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“Why would I call China a currency manipulator when they are working with us on the North Korean problem?” tweeted President Donald Trump on Easter Sunday.

Earlier, after discovering “great chemistry” with Chinese President Xi Jinping over “the most beautiful piece of chocolate cake” at Mar-a-Lago, Trump had confided, “I explained … that a trade deal with the U.S. will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem!”

“America First” thus takes a back seat to big-power diplomacy with Beijing. One wonders: How much will Xi end up bilking us for his squeezing of Kim Jong Un?

Trump once seemed to understand how America had been taken to the cleaners during and after the Cold War. While allies supported us diplomatically, they piled up huge trade surpluses at our expense and became virtual free-riders off the U.S. defense effort.

No nations were more successful at this than South Korea and Japan. Now Xi is playing the game — and perhaps playing Trump.

What is the “North Korean problem” Beijing will help solve in return for more indulgent consideration on future U.S.-China trade deals?

North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. As 80 percent of Pyongyang’s trade comes through China, Trump believes that Beijing can force Kim to stop testing missiles and atomic bombs before he produces an intercontinental ballistic missile that could hit the U.S.

But what is to prevent Xi from pocketing Trump’s concessions and continuing on the strategic course China has long pursued?

For in many ways, Pyongyang’s goals parallel China’s.

Neither could want an all-out war on the Korean Peninsula. For Kim, this would devastate his country, bring down his regime, and cost him his life. For China, war could mean millions of Koreans crossing the Yalu into Manchuria and a disruption of Beijing’s march to Asian hegemony.

A continuing crisis on the peninsula, however, with Trump and the U.S. relying on Beijing’s help, could leave Xi in the catbird seat.

And now that North Korea has declared its goal to be building missiles with nuclear warheads that could hit all U.S. bases in Asia — and even California — the clock is running for the White House.

“It won’t happen,” Trump has said of North Korea’s developing an ICBM that could hit the United States. “If China is not going to solve North Korea, we will.”

“The threat is upon us,” says outgoing deputy national security adviser K.T. McFarland. “This is something President Trump is going to deal with in the first year.”

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Vice President Mike Pence have declared that our policy of “strategic patience” with Pyonyang is at an end.

National security adviser H.R. McMaster said Sunday the U.S. has “to take action, short of armed conflict, so we can avoid the worst” in dealing with “this unpredictable regime.”

With a stunning parade of missiles in Pyongyang on Saturday, the North’s failed firing of a solid-fueled missile that same day, and the promise of new missile tests weekly, Kim is forcing our hand.

Either he backs away from building atomic bombs and long-range missiles or Trump and his generals must make good on their warnings.

How did we get to this point?

Why, 64 years after the Korean War, a quarter-century after the Cold War, are we still obliged to go to war to defend South Korea from a North with one-half the South’s population and 3 percent of its gross domestic product?

Why are we, on the far side of the Pacific, still responsible for containing North Korea when two of its neighbors — Russia and China — are nuclear powers and South Korea and Japan could field nuclear and conventional forces far superior to Kim’s?

How long into the future will containing militarist dictators in Pyongyang with nuclear missiles be America’s primary responsibility?

Another issue arises. Before the U.S. launches any pre-emptive strike on North Korea, Congress should be called back into session to authorize any act of war against the North.

Perhaps this time, Congress would follow the Constitution.

Though Korea is the crisis of the moment, it is not the only one.

Not since 9/11 have the Afghan Taliban been stronger or controlled more territory. The United States’ commanding general there is calling for thousands more U.S. troops. Russia and Iran are reportedly negotiating with the Taliban. Pakistan is said to be aiding them.

ORDER IT NOW

To counter Vladimir Putin’s Russia, we have moved U.S. and NATO troops into Poland, the Baltic States, Romania and Bulgaria. We have fired missiles into Syria. We are reportedly preparing to back the Saudis in the latest escalation of their war on the Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Twenty-four years after “Black Hawk Down,” the weekend brought reports of U.S. troops returning to Somalia.

The promise of a Trump presidency — that we would start looking out for our own country and own national interests first and let the rest of the world solve, or fail to solve, its own problems — appears, not 100 days in, to have been a mirage.

Will more wars make America great again?

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of the new book “The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose From Defeat to Create the New Majority.”

Copyright 2017 Creators.com.

 
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  1. I agree and find it deplorable that Trump showed so little backbone in confronting the militarist nihilist deep state.

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    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    I agree and find it deplorable that Trump showed so little backbone in confronting the militarist nihilist deep state.
     
    It is deplorable. It was both predictable and inevitable too.

    The jerk's only positive is that he's not Hillary.
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  2. reiner Tor says: • Website

    I think the fact that Trump recently decided to focus on foreign policy means that his domestic agenda is falling apart.

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  3. I can’t see anything in here to argue against. I wish this guy Buchanan had gone further in his campaign back in 1992. The media and establishment did their jobs to shut him down, just like Ron Paul was pushed onto the back burner in ’12. The Trump support had gotten too far for them to do anything successful about, but the way the guy is behaving now, maybe the establishment is still getting its way by other means.

    Oh, I (and Buchanan) forgot to mention that the other thing is the US is broker than broke, I mean so far in the debt hole (nominal $20,000,000,000,000 with about 10x that in future obligations at the, Feral Gov’t level, pension plans solvent only in their accountants’ dreams, and consumer debt out the yinyang as people live by borrowing to keep up their lifestyle in a land of rapidly-diminishing decent jobs), there will need to be financial pain >> G.Dep 1.0 to get out of it. I guess we got these missiles and A/C carriers cheap, or we wouldn’t use them as playthings like we are, right?

    Maybe Buchanan doesn’t realize this, but Peak Stupidity sure does.

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  4. Pat’s lamentations–the financial displacement of White Christian Americans in the country built by their forefathers and what to do to alleviate it–can find answers in one of his musings in the article: An all out war, which will not only remove a minor irritant like North Korea forever, but it will set back an overly ambitious China, whose folly has been to bite the hand feeding it… The hand that is too generous is the America willing to share its largess with all and sundry, without remuneration!

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  5. Mark Green says: • Website

    More wars will not make America great again. Trump therefore is beginning to look like GW Bush: an inexperienced rube that thinks military ‘victory’ will bring him greatness.

    Here we go again. The neocons have set their trap. Trump is theirs.

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    • Agree: jacques sheete
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  6. Rurik says:

    Not since 9/11 have the Afghan Taliban been stronger or controlled more territory.

    that’s because the war-ravaged citizens of Afghanistan, just as increasingly more and more of the planet’s people, have come to realize that it was Israel and neocon elements inside the US fecal government/CIA-controlled msm that perpetrated 9/11 in the first place, as a pretext to destroy all nations inconvenient to Israel. Duh.

    And so tragically for the people of Afghanistan, it once again is none other than the Taliban who – even with their Islamic extremism- are more honorable and tolerable than the uber-corrupt zio-quislings that the ZUSA has propped up in Kabul- to assist with the CIA’s heroin trafficking operations and other US treacheries, atrocities, drone terror assassinations and sundry war crimes.

    It is becoming brutally obvious that it is the entire sane, peaceable, and law abiding world vs. the ZUSA fiend.

    the enemies of Afghanistan and Libya and Syria and Russia … are the exact same enemies of the citizens of the USA and Germany and France and England – the zio-cons, who wage unilateral aggressive wars upon everyone at their whim. It’s all of us vs. the fiends who run torture camps. It’s us vs. the fiends who shoot children in Palestine from rooftops

    John McCain is not just the enemy of Putin and Russia, (and Afghanistan and Syria) he’s also the enemy of the people of the USA.

    it really is that stark. It is the Fiend; (McCain / Bibi / Trump / NYT / Kristol, et al) vs. all people of good will on the planet.

    The children of Afghanistan and Syria and Donbas and Korea are in the same boat as the children of America and England and Canada and Mexico.

    we’re all ravaged and set at each other’s throats by this demonic force of hatred and war in the world- Zionism.

    And as long as Trump is making it abundantly clear on whose side he finds himself on, well then so too will the rest of us.

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    • Agree: Stonehands
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  7. “With a stunning parade of missiles in Pyongyang on Saturday, the North’s failed firing of a solid-fueled missile that same day, and the promise of new missile tests weekly, Kim is forcing our hand.”

    What utter bullshit.

    The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea.

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    • Replies: @Realist
    "The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea."

    Or any other place either.
    , @David
    I think you're being a little unfair. Buchanan isn't saying the US has to play, just that as it is playing, its hand is being forced. We can't go around announcing something will never happen and then do nothing to stop it. A few paragraphs later, Buchanan makes it clear he doesn't think containing dictators with nukes in Korea should be the role of the US. He's made the same point at least half a dozen times about Korea alone, and thousands of times about foreign adventures generally.
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  8. Realist says:
    @Bill Jones
    "With a stunning parade of missiles in Pyongyang on Saturday, the North’s failed firing of a solid-fueled missile that same day, and the promise of new missile tests weekly, Kim is forcing our hand."

    What utter bullshit.

    The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea.

    “The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea.”

    Or any other place either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Avery
    {Or any other place either.}

    Not true: US has a legitimate reason for military presence in Afghanistan.
    We need to protect _our_ opium producing poppy fields there.
    With no US military presence, Taliban would eradicate those fields.


    That's what they did when they ran the place before US showed up.
    Opium production was up a healthy 40%+ in 2016 compared to 2015, according to UN.

    I have no data of opium production increases year-in, year-out, since US invaded and ousted the Talibs. But it has to be off the charts.
    God bless America.
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  9. Avery says:
    @Realist
    "The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea."

    Or any other place either.

    {Or any other place either.}

    Not true: US has a legitimate reason for military presence in Afghanistan.
    We need to protect _our_ opium producing poppy fields there.
    With no US military presence, Taliban would eradicate those fields.

    That’s what they did when they ran the place before US showed up.
    Opium production was up a healthy 40%+ in 2016 compared to 2015, according to UN.

    I have no data of opium production increases year-in, year-out, since US invaded and ousted the Talibs. But it has to be off the charts.
    God bless America.

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  10. Maybe Buchanan doesn’t realize this, but Peak Stupidity sure does.

    I like your classic 1st and 2nd derivatives approach. I believe it is Fermat’s theorem on minimum and maximum;-)

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is? I have read your site before, maybe a couple of months back. Good writing, and I'll check out your unz one tomorrow.

    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus, but the gist of it will stay with me, and I could pick it back up. On the non-theoretical side, we just need a better way to measure the stupidity in units that are familiar and some type of stupidity sensor that could be put on a chip. Anybody on here got any grant money I could get my hands on?
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  11. @Andrei Martyanov

    Maybe Buchanan doesn’t realize this, but Peak Stupidity sure does.
     
    I like your classic 1st and 2nd derivatives approach. I believe it is Fermat's theorem on minimum and maximum;-)

    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is? I have read your site before, maybe a couple of months back. Good writing, and I’ll check out your unz one tomorrow.

    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus, but the gist of it will stay with me, and I could pick it back up. On the non-theoretical side, we just need a better way to measure the stupidity in units that are familiar and some type of stupidity sensor that could be put on a chip. Anybody on here got any grant money I could get my hands on?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is?
     
    No meaning whatsoever, one of the first things which came to me while either registering for some internet purchase of something like that several years ago. You know, one of those sites which informs you that pretty much any user name you take was taken, so SmoothieX12 it is--this was available after a huge number of attempts. It stuck:))
    , @robt
    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus ...

    Most everyone has. Father Guido Sarducci's Five Minute University explains why:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kO8x8eoU3L4
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  12. Corvinus says:

    Relax, everyone. The venerable Vox Day has the insight.

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/syria-because-north-korea.html

    “My current thinking is that the attack on Syria was intended to let Premier Xi know that Trump meant what he was saying about North Korea, and that if China did not swiftly address the situation, the US naval forces being sent to the Sea of Japan would be utilized instead. This also means that the US will have additional assets in place if North Korea were to respond to a Chinese attack by attacking South Korea.

    I’ve never thought it was an accident that the attack took place during the meeting between Trump and Xi. It also tends to answer the question that has been plaguing the Trump-doubters, which is why Trump would suddenly appear to do an about-face on Syria. But Trump still doesn’t care about Syria or see it in the national interest, he simply needed something to blow up in order to make it clear to Xi that he would actually follow through on his threats. And I think Trump actually agrees with the Chinese in that he, too, would prefer that any bombs or missiles dropped on North Korea be Chinese rather than American.

    If this is the correct interpretation of events, and if the Syria attack causes the Chinese to remove the Kim dynasty from power in North Korea, it will be seen as a brilliant grand strategic move on the God-Emperor’s part. It will also demonstrate that Trump not only is not controlled by the neocons, but that he doesn’t need them at all.”

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/you-dont-say.html

    “This doesn’t mean I’m correct. It doesn’t mean that the God-Emperor isn’t sending 150,000 troops to Syria in order to attack Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime there. But it does demonstrate why it’s probably best to keep your eyes open and your mouth shut when the God-Emperor does something you don’t understand.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    How can anyone know better than one who is half man/half worm?
    https://www.google.com/search?q=god+emperor+dune&client=ms-android-verizon&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiutYmOw6_TAhVC4WMKHVAbAQEQ_AUIBygB&biw=360&bih=559

    Shai Hulud shall have his victory; no one must stand in the way - THE SPICE MUST FLOW!

    Peace.
    , @Anonymous
    Wow.

    Can't believe how delusional these Trumpkins are.

    Trump obviously wants more involvement in Syria than just as a show of force. Why?

    Because that's what the neocons want. And Trump will do their bidding.

    If firing off 59 missles and missing half of them was a show of force to scare China, Trump is nieve.

    More likely China is trying to bait America into costly wars that will take us down.
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  13. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Having an unstable, aspiring nuclear state on one’s border is more of a problem for the neighboring country than anyone else. No?

    If the Norks shoot one off, China has problems. Everyone has problems. But the US is at the bottom of the list.

    A rogue nuclear state is a potential problem for the international world order, but isn’t primarily a US problem. And the only country that can solve it is the one that it is sitting right next to it, its theoretical ally, dependent on it for the majority of its trade and food.

    Trump might want to consider how war tends to work out for Presidents. Lincoln? It’s possible to create a narrative of success but it ends up with him dead. It’s pretty much a guarantee of failure.

    Whatever the upside of turning things over to the Generals …. its already happened.

    So — if it is mostly China’s problem, then why are we willing to give up anything for it?

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    If the Norks shoot one off, China has problems.

    I am not so sure about that. The US has made no Kennedyesque assertion that it will assume an attack by NK is an attack by China and will bring a full nuclear strike on China.

    I am not endorsing this stupidity or supporting anything Trump is doing. You cannot get rid of this dictator. Even China cannot do it. You certainly cannot do it with US belligerence.

    The best way to end this is to unify the two countries - something the US seems to be against unless it is via complete capitulation to US demands. I look at Kim as similar to the Saudi princes. The best way to unify the country might be to let him be royalty without any responsibilities or power and let him parade around the world spending money at whorehouses and casinos to his heart's content with lavish praise everywhere he goes.
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  14. Talha says:
    @Corvinus
    Relax, everyone. The venerable Vox Day has the insight.

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/syria-because-north-korea.html

    "My current thinking is that the attack on Syria was intended to let Premier Xi know that Trump meant what he was saying about North Korea, and that if China did not swiftly address the situation, the US naval forces being sent to the Sea of Japan would be utilized instead. This also means that the US will have additional assets in place if North Korea were to respond to a Chinese attack by attacking South Korea.

    I've never thought it was an accident that the attack took place during the meeting between Trump and Xi. It also tends to answer the question that has been plaguing the Trump-doubters, which is why Trump would suddenly appear to do an about-face on Syria. But Trump still doesn't care about Syria or see it in the national interest, he simply needed something to blow up in order to make it clear to Xi that he would actually follow through on his threats. And I think Trump actually agrees with the Chinese in that he, too, would prefer that any bombs or missiles dropped on North Korea be Chinese rather than American.

    If this is the correct interpretation of events, and if the Syria attack causes the Chinese to remove the Kim dynasty from power in North Korea, it will be seen as a brilliant grand strategic move on the God-Emperor's part. It will also demonstrate that Trump not only is not controlled by the neocons, but that he doesn't need them at all."

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/you-dont-say.html

    "This doesn't mean I'm correct. It doesn't mean that the God-Emperor isn't sending 150,000 troops to Syria in order to attack Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime there. But it does demonstrate why it's probably best to keep your eyes open and your mouth shut when the God-Emperor does something you don't understand."

    How can anyone know better than one who is half man/half worm?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=god+emperor+dune&client=ms-android-verizon&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiutYmOw6_TAhVC4WMKHVAbAQEQ_AUIBygB&biw=360&bih=559

    Shai Hulud shall have his victory; no one must stand in the way – THE SPICE MUST FLOW!

    Peace.

    Read More
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  15. It is as if no one, however well-intentioned, can resist the possibilities inherent in the role of Commander-In-Chief of the greatest military power in the world.

    This is bad for America. It would be in America’s best interests to halve its defense spending – currently running at more than twice the sum of Russian and Chinese spending. The USA would remain the strongest military power in the world, but it would have to think more carefully about when and whether to deploy military force overseas.

    Read More
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  16. map says:

    I am generally opposed to war. Let’s understand that, given the anti-White nature of the Republicans and Democrats, any wars initiated by the United States will simply result in increasing the White death toll. This is to avoided at all costs.

    Yet, there is a certain brilliance about this military pivot toward Asia.

    Trump drops bombs on Syria and then on Afghanistan, alleging some military or political objective that does not seem consistent.

    We don’t know if Syria used sarin and, even if they did, the damage to the airbase was minimal. Assad is still using the base.

    The moab in Afghanistan is not merely alleged to have done its job. Who knows what that is about.

    The only successful application of these acts was to control and misdirect the news cycle away from Trump-as-Putins-Puppet and to raise Trump’s ratings.

    What instead has happened is a complete pivot toward Asia, alleging that the Norks have viable nukes capable of hitting the US and its allies. Maybe yes; Maybe no…but this is pretty brilliant.

    The entire news cycle has been sucked with concerns over North Korea. Yet, little information comes out because there are no Western news bureaus in Pyongyang. South Korea, China and Japan also have little information.

    It is quite possible that Trump may have exported a Middle East-style quagmire into Northeast Asia. This will suck time, political capital, money and energy out of the East Asian miracle and introduce a problem that has, so far, been and exclusive problem for America: a hostile and unstable Marcher territory: Nork is China’s Mexico.

    This dovetails with Trump’s domestic strategy of America first. Instead of arguing with American business over labor and regulatory arbitrage, why not simply make northeast Asia a more dangerous place to do business? A Nork quagmire is just what America needs.

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  17. David says:
    @Bill Jones
    "With a stunning parade of missiles in Pyongyang on Saturday, the North’s failed firing of a solid-fueled missile that same day, and the promise of new missile tests weekly, Kim is forcing our hand."

    What utter bullshit.

    The US has no legitimate reason for any military presence anywhere near Korea.

    I think you’re being a little unfair. Buchanan isn’t saying the US has to play, just that as it is playing, its hand is being forced. We can’t go around announcing something will never happen and then do nothing to stop it. A few paragraphs later, Buchanan makes it clear he doesn’t think containing dictators with nukes in Korea should be the role of the US. He’s made the same point at least half a dozen times about Korea alone, and thousands of times about foreign adventures generally.

    Read More
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  18. @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is? I have read your site before, maybe a couple of months back. Good writing, and I'll check out your unz one tomorrow.

    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus, but the gist of it will stay with me, and I could pick it back up. On the non-theoretical side, we just need a better way to measure the stupidity in units that are familiar and some type of stupidity sensor that could be put on a chip. Anybody on here got any grant money I could get my hands on?

    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is?

    No meaning whatsoever, one of the first things which came to me while either registering for some internet purchase of something like that several years ago. You know, one of those sites which informs you that pretty much any user name you take was taken, so SmoothieX12 it is–this was available after a huge number of attempts. It stuck:))

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I see. I can't say exactly the same for my name here. I had seen it before, but just put it in the unz textarea along with my website name, just to test if I could indeed post comments at all. It works, I've made a lot of comments, and so feel stuck with the name at least on here (I like it, but I ran into the blog where I saw the name before - maybe I can pay him off? ;-)
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  19. robt says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is? I have read your site before, maybe a couple of months back. Good writing, and I'll check out your unz one tomorrow.

    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus, but the gist of it will stay with me, and I could pick it back up. On the non-theoretical side, we just need a better way to measure the stupidity in units that are familiar and some type of stupidity sensor that could be put on a chip. Anybody on here got any grant money I could get my hands on?

    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus …

    Most everyone has. Father Guido Sarducci’s Five Minute University explains why:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Pretty funny, Rob. Speaking of forgetting, I hadn't thought of Father Guido Sarducci in about 30 years. Thanks.
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  20. MarkinLA says:
    @anon
    Having an unstable, aspiring nuclear state on one's border is more of a problem for the neighboring country than anyone else. No?

    If the Norks shoot one off, China has problems. Everyone has problems. But the US is at the bottom of the list.

    A rogue nuclear state is a potential problem for the international world order, but isn't primarily a US problem. And the only country that can solve it is the one that it is sitting right next to it, its theoretical ally, dependent on it for the majority of its trade and food.

    Trump might want to consider how war tends to work out for Presidents. Lincoln? It's possible to create a narrative of success but it ends up with him dead. It's pretty much a guarantee of failure.

    Whatever the upside of turning things over to the Generals .... its already happened.

    So --- if it is mostly China's problem, then why are we willing to give up anything for it?

    If the Norks shoot one off, China has problems.

    I am not so sure about that. The US has made no Kennedyesque assertion that it will assume an attack by NK is an attack by China and will bring a full nuclear strike on China.

    I am not endorsing this stupidity or supporting anything Trump is doing. You cannot get rid of this dictator. Even China cannot do it. You certainly cannot do it with US belligerence.

    The best way to end this is to unify the two countries – something the US seems to be against unless it is via complete capitulation to US demands. I look at Kim as similar to the Saudi princes. The best way to unify the country might be to let him be royalty without any responsibilities or power and let him parade around the world spending money at whorehouses and casinos to his heart’s content with lavish praise everywhere he goes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Of course either China or the USA could easily and quickly kill Kim and his higher-ranking officials. And/or destroy Pyongyang. And/or occupy Pyongyang. Whatever they want to do.

    That doesn't mean we should do it. We shouldn't.
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  21. @MarkinLA
    If the Norks shoot one off, China has problems.

    I am not so sure about that. The US has made no Kennedyesque assertion that it will assume an attack by NK is an attack by China and will bring a full nuclear strike on China.

    I am not endorsing this stupidity or supporting anything Trump is doing. You cannot get rid of this dictator. Even China cannot do it. You certainly cannot do it with US belligerence.

    The best way to end this is to unify the two countries - something the US seems to be against unless it is via complete capitulation to US demands. I look at Kim as similar to the Saudi princes. The best way to unify the country might be to let him be royalty without any responsibilities or power and let him parade around the world spending money at whorehouses and casinos to his heart's content with lavish praise everywhere he goes.

    Of course either China or the USA could easily and quickly kill Kim and his higher-ranking officials. And/or destroy Pyongyang. And/or occupy Pyongyang. Whatever they want to do.

    That doesn’t mean we should do it. We shouldn’t.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    I think the only way to get rid of Kim via assassination is for somebody like the Chinese to secretly get the approval of the NK military and do it up close and personal during a foreign relations function either themselves or with one of his insiders. We would never get close enough and a conventional military strike has large chance of failing and causing Kim to order a nuclear attack.

    The old rule still applies when killing a king - you have to be successful.
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  22. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Corvinus
    Relax, everyone. The venerable Vox Day has the insight.

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/syria-because-north-korea.html

    "My current thinking is that the attack on Syria was intended to let Premier Xi know that Trump meant what he was saying about North Korea, and that if China did not swiftly address the situation, the US naval forces being sent to the Sea of Japan would be utilized instead. This also means that the US will have additional assets in place if North Korea were to respond to a Chinese attack by attacking South Korea.

    I've never thought it was an accident that the attack took place during the meeting between Trump and Xi. It also tends to answer the question that has been plaguing the Trump-doubters, which is why Trump would suddenly appear to do an about-face on Syria. But Trump still doesn't care about Syria or see it in the national interest, he simply needed something to blow up in order to make it clear to Xi that he would actually follow through on his threats. And I think Trump actually agrees with the Chinese in that he, too, would prefer that any bombs or missiles dropped on North Korea be Chinese rather than American.

    If this is the correct interpretation of events, and if the Syria attack causes the Chinese to remove the Kim dynasty from power in North Korea, it will be seen as a brilliant grand strategic move on the God-Emperor's part. It will also demonstrate that Trump not only is not controlled by the neocons, but that he doesn't need them at all."

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2017/04/you-dont-say.html

    "This doesn't mean I'm correct. It doesn't mean that the God-Emperor isn't sending 150,000 troops to Syria in order to attack Russia, Iran, and the Assad regime there. But it does demonstrate why it's probably best to keep your eyes open and your mouth shut when the God-Emperor does something you don't understand."

    Wow.

    Can’t believe how delusional these Trumpkins are.

    Trump obviously wants more involvement in Syria than just as a show of force. Why?

    Because that’s what the neocons want. And Trump will do their bidding.

    If firing off 59 missles and missing half of them was a show of force to scare China, Trump is nieve.

    More likely China is trying to bait America into costly wars that will take us down.

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  23. @robt
    I honestly have forgotten all but the very basics of Calculus ...

    Most everyone has. Father Guido Sarducci's Five Minute University explains why:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kO8x8eoU3L4

    Pretty funny, Rob. Speaking of forgetting, I hadn’t thought of Father Guido Sarducci in about 30 years. Thanks.

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  24. @Andrei Martyanov

    Thanks, smoothie x12. Could you tell me what the meaning of that name is?
     
    No meaning whatsoever, one of the first things which came to me while either registering for some internet purchase of something like that several years ago. You know, one of those sites which informs you that pretty much any user name you take was taken, so SmoothieX12 it is--this was available after a huge number of attempts. It stuck:))

    I see. I can’t say exactly the same for my name here. I had seen it before, but just put it in the unz textarea along with my website name, just to test if I could indeed post comments at all. It works, I’ve made a lot of comments, and so feel stuck with the name at least on here (I like it, but I ran into the blog where I saw the name before – maybe I can pay him off? ;-)

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  25. MarkinLA says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Of course either China or the USA could easily and quickly kill Kim and his higher-ranking officials. And/or destroy Pyongyang. And/or occupy Pyongyang. Whatever they want to do.

    That doesn't mean we should do it. We shouldn't.

    I think the only way to get rid of Kim via assassination is for somebody like the Chinese to secretly get the approval of the NK military and do it up close and personal during a foreign relations function either themselves or with one of his insiders. We would never get close enough and a conventional military strike has large chance of failing and causing Kim to order a nuclear attack.

    The old rule still applies when killing a king – you have to be successful.

    Read More
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  26. KenH says:

    The promise of a Trump presidency — that we would start looking out for our own country and own national interests first and let the rest of the world solve, or fail to solve, its own problems — appears, not 100 days in, to have been a mirage.

    With Trump’s lightning quick pivot to centrism on most of his signature domestic issues and his support for Syrian regime change (after staunchly opposing it since 2013) in less than 100 days, I’m becoming convinced that his campaign was the biggest con job in history.

    When he ran as a centrist in 2000 on the Reform Party ticket his campaign ended almost as soon as it started since he was out shined and upstaged by Pat Buchanan who ran on a rightest, non-interventionist and nativist platform. I think Trump realized he would need to rip some pages from Pat’s playbook to have any future chance, but it’s clear he didn’t have the same level of conviction as Pat if he even had them at all.

    Now he’s filling his advisory staff with globalist, liberal Jews like Jared Kushner and Gary Kohn while more or less telling the nation that right wing populist Steve Bannon’s days are numbered. The swamp has been replenished, not drained, but it sure made for a good campaign slogan to excite all of the deplorables. The Donald does know how to manipulate crowds.

    It looks like we’re stuck with “lyin’ Donald” until 2020. If he blunders this nation into a major conflagration with Syria, N. Korea or Russia without Congressional approval then we should “lock him up!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Well Kenh there was little we could do. NOBODY else from the GOP was going to win Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. We have to fight little wars that mean something. When an amnesty rears it's head in the form of a DACA amnesty (and allowing their parents to stay for family reunification) we have to be prepared to let Trump and the Congress know that they won't keep their jobs in 2018 and 2020. Hopefully, that will be enough.
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  27. MarkinLA says:
    @KenH

    The promise of a Trump presidency — that we would start looking out for our own country and own national interests first and let the rest of the world solve, or fail to solve, its own problems — appears, not 100 days in, to have been a mirage.
     
    With Trump's lightning quick pivot to centrism on most of his signature domestic issues and his support for Syrian regime change (after staunchly opposing it since 2013) in less than 100 days, I'm becoming convinced that his campaign was the biggest con job in history.

    When he ran as a centrist in 2000 on the Reform Party ticket his campaign ended almost as soon as it started since he was out shined and upstaged by Pat Buchanan who ran on a rightest, non-interventionist and nativist platform. I think Trump realized he would need to rip some pages from Pat's playbook to have any future chance, but it's clear he didn't have the same level of conviction as Pat if he even had them at all.

    Now he's filling his advisory staff with globalist, liberal Jews like Jared Kushner and Gary Kohn while more or less telling the nation that right wing populist Steve Bannon's days are numbered. The swamp has been replenished, not drained, but it sure made for a good campaign slogan to excite all of the deplorables. The Donald does know how to manipulate crowds.

    It looks like we're stuck with "lyin' Donald" until 2020. If he blunders this nation into a major conflagration with Syria, N. Korea or Russia without Congressional approval then we should "lock him up!"

    Well Kenh there was little we could do. NOBODY else from the GOP was going to win Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. We have to fight little wars that mean something. When an amnesty rears it’s head in the form of a DACA amnesty (and allowing their parents to stay for family reunification) we have to be prepared to let Trump and the Congress know that they won’t keep their jobs in 2018 and 2020. Hopefully, that will be enough.

    Read More
    • Replies: @KenH
    I'm not blaming anyone and even fooled myself into thinking Trump was finally the real deal given how he consistently savaged the left wing media where other candidates would have surrendered and apologized. It wasn't wrong to think he would upend the establishment, but either the establishment is upending him, he was always a phony, or a combination thereof.

    Trump will no doubt do some good but we're back to the lesser of two evils. He's just proving to us cynics that elections really don't matter and that change won't come from inside the system due to the stranglehold Jewish power and influence has on all of our institutions.
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  28. KenH says:
    @MarkinLA
    Well Kenh there was little we could do. NOBODY else from the GOP was going to win Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. We have to fight little wars that mean something. When an amnesty rears it's head in the form of a DACA amnesty (and allowing their parents to stay for family reunification) we have to be prepared to let Trump and the Congress know that they won't keep their jobs in 2018 and 2020. Hopefully, that will be enough.

    I’m not blaming anyone and even fooled myself into thinking Trump was finally the real deal given how he consistently savaged the left wing media where other candidates would have surrendered and apologized. It wasn’t wrong to think he would upend the establishment, but either the establishment is upending him, he was always a phony, or a combination thereof.

    Trump will no doubt do some good but we’re back to the lesser of two evils. He’s just proving to us cynics that elections really don’t matter and that change won’t come from inside the system due to the stranglehold Jewish power and influence has on all of our institutions.

    Read More
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  29. The promise of a Trump presidency — that we would start looking out for our own country and own national interests first and let the rest of the world solve, or fail to solve, its own problems — appears, not 100 days in, to have been a mirage.

    Mirage?

    It was no mirage; it was pure political BS from day one.

    Trump, despite his position and money, is as dishonest as he is ignorant,stupid and gutless. He never was the Messiah and never will be.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Well JS,

    It was no mirage; it was pure political BS from day one.
     
    Nobody said he wasn't a good salesman - just one more deal he closed.

    Peace.
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  30. @Exiled off mainstreet
    I agree and find it deplorable that Trump showed so little backbone in confronting the militarist nihilist deep state.

    I agree and find it deplorable that Trump showed so little backbone in confronting the militarist nihilist deep state.

    It is deplorable. It was both predictable and inevitable too.

    The jerk’s only positive is that he’s not Hillary.

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  31. Talha says:
    @jacques sheete

    The promise of a Trump presidency — that we would start looking out for our own country and own national interests first and let the rest of the world solve, or fail to solve, its own problems — appears, not 100 days in, to have been a mirage.
     
    Mirage?

    It was no mirage; it was pure political BS from day one.

    Trump, despite his position and money, is as dishonest as he is ignorant,stupid and gutless. He never was the Messiah and never will be.

    Well JS,

    It was no mirage; it was pure political BS from day one.

    Nobody said he wasn’t a good salesman – just one more deal he closed.

    Peace.

    Read More
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  32. sonbeams says:

    Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin have been “dealing with” Kim Jong Un for some time. They have been working to transition North Korea into a market economy and, I believe, with some success. This is in keeping with their overall multipolar world view and the One Belt One Road/New Silk Road trading and economic development strategy.

    If they are successful then the North and South will eventually be able to re-unite. The necessity to have a large U.S. military stationed in South Korea would disappear leaving less for China to worry about. It is more than likely that maintaining tension in the region is the actual U.S goal in order to justify their presence there.

    As for President Trump’s apparent betrayal of his campaign rhetoric, there are three main possibilities:

    First, he is following the adage to keep your friends close and your enemies closer. He is therefore still committed to keeping his promises but in the meantime he is allowing his opponents to “out” themselves and in due time he will round them all up and incarcerate them.

    Second, he has found the Washington Zionist cabal too strong to overcome and has succumbed to them. He is now a captive of the entrenched neoconservative permanent government and is following their bidding, appointing hard core globalists to his inner circle. One recent example is Fiona Hill, an expert on Soviet and Russian affairs and most recently a senior fellow of the neoconservative think tank, the Brookings Institution, the authors of the paper “Which Path to Persia” outlining the means of subjugating Iran.

    Third, his entire campaign was aimed at pandering to the known proclivities of his audiences and he had no intention of ever keeping his promises beyond throwing an occasional bone to his diminishing band of loyalists. He has always been a globalist but he witnessed how GW Bush conducted his campaign in 2000 and decided to follow his example.

    My considered opinion, on the evidence I have seen, is that the third option is the correct one.

    Nevertheless, he is following the way that has been predestined for him and he will preside over the end of the American Empire. I have read that the financial architecture for a new banking and monetary system has been completed and is now ready to be rolled out by China and Russia and their allies. It will accommodate any nation that wishes to join so when the U.S. dollar centred system collapses there will be a viable alternative to take its place. This means the transition will likely be less jarring than many believe and it will be very much in the interests of the nations of the world that this take place as smoothly and as quickly as possible.

    However, before that happens, I believe that there will be a denouement in the Middle East in the form of a regional war with nuclear weapons being used. This will end with the destruction of Jerusalem and the Jewish State and possibly Damascus. The present focus on North Korea is, in my opinion, simply a diversion to distract attention from the real theatre of action. The question is: what on Earth are the globalists doing and preparing for us in that theatre?

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  33. grapesoda says:

    > when the U.S. dollar centred system collapses

    People have been talking about this for at least a decade. There is even a popular blog that talks about nothing but economic collapse every day.

    Just let me know when it happens because I got tired of waiting. I’m just going to go on living my life, although diversification of assets is always a prudent and antifragile strategy when one can manage it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @sonbeams
    Effectively the final collapse began in June 2007 with the sub-prime mortgage crisis and gathered speed with the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy in October 2008.

    The controllers of the global fiat banking and monetary system have worked overtime to prevent the collapse but it has continued. They have run out of options so they have been trying to foment a world war to cover their tracks which has always been their modus operandi.

    The delay has given us all time to build our holdings of precious metals and for the alternate system to be built.

    You won't be able to miss the final moments since everyone will be affected no matter where you are in the world. We are living at an historical time. Most people will be surprised at what actually happens. A time of great liberation is at hand. As it is written, "Look up for My Redemption draws nigh".
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  34. sonbeams says:
    @grapesoda
    > when the U.S. dollar centred system collapses

    People have been talking about this for at least a decade. There is even a popular blog that talks about nothing but economic collapse every day.

    Just let me know when it happens because I got tired of waiting. I'm just going to go on living my life, although diversification of assets is always a prudent and antifragile strategy when one can manage it.

    Effectively the final collapse began in June 2007 with the sub-prime mortgage crisis and gathered speed with the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy in October 2008.

    The controllers of the global fiat banking and monetary system have worked overtime to prevent the collapse but it has continued. They have run out of options so they have been trying to foment a world war to cover their tracks which has always been their modus operandi.

    The delay has given us all time to build our holdings of precious metals and for the alternate system to be built.

    You won’t be able to miss the final moments since everyone will be affected no matter where you are in the world. We are living at an historical time. Most people will be surprised at what actually happens. A time of great liberation is at hand. As it is written, “Look up for My Redemption draws nigh”.

    Read More
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