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“The liberal idea has become obsolete. … (Liberals) cannot simply dictate anything to anyone as they have been attempting to do over the recent decades.”

Such was the confident claim of Vladimir Putin to the Financial Times on the eve of a G-20 gathering that appeared to validate his thesis.

Consider who commanded all the attention at the Osaka summit.

The main event was Trump’s meeting with China’s Xi Jinping and their agreement to renew trade talks. Xi runs an archipelago of detention camps where China’s Uighur Muslims and its Kazakh minority have their minds coercively “corrected.”

A major media focus at the summit was Trump’s meeting with Putin where he playfully admonished the Russian president not to meddle again in our 2020 election. The two joked about how both are afflicted with a media that generates constant fake news.

At the G-20 class picture, Trump was seen smiling and shaking hands with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, whom U.S. intelligence says ordered the murder of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Trump called the prince “a friend” who has done a “spectacular job.”

Trump then left for Seoul, traveled to the DMZ, and crossed into North Korea to shake hands with Kim Jong Un, who runs a police state unrivaled for its repression.

Negotiations on Kim’s nuclear weapons may be back on track.

Among other G-20 leaders present were Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi of India and President Recep Erdogan of Turkey, who has imprisoned tens of thousands following a coup attempt in July 2016.

In his interview with the FT’s Lionel Barber, Putin appeared as much an analyst of, as an advocate for, the nationalism and populism that seems to be succeeding the 20th-century liberalism of the West.

Why is liberalism failing? Several causes, said Putin. Among them, its failure to deal with the crisis of the age: mass and unchecked illegal migration. Putin praised Trump’s efforts to secure the U.S. border:

“This liberal idea has become obsolete. It has come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population. … This liberal idea presupposes that … migrants can kill, plunder and rape with impunity because their rights as migrants have to be protected.”

Putin deplored Chancellor Angela Merkel’s 2015 decision to bring into Germany a million refugees from Syria’s civil war.

His comments came as 10 Democratic candidates in the second presidential primary debate were raising their hands in support of the proposition that breaking into the USA should cease to be a crime and those who succeed in breaking in should be given free health care.

Putin also sees the social excesses of multiculturalism and secularism in the West as representing a failure of liberalism.

In a week where huge crowds celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall “uprising” in Greenwich Village, as it is now called, with parties and parades, Putin declared:

ORDER IT NOW

“Have we forgotten that all of us live in a world based on biblical values? … I am not trying to insult anyone because we have been condemned for our alleged homophobia. But we have no problem with LGBT persons. God forbid, let them live as they wish.”

He added, “But some things do appear excessive to us. They claim now that children can play five or six gender roles.”

Elton John pronounced himself “deeply upset.”

Putin did not back off: “Let everyone be happy … But this must not be allowed to overshadow the culture, traditions and traditional family values of millions of people making up the core population.”

Putin took power, two decades ago, as this 21st century began. In recent years, he has advanced himself not only as a foe of liberalism but a champion of populism, traditionalism and nationalism.

Nor is he hesitant to declare his views regarding U.S. politics.

Of Trump, Putin says, “He is a talented person (who) knows very well what his voters expect of him. … Trump looked into his opponent’s attitude toward him and saw changes in American society.”

Recalling his own controversial comment that the collapse of the Soviet Union was the greatest tragedy of the 20th century, Putin said the tragedy was not the death of Communism but the shattering of the Russian Federation into 15 separate nations.

The tragedy was the “dispersal of ethnic Russians” across the newly independent successor states of the Soviet Union: “25 million ethnic Russians found themselves living outside the Russian Federation. … Is this not a tragedy? A huge one!

And family relations? Jobs? Travel? It was nothing but a disaster.”

What may be said of Putin?

He is no Stalin, no Communist ideologue, but rather a Russian nationalist who seeks the return of her lost peoples to the Motherland, and, seeing his country as a great power, wants NATO out of his front yard.

While we have issues with him on arms control, Iran and Venezuela, we have a common interest in avoiding a war with this nuclear-armed nation as we did with the far more menacing Soviet Empire of the Cold War.

Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

Copyright 2019 Creators.com.

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Liberalism, Vladimir Putin 
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  1. Albertde says:

    Fahrenheit is also obsolete (and unscientific) – except in Fahrenheit Land.

  2. As character is destiny,
    So the West is condemned to eternal war.
    Fate of moral vacuity:
    Ship forever wrecked on the coral-ribbed shore.

    • Replies: @Richard B
  3. RVBlake says:

    Trump says his pal Mohammed bin Salman is a friend who has done a spectacular job. Slaughtering Yemeni civilians, that is.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
  4. Paul says:

    Pat Buchanan writes that Xi runs an archipelago of detention camps where China’s Uighur Muslims and its Kazakh minority have their minds coercively “corrected.”

    But Donald Trump backs Israel, which confines indigenous and ethnically-cleansed Palestinians to the ghetto in Gaza. He has no problem with that.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Achmed E. Newman
  5. Anonymous[240] • Disclaimer says:

    Xi runs an archipelago of detention camps where China’s Uighur Muslims and its Kazakh minority have their minds coercively “corrected.”

    At least it’s just an archipelago. The entirety of the US, from elite colleges to mass media, is a brainwashing camp controlled by Jewish globalists to turn us into mindless sheeple.

    Liberalism is dead because even liberals are not liberal. They are dogmatic and coercive.

    • Replies: @Realist
    , @KenH
  6. anon[487] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paul

    Clearly Xi isn’t living up to Pat’s standards.
    China needs to stop with their half-assed imitation and follow Israel’s example to the letter: stop trying to brainwash Uyghurs and start murdering them in cold blood instead!

  7. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    A pretty good column, given the source. But keep in mind that Mr. Buchanan is Stagehand Right in the puppet show, whose job is to keep Americans focused on Red v Blue politics and identifying with those who want to run the country and as much of the world as they can from Washington. Look closely, and you’ll usually find something like today’s nuggets:

    1. “A major media focus at the summit was Trump’s meeting with Putin where he playfully admonished the Russian president not to meddle again in our 2020 election.”

    Another soft endorsement of the Beltway narrative. The Republicans echo the Democrats on Russia “hacking” because Big Gov needs wolves to herd the sheep.

    2. “While we have issues with him on arms control, Iran and Venezuela, …”

    More pronoun propaganda. And what are these unspecified “issues”? Which nation is abrogating agreements to manage the threat of nuclear war? Why are “we” waging a war of economic sanctions against the people of Iran? What has Russia done in Venezuela other than thwart Uncle Sam’s installation of a new head of state to rule those people?

    When it comes to matters beyond his own country, this website’s “Mr. Paleoconservative” is a right-sizing imperialist. His dissidence concerns tactics, not principles.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
  8. Patrick J Buchanan is right when he says about Russia: “We have a common interest in avoiding a war with this nuclear-armed nation…” But I would respectfully disagree that the Cold War was a “far more menacing” time. The Cold War was the peace, a post-world war environment: we now live in a pre-world war environment. Humanity has experienced long periods of peace (or relative peace) throughout history. The Thirty Years Peace between the two Peloponnesian Wars, Pax Romana, Europe in the 19th century after the Congress of Vienna, to name a few. The Congress System finally collapsed in 1914 with the start of World War One. That conflict was followed by the League of Nations. It did not stop World War Two. That was followed by the United Nations and other post-war institutions. But all the indications are they will not prevent a third world war.
    https://www.ghostsofhistory.wordpress.com/

    • Replies: @David
    , @follyofwar
  9. Kenan says:

    I wonder if Mr. Buchanan had read the whole transcript of the interview before he wrote this article…

  10. Pat kind of conveyed the key points, but stylistically this is not one of his better columns.

  11. KenH says:

    Liberalism and the extreme leftism of America’s Democrat party may be on the wane elsewhere in the white world but it seems to be gaining strength in America thanks to the (((usual suspects))) owing to their unbridled wealth, media control and political power. A 21st century Soviet Union is now in the making over the carcass of America.

    Anti-white racial hatred, which was once relegated to the leftist fringes has now moved into the mainstream to which all serious Democrat politicians must take a vow. White Republican pols must take a vow of racial neutrality and indifference towards their fellow whites. They can acknowledge race only to disparage whites who don’t hate themselves. Repubs are allowed to make race based appeals to non-whites but never to whites and if anyone breaks the (((rules))) their political career is all but over.

    Now that Pat has been intimidated into silence on racial issues he won’t touch this subject anymore.

    • Replies: @Monotonous Languor
  12. David says:
    @peter mcloughlin

    Ah yes, the famous Thirty Years Peace, sandwiched between the Peace of Nicias in 421 BC and the final defeat of the Athenians in 405 or 404 BC.

  13. @anonymous

    I wish that Old Pat would spend a few minutes reading a few of the comments to his articles @ Unz. Perhaps then he might recognize that his conspicuous and inappropriate use of the pronoun “WE” is profoundly annoying and detracts from the message he wishes to convey. C’mon Pat, you’re still a great writer and should know better than that.

  14. I do hope Russians this time really interfere in US elections.
    And they should help Democrats to win.(If they are smart,)
    That will guarantee that US will go down the drain in the next four years.
    Is something wrong with that?

  15. Tell us Patirck, did Putin also actually predictthe demise of communism and the fall of the FSU?

  16. @peter mcloughlin

    I agree with you, Peter, and also with Stephen Cohen, that the post-Soviet times we live in are much more dire than the situation was during the Cold War. During the days of the so-called Iron Curtain over Eastern Europe, no NATO forces were stationed anywhere near the Soviet Union’s borders. Now, thanks to Bill Clinton and his successors, they are right up against Russia’s face in the Baltic countries. And then there’s the ongoing Victoria Nuland inspired disaster in Ukraine. Thank god that Hillary wasn’t elected and that John McCain is dead.

    I’m currently reading Cohen’s “War With Russia?” which chronicles US aggression toward Russia since 2014. And thank god that there is a statesman of Mr. Putin’s stature doing his level best to avoid armed confrontation with the world’s hegemon. With the Russia collusion farce now behind him, perhaps Trump and Vladimir can finally engage in some fruitful discussions.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  17. @RVBlake

    Perhaps Mr. Trump, who in some ways has become a master politician, is following that old dictum – “Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.”

  18. Rurik says:

    “This liberal idea has become obsolete. It has come into conflict with the interests of the overwhelming majority of the population. … This liberal idea presupposes that … migrants can kill, plunder and rape with impunity because their rights as migrants have to be protected.”

    There’s a reason you won’t find this guy’s name: Ayoola Adisa Ajayi, anywhere on CNN or MSNBC or NPR or NYT or any other of the liberal controlled media’s outlets.

    And that’s because, in spite of it being a national story when the girl first went missing, now that her killer has been found,

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7194583/Ex-Army-specialist-charged-with.html

    the modus operandi is to spike the story down the memory hole, like they do all such stories, as it doesn’t fit (((the narrative))).

    The tragedy was the “dispersal of ethnic Russians” across the newly independent successor states of the Soviet Union: “25 million ethnic Russians found themselves living outside the Russian Federation. … Is this not a tragedy? A huge one!

    Hmm

    How did those Russians come to be living in Estonia, (for instance) in the first place, eh?

    Did they come as refugees? Pleading for succor? Or were they forced in with a Soviet gun to Estonia’s (and others) collective head?

    The problem is that they are there now, and should accommodate themselves as guests in the nations where they were insinuated as a fifth column to keep those nations submissive to the commie thugs in Moscow.

    Now is the time for reconciliation, rapprochement and repudiation of the Soviet imperial crimes.

    If the 25 million Russians living in the former Soviet satellite states don’t want to assimilate and learn and adopt the language and culture of their hosts, then they should be given safe passage back to mother Russia.

    Problem solved.

    • Replies: @Robjil
  19. Rurik says:
    @follyofwar

    Thank god that Hillary wasn’t elected and that John McCain is dead.

    bears repeating

  20. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @follyofwar

    But it obviously is the message that he wishes to convey. Like the “Russian interference in our election” message that you and I discussed last week.

  21. Totally confused & confusing article. Buchanan conflates a few various issues:

    1. liberalism as the idea of protection of individual freedom, property etc.

    2. neo-liberal economic deregulation policies of Reagan, Thatcher et al. in 1970s & later

    3. suicidal Western unlimited immigration policy which has nothing to do with 1 & 2

    4. questions of national, collective ethnic freedom & independence

    Buchanan’s thoughts are mush. For instance, he quotes- I think, approvingly – Putin’s remarks about “Russian tragedy”. Well- what about “tragedies” of Lithuanians or Georgians Russians subjugated? For most of them, the collapse of not only Communism, but especially Soviet Union as the instrumental of national oppression of other nations was something wonderful & liberating.

    Which is Buchanan’s stance? That “Russian Empire” (any form of government) should have remained?

    Of course I am glad it collapsed & all those non-Russian people got their nation-states. The collapse of Russian yoke is not just good. It is great. For ethnic Russian living in other countries- they should choose what to do with their lives & future. It is up to them. They won’t be rulers of neighboring countries anymore, anytime. That train has left. For good.

    Then, Buchanan seems to be confused about reality & ideals. Of course it would be right that Uyghurs do have the power to consume their right of national self-determination. After all, it is their & not the Chinese land. But this system cannot be dismantled just like that, with good wishes. China is too big & injustice will have to be tolerated for a long time. And I just hope Uyghurs won’t stop their fight for nationhood.

    But- what has deregulation policy got to do with that?

    Also, no mentally sane person would somehow logically connect ethnic swamping of Euro lands by alien races & cultures with the very notion of individual freedom. Freedom is not some savage anarchy, nor does it lie in the denial of collective, national identity. True 19th C liberals were nationally conscious men who didn’t want their peoples to oppress others, but were neither willing to see their lands swamped or subjugated by others.

    And- what this all has to do with neo-liberal, market-idolatrous economic policies?

    Buchanan is sliding into complete confusion. This text is a disgrace.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  22. Liberalism is an essential counterpoint to authority, because it contributes the rebellious and progressive dynamic to prevent tradition and status quo from becoming stagnant and repressive. But it utterly fails itself and everyone when allowed to BE the status quo and to rule uncontested. Putin and Trump are merely warning shots that the overdue checks and balances are being called for.

  23. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Good comment.

    O.T. BTW, last week came across a guy here who’s going through Tom Sunic books.
    What’s your take on the man?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  24. anon[224] • Disclaimer says:

    “What is happening in the West? What is the reason for the Trump phenomenon, as you said, in the US? What is happening in Europe as well? The ruling elites have broken away from the people. The obvious problem is the gap between the interests of the elites and the overwhelming majority of the people.

    Of course, we must always bear this in mind. One of the things we must do in Russia is never to forget that the purpose of the operation and existence of any government is to create a stable, normal, safe and predictable life for the people and to work towards a better future.” ~ Vladmir Putin

    He’s talking about the end of neoliberalism, globalization, corporate fascism. The end of libertarian “economic freedom” at the expense of social freedom. It was after all, libertarians who created neoliberalism, and we have basically been rolling out David Koch’s 1980 VP libertarian platform for the past 40 years.

    Let’s get back to using fiscal policy for public purpose again!

    https://www.blacklistednews.com/article/73549/how-russias-president-putin-explains-the-end-of-the-liberal.html?fbclid=IwAR2BHuRYaaYhRc1qnDAZb4MuN6MU0arDBp8m9i_xYMbimE5lelFYpkLqyo4

  25. @Paul

    Nah, I think you’re reading this part wrong, Paul. Pat Buchanan was giving an example of oppression in about every country whose leader President Trump shook hands with and said kind words about (he is WAY too much of a bullshitter in that realm too, BTW). Mr. Buchanan’s point is to compare them with Mr. Putin of Russia, who the neocons and left both have been vilifying for years.

    If Pat had mentioned the Prime Minister of Israel being at this conference, I figure he’d have made some kind of statement about Palestinians too.

    That’s just my reading of it.

  26. @follyofwar

    He’s also big on the “she” pronoun to describe countries. That’s a different story, but it sure makes Mr. Buchanan sound 100 years old, when he’s not a year over 80!

    AGREED!, though.

  27. @peterAUS

    Generally OK, but too ideologized; too idealistic about the, I would say, “ethical profile” of Croatian nation; ahistorical in assessment of Yugoslav & Communist ideologies & tends to view the world in black-and-white; also, there are numerous smaller points when he indulges in victimhood mentality, but I must say I understand him: he is highly qualified as a political scientist & yet cannot get a regular university job because of obstruction of ex-Yu moronic professors who got their PhDs on such magnificent topics like “the role of Bosnian mule in socialist revolution”.

    All in all: his basic ideas are sound; he is not a dogmatist either of IQ, race or nation, but rightly judges the place of them all; his heart is in the right place with regard to most global & national topics. Yet – he is basically an ideologue, is not cut out for operative politics & his main weakness is, I think, impatience. People, any nation or culture, just won’t do what is in their best interest much of the time. So, my final verdict on him: an intellectual, with all pluses & minuses that follow from that qualification.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @Robjil
  28. KenH says:
    @Anonymous

    Liberalism is dead because even liberals are not liberal.

    Liberals aren’t liberal (they’re left wing totalitarians) and conservatives don’t conserve anything.

  29. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Gracias….or is it 谢谢 for us here. Preferred language of our (progressive) betters seeking high office(s).

    Now, have another one. This is tricky, admit. Sorry, guys, more O.T. and, worse, not about JQ/Israel.

    Met a guy, second gen immigrant from Dalmatia, over JD this weekend. Highly critical about the late Pres. Tudjman, especially about https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croat%E2%80%93Bosniak_War.
    What’s your take about the man if I may ask? I do get that you, living there, could be reluctant to post about it.

    My interest is simple: as things look as we speak, well…..it’s not unlikely we’ll see something similar in Balkans in not so distant future. And, this time it could go different with, more importantly, wider consequences for Europe itself. Or, to put it bluntly: the attitude towards Muslims this time could be different. Something like that.

  30. @peterAUS

    1. the guy from Dalmatia is an idiot.

    2. Tuđman was, with his policy towards BH Muslims, 90% right.

    3. wiki text is usual mixture. It has some good parts, but the underlying assumption is that Croats in BH are somehow “guilty” of aggression on Muslims (I’ll leave Serbs out of picture). It is based on innuendos in most parts & leaves out most Muslim crimes & ethnic cleansing of Croats. Not completely worthless, but tendentious. And waaay too long.

    4. Croats from Herceg-Bosna were, generally, right. Their position oscillated between two options: absorption of Croatian parts into Croatia proper or re-establishment of BH as some kind of loose confederation of ethnically based units (republics, cantons, entities, whatever)

    5. during war, HVO, the army of Bosnian Croats, was the most effective. In Croat-Serbian war in BH, it was, re military casualties (dead): HVO (local Croat army) killed 7500 Serbian soldiers, while local Serb army killed 2600 Croatian soldiers; Muslim Army killed 3000 HVO soldiers, while HVO killed 6000 Muslim soldiers; Muslim army killed ca. 13,300 Serbian soldiers, while Serb army killed ca. 24.000 Muslim soldiers.

    As for civilians, during our war with Muslims, perhaps 30% more Croats had been killed by Muslims, but figures are still unreliable.

    6. the Hague court & its verdicts are 100% political, so there is not much to discuss here.

    7. Bosniak/Muslim nationalism is absolutely irrational, their intellectual elite is bonkers (basically, they want to rule over Croats & Serbs like Ottomans’ heirs). As yet, we have much better relations with Serbs than with them. Serbs are simply more mature.

    I don’t know how all will end, but I don’t believe in BH future. These peoples have different views on the past, present & future. Simply- irreconcilable differences. It this protectorate remains for a time, it will consist of 3 parallel societies without much interaction.

    Chief obstacle to any type of normalization is American policy, which is completely on Muslim side & is anti-Croatian & anti-Serbian. Why- I couldn’t figure out.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @anonymous
  31. @peterAUS

    Just another point: general Praljak (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slobodan_Praljak), the chief commander of BH Croat staff, who was a hero of antique stature & dispensed with his body in Stoic manner, gave a following speech before his sentencing. I happen to agree with him completely.

    http://www.nsf-journal.hr/online-issues/editorials/id/1234#.XRvfn4-xVPY

    Slobodan Praljak: Defence Closing Statement
    (Svezak 18, br. 3, 2017.)

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  32. @peterAUS

    Third time a charm.

    I have nothing against Bosnian Muslims; in fact, some of them are my ancestors/relatives (genealogically, I stem from 5-6 European peoples &, it seems even central Asia- according to a family legend, one of my ancestors was an Afghan Pushtu who fled to the Ottoman Empire in the 17th C because he had killed some Mongol moron & in order to escape vengeance split for Turkey; he was later caught by Austrian-Croatian troops in what is now Bosnia); others are Croats, Germans, Czechs,…basically the whole Central Europe (not a single Jew).

    But I’ve long since ceased to communicate with my Bosnian Muslim relatives because they are like children. To argue with them is an exercise in futility. Having the war in mind, I can only conclude with William Faulkner: The past is never dead. It’s not even past.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
    , @Parbes
  33. Richard B says:
    @SeekerofthePresence

    Pretentious comment.

    “As character is destiny”

    Whatever.

    “So the West is condemned to eternal war.”

    Self-discrediting non sequitur.

    “Fate of moral vacuity:”

    Speaking of “vacuity.”

    “Ship forever wrecked on the coral-ribbed shore.”

    Like I said, “Pretentious.”

    • Replies: @SeekerofthePresence
  34. @KenH

    Correct.

    My prediction: A traditional white-centered US society has about ten more years, and then it’s over. Since the majority of whites go through existence in an oblivious stupor, they won’t fight the progressive insanity called leftism along with its (((enablers))). They should have started fighting long ago. So they don’t deserve to have a country.

    In ten more years they can kiss America and their place in it goodbye.

  35. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Muchas gracias/非常感谢你.

    the Hague court & its verdicts are 100% political, so there is not much to discuss here.

    basically, they want to rule over Croats & Serbs like Ottomans’ heirs

    Yep.
    As for

    ..American policy, which is completely on Muslim side & is anti-Croatian & anti-Serbian. Why- I couldn’t figure out.

    My take: keeping the EU in check, just in case. If EU starts to challenge the US domination re-activate troubles there.

  36. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I am aware of the General’s case and fate.
    My take: he, somehow, didn’t realize or maybe could’t accept

    the Hague court & its verdicts are 100% political, so there is not much to discuss here.

    He took the court, and its, personnel wrong, IMHO.

    I really would like to know whether the saying “quod licet Iovi non licet bovi” is something that is a valid rule here in this Tribunal.

    There wasn’t/isn’t any “whether” there.
    I am sort of mixed about his suicide.
    You know…hehe…….perhaps his war enemy, Mr Seselj, had better approach there. Some of his exchanges with the court characters were quite funny and, actually, to the point.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  37. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The past is never dead. It’s not even past.

    Definitely.

  38. @peterAUS

    No, wrong. This was a heroic act of a man who psycho-spiritually belonged to heroic, ancient times & didn’t give rat’s ass about judges or anything tangible. It was his Destiny that mattered ultimately, not his life or anything similar.

    Basically, he who doesn’t get transcendence, any kind, cannot get his act.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  39. Jason Liu says:

    Liberalism is failing because it’s based on the factually incorrect and morally evil ideal of equality

    • Agree: Monotonous Languor
  40. peterAUS says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    This was a heroic act of a man who psycho-spiritually belonged to heroic, ancient times & didn’t give rat’s ass about judges or anything tangible. It was his Destiny that mattered ultimately, not his life or anything similar.
    Basically, he who doesn’t get transcendence, any kind, cannot get his act.

    O.K.

  41. @Richard B

    Pretentious as in pretend democracy.

    Where is Betsy Ross when you need her?

  42. anonymous[290] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    I don’t know how all will end

    About the ultimate end, of that you should never doubt, pagan. It sure won’t be easy, to put it rather mildly.

    May I suggest you first make peace with your muslim relatives, followed by true monotheists in general, then who knows… the Almighty One’s mercy is limitless. 🙂

    Peace.

  43. Parbes says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    “…one of my ancestors was an Afghan Pushtu who fled to the Ottoman Empire in the 17th C because he had killed some Mongol moron…”

    How do you know he was a “moron”, idiot? Most probably he was a normal guy killed in a cowardly sneak attack by your rat ancestor.

    “…genealogically, I stem from 5-6 European peoples &, it seems even central Asia- according to a family legend, one of my ancestors was an Afghan Pushtu…”

    So you have MOSLEM AFGHAN PUSHTU mongrel ancestry, and at the same time you are constantly pillorying Serbians, Russians etc. on this website because of “not being Western”, “not being European enough”, “being communist sovoks” etc.??

    What a slimy hypocrite piece of shit you are…like all of your ilk.

  44. Robjil says:
    @Rurik

    Most of these regions in these republics where these Russian ethnics lived were parts of Russia. The Donbass region, Southern Ukraine and Crimea were Russian. They were added to Soviet Ukraine. In the Baltic states, the southern parts of them was added from parts of Russia. Kazakhstan’s northern area was Russian, it was added to it. Even little Moldavia, got a bit of Old Russia, Transnistria. This is where the bulk of the twenty five million Russians lived. In other non-Russian areas the Russian ethnics have went back to Russia such as the Central Asian Republics and the Caucasus Republics.

    The Soviets did this to weaken Russian culture and create a Soviet culture instead. It worked sadly when the Soviet Union broke up. Putin said Lenin put dynamite in the creation of the Soviet Union with this division of Russia. If the Soviet Union ever broke up, this dynamite would explode. It has with many problems with all the Russian areas of the Soviet republics that went “free” to the arms of the US and Z money.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  45. Robjil says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Robert Baer, CIA agent, admits that the CIA purposely divided Yugoslavia. The petty ethnic groups went for the bait and destroyed their country of Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia created the non-aligned nations concept. The US wanted no independent nations in the world after the collapse of the Soviet Union. For that reason, Yugoslavia was targeted. It wasn’t about giving these petty little seven statelets “freedom”.

    http://www.ebritic.com/?p=551270

    Serbs were picked to be demonized by the CIA , since they had the biggest input into the non-aligned Yugoslavia concept.

    “So there was only propaganda against the Serbs?

    Yes and no. The aim of the propaganda was to divide the republics so they would break away from the motherland Yugoslavia. We had to choose a scapegoat who would be blamed for everything. Someone who would be responsible for the war and violence. Serbia was chosen because in some ways it is a successor to Yugoslavia.”

    The massacres such as Srebrenica were all created for division.

    “We all know of Srebrenica, can you say about it?

    Yes! In 1992 I was in Bosnia again, but this time we were supposed to train military units to represent Bosnia, a new state that had just declared independence. Srebrenica is an exaggerated story and unfortunately many people are being manipulated. The number of victims is the same as the number of Serbs and others killed but Srebrenica is political marketing. My boss, who was formerly a US Senator, stressed repeatedly that some kind of scam would go down in Bosnia. A month before the alleged genocide in Srebrenica, he told me that the town would be headline news around the world and ordered us to call the media. When I asked why, he said you’ll see. The new Bosnian army got the order to attack homes and civilians. These were of course citizens of Srebrenica. At the same moment, the Serbs attacked from the other side. Probably someone had paid to incite them!”

    Who should be blamed for Srebrenica?

    “Then who is guilty of genocide in Srebrenica?

    Srebrenica should be blamed on Bosnians, Serbs and Americans – that is us! But in fact everything has been blamed on the Serbs. Unfortunately, many of the victims buried as Muslims were Serbs and other nationalities. A few years ago a friend of mine, a former CIA agent and now at the IMF, said that Srebrenica is the product of agreement between the US government and politicians in Bosnia. The town of Srebrenica was sacrificed to give America a motive to attack the Serbs for their alleged crimes.”

    What does Robert Baer think about what he and the CIA did to Yugoslavia?

    “Do you have a message for the people of the former Yugoslavia?

    I have. Forget the past, it was staged and false. They manipulated you, they got what they wanted and it is stupid that you still hate one another, you must show that you are stronger and you realise who has created this ! I sincerely apologise! That’s why I have for a long time disclosed the secrets of the CIA and the White House!”

  46. Corvinus says:

    “The liberal idea has become obsolete. … (Liberals) cannot simply dictate anything to anyone as they have been attempting to do over the recent decades.”

    Patrick does have to realize that Putin’s economic policies are steeped in liberalism. For example, his government pays married couples to have children. Remember, Putin was part of the communist apparatus–centrally planned command economies failed spectacularly, revealing they had no economic solution to the modern riddles of injustice and inequality, and were also devastatingly blind to their own environmental depredations. It should not be forgotten that the shock therapy of free markets administered to Russia during the 1990’s caused widespread chaos and mass suffering there, eventually boosting Putin to power.

    And, of course, Putin’s policies have curtailed individual rights and civil liberties, as well have enabled the rise of oligarchs in his own nation. I’m not shocked that Patrick chose not to NOTICE those two important facts.

    “Why is liberalism failing? Several causes, said Putin. Among them, its failure to deal with the crisis of the age: mass and unchecked illegal migration.”

    That is actually a governmental failing, not a liberal or conservative failing.

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  47. Rurik says:
    @Robjil

    Most of these regions in these republics where these Russian ethnics lived were parts of Russia.

    Well Robjil, for simplicities sake, let’s just take the case of Estonia and the Baltic states.

    (We all know Wiki is biased, but in favor of the commies vs. the Nazis vis-a-vis the WWII, narrative. So if anything, they’d sugar coat the Soviets, I would suggest).

    After the Occupation and annexation of the Baltic states by the Soviet Union in 1940,[13][14] repression of ethnic Estonians followed. According to Sergei Isakov, almost all societies, newspapers, organizations of ethnic Estonians were closed in 1940 and their activists persecuted.[15] The country remained annexed to the Soviet Union until 1991, except for the period of Nazi occupation between 1941 and 1944. During the era of Soviet occupation, the Soviet government maintained a program of replacing the indigenous Estonians with immigrants from the Soviet Union. In the course of violent population transfers, thousands of Estonian citizens were deported to the interior parts of Russia (mostly Siberia), and huge numbers of Russian-speaking Soviet citizens were encouraged to settle in Estonia. In the Ida-Viru and Harju Counties, cities such as Paldiski, Sillamäe, and Narva were ethnically cleansed and the indigenous Estonian population was totally replaced by Russian colonists. As a result of Soviet occupation, the Russian population in Estonia grew from about 23,000 people in 1945 to 475,000 in 1991, and the total Slavic population to 551,000, constituting 35% of the total population at its peak.[16]

    During the Singing Revolution, the Intermovement, International Movement of the Workers of the ESSR, organised the indigenous Russian resistance to the independence movement and purported to represent the ethnic Russians and other Russophones in Estonia.[22]

    Mass deportations 1940–1941[edit]

    Immediately after the elections, NKVD units under the leadership of Ivan Serov arrested more than 15,000 “hostile elements” and members of their families.[12] Arrests and deportations began slowly, partly because of the language problems, as not enough Soviet officials were capable of reading the local language documents.[13]:47 In the first year of Soviet occupation, from June 1940 to June 1941, the number confirmed executed, conscripted, or deported is estimated at a minimum of 124,467: 59,732 in Estonia, 34,250 in Latvia, and 30,485 in Lithuania.[14] This included eight former heads of state and 38 ministers from Estonia, three former heads of state and 15 ministers from Latvia, and the then president, five prime ministers and 24 other ministers from Lithuania.[15] A large-scale operation was planned for the night of 27–28 June 1941. It was postponed until after the war when the Germans invaded the USSR on June 22, 1941 – Operation Barbarossa.[12] A Lithuanian government official claimed to have seen a Soviet document suggesting that 700,000 deportations were envisaged from Lithuania alone.[13]:48

    According to historian Robert Conquest, the selective deportations from the Baltic States represented the policy of “decapitation” of the nation by removing its political and social elite, “as was later evidently to be the motive for the Katyn massacre.”[16]

    On January 12, 1949, in an effort to end the insurgency, the Soviet Council of Ministers issued a decree “on the expulsion and deportation” from Baltic states of “all kulaks and their families, the families of bandits and nationalists”, and others.[12] More than 200,000 people are estimated to have been deported from the Baltic in 1940-1953. In addition, at least 75,000 were sent to Gulag. 10 percent of the entire adult Baltic population was deported or sent to labor camps,[12] effectively breaking the back of the insurgency.

    After World War II, as part of the goal to more fully integrate Baltic countries into the Soviet Union, mass deportations were concluded in the Baltic countries and the policy of encouraging Soviet immigration to the Baltic states continued.[27]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovietization_of_the_Baltic_states

    It is these Russian living in Estonia, pining for the good old days, when Estonians were persecuted in their own country, for the temerity of being proud Estonians, that is driving places like Estonia into the jaws of NATO.

    Russians need to repudiate the crimes and horrors of the Soviet period. They are guests in the places where they were force-migrated into, and should learn the language and assimilate, or move back to mother Russia.

    By doing one or the other of these things, will mollify the simmering hatreds in the region, and lead to lasting peace.

    Let NATO pound sand, and the Zios lose their dream of a WWIII fought mainly between Russia and Eastern Europe.

    • Replies: @Robjil
    , @anonymous coward
  48. Robjil says:
    @Rurik

    I haven’t looked into the history of Estonia or the Baltics. I am more interested in Ukraine. Ukraine is the place that is most hurtful to Russia and a power keg since large areas of it was Russian. The Soviets were not pro-Russian, they wanted a multi-cultural Soviet Union as an example to the world thus, the Baltics were allowed to develop and promote their languages in the Soviet era. Russian and Baltic languages were both widely used in the Baltics in Soviet times. Otherwise, there would be no one speaking Baltic languages now.

    France and Britain have been much tougher on native languages than the Russians or Soviets ever were. France was tough on Breton for centuries. It is still surviving though in small numbers. Britain was very tough on Irish. It is barely surviving in a Free Ireland. The Welsh, right next to England, did the best job of keeping their language in the British Isles.

    Putin often talks about Lenin’s anti-Russian reasoning for making of the republics in the Soviet Union. Lenin whimsically created the borders of the “nation/republics” like the French and British did in dividing up the Middle East and Africa.

    https://www.sott.net/article/311329-Learning-from-the-past-Vladimir-Putins-comments-on-the-time-bomb-Lenin-placed-under-Russia

    “So, Lenin said the state, the Soviet Union should be formed on the basis of full equality with the possibility of seceding from the union – I may have gotten the exact words wrong, but that was the idea. That was the time bomb that was planted under the structure of our statehood. Not only did they set the borders for ethnic groups of a multinational, essentially unitarian state; the borders were also established arbitrarily, without much reason. Thus, why did they make Donbass part of Ukraine? The reason was to raise the share of the proletariat there to ensure greater social support. Pure nonsense, as you may see. And this is not the only example, there are many others.”

    I don’t know the exact borders of the Baltic states before Lenin did his “nation/republic” building but Ukraine’s borders before Lenin’s
    “nation/republic” building are easy to find since they were such big additions – Novorossia 1922 – what is now Southern Ukraine and Donbass in 1922. Later, Stalin would add Transcarpathia from Czechoslovakia – 1945, and Galicia from Poland – 1939 and again 1945 and Crimea by Kruschev in 1954. , Yugoslavia made the same exact mistake of making republics that could easily go away if the government had trouble. This caused many wars in Yugoslavia and the same in the Soviet republics.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  49. Given the rapid increase of Russia’s native Muslim population, the power of Chechen crime gangs and the number of Tajik and Uzbeks roaming Moscow, Putin has a lot of Chutspa to be pointing fingers at the West on failure to control immigration.

  50. @Corvinus

    mass and unchecked illegal migration

    It’s simply economic incentives, same as in Russia. Every business owner wants grateful compliant employees he can fire at a moment’s notice. That creates huge pressure from economic elites to let immigrants in under both liberal and authoritarian regimes. The “advantage “ of an authoritarian regime is that business owners have more leeway to treat their own people like serfs. But eventually, as in Russia, their are not enough capable natives to go around and you still get mass immigration. Modern Russia is the worst of both worlds from the point of view of a working class native.

    • Replies: @peterAUS
  51. @Rurik

    Tartu was founded by a Russian prince way back in the Middle Ages, before the Battle of Hastings.

    Needless to say, there was no ‘Estonia’ or ‘Estonians’ back then in 11th century.

    Political and ethnic boundaries shift, but Russians lived in Estonia since basically forever.

  52. peterAUS says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Every business owner wants grateful compliant employees he can fire at a moment’s notice.

    This.

  53. Rurik says:
    @Robjil

    the Baltics were allowed to develop and promote their languages in the Soviet era

    hmm

    I suppose you mean what was left of the best of the Baltic people’s who hadn’t been summarily shot or deported to die in Siberia, and replaced with tens of thousands of Russians and others from the Soviet hinterlands.

    As for promoting their language..

    By the 1970s, national concerns, including worries about ecological ruin, became the major theme of dissent in Estonia. In the late 1970s, Estonian society grew increasingly concerned about the threat of cultural Russification to the Estonian language and national identity. By 1981, Russian was taught in the first grade of Estonian language schools and was also introduced into the Estonian pre-school teaching. These acts prompted 40 established intellectuals to write a letter to Moscow and the republic authorities. This “Letter of the Forty” spoke out against the use of force against protesters and the increasing threat to the Estonian language and culture. In October of 1980, the youth of Tallinn also demonstrated against toughened Russification policies, particularly in education.

    https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/europe/et-history-soviet.htm

    Thus, why did they make Donbass part of Ukraine?

    I’m all for dividing Ukraine among ethnic lines. If the people in the east want to align with Russia, then let them.

    Same with those break-away provinces in Georgia. Where the Fiend tried to use them to foment war. Just as ((it)) used the divisions in Ukraine to foment war.

    53.anonymous coward says:

    Needless to say, there was no ‘Estonia’ or ‘Estonians’ back then in 11th century.

    I’m not talking about the 11th century, I’m talking about now.

    And *what* is driving the willingness of Eastern Europe (including the Baltic states and Scandinavia), to allow NATO to amass tanks and weapons on their soil — damnable Russian intractable unwillingness (tender vanities) to offer a cogent repudiation for the crimes of the Soviet period, (when ethnic Russians also suffered). Instead, Russia idiotically and dangerously continues to demand that Eastern Europeans who fought the Red Army rapists, were evil fascists!. Blah, blah.

    Scores of thousands of Baltic peoples, men women and children, were rounded up and deported to Siberian gulags to die. Because they were capable people of ability. And didn’t want to be Soviet slaves. So they were shot or put in cattle cars and shipped away to die.

    And the men who said ‘fuck that shit’, and fought the Soviet fiend, were heroes, and should be honored as such. With parades and huge proud memorials.

    But the arrogant (idiotic) Russian ultra-nationalists (many of them here at Unz ; ), insist that such honoring of these heroic men, amounts to glorifying Nazism.

    It’s a cartoon-like vision of that conflict with the Germans as = ultimate evil / and Soviet Russians as = liberators.

    And such idiocies are not just stupid, (in which case I really wouldn’t mind too much), but to the point, they’re dangerous, because they encourage Eastern Europe to allow the Zio-Fiend to place missles right on Russia’s border, and Poland and Ukraine and Estonia and others, all say…

    ‘As long as those dunderheaded Russians pretend that our grandfathers who fought (like many millions of ethnic Russians) against the Red Army rapists, were facists, then fuck them’,

    ‘and go ahead (((NATO))), and brandish your missiles here’.

    Because we all know ‘ethnic boundaries shift’, but this time, we don’t want our ethnic boundaries ‘shifting’ away. Thankyouverymuch.

    • Replies: @Robjil
  54. Robjil says:
    @Rurik

    I don’t know much about the Baltics. They are small nations, it will not disturb the world with what they do. They never interested me very much. Russia has no real interest in them either.

    Ukraine is the biggest problem. It is made up many parts of other nations. Ukraine means borderlands in Slavic languages. Krajina in Croatia is a Serbo-Croatian word for borderlands. Notice the Kraj in the word which is similiar to U(krai)ne. Borderlands term is almost the same in both Slavic languages.

    Croatia’s Krajina, an area on its border with Serbia where Serbs lived. This area was ethnically cleansed on television. CNN, oh course for it was their war, broadcasted the Serbs, women, men, children, 300000 thousand or more marching from their homes to Serbia. The US and friends promoted this as a success. They are thinking of doing the same to Donbass. Donbass is millions and not 300000 thousand.

    The US, British and Red Army all don’t have much to celebrate for what they did in WWII. It was a cruel slaughter of millions of innocents. I understand that very well. Russians understand that very well, that is why they are so against wars these days.

    US and Britain aren’t so fearful of wars since they did not have much war on their lands. Britain got some bombs from Germany but nothing compared to the cruel genocidal fire bomb attack on millions of German civilians in over hundred German cities by Britain and US. After the war, fourteen million Germans had to march from their ancestor lands. Millions died on the long march. Many were put in the concentration camps. German soldiers were kept in fields by the millions with no shelter for over a year. Millions died from that. It was beyond words what was done to millions of people during and after that war. Yet, all we hear is the six million story and nothing else at all.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  55. Rurik says:
    @Robjil

    They never interested me very much. Russia has no real interest in them either.

    It’s not Estonia per se, but the collective victims of Soviet communism/slavery/genocide. (including millions of ethnic Russians)

    This is the heart of the problem.

    The fervent anti-Soviet sentiment has become part of the official policy in Kiev since a Western-backed coup in 2014 brought the current government into power. The 2015 “de-communization” law mandated to dismantle all monuments bearing Soviet heritage and to rename places named after communist-related figures and events. Some 1320 Lenin statues were toppled and 51,493 streets renamed by January 2017 alone, according to the Ukrainian Institute of National Remembrance.

    At the same time, Kiev has been glorifying figures of the Ukrainian nationalism, some of whom directly collaborated with the Nazi regime during WWII,

    https://www.rt.com/news/452928-ukraine-soviet-wwii-memorial-demolished/

    The reason they collaborated with the Nazis was because that was the only game in town!

    They no doubt hated the Germans being on their sacred territory, but if they wanted to free themselves from the Soviet fiend, they had to ally with the Germans.

    Just as the Poles and Baltics and Ukrainians and Russians and Cossacks everyone else who was menaced by the Soviet plague and donned the German uniform to kill it.

    Even today, I’ve not heard that Putin has ever repudiated the Soviet horror of the Holodomor. Not to blame Russia or Russians, but to honor the Ukrainian men who fought the Soviet Red Army who’d just mass-murdered their relatives.

    If only he’d simply do for the Holodomor what did at Katyn. And repudiated the crime as an epic and monstrous horror of the Soviet period.

    Here Putin treats the sensitive issue of Katyn exactly as he should. Laying blame for the atrocity where it belongs = one more of so many genocidal crimes of the Soviets.

    “For decades, attempts have been made to cover up the truth about the Katyn executions with cynical lies,” the Russian Prime Minister said, as quoted by RIA Novosti. “However, suggesting that the Russian people are to blame for that is the same kind of lie and fabrication.”

    “These crimes cannot be justified in any way,” Putin said. “Our country has given a clear political, legal and moral assessment of the evil of the totalitarian regime. And this assessment cannot be revised,” he stressed.

    https://www.rt.com/russia/katyn-poloes-massacre/

    Bingo!

    Now, if he’d simply do the same for the Holodomor, and honor the Ukrainian men who died fighting the Red Army fiend that starved their families to death by the millions..

    Instead of implying that they were all Nazis and traitors, (preposterous), then he could singlehandedly go a long way towards defusing the hostilities between Russia and Ukraine, who both suffered under that era of horrific genocidal Jewish supremacy.

    Russians and Ukrainians are brothers and sisters, having lived side by side for eons.

    They both suffered during those terrible times, and should both make reconciliation and mutual prosperity a common goal.

    But the ultra-nationalist Russians and the idiotic Ukros (taking their orders from Jewish supremacists) both demanding that the other are evil and wicked and wrong and stupid and blah, blah, blah…

    …are the problem, not the solution.

    IMHO

    • Replies: @Robjil
  56. Robjil says:
    @Rurik

    https://tass.com/politics/988863

    Russians know about the famine. They dislike when it used by US ukrainians to demonize Russia. Russians had the famine too, just a bad. So did the Kazakhs.

    This famine was a common tragedy for the Russians, Ukrainians and Kazakh and other Soviet peoples, as well as the largest humanitarian disaster in the country,” the Russian embassy said. “So, representation of these events as a deliberate policy aimed to destroy the Ukrainian nation runs counter to historical facts and is a cynical usage of the memory of the millions of victims on political grounds.”

    Following the establishment of independence in the early 1990s, Ukraine’s politicians, especially nationalist ones, started manipulating facts about the famine that struck some parts of the Soviet Union in the 1930s. In 2006, under Viktor Yushchenko’s presidency, the Verkhovna Rada adopted the law “On the Holodomor of 1932-1933 in Ukraine,” in which it recognized the famine of this period as genocide of the Ukrainian people. Russia slammed these actions as political gambling and attempts to rewrite the history. On December 7, 2016, Verkhovna Rada MPs adopted a statement in which they called on the global community to recognize the 1932-1933 famine in the Soviet Union as an act of genocide of the Ukrainian people.

  57. Rurik says:

    They dislike when it used by US ukrainians to demonize Russia

    I don’t think so Robjil,

    That may be true in a few cases, but the majority of the problem is when Russians equates the Soviet Regime = to Russia.

    They are not one and the same, exactly as Putin points out here:

    Putin said. “Our country has given a clear political, legal and moral assessment of the evil of the totalitarian regime. And this assessment cannot be revised,” he stressed.

    The problem is when Poland removes the Soviet abominations on their sacred soil, the Russians screech ‘how dare you?!’

    In Poland, the destruction of monuments to the Soviet soldiers who drove the German Nazis out of the country in 1944-1945 has filled the cup of patience of Russian authorities.

    https://www.rt.com/op-ed/404313-poland-destroys-monuments-soviet-russia/

    The present-day nationalist backlash is a result of decades of communist lies and brainwashing. Unfortunately, such an aggressive attempt to erase the communist past is likely to ratchet up tensions and make conflict more likely. Much better to let these monuments decay naturally, to symbolise the decline and fall of the aggressively imperialistic but inherently rotten and mendacious USSR.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/19/soviet-monuments-in-poland-should-be-left-to-rot

    You see, it’s the Russians that are demanding these monuments to genocide and slavery continue to be honored on Polish and other Eastern European blood-soaked lands.

    So yes, millions of Russians also perished in the conflagration of ((Bolshevism)), and they should join with Poles and Ukrainians and Baltics and Hungarians and Germans and all the rest in a massive celebration that this evil pall has lifted from their lands, (and now, tragically infects the body politic of the West).

    Instead of the May day Parades, they should celebrate the liberation of all of Eastern Europe and Russia from the Soviet menace, that had its boot on all their necks.

    I’d say the day the Berlin Wall came down would make a great substitute for the May Day parade, that only celebrates the liberation from Nazis into the cold embrace of the Soviets.

    Better to celebrate the day they were all liberated, (as tragically, and not ironically, the sun was setting upon liberty in Western Europe and North America.

    Perhaps one day we’ll be able to celebrate the day Russia and Poland and Germany and Ukraine and Hungary and Estonia and England and France and America and the rest of humankind are liberated from the global central bankster Fiend that caused all those wars and atrocities and is busy causing the ones we’re having today.

    Won’t that be a day, eh?

  58. Robjil says:

    George Friedman, a Geopolitical forecaster, talks about Germany and Russia a lot. Zios took down Russia with Bolshevikism in 1971. Germany in 1918 and again in 1945. Zios still think of these two nations as the main nations of Europe. So, Zios are endless trying to destabilize both to control Europe. I like them both. A strong Germany and strong Russia is the best hope to keep the Zio fake money control out of Europe. Ukraine, Baltics and other wannabee baby nations that want to hang the legs of Zio US is not my cup of tea.

    I would say the fall of the Berlin Wall wasn’t a good thing after all. It should of stayed up for a few more decades. In 1991, the US attacked Iraq because it had no fear of a broken Russia. Next, it worked on destroying Yugoslavia and cut it up into seven pieces by the end of nineties. Then nine eleven, then seven nations to destroy. Iran is the last one. So it is in our “news” all the time.

    The cold war era was better. The US had a race with the USSR to improve the standard of living of its colonies in Europe and all over the west. Now the US is racing to bottom the standard of living for its citizens, inviting the poorest of poor from destroyed nations from US coups and wars to pour in to create divide and conquer games. The coming down of the wall looked good in 1989. It does not look so good now.

    A better time to honor was the days before June 28 1914. That day was the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo, it ended European nations as independent powers and began our days of total Zio bank control.

    • Replies: @Rurik
  59. Rurik says:
    @Robjil

    A strong Germany and strong Russia is the best hope to keep the Zio fake money control out of Europe.

    Agree.

    Ukraine, Baltics and other wannabee baby nations that want to hang the legs of Zio US is not my cup of tea.

    nor mine!

    It’s pathetic the way they want Zio-spiritual sewage to flow from Hollywood’s feculent orifice into their children’s soul-veins. We want rap “music’ too! We want Jay-Z and Beyoncé!

    Imbeciles!

    But such is the state of it, and I don’t see anything we in the West can do. All I see is what Putin’s Russia can do to defuse the situation. As I suggested. Putin knows we in the West have a zio-boot on our necks, and can say or do nothing. I’ve heard him speak of Germany’s absolute vassal status, so he knows. And the ZUS is an even bigger vassal than Germany.

    https://www.fort-russ.com/2019/07/major-berlin-rejects-u-s-request-to-send-troops-to-syria-in-isis-fight/

    Now the US is racing to bottom the standard of living for its citizens, inviting the poorest of poor from destroyed nations from US coups and wars to pour in to create divide and conquer games

    Well, for the record, Mexicans and Guatemalans never needed any help being poor and corrupt. But I get your point about Europe, but then again, they’re coming from Africa too, including sub-Sahara Africa, where it’s endemically poor and corrupt, and always has been, and always will be.

    A better time to honor was the days before June 28 1914.

    Well, we’re close. I see the day of Mordor as Dec. 24th, 1913. The day the (((Fed))) was handed the keys to the US Treasury. But both dates are intrinsically related.

    We’re not far off on problems, causes and solutions.

    • Agree: Robjil
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