped or exploded from the beginning of the war in 1950 to the cease-fire in 1953, I know for sure that a lot of ammo regularly was used up in 24/7 artillery fire, primarily as a way to get rid of it. That did seem wasteful and foolish.

    We do have good stats on Chinese POWs who managed to surrender to UN
    , @Grandpa Charlie
    My question to the anonymous Yung Fahr Ting who is so certain of the 3 million NKoreans "killed" by the USA is this:

    Why has USA (and the world) been able to achieve the peaceful reunification of Germany (with all its border problems) but has been stymied and stumped in the peaceful reunification of Korea?

    The answer has very little today to do with strategic bombing of the North that ended immediately after the cease-fire agreement had been clobbered together at Panmunjon – rather the failure of all progress toward reunification is the result of the fact that North Korea has been under the heel of the demagogic autocratic rulers of the self-enriching dictatorship of the Kim family dynasty ever since Stalin installed the first Kim ruler back before 1950.

    That's why there is no peace and no reunification possible for Korea. It's like everyone knows: it's very hard, or even impossible to pry billionaires away from their ill-gotten gains, and Kim Jong-un is a multi-billionaire who sees the whole of North Korea and all the North Korean people as his personal domain, his personal fortune, to do with as he wants.

    Korea isn't Afghanistan or Iraq or Iran or Syria or Libya or Ukraine. The Korean people and the Republic of Korea had nothing to do with the destruction that occurred in the USA on September 11, 2001.

    The Korean people deserve better than Kim Jong-un.

    BTW: do those of you who choose to act as apologists for Kim Jong-un, do you even know that North Korea unilaterally cancelled the 60-year-old cease-fire in March 2013?

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/mar/11/north-korea-declares-end-armistice

    PS: I apologize for dwelling so much on Korea, but Pat did bring it up under the heading of Hurricane Harvey ("War in Korea has never seemed so close since Dwight Eisenhower ended the Korean War with an armistice more than 60 years ago.") I guess there are many things weighing on Pat's mind ... and on the collective mind of America.
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  22. Ivy says:

    One positive note or silver lining from Harvey Hurricane is the eventual economic boost from all the construction, refurbishing and insurance money gushing around. That will help areas beyond Texas as well continue with income and employment growth. Imagine the boost to American workers, if allowed to participate.

    The Harvey hustle should reduce slightly the need for our DC neocons to trot out their economic arguments for evermore ME interventions. Neither natural disasters nor wars should be relied upon as policy instruments, although you wonder if those are more than just penciled-in when neocons are at play.

    Read More
    • Replies: @KA
    where is the money going to come for reconstruction of the destroyed /damaged houses, schools,colleges,roads ,bridges and possible surges of different health hazards among kids and elderly.
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  23. KA says:
    @Ivy
    One positive note or silver lining from Harvey Hurricane is the eventual economic boost from all the construction, refurbishing and insurance money gushing around. That will help areas beyond Texas as well continue with income and employment growth. Imagine the boost to American workers, if allowed to participate.

    The Harvey hustle should reduce slightly the need for our DC neocons to trot out their economic arguments for evermore ME interventions. Neither natural disasters nor wars should be relied upon as policy instruments, although you wonder if those are more than just penciled-in when neocons are at play.

    where is the money going to come for reconstruction of the destroyed /damaged houses, schools,colleges,roads ,bridges and possible surges of different health hazards among kids and elderly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Some money comes from Uncle Sugar via money supply expansion with increased national debt and taxes, accompanied by budgetary shifting of accounts to reduce other expenditures, some comes from insurance and reinsurance companies that will have a bad loss experience year and also have to raise premiums to replenish their loss reserves, some from other levels of government debt raising and taxes. Multiplier effect of all the new investment through more local purchases and temporary hiring. Not saying a great way to expand, just looking at mechanical impacts. At least stuff is getting built instead of destroyed, like in ME.
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  24. Ivy says:
    @KA
    where is the money going to come for reconstruction of the destroyed /damaged houses, schools,colleges,roads ,bridges and possible surges of different health hazards among kids and elderly.

    Some money comes from Uncle Sugar via money supply expansion with increased national debt and taxes, accompanied by budgetary shifting of accounts to reduce other expenditures, some comes from insurance and reinsurance companies that will have a bad loss experience year and also have to raise premiums to replenish their loss reserves, some from other levels of government debt raising and taxes. Multiplier effect of all the new investment through more local purchases and temporary hiring. Not saying a great way to expand, just looking at mechanical impacts. At least stuff is getting built instead of destroyed, like in ME.

    Read More
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  25. Expansion of the money supply simply lowers the value of every dollar in existence, your’s and mine. Most of the tools and materials will come from Chynah and the destruction and waste in the ME will continue because it suits America’s masters to be that way. Sad but true.

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    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @anonymous
    expansion of the money supply ---> lowers value of dollar --->a larger number is attached to the value of an asset (the asset does not have a greater value, just a larger number) ---> the larger number is taxed by federal, state, local authorities.

    i.e. a landlord purchases rental property for $100k in 2005.
    fixes up, pays property taxes, pays insurances, pays maintenance, takes depreciation, collects rents, pays tax on rent income

    Landlord sells property for $130k in 2017

    Landlord/seller pays capital gains tax on $30k gain, plus total of depreciation

    BUT money supply having expanded, $100k in 2005 = $125k in 2017 http://www.usinflationcalculator.com

    the landlord/seller pays taxes on $25k of expanded money supply/hot air.
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  26. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @NoseytheDuke
    Expansion of the money supply simply lowers the value of every dollar in existence, your's and mine. Most of the tools and materials will come from Chynah and the destruction and waste in the ME will continue because it suits America's masters to be that way. Sad but true.

    expansion of the money supply —> lowers value of dollar —>a larger number is attached to the value of an asset (the asset does not have a greater value, just a larger number) —> the larger number is taxed by federal, state, local authorities.

    i.e. a landlord purchases rental property for $100k in 2005.
    fixes up, pays property taxes, pays insurances, pays maintenance, takes depreciation, collects rents, pays tax on rent income

    Landlord sells property for $130k in 2017

    Landlord/seller pays capital gains tax on $30k gain, plus total of depreciation

    BUT money supply having expanded, $100k in 2005 = $125k in 2017 http://www.usinflationcalculator.com

    the landlord/seller pays taxes on $25k of expanded money supply/hot air.

    Read More
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  27. I noticed very few Antifa, or other obvious “progressives”, in the Cajun Navy. Most looked like “deplorables” drafted from the cast of Duck Dynasty.

    It was thrilling to see the government call for help for the governed.

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  28. KenH says:

    On display this week was America at her best.

    LOL. As with 9/11 the appearance of national unity in the face of disaster will be short lived. I think 9/11 unified America for all of two weeks before things devolved back into race baiting, finger pointing and partisan squabbling.

    When the waters recede, the misery of the evacuees left behind will become less tolerable. Then will come the looters and gougers and angry arguments over who’s to blame and who should pay.

    The vast majority of looters are invariably high in melanin.

    With few exceptions, Trump has been neutered by the establishment. He’s surrounded himself with globalists and liberals, so I don’t expect any sea changes in domestic or foreign policy to benefit the “deplorables” who voted for such changes after decades of broken promises.

    Say hello to Kamala Harris or Deval Patrick in 2020 and the end of the bill of rights for anyone to the right of Barack Hussein Obama.

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  29. @KA
    Bruce Cummings of University of Chicago 2 volume The Origins of the Korean War, and The Korean War: A History are better sources


    US backed quisling erstwhile vassal of Japan when under Japanese occupation Rhee was hated by Koreans . Rhee orchestrated mass murder engaged in killing spree and initiated series of attacks against N Korea . Korean War occupied when South was under American occupation.

    KA,

    You ask “what the F* US was doing there anyway”? And then you cite Cummings’ The Origins of the Koreqan War??? Just read what you want others to read: you may or may not agree with everything Cunnings says, but at least you would not need to ask such an out-of-total-ignorance (or disingenuous?) question!

    You are right about the Rhee government, except that while there probably were sorties (or intelligence0-gathering and even smuggling ventures) across the 38th prior to the North’s invasion in June 1950 – sorties both into the South from the North and into the North from the South – these activities could never be fairly characterized as a “series of attacks against N Korea.” The thing is that the premise of the division of Korea (coming out of FDR’s view of Stalin as a “normal” politician) was that Russia would be reasonable after World War II and would cooperate in a reunification not only of Korea but also of Germany and of Iran. As it turned out, USSR (Stalin, at that time) did pull its troops out of the northern half of Iran, but was anything but cooperative either in Germany or in Korea. So that’s the origin of the Korea SNAFU.

    (Stalin apparently thought that since he had pulled back from northern Iran, that the US should reciprocate by pulling out of the Korean Peninsula. And, about FDR, it’s clear from the record that he had no illusions about continuation of European colonialism in Asia after the war, so if he had been able to look ahead to the situation where USA would find itself trapped in “post-colonial” support of such corrupt dictatorships as Rhee’s … well, he would never have agreed to split Korea in two. What FDR was all about late in WW II – and very late in his life, as it turned out – was just making sure that when troops of the USA and of the USSR met up, they would know where the temporary and necessary jurisdictional lines were to be drawn.)

    My question to you is this: why has USA (and the world) been able to achieve the peaceful reunification of Germany (with all its border problems) but has been stymied and stumped in the peaceful reunification of Korea?

    The answer has very little today to do with strategic bombing of the North that ended immediately after the cease-fire agreement had been clobbered together at Panmunjon – rather the failure of all progress toward reunification is the result of the fact that North Korea has been under the heel of the dictatorial self-enriching dictatorship of the Kim family dynasty ever since Stalin installed the first Kim ruler back before 1950.

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  30. @anonymous
    dear myopic old fart,

    http://www.newsweek.com/us-forget-korean-war-led-crisis-north-592630
    During the course of the three-year war, which both sides accuse one another of provoking, the U.S. dropped 635,000 tons of explosives on North Korea, including 32,557 tons of napalm, an incendiary liquid that can clear forested areas and cause devastating burns to human skin. (In constrast, the U.S. used 503,000 tons of bombs during the entire Pacific Theater of World War Two, according to a 2009 study by the Asia-Pacific Journal.) In a 1984 interview, Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, claimed U.S. bombs "killed off 20 percent of the population" and "targeted everything that moved in North Korea." These acts, largely ignored by the U.S.' collective memory, have deeply contributed to Pyongyang's contempt for the U.S. and especially its ongoing military presence on the Korean Peninsula.
     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-us-war-crime-north-korea-wont-forget/2015/03/20/fb525694-ce80-11e4-8c54-ffb5ba6f2f69_story.html?utm_term=.14f1b868c63e

    The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

    Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home.
     

    https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/ “The hate, though,” as longtime North Korea watcher Blaine Harden observed in the Washington Post, “is not all manufactured.” Some of it, he wrote, “is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.”

    Forgets as in the “forgotten war.” . . . which has since been conveniently airbrushed from most discussions and debates about the “crazy” and “insane” regime in Pyongyang?

    {snip}

    “What hardly any Americans know or remember,” University of Chicago historian Bruce Cumings writes in his book “The Korean War: A History,” “is that we carpet-bombed the north for three years with next to no concern for civilian casualties.”

    How many Americans, for example, are aware of the fact that U.S. planes dropped on the Korean peninsula more bombs — 635,000 tons — and napalm — 32,557 tons — than during the entire Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War II?

    How many Americans know that “over a period of three years or so,” to quote Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, “we killed off … 20 percent of the population”?

    Twenty. Percent. For a point of comparison, the Nazis exterminated 20 percent of Poland’s pre-World War II population. According to LeMay, “We went over there and fought the war and eventually burned down every town in North Korea.

    Every. Town. More than 3 million civilians are believed to have been killed in the fighting, the vast majority of them in the north.
     

    Dear Yung-Fahr-Ting,

    Well. you have made a kind of show of answering my first question as to where you get your 3 million North Korean deaths number … or, I guess now you are saying some of those were in the South although the “vast majority” of them in the North. The thing is that you don’t have any real basis for that number and even if Cummings gives you that number, he has nothing to base it on! No one knows or can know how many North Koreans died as the result of the strategic bombing of the North prior to the declaration of a cease-fire in 1953. No one can know because (in case you haven’t noticed) no information gets out of N. Korea (just as no information gets to anyone in the North from the outside, except maybe for the “royal” Kim family, but they don’t share!)

    As for the statement of SAC commander General LeMay, “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” it’s clear from his statement that he had no idea, he had just a rough off-the-cuff guesstimate. Anyway, you need to understand that LeMay was bragging – advertising the capabilities of SAC. Also, if you read what he says, he’s apparently talking about the total effect on the population of N. Korea from all types of USA’s military action and even unintended consequences (such as lack of medical care due to destruction of medical facilities). I am thinking that where your (or somebody’s) 3 million comes from is LeMay’s 20% times the possible population of North Korea at the time, 15 million. In other words, GIGO, but thanks for trying.

    Anyway, you really have about as much of a basis for your 3 million number (“vast majority” in the North) as how many civilians “killed” by USA as have holocausters for their their 6 million number.

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  31. @KA
    Cold War is back with roles reversed . America is fighting distorted ideological , corrupted , feed back free global war . It has only one thing - blind and unyielding conviction that military power will save the imperial role for perpetuity . While Americans don't support US , Russians do support Russia . American allies are opportunistic and trying to get the maximum out of the rivalry from both US and Russia . Russian allies are clear headed and harbors no illusion about America .
    Russia is using veto power , military muscle , and energy more effectively and pointedly against US interests .

    America in addition to becoming a relic of the old Cold War inflexibility for a new kind of Cold War . Other countries have left the ideological bandwagon .


    In addition, America like Britain is now being propelled to a repeat of destructive WW2 of 1937 by a lot of Churchill- collectively known as global interventionists.

    “Cold War is back with roles reversed. America is fighting distorted, corrupted , feed back free global war. It has only one thing – blind and unyielding conviction that military power will save the imperial role for perpetuity.” — KA

    Okay. That’s a pretty good summary of it (although you could have skipped the PNAC part of it since no one really believes that crap anyway). At least that’s a pretty good summary since the “great” Kissinger made his secret trip to Beijing in 1971 to arrange for his ‘real politik’ surrender of USA to PRC … and, it seems likely, also to arrange for the New China lobby to take over from the old China Lobby, including regular paychecks to the secret bank accounts of Washington’s neocons, including notably Kissinger himself as well as select members if Congress.

    Yet none dare call it treason!

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  32. Sparkon says:

    The real tragedy of Hurricane Harvey at Houston is that this disaster might have been prevented if urban infrastructure were as important as national defense offense. The trillion-dollar F-35 comes to mind.

    The danger to Houston has been recognized by engineers for years, but, especially after Katrina and Sandy, the responsible city, state, and federal authorities must have realized the danger, and should have made it their highest priority to protect these vulnerable, low-lying, coastal urban areas like Houston with sea walls, levees, reservoirs, lakes, bayous, spillways, retention ponds, and green belts. Indeed some work was done, but not nearly enough.

    Houston was particularly vulnerable. The city has no zoning laws. It gets a lot of rain. but is entirely flat. Making matters worse, parts of the area are subsiding. Making matters even worse, politics and/or incompetence:

    Toth added, “I’m appalled at the complete lack of coordination with local officials to warn them and to ensure that residents in cities and subdivisions downstream received real and adequate warnings, not just a flimsy press release. The SJRA¹ released two-and-a-half times more water than they’d ever released before. There is no excuse for not adequately warning in a meaningful way.”

    Toth pointed to the devastating flooding in Kingwood, Harpers Landing, and River Plantation as areas which SJRA harmed.

    Despite the heavy rainfall above the hydrologic levels of the Lake Conroe Dam, there was little flooding in those areas. Neighborhoods below the Lake Conroe Dam suffered greatly.

    http://thegoldenhammer.net/the-flooding-catastrophe-from-tropical-storm-harvey-was-largely-man-made/

    ¹ SJRA – San Jacinto River Authority

    The Boy Scout motto comes to mind…

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  33. @anonymous
    dear myopic old fart,

    http://www.newsweek.com/us-forget-korean-war-led-crisis-north-592630
    During the course of the three-year war, which both sides accuse one another of provoking, the U.S. dropped 635,000 tons of explosives on North Korea, including 32,557 tons of napalm, an incendiary liquid that can clear forested areas and cause devastating burns to human skin. (In constrast, the U.S. used 503,000 tons of bombs during the entire Pacific Theater of World War Two, according to a 2009 study by the Asia-Pacific Journal.) In a 1984 interview, Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, claimed U.S. bombs "killed off 20 percent of the population" and "targeted everything that moved in North Korea." These acts, largely ignored by the U.S.' collective memory, have deeply contributed to Pyongyang's contempt for the U.S. and especially its ongoing military presence on the Korean Peninsula.
     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-us-war-crime-north-korea-wont-forget/2015/03/20/fb525694-ce80-11e4-8c54-ffb5ba6f2f69_story.html?utm_term=.14f1b868c63e

    The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

    Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home.
     

    https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/ “The hate, though,” as longtime North Korea watcher Blaine Harden observed in the Washington Post, “is not all manufactured.” Some of it, he wrote, “is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.”

    Forgets as in the “forgotten war.” . . . which has since been conveniently airbrushed from most discussions and debates about the “crazy” and “insane” regime in Pyongyang?

    {snip}

    “What hardly any Americans know or remember,” University of Chicago historian Bruce Cumings writes in his book “The Korean War: A History,” “is that we carpet-bombed the north for three years with next to no concern for civilian casualties.”

    How many Americans, for example, are aware of the fact that U.S. planes dropped on the Korean peninsula more bombs — 635,000 tons — and napalm — 32,557 tons — than during the entire Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War II?

    How many Americans know that “over a period of three years or so,” to quote Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, “we killed off … 20 percent of the population”?

    Twenty. Percent. For a point of comparison, the Nazis exterminated 20 percent of Poland’s pre-World War II population. According to LeMay, “We went over there and fought the war and eventually burned down every town in North Korea.

    Every. Town. More than 3 million civilians are believed to have been killed in the fighting, the vast majority of them in the north.
     

    Yung Fahr Ting has made kind of a show (albeit short of clear and convincing proof) t0 substantiate the claim that USA “killed three million civilian citizens of North Korea.” See my rejoinder, above.

    However, Yung Fahr Ting has never even attempted to respond to my other requests, as follows:

    “The number of NKoreans who have fled NKorea since, say, 1970? Probably at least 6 million. The number that died trying? Nobody knows.”

    Or, what about the number of NKoreans who died of starvation between, say, 1970 and today?

    About the quantity of bombs and other ordnance that were dropped or exploded from the beginning of the war in 1950 to the cease-fire in 1953, I know for sure that a lot of ammo regularly was used up in 24/7 artillery fire, primarily as a way to get rid of it. That did seem wasteful and foolish.

    We do have good stats on Chinese POWs who managed to surrender to UN

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  34. @anonymous
    dear myopic old fart,

    http://www.newsweek.com/us-forget-korean-war-led-crisis-north-592630
    During the course of the three-year war, which both sides accuse one another of provoking, the U.S. dropped 635,000 tons of explosives on North Korea, including 32,557 tons of napalm, an incendiary liquid that can clear forested areas and cause devastating burns to human skin. (In constrast, the U.S. used 503,000 tons of bombs during the entire Pacific Theater of World War Two, according to a 2009 study by the Asia-Pacific Journal.) In a 1984 interview, Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, claimed U.S. bombs "killed off 20 percent of the population" and "targeted everything that moved in North Korea." These acts, largely ignored by the U.S.' collective memory, have deeply contributed to Pyongyang's contempt for the U.S. and especially its ongoing military presence on the Korean Peninsula.
     

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-us-war-crime-north-korea-wont-forget/2015/03/20/fb525694-ce80-11e4-8c54-ffb5ba6f2f69_story.html?utm_term=.14f1b868c63e

    The bombing was long, leisurely and merciless, even by the assessment of America’s own leaders. “Over a period of three years or so, we killed off — what — 20 percent of the population,” Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, told the Office of Air Force History in 1984. Dean Rusk, a supporter of the war and later secretary of state, said the United States bombed “everything that moved in North Korea, every brick standing on top of another.” After running low on urban targets, U.S. bombers destroyed hydroelectric and irrigation dams in the later stages of the war, flooding farmland and destroying crops.

    Although the ferocity of the bombing was criticized as racist and unjustified elsewhere in the world, it was never a big story back home.
     

    https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/ “The hate, though,” as longtime North Korea watcher Blaine Harden observed in the Washington Post, “is not all manufactured.” Some of it, he wrote, “is rooted in a fact-based narrative, one that North Korea obsessively remembers and the United States blithely forgets.”

    Forgets as in the “forgotten war.” . . . which has since been conveniently airbrushed from most discussions and debates about the “crazy” and “insane” regime in Pyongyang?

    {snip}

    “What hardly any Americans know or remember,” University of Chicago historian Bruce Cumings writes in his book “The Korean War: A History,” “is that we carpet-bombed the north for three years with next to no concern for civilian casualties.”

    How many Americans, for example, are aware of the fact that U.S. planes dropped on the Korean peninsula more bombs — 635,000 tons — and napalm — 32,557 tons — than during the entire Pacific campaign against the Japanese during World War II?

    How many Americans know that “over a period of three years or so,” to quote Air Force Gen. Curtis LeMay, head of the Strategic Air Command during the Korean War, “we killed off … 20 percent of the population”?

    Twenty. Percent. For a point of comparison, the Nazis exterminated 20 percent of Poland’s pre-World War II population. According to LeMay, “We went over there and fought the war and eventually burned down every town in North Korea.

    Every. Town. More than 3 million civilians are believed to have been killed in the fighting, the vast majority of them in the north.
     

    My question to the anonymous Yung Fahr Ting who is so certain of the 3 million NKoreans “killed” by the USA is this:

    Why has USA (and the world) been able to achieve the peaceful reunification of Germany (with all its border problems) but has been stymied and stumped in the peaceful reunification of Korea?

    The answer has very little today to do with strategic bombing of the North that ended immediately after the cease-fire agreement had been clobbered together at Panmunjon – rather the failure of all progress toward reunification is the result of the fact that North Korea has been under the heel of the demagogic autocratic rulers of the self-enriching dictatorship of the Kim family dynasty ever since Stalin installed the first Kim ruler back before 1950.

    That’s why there is no peace and no reunification possible for Korea. It’s like everyone knows: it’s very hard, or even impossible to pry billionaires away from their ill-gotten gains, and Kim Jong-un is a multi-billionaire who sees the whole of North Korea and all the North Korean people as his personal domain, his personal fortune, to do with as he wants.

    Korea isn’t Afghanistan or Iraq or Iran or Syria or Libya or Ukraine. The Korean people and the Republic of Korea had nothing to do with the destruction that occurred in the USA on September 11, 2001.

    The Korean people deserve better than Kim Jong-un.

    BTW: do those of you who choose to act as apologists for Kim Jong-un, do you even know that North Korea unilaterally cancelled the 60-year-old cease-fire in March 2013?

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/mar/11/north-korea-declares-end-armistice

    PS: I apologize for dwelling so much on Korea, but Pat did bring it up under the heading of Hurricane Harvey (“War in Korea has never seemed so close since Dwight Eisenhower ended the Korean War with an armistice more than 60 years ago.”) I guess there are many things weighing on Pat’s mind … and on the collective mind of America.

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  35. RodW says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    RodW, I assumed at first this is parody. If so, kudos! If, in the off-chance that you are serious, you have some reading to do. Don't worry, it's pretty easy reading with a lot of humor in there (not as good as your parody, I will admit. I am not worthy!)

    You obviously kept yourself well amused producing that great compendium of drivel.

    I prefer reading real, sober science about climate change and ocean acidification. It’s more persuasive.

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