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Obscured American: Hank the Christian Constitutionalist
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Hank Near Liberty Bell, 2016
Hank Near Liberty Bell, 2016
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America has become an eviscerated country draped in a gigantic flag. Day by day, its culture becomes more grotesque and obscene, a luna park of lunacy. Leached of essence, it burps up slogans, but who’s convinced?

What define America, exactly? Paul Craig Roberts narrows it down to the Constitution and Christianity, “All Americans have a huge stake in Christianity. Whether or not we are individually believers in Christ, we are beneficiaries of the moral doctrine that has curbed power and protected the weak.” And, “The other cornerstone of our culture is the Constitution. Indeed, the United States is the Constitution. Without the Constitution, the United States would be a different country, and Americans would be a different people. This is why assaults on the Constitution and assaults on Christianity are assaults on all of us.”

You’re not going to get away with that in most American universities! In this nominally Christian country, Christians are routinely caricatured as buffoons and fanatics. They don’t wear crosses as much as burn them on African-Americans’ front lawns. Don’t show them Mel Gibson’s The Passion of Christ, or they’ll torch the nearest chopped liver joint.

These thoughts about Christianity and the Constitution were triggered by my recent encounter with a 70-year-old black man, Hank. Twice a week, he stands outside for about ten hours to inform us all of our systematic degradation. On Mondays, you’ll find Hank and his large sign at UPenn, while on Thursdays, he can be found near Independence Hall, right outside the National Museum of American Jewish History.

Hank was dressed very shabbily, and I suspect it’s not really due to poverty, but neglect. He’s simply too preoccupied with his thoughts to bother. Vanity of vanities, all is vanity. Hank is also wifeless.

My father was mostly a truck driver. My mother did domestic work when she was able to, when she wasn’t home raising children. I had two brothers and a sister. When we were able to take care of ourselves, when we could go back and forth from school, my mother worked.

Back then, you could walk the street as a nine-year-old and not worry about being kidnapped or raped. People can’t do that nowadays. The atmosphere has become so fearful and hostile for everybody. It’s considered child abuse to not keep an eye on your kids.

We came along. We had wonderful Christmases, wonderful Easters, a wonderful grandmother, wonderful cousins. Easters were happy occasions, and our grandmother, we would go visit her. I’m not saying everything was peach and cream, but it certainly wasn’t all this horror and mess, and all this negative stuff.

I went to a parochial school in a negro neighborhood, bordered by the Irish. I went to a high school that was probably 80%, 90% Italians, Irish, Polish, everybody, you know, whites. Also, most of my teachers in grade school were nuns and priests, so they were white also.

The neighborhood stores were Jewish, some were Italian. We did have a few Negro shops, and the door-to-door salesman were a mixed bag. They were colored and whites.

It was safe enough then for people to go door-to-door and sell things. The men who were driving horse and wagons were a mixture. I had experiences with all kinds of people.

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One of our closest friends was Billy Lee. He was a white kid who was brought up by a Chinese family. That wasn’t even a consideration. There was no discussion at all of race, in my experience. Billy Lee was friends with my older brother, but he was a friend of mine too. My brother worked in a Chinese restaurant from the time he was 12-years-old.

After high school, I went to a seminary. God has always been important to me.

I never got married. I was reading Jeremiah the other day. God would not allow Jeremiah to get married, because he wanted him. God said in the first chapter, “I ordain you from your womb. You’re going to be my prophet, and I’m going to make you a destroyer.” Well, he didn’t make Jeremiah a physical destroyer of Israel, but he made Jeremiah the one to preach the destruction of Israel.

I enjoyed being around people. I worked some years in a department store, and the people there were very friendly, very nice. The owners, everybody was really friendly.

Mostly, I worked in power generation. I was a maintenance worker at Limerick and Peach Bottom nuclear plants. We maintained all the equipment, pumps, turbines, generators, etc. There was a constant replacement of parts. I also worked at coal and oil plants.

When I was growing up, there wasn’t an emphasis on everything being about race. Throughout human history, people have disliked somebody for whatever reason, racial reasons, but it wasn’t drilled into you by the news media day after day, after day. You didn’t get it at school that race is all there is about life.

My daily life wasn’t filled with any racial animosity or discomfort. I went to church. I was in the Boy Scouts. We went to a camp in the Poconos. One time, somebody said that they put us in this lousy campsite because we were colored, but there were these Jewish kids who were using the same facility, and they were saying, “Maybe they assigned us this campsite because we’re Jews!” It wasn’t serious.

I’m not saying we had a life devoid of any racial remarks or comments, but it was never taken seriously. It’s like the word nigger. When I was growing up, I hardly ever heard my father or mother mention the word. I didn’t know the word. One time, I heard the word nigger roach, so I thought nigger roach was some kind of insect!

We sat around and talked about baseball. Nobody made a big deal about the word nigger. I could think of one or two occasions when I was called that, but it wasn’t something I built my life on. You had Irish being called micks. You had Italians being called dagos. It wasn’t anything serious. Nobody made a major case about it. Now, you’ll go to jail for saying “nigger,” you are so bad.

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It was a more civil society in the 50’s. There were problems in the southern cities in terms of legal segregation, which they got rid of. You had instances of lynching here and there, I don’t know, I wasn’t there, but I understand that lynching took place not only against blacks, it was also done on whites, but they’ve blown it up to be a white-on-black thing.

Anything that they could find to be negative about whites, they did, especially in the South, so the governor down there was blocking people from going to school. I’m not saying it wasn’t something serious, but you had all these other schools that were not being blocked. In the South, you got the University of Mississippi that wasn’t being blocked, and you got all these schools in northern cities that were not being blocked. All these blacks were going to Columbia, PennUniversity, but they made it out like it was some national calamity.

Yes, the laws were unfair, so they corrected them, and that should have been it, but they harped on it in the media every year. They had all these shows and features on ancient racial unfairness, over and over and over and over. It was unnecessary.

Now they go on and on about slavery, but when I was in school, I didn’t hear about slavery until, I think, 7th grade. My parents and my parents’ parents never talked about slavery. They talked about the Phillies and the Milwaukee Braves. These were people who were tailors and truck drivers. They were professional people. You just didn’t hear this nonsense. Today, children go to school and all they hear about is slave ships and all this slave nonsense. It’s extreme and it’s unnecessary.

There are more important things in life than to keep bringing up somebody’s great-great-great-grandfather’s miserable experience. All tribes, all people, have had some experience with slavery. In America, it was the Christians who actually abolished slavery. It was abolished because Jesus Christ said, “Love your neighbor.” So the Christians who abolished slavery are persecuted the most for being slave owners.

Throughout the world, particularly in Africa, there is slavery, even today. It never stopped being a slave continent. Sudanese Arabs have been enslaving Sudanese black Christians all throughout the 20th century, yet all these phonies in this country ignore it. The NAACP ignores it. W. E. B. Du Bois, who was the founder of the group, he joined the Communist Party before he died. He was a Communist all his life, but this isn’t talked about.

All they want to talk about is what the white man did, what George Washington and Thomas Jefferson did, but they grew up in a world where there’s always been, from the beginning of mankind, slavery. It was considered acceptable and moral.

Aristotle, Plato and pagan natural law taught that slavery was OK. All throughout Asia Minors, they believed it. In Asia, they believed it. Koreans kept slaves, and the Chinese did. When the Christians understood from Jesus Christ that it was wrong, and they started to abolish it, these enemies of God turned their wrath on the Christians who abolished slavery.

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Jefferson and Washington were not proponents of it. They derived wealth from it because there it was. You grew up in a household and there were slaves from your father and from your mother, etc, but as they grew older, they understood from the teachings of Jesus Christ that this was not right, so they sought to undo it, but all these people who hate America and hate the views of Jefferson and Washington portray them as evil slave owners.

Even today, there’s this Arab group in the Middle East that’s enslaving women. Sex slaves, raping little girls and nobody’s talking about it. Obama is having his coffee and steak, and he doesn’t give a hoot.

This new obsession about race is used to manipulate black people in particular. Black people in the cities, coming from the South, were looking to maintain their tradition, which was home and the family, but many caved in to the circumstances. In the city, they were tempted with lax, easy, lenient punishment for committing crimes.

When judges were not enforcing the laws, many blacks began to suffer. When behavior breaks down in one instance, it breaks down in other areas. Blacks became not responsible for their children and for their families, so they would leave their wives, or they were impregnating girls and not taking care of their children.

The earlier society with black people had traditional mores, traditional rules and behaviors. It was a much better society, much more civil. I remember as a child that there were one or two black families in the neighborhood that people felt you should not associate with, but overall, that was not the case. What has happened is that that one or two black families became the majority.

When I was growing up, you did not hear “racism,” or all these other governmental terms. There was no “diversity.” It was America. We were colored or black, but we were Americans. You certainly didn’t hear “African-Americans.”

You heard a lot of positives about being an American. Joe Louis, a very important black fighter, he talked about how proud he was to be an American. Jackie Robinson was proud to be an American. All that was instilled in us. You didn’t grow up to hate your country.

There wasn’t antagonism towards law enforcement. Like any group or organization, you’re going to have bad apples here and there, but in general, there was no disrespect for police officers. There wasn’t this: He’s the enemy so we have to correct and change him.

I stopped watching TV a long time ago because it’s all anti-God. The commercials have taken on the same air. Anything that’s vulgar and profane, if it insults God, Jesus Christ, they’ll push it out right away.

When I was growing up, if you said, “Oh, my God,” people would say, “Don’t take God’s name in vain!” Today, they teach everybody to say that. If a movie comes out, and the scriptwriter only has “Oh, my God” 100 times, they’ll say put it in 200 times, so you grow up hearing oh my God, oh my God, oh my God. Everybody is saying it. It’s no big deal.

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All these T-shirts I see, “Just Do It,” so right away, it conveys a sexual message. There was a time when you would be appalled at a little girl saying a cuss word. Now, you’ll hear them say mother this, mother that. It’s no big deal.

All this came about to make sure that future generations would not have the Christian restraints of their parents. Stalin talked about it. Alinsky talked about it. Lenin said, “Give me the children and I’ll change the world.”

They all know the way to corrupt and demoralize the people is through the young. Don’t let them hear about righteousness, don’t let them hear about God. That’s why today they are walking around with “Just Do It.”

Anything that conveys sex is good. My parents and grandparents would have been appalled. Another thing is, in Catholic schools or public schools, if you misbehaved, your parents expected the teacher to give you a whopping, and if it got known when you came home, you got another whopping.

It was expected that girls should behave better than boys. Today, they teach you, “Well, you’re a girl but you’re just like a boy, etc. There’s no difference. Don’t make a big deal about it. Do whatever you want to do.”

There’s no value in being chaste anymore. A woman can stand around in all kinds of crooked postures. Back in the day, a woman would be ashamed to be standing around with a crooked posture. They’re taught to be crude, vulgar and profane. We’re seeing the results of two generations of deliberate, godless, profane, vulgar teachings in American society.

And all these new words. “Transsexual” didn’t exist 50 years ago. These words are made up, which means the things they are talking about are made up. Just like “homosexual,” that word was coined probably in the early 20th century. Prior to that, you never heard such a term. They made it up, then they tell people, “You are a special kind of person. This is who you are. You were born this way.”

All of a sudden, you are no longer a man or a woman, you are something else. God didn’t just make men and women, he made all these different genders, with rights. They make these things up, then they go to the government and say, “You need special laws for these people.”

If you are a man who loves a man, you are still a man who loves a man. You are not something called a homosexual.

If you are a woman who thinks she is a man, you are still a woman and not a transsexual.

What they’re aiming for is to get back to pederasty. NAMBLA, the North American Man/Boy Love Association is a favorite of the ACLU. Before too long, they’ll say that it’s good for a 12-year-old to have a male mentor.

Pederasty was encoded in the 8th Century B.C. by this fellow, Lycurgus. He enacted it into law in 8th Century Sparta. Athens took it up later. Other Greek cities began to do that too. You get that from Plutarch, from his Lives.

Plato borrowed from Lycurgus, but we never hear about Lycurgus because he’s so close to pederasty. People who are smart want to sneak this stuff in. They don’t want to hit you with a broad brush. They sneak around the corner.

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Under God’s law, there are some things man cannot do. God says, “No! No! No!’ so George Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell and all these big-headed people who thought so well of themselves, they went to work to push God out of the way. Julian Huxley, Margaret Sanger and Adolf Hitler were in the same group. They all believed in natural law. John Dewey, too. How he got to be in charge of American education, I’ll never know.

Marx dedicated his book to Darwin. When Darwin came out with evolution, they loved that. “Oh, wow! Now, we don’t need that Genesis stuff!” They believed that everything depends on what man… What did the Greeks say? Yes, man is the measure of all things. They believed that man decides what’s right and wrong, and they weren’t going to have God get in the way. All these people believed in eugenics, of course, Nietzsche said, “The heck with man.”

So this is what they’ve been doing since the end of the 19th century. We had Ralph Waldo Emerson working on it in America. All these forces have been converging together against American society, which is God-based, and against the American Constitution, which is God-based.

Freud was another problem. Psychology has done a terrible thing, because right away, they said, “We’ve got the answer, and it has nothing to do with God.” Freud and Jung said, “Let’s look at the human mind. Let’s push God aside, and let’s figure out what this thing is all about, on our own.”

God already told you what the mind of man is. They said, “We’ve got a better idea. Man is divided into these compartments. The subconscious, the unconscious, etc, etc, and this is the libido,” so they built all this other stuff up, just like with evolution.

They build up all these scenarios, from their own minds, put it in a book and go to the university, “This is the truth! If you give me the correct answer to this, I’ll make you a B.A., or a B.S.!”

A lot of the illness or the evil in society has been deliberately injected into our people through the media and the schools, especially by those people who are hidden. I’m thinking of the planners like John Dewey and Antonio Gramsci. He was an Italian Communist. He said he was going to make American culture stink. He was going to make American culture so bad that it stinks.

There’s a DVD that’s put together by a state legislator, Curtis Bowers. It’s called Grinding America Down. It’s very good in terms of what some of these Communists, these philosophers, what their intent was for America, and they have succeeded.

The Communists have infiltrated American institutions, the schools, the government, the parties, to get rid of the godly foundation of this country, so they can use their own selfish power to run American society. Communism wants to control people, and it wants to control their assets, their riches.

We’ve had Communists in this country since the 1920s, especially with the ACLU under Roger Baldwin, who was its Communist founder. The ACLU is working every day to continuously corrupt political parties, and they’ve been very successful with Democrats, and the Republicans have not been much of a resistance.

William Penn said, and this is from Romans 13, in the Bible, that government comes under the authority of God. He cited the origin of government in God’s Bible. This is where government comes from.

Benjamin Franklin said that, “Except the Lord build the house, they build it in vain,” citing from the Bible. He was talking about the Constitution of our country.

People think of Ben Franklin as some kind of anti-Christian. He was a Deist, they say. That’s ridiculous! Ben Franklin was a Christian Presbyterian governor who wrote proclamations about prayer in the classroom.

Ben Franklin said on June 6th, 1787 that “I’ve lived a long time, and the more I live, the more convincing proofs I see of God’s governance in the affairs of man.” That’s in James Madison’s notes.

In his autobiography, Benjamin Franklin wrote that “atheism is not known in America,” but they don’t teach that. Where did the Founding Fathers come from? Did they come out of nowhere? The founding churches built this country, not the Founding Fathers!

In these gift shops, they have these little books about Benjamin Franklin, but it’s all trivial nonsense. Or go into the BourseBuilding. A year or two ago, they had a big statue of Franklin, down in the basement. You can ask him a question, “Ah, how many children did you have, Ben?” You push this button and Franklin will answer. It’s just incredible, the length they’ll go to make our Founding Fathers look silly!

A year ago, they had a big display sign of the Founding Fathers drinking champagne. I said to the security, “Do you know the administrator to this building? Well, you tell them I’m out here, and I’m protesting this caricature, this aberration of our Founding Fathers.” He said, “I will.”

There used to be a cardboard caricature of Benjamin Franklin, with a mechanical arm that was going up and down, selling hamburgers and hot dogs, in front of the BourseBuilding.

At the American Philosophical Society, they have a statue of Benjamin Franklin dressed in a toga! They have him dressed as a pagan!

Columbus said, “The Lord put it in me.” Now, you’d think everybody would know at least one quote from the founder of America? They don’t know one quote from Christopher Columbus!

Thomas Paine was not an American citizen. He was a Britisher. He was successful when he wrote that pamphlet, Common Sense, which excited a lot of people because it talked about sunshine patriots, etc, There was a lot of good prose that excited people. As a matter of fact, “Common Sense” was suggested by Benjamin Rush. Thomas Paine wanted to call it, “Plain Truth,” but Rush said, “Common Sense is better.”

Thomas Paine was great until one day, he decided to write The Age of Reason. He lost friendships because he blasphemed God. Paine showed that he was a Deist, if not an atheist altogether. Thomas Paine is celebrated by people in this country who wants to continue to tear down America.

I stop in Washington Square, and I see people reading all this trivial nonsense about William Penn. On a sign, it mentions how William Penn was concerned about making a green city.

The man came here because he was persecuted in England and put in jail! He came here to build a haven for people who were being persecuted! Also, the Quakers were at the forefront in the abolition of slavery, and that should be on the sign, not some nonsense about how he lay out some plants for a park in the city! But that’s what they do. They take you away from the important things, and give you the trivia and entertainment. It’s done deliberately.

There is no such thing as a separation of church and state! They made it up, and they’ve gotten everybody to believe it. In 1947, they had a ruling in the Supreme Court, separation of church and state. Before that, God was everybody’s authority. Authority in America was God, then they started this nonsense in the Supreme Court.

We’re living under Communists, a Communist in the White House, and this Communist Hillary Clinton, and all these other fools.

That’s why we’re in this mess today. The world doesn’t have the respect it had for America anymore. All these Christians are being slaughtered, raped, destroyed, and people are saying, “Where is America?”

America didn’t have to save South Korea. America went there out of the love that Christ taught, “Love thy neighbor.” In 1949, Truman said, “All men are created equal because we’re made in the image of God.” A couple years later, when South Korea was under attack, they came to Truman’s office and cried, and that man said, “You’ve got our troops,” and he sent MacArthur.

He didn’t have to. America does these things out of a loving, godly heart. We had a reputation of going to the rescue of people who were in trouble, people who were being besieged by an enemy, by an oppressor. That was our reputation. Today, you have in the Middle East all these slaughters going on, and people are saying, “Oh, my goodness, what happened to America?”

America used to be a force for righteousness. Now, it’s acting like an evil nation, because we have an evil man in the White House. Obama doesn’t care. He was brought up as a Communist. His father was, his mother was, all of the family.

Stalin gave them direction. Stalin said, “Break them down in their religion, break them down in their morality, break them down in their spiritual life, and America will crumble inside.” Stalin was right.

Linh Dinh is the author of two books of stories, five of poems, and a novel, Love Like Hate. He’s tracking our deteriorating socialscape through his frequently updated photo blog, Postcards from the End of America.

 
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  1. Jason Liu says:

    A little too Uncle Tom for me. It’s perfectly alright to acknowledge attacks on your own race while fighting leftism.

    Hank’s mentality is born from the western dichotomy of either being with the oppressed or the oppressor. A more nationalistic upbringing would have taught him to be simultaneously against egalitarianism while promoting his own racial interests, because those two things go hand in hand.

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.

    Read More
    • Troll: Che Guava
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.
     
    The communism most us have now been taught to hate was once fashionable and all the rage and had the support of both the money bag crowd as well as the effete "elite." Lenin and Stalin and their goons got away with hideous mass murder and still had that support.

    However, after the money bags suckered the dupes into doing their dirty work such as killing off the competition, both foreign and domestic, and the "intellectuals" got bored with it, it suddenly lost its glamour and out down the tubes it went, where it always belonged. He's correct though, that we're dealing with the results of that sick romance even today.
    , @anonymous
    "Uncle Tom"? More like someone who hasn't let himself be divided and conquered by swilling the cheap liquor of "promoting his own racial interests."

    Too bad yours was the first comment. Hopefully, others will address what this man had to say, and not foul the thread with recycled race crap.
    , @Pat the Rat
    Nationalism is just another idol, like race.

    They all lead to massive conflict between nations and peoples. WWI and WWII weren't dreams, they happened because of Nationalism.

    The modern left idea is that we will not have Nationalism, just people, individual identities free to be and do whatever they want. Unfortunately some people don't care if they exploit others by lying to them and using them. Their view is if people are not smart enough to look after themselves then they deserve to be used and abused.

    Remember the degraded life of Amanda that L. wrote about a few posts back, drugs, prostitution, family breakdown.

    The modern lefty libertarian type just goes well that's her problem, I can do drugs and prostitution and divorce without becoming that, why should I stop watching porn even if I know that the making of p0rn causes great suffering and exploitation.

    In the end they deny evil and sin totally to justify their own choices in life no matter how much injustice and suffering they cause.
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  2. All truth.

    Satan is the father of lies and in the garden he tempted and corrupted with his first lies, “you will be like gods”. So it is at present, the liars among us tell us what we want to hear, and bit by bit they lead us into the dark.

    It has been going on for ever, but now with the modern communications it has become incredibly powerful. But it still has not won, people still understand their lies and object.

    Many on this site understand the idea of fiat currency and how money is simply created through credit by lowering interest rates. It has lead to massive inflation and property bubbles.

    The same happens with man, they lie and invent ideas and blow us up with pride and pomposity and self importance, and this attitude alienates us from God.

    That’s why people so easily accept the many evils in the western nations, abortion, porn and using third parties to wage war. The lies have filled them with pride makes them blind to their own sinful nation. And blind to their own sinful nature.

    Read More
  3. They take you away from the important things, and give you the trivia and entertainment. It’s done deliberately.

    Pretty sharp dude!

    Another fine one, LD!

    Read More
  4. @Jason Liu
    A little too Uncle Tom for me. It's perfectly alright to acknowledge attacks on your own race while fighting leftism.

    Hank's mentality is born from the western dichotomy of either being with the oppressed or the oppressor. A more nationalistic upbringing would have taught him to be simultaneously against egalitarianism while promoting his own racial interests, because those two things go hand in hand.

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.

    The communism most us have now been taught to hate was once fashionable and all the rage and had the support of both the money bag crowd as well as the effete “elite.” Lenin and Stalin and their goons got away with hideous mass murder and still had that support.

    However, after the money bags suckered the dupes into doing their dirty work such as killing off the competition, both foreign and domestic, and the “intellectuals” got bored with it, it suddenly lost its glamour and out down the tubes it went, where it always belonged. He’s correct though, that we’re dealing with the results of that sick romance even today.

    Read More
  5. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Jason Liu
    A little too Uncle Tom for me. It's perfectly alright to acknowledge attacks on your own race while fighting leftism.

    Hank's mentality is born from the western dichotomy of either being with the oppressed or the oppressor. A more nationalistic upbringing would have taught him to be simultaneously against egalitarianism while promoting his own racial interests, because those two things go hand in hand.

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.

    “Uncle Tom”? More like someone who hasn’t let himself be divided and conquered by swilling the cheap liquor of “promoting his own racial interests.”

    Too bad yours was the first comment. Hopefully, others will address what this man had to say, and not foul the thread with recycled race crap.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ace
    Exactly. Liu's comment was bizarre. This man is extraordinary in his knowledge and insight. I could hold forth like that without a day's preparation and a handful of notes.

    It's absurd to think that he can be dismissed as being "too Uncle Tom."

  6. @Jason Liu
    A little too Uncle Tom for me. It's perfectly alright to acknowledge attacks on your own race while fighting leftism.

    Hank's mentality is born from the western dichotomy of either being with the oppressed or the oppressor. A more nationalistic upbringing would have taught him to be simultaneously against egalitarianism while promoting his own racial interests, because those two things go hand in hand.

    Such a mentality leaves no wiggle room for the left, meaning that the communism he hates so much would have never had the support it needed to become anything.

    Nationalism is just another idol, like race.

    They all lead to massive conflict between nations and peoples. WWI and WWII weren’t dreams, they happened because of Nationalism.

    The modern left idea is that we will not have Nationalism, just people, individual identities free to be and do whatever they want. Unfortunately some people don’t care if they exploit others by lying to them and using them. Their view is if people are not smart enough to look after themselves then they deserve to be used and abused.

    Remember the degraded life of Amanda that L. wrote about a few posts back, drugs, prostitution, family breakdown.

    The modern lefty libertarian type just goes well that’s her problem, I can do drugs and prostitution and divorce without becoming that, why should I stop watching porn even if I know that the making of p0rn causes great suffering and exploitation.

    In the end they deny evil and sin totally to justify their own choices in life no matter how much injustice and suffering they cause.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ace
    Nationalism is not the problem. That's the bogus justification employed by the E.U. autocrats to impose their straitjacket on the people of Europe.

    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers, compounded by the rulers losing their inner moral compass.

    Mexicans, Icelanders, Japanese, and New Zealanders are nationalistic but they aren't a threat to world peace. Men who who can command armies and secret police to do what they in their sole discretion decide are the ones who cause human misery. I'm a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.

    Westerners are getting a bellyful of what happens when they lose control of government. For a long time I and, I believe, millions of other Westerners assumed that we still live in a civilization that is Western. We know now that we are no longer in Kansas and that the scum who control our governments are authoritarian, criminals whose parents were not married to each other.
  7. Oldeguy says:

    When wisdom and sane perspective are voiced most clearly by a shabbily dressed street person, what does that say about the rest of us ?

    Read More
  8. This guy starts out well, but then devolves into fundamentalist Christian nonsense. Sure, Darwin was a commie and the provable-every-minute-of-everyday theory of evolution is hogwash (by everyday in every way I’m speaking of the rapid evolution of bacteria, and the not as rapid evolution of plant species as seen in hybrid forms of seed stock as well as the fairly rapid evolution of the sparrow as still studied on the Galapagos Islands.

    Thers is a place for Christian faith and a simultaneous place for science without throwing either one out the window (as the atheists are wont to do; as the Christians are wont to do). And without degrading the culture what this guy does accurately describe.

    There appears to be a seminal movement underfoot of people that are calling themselves “traditionalists” that may end up countering the decaying nonsense coming out via Beyonce, Madonna, Miley, et al.

    Personally, I’d like to see women smile again. That’s not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the partriarchy. Perhaps, like Linh’s subject in this interview, I am as lost as he is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marcus
    Darwinian hereditarianism is directly opposed to communist belief in the infinite plasticity of human nature. Marx dedicated his book to Darwin because "evolution" seemed to fit his view of progression of economic systems from feudalism to capitalism to communism.
    , @Quartermaster
    I see women smile all the time. I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science. Methinks you live in a very narrow world, circumscribed by your own fantasies.
    , @Stonehands

    "...Personally, I’d like to see women smile again. That’s not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the patriarchy"

    C'mon man, who put that in your head- some screwball feminist?

    This country has been taken over treasonously, by homos, trangenders, and other spineless, dilapidated lackeys for the NWO.

    ...That ain't no Patriarchy!

  9. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Twice a week, he stands outside for about ten hours to inform us all of our systematic degradation.

    [...]

    He’s simply too preoccupied with his thoughts to bother. Vanity of vanities, all is vanity. Hank is also wifeless.

    No-one as cool as Hank isn’t unwed. I expect you to be unwed as well Dinh. And of course, I am unwed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Unless you are an older guy with already-grown kids, your statement likely means that you are either having no children or raising children without being married and committed to their mother. Wow, something to be proud of.

    Doing nothing to perpetuate your family and your nation (I didn't say "government" or even "country") is shirking your fundamental responsibility -- as well as depriving yourself of the most beautiful, most challenging, most rewarding, and most maturing experience you could ever have.

    Yeah, cool unmarried people, huh huh huh.

    PS I'd rather have this guy Hank having children than a lot of people who have -- including almost all of his Affican-"American" brothers and sisters.
  10. EmilyIO says:

    “These words are made up, which means the things they are talking about are made up.”

    This heuristic does not work in the general case. C.f., “gravity”, “explicandum”, “booty call”.

    Read More
  11. OutWest says:

    Smart man. But he really needs some good conversation to refine his views. What he learned in grade school is unexamined and short of his more adult learning. His religious polemics are a tad weak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Beenthere
    Many years of living have refined Hank's clear words of wisdom. You have many many years of living to fully appreciate them.
    , @Roofgoat
    Outwest, you wish you had a 1/10 of wisdom this guy possesses. But your are loaded with "intelligence" - and the gift of academic intelligence is a dime a dozen today.
  12. Marcus says:
    @restless94110
    This guy starts out well, but then devolves into fundamentalist Christian nonsense. Sure, Darwin was a commie and the provable-every-minute-of-everyday theory of evolution is hogwash (by everyday in every way I'm speaking of the rapid evolution of bacteria, and the not as rapid evolution of plant species as seen in hybrid forms of seed stock as well as the fairly rapid evolution of the sparrow as still studied on the Galapagos Islands.

    Thers is a place for Christian faith and a simultaneous place for science without throwing either one out the window (as the atheists are wont to do; as the Christians are wont to do). And without degrading the culture what this guy does accurately describe.

    There appears to be a seminal movement underfoot of people that are calling themselves "traditionalists" that may end up countering the decaying nonsense coming out via Beyonce, Madonna, Miley, et al.

    Personally, I'd like to see women smile again. That's not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the partriarchy. Perhaps, like Linh's subject in this interview, I am as lost as he is.

    Darwinian hereditarianism is directly opposed to communist belief in the infinite plasticity of human nature. Marx dedicated his book to Darwin because “evolution” seemed to fit his view of progression of economic systems from feudalism to capitalism to communism.

    Read More
  13. @restless94110
    This guy starts out well, but then devolves into fundamentalist Christian nonsense. Sure, Darwin was a commie and the provable-every-minute-of-everyday theory of evolution is hogwash (by everyday in every way I'm speaking of the rapid evolution of bacteria, and the not as rapid evolution of plant species as seen in hybrid forms of seed stock as well as the fairly rapid evolution of the sparrow as still studied on the Galapagos Islands.

    Thers is a place for Christian faith and a simultaneous place for science without throwing either one out the window (as the atheists are wont to do; as the Christians are wont to do). And without degrading the culture what this guy does accurately describe.

    There appears to be a seminal movement underfoot of people that are calling themselves "traditionalists" that may end up countering the decaying nonsense coming out via Beyonce, Madonna, Miley, et al.

    Personally, I'd like to see women smile again. That's not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the partriarchy. Perhaps, like Linh's subject in this interview, I am as lost as he is.

    I see women smile all the time. I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science. Methinks you live in a very narrow world, circumscribed by your own fantasies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science.
     
    Yeah, well that doesn't stop a lot of them from trying. I remember the exact moment I gave up on organized religion. I was just a kid and the priest started railing and raving over the incompatibility between religion and science. He sounded like a complete nitwit and I still marvel at the remarks of the deluded simpleton and wonder if anyone could be that misguided.

    In short, he threw his brand of religion out the window instead of "science."
  14. unit472 says:

    Remarkable and this guy is not a ‘street person’. If he worked in utility power plants he’s got a pension and, never having been married or had children, probably a decent nest egg too. He’s just that rare bird. Someone who walks the walk not just pays lip service to his beliefs.

    Read More
  15. @Quartermaster
    I see women smile all the time. I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science. Methinks you live in a very narrow world, circumscribed by your own fantasies.

    I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science.

    Yeah, well that doesn’t stop a lot of them from trying. I remember the exact moment I gave up on organized religion. I was just a kid and the priest started railing and raving over the incompatibility between religion and science. He sounded like a complete nitwit and I still marvel at the remarks of the deluded simpleton and wonder if anyone could be that misguided.

    In short, he threw his brand of religion out the window instead of “science.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Che Guava
    Well said, Jaques.

    Exposure to a 'young-Earth' creationist was an unpleasant surprise (among others).

    Theologically, there are only two explanations for that.

    1. God set down a false fossil and geological record as a test of faith. That seemed to be the idea of the 'minister' from whom I first heard the idea. Perverse God in that case.

    2. The devil created the false geological and fossil records to lead people astray. Although thus ascribing creative power is heresy in any form of Christianity, I have seen this idea presented by sites and writing from people in the US.

    Hank is certainly well-read, a few there to catch up with.

    A great recording (and no doubt drawing out) of his interesting statement, Mr. Dinh.
  16. turtle says:

    intellectual = human who engages in the dangerous and societally disapproved act known as “thinking”
    Doesn’t matter if you are “correct” or not.
    Matters that you continue to use your brain.
    Peace be upon you, Hank.

    Read More
  17. Rehmat says:

    “All Americans have a huge stake in Christianity. Whether or not we are individually believers in Christ, we are beneficiaries of the moral doctrine that has curbed power and protected the weak.” – A very tall but HOLLOW claim my friend.

    I wish Canadian female professor Julie Macfarlane (University of Windsor), buy that statement.

    According to her own story —- “In 1975, at the age of 16, I worried that my faith was fading. I sought out the Rector in his church office for spiritual counseling. He told me that God wanted me to kneel and perform oral sex on him. This was the start of more than 12 months of constant sexual abuse by the priest. He continued to make me perform fellatio on him, and masturbated on me, in multiple locations. He waited for me in dark alleyways as I walked home from the restaurant where I worked as a dishwasher in the evenings.”

    https://rehmat1.com/2015/12/18/god-wanted-me-to-perform-oral-sex-on-my-priest/

    Read More
    • LOL: Che Guava
    • Replies: @Sherman
    Hey Homer

    There's a mistake in your post.

    You left out the part about the Zionist Jews.

    Sherm
  18. @Anonymous

    Twice a week, he stands outside for about ten hours to inform us all of our systematic degradation.

    [...]

    He’s simply too preoccupied with his thoughts to bother. Vanity of vanities, all is vanity. Hank is also wifeless.
     
    No-one as cool as Hank isn't unwed. I expect you to be unwed as well Dinh. And of course, I am unwed.

    Unless you are an older guy with already-grown kids, your statement likely means that you are either having no children or raising children without being married and committed to their mother. Wow, something to be proud of.

    Doing nothing to perpetuate your family and your nation (I didn’t say “government” or even “country”) is shirking your fundamental responsibility — as well as depriving yourself of the most beautiful, most challenging, most rewarding, and most maturing experience you could ever have.

    Yeah, cool unmarried people, huh huh huh.

    PS I’d rather have this guy Hank having children than a lot of people who have — including almost all of his Affican-”American” brothers and sisters.

    Read More
  19. Hank sounds like a latter-day Eric Hoffer, albeit with a more theological bent. Not sure I buy into everything he says but give him credit. He is, above all, a thinker…raising questions to which no one seems to have any answers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Klokman
    Not even close to Eric. But Eric described this character quite well in his writings.
  20. Che Guava says:
    @jacques sheete

    I also have as yet to see a Christian defenestrate Science.
     
    Yeah, well that doesn't stop a lot of them from trying. I remember the exact moment I gave up on organized religion. I was just a kid and the priest started railing and raving over the incompatibility between religion and science. He sounded like a complete nitwit and I still marvel at the remarks of the deluded simpleton and wonder if anyone could be that misguided.

    In short, he threw his brand of religion out the window instead of "science."

    Well said, Jaques.

    Exposure to a ‘young-Earth’ creationist was an unpleasant surprise (among others).

    Theologically, there are only two explanations for that.

    1. God set down a false fossil and geological record as a test of faith. That seemed to be the idea of the ‘minister’ from whom I first heard the idea. Perverse God in that case.

    2. The devil created the false geological and fossil records to lead people astray. Although thus ascribing creative power is heresy in any form of Christianity, I have seen this idea presented by sites and writing from people in the US.

    Hank is certainly well-read, a few there to catch up with.

    A great recording (and no doubt drawing out) of his interesting statement, Mr. Dinh.

    Read More
  21. Sherman says:
    @Rehmat
    “All Americans have a huge stake in Christianity. Whether or not we are individually believers in Christ, we are beneficiaries of the moral doctrine that has curbed power and protected the weak.” - A very tall but HOLLOW claim my friend.

    I wish Canadian female professor Julie Macfarlane (University of Windsor), buy that statement.

    According to her own story ---- “In 1975, at the age of 16, I worried that my faith was fading. I sought out the Rector in his church office for spiritual counseling. He told me that God wanted me to kneel and perform oral sex on him. This was the start of more than 12 months of constant sexual abuse by the priest. He continued to make me perform fellatio on him, and masturbated on me, in multiple locations. He waited for me in dark alleyways as I walked home from the restaurant where I worked as a dishwasher in the evenings."

    https://rehmat1.com/2015/12/18/god-wanted-me-to-perform-oral-sex-on-my-priest/

    Hey Homer

    There’s a mistake in your post.

    You left out the part about the Zionist Jews.

    Sherm

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rehmat
    Nyeth Sharon - As a typical Zionist bastard you're even lying from your grave.

    Zionist Jews are very evil people. They collaborated with Nazi to push Jews from Iraq, Morocco, Tunis, and other Muslim countries to populate the Zionist state experiment on an Arab land. Once they succeeded fooling these Arab Jews - in 1960s, they killed 100,000 of them by using them guinea-pigs for testing nuclear radiation effects.

    In October 2013, Israeli historian professor Yigal Bin-Nun (Bar-Ilan University), in a study exposed Zionist lies about Jewish exodus from Morocco. Based on his study of Moroccan Jewish community, Bin-Nun has claimed that Mossad, the national intelligence agency of Israel, was behind the whole operation wherein about 160,000 Moroccan Jews left Morocco for the Zionist occupied Palestine.....

    https://rehmat1.com/2013/11/13/why-jews-left-morocco/
  22. Living in Mumbai, India, I find Linh Dinh’s interviews fascinating. They are true and honest windows to see real America, be they at basement level.
    To see western society from a skyscraper, I think ‘Taki’ is quite good.
    Peace

    Read More
  23. woodNfish says:

    Hank is a very smart and insightful man. I am having a hard time believing Dinh actually wrote this excellent piece. He usually finds worthless leftist turds who blame everyone else for the problems they created for themselves.

    Hank is completely right about slavery, trivializing our founders and what they were about and the great evil our country has become. There are no blinders on this fellow’s eyes. The democrats have not fooled him at all.

    I do take issue with one part of his narrative concerning Thomas Paine. Yes Paine was British and they considered him a traitor. The Brits even raided his grave and stole his remains which have never been found. And Paine may have been a deist, but Paine told us, “Society is good. Government is evil.” He was right, and those are words to live by.

    Read More
    • Agree: Stonehands
    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
    I visited Paine's hometown, Thetford, in 2006; his American home, Bordentown, in 2014; then wrote about him. An excerpt:

    [...]

    Over and over again, Paine would speak and act from his firmest convictions, no matter the cost. A poor man, he gave his royalties from Common Sense and American Crisis to clothe the Continental Army, and even donated his life savings to it. As our first whistleblower, Paine exposed Silas Deane as an embezzler and war profiteer, thus provoking the wrath of not just Deane’s many powerful allies, but other corrupt officials as well. In Age of Reason, his dismantling of organized religions, Paine alienated many ordinary folks, his natural audience.

    Always blunt and upright, Paine annoyed or threatened many people, including erstwhile allies, like George Washington, for one. When Paine was imprisoned and almost killed during the French Revolution, Washington didn’t gnash his ivory, cow bone and black slave teeth in worries or sorrows, and this mean coldness destroyed their lopsided relationship. Paine had mistakenly considered Washington an intimate friend. Except for Paine, America’s Founding Fathers came from the wealthiest stratum of American society, so during and after the Revolutionary War, they sought to protect their privileges. They tolerated Paine since he could rally the ordinary people, “the grazing multitude” in Washington’s memorable phrase, but when the war had been won, they had no more use for him.

    Just as you and I inhabit a world entirely alien to those who rule over us, Paine was also viewed by the elites of his time as a clear outsider or pesty gadfly, if not outright freak. Speaking on the floor of Congress, Gouverneur Morris described Paine as “a mere adventurer from England, without fortune, without family connections, ignorant even of grammar.” John Adams acknowledged Paine’s unmatched sway over the masses, but arrived at a colorful and telling conclusion, “I know not whether any man in the world has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs or the last thirty years than Tom Paine. There can be no severer satyr on the age. For such a mongrel between pig and puppy, begotten by a wild boar on a bitch wolf, never before in any age of the world was suffered by the poltroonery of mankind, to run through such a career of mischief,” so to have such influence over ordinary people is to indulge in a career of mischief? So Paine was little more than a demagogue from many elites’ perspective, but if he could get farmers and tradesmen to pick up rifles, then he had a temporary role to play.

    Paine gave the American Revolution a much more democratic veneer, and he’s still trotted out every now and them, in tiny doses, to give the impression that we have stayed true to his vision, but if Paine’s foundational ideas are really compared to the actual state of our union, it’s clear that we’ve gone from a flawed yet promising beginning to become this physically and mentally ill, insatiably rapacious yet raped nation. Throughout our entire history, the American underclass has been partially appeased by a trickled down prosperity achieved through endless plunder and conquest, but our rottenness is becoming harder to hide as our ship creaks, lists and sucks in cascades. Standing in this bilge, we can’t help but see our misfortune steadily rising to our ankles, shins, thighs and higher. It’s past time we act.

    [...]

    , @utu
    Hank is thoughtful and have good heart.
  24. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @woodNfish
    Hank is a very smart and insightful man. I am having a hard time believing Dinh actually wrote this excellent piece. He usually finds worthless leftist turds who blame everyone else for the problems they created for themselves.

    Hank is completely right about slavery, trivializing our founders and what they were about and the great evil our country has become. There are no blinders on this fellow's eyes. The democrats have not fooled him at all.

    I do take issue with one part of his narrative concerning Thomas Paine. Yes Paine was British and they considered him a traitor. The Brits even raided his grave and stole his remains which have never been found. And Paine may have been a deist, but Paine told us, "Society is good. Government is evil." He was right, and those are words to live by.

    I visited Paine’s hometown, Thetford, in 2006; his American home, Bordentown, in 2014; then wrote about him. An excerpt:

    [...]

    Over and over again, Paine would speak and act from his firmest convictions, no matter the cost. A poor man, he gave his royalties from Common Sense and American Crisis to clothe the Continental Army, and even donated his life savings to it. As our first whistleblower, Paine exposed Silas Deane as an embezzler and war profiteer, thus provoking the wrath of not just Deane’s many powerful allies, but other corrupt officials as well. In Age of Reason, his dismantling of organized religions, Paine alienated many ordinary folks, his natural audience.

    Always blunt and upright, Paine annoyed or threatened many people, including erstwhile allies, like George Washington, for one. When Paine was imprisoned and almost killed during the French Revolution, Washington didn’t gnash his ivory, cow bone and black slave teeth in worries or sorrows, and this mean coldness destroyed their lopsided relationship. Paine had mistakenly considered Washington an intimate friend. Except for Paine, America’s Founding Fathers came from the wealthiest stratum of American society, so during and after the Revolutionary War, they sought to protect their privileges. They tolerated Paine since he could rally the ordinary people, “the grazing multitude” in Washington’s memorable phrase, but when the war had been won, they had no more use for him.

    Just as you and I inhabit a world entirely alien to those who rule over us, Paine was also viewed by the elites of his time as a clear outsider or pesty gadfly, if not outright freak. Speaking on the floor of Congress, Gouverneur Morris described Paine as “a mere adventurer from England, without fortune, without family connections, ignorant even of grammar.” John Adams acknowledged Paine’s unmatched sway over the masses, but arrived at a colorful and telling conclusion, “I know not whether any man in the world has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs or the last thirty years than Tom Paine. There can be no severer satyr on the age. For such a mongrel between pig and puppy, begotten by a wild boar on a bitch wolf, never before in any age of the world was suffered by the poltroonery of mankind, to run through such a career of mischief,” so to have such influence over ordinary people is to indulge in a career of mischief? So Paine was little more than a demagogue from many elites’ perspective, but if he could get farmers and tradesmen to pick up rifles, then he had a temporary role to play.

    Paine gave the American Revolution a much more democratic veneer, and he’s still trotted out every now and them, in tiny doses, to give the impression that we have stayed true to his vision, but if Paine’s foundational ideas are really compared to the actual state of our union, it’s clear that we’ve gone from a flawed yet promising beginning to become this physically and mentally ill, insatiably rapacious yet raped nation. Throughout our entire history, the American underclass has been partially appeased by a trickled down prosperity achieved through endless plunder and conquest, but our rottenness is becoming harder to hide as our ship creaks, lists and sucks in cascades. Standing in this bilge, we can’t help but see our misfortune steadily rising to our ankles, shins, thighs and higher. It’s past time we act.

    [...]

    Read More
    • Replies: @woodNfish
    So Dinh, I have to ask you why you seem to focus on the downtrodden fringe of society rather than the middle class of this country where most of the "underclass" and readers of this blog reside.

    You've obviously recognized the lie this country has been for much longer than I have, but the truth was well hidden and difficult to find until the republicans and their media toadies began showing their true colors in the last election and entirely threw away their cloak of deceit for this one. However I think your dwelling at the bottom of society doesn't help you get the message out.
    , @jacques sheete
    I'm pretty much a "Paineophile" except for the fact that he was in favor of the constitution, and consider myself a minor scholar regarding the man, but your comment earns you an A+ in my book. Damn good stuff there including some things I was unaware of. Hank gets high grades too.

    It’s past time we act.
     
    For sure.
    , @Rev. Spooner
    The life of Thomas Paine was a life of pain. An ordinary printer came to the land of brave and the free and if I remember correctly, died penniless and lonely.
    Come on America, bend down and tie those shoelaces. You really don't want to walk with the Jidahists in Syria or fight the Russians, do you?
  25. iffen says:

    It’s past time we act.

    Yeah! I gots my pitchfork. Who we gonna get first? Dem Joose?

    Read More
  26. This man has a soul. The only question is how deep is that soul. We can argue that, but do not deny that he is blessed by his personal understandings and knowledge. I believe that he is a happy man who has found meaning and therefore fulfillment, and judging by some of the previous comments, many here have not.

    Read More
  27. sturbain says:

    For its (minor) flaws, that is one of the best analyses of the decline of American culture that I’ve come across.

    Men are qualified for civil society in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites… in proportion as they are more disposed to listen to the counsel of the wise and good, in preference to the flattery of knaves. Society cannot exist, unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere; and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters.
    Edmund Burke

    We are doomed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iffen
    The sycophant—who in the pay of the English oligarchy played the romantic laudator temporis acti against the French Revolution just as, in the pay of the North American colonies at the beginning of the American troubles, he had played the liberal against the English oligarchy—was an out-and-out vulgar bourgeois. "The laws of commerce are the laws of Nature, and therefore the laws of God." (E. Burke, l.c., pp. 31, 32) No wonder that, true to the laws of God and Nature, he always sold himself in the best market.

    K.Marx
  28. woodNfish says:
    @Linh Dinh
    I visited Paine's hometown, Thetford, in 2006; his American home, Bordentown, in 2014; then wrote about him. An excerpt:

    [...]

    Over and over again, Paine would speak and act from his firmest convictions, no matter the cost. A poor man, he gave his royalties from Common Sense and American Crisis to clothe the Continental Army, and even donated his life savings to it. As our first whistleblower, Paine exposed Silas Deane as an embezzler and war profiteer, thus provoking the wrath of not just Deane’s many powerful allies, but other corrupt officials as well. In Age of Reason, his dismantling of organized religions, Paine alienated many ordinary folks, his natural audience.

    Always blunt and upright, Paine annoyed or threatened many people, including erstwhile allies, like George Washington, for one. When Paine was imprisoned and almost killed during the French Revolution, Washington didn’t gnash his ivory, cow bone and black slave teeth in worries or sorrows, and this mean coldness destroyed their lopsided relationship. Paine had mistakenly considered Washington an intimate friend. Except for Paine, America’s Founding Fathers came from the wealthiest stratum of American society, so during and after the Revolutionary War, they sought to protect their privileges. They tolerated Paine since he could rally the ordinary people, “the grazing multitude” in Washington’s memorable phrase, but when the war had been won, they had no more use for him.

    Just as you and I inhabit a world entirely alien to those who rule over us, Paine was also viewed by the elites of his time as a clear outsider or pesty gadfly, if not outright freak. Speaking on the floor of Congress, Gouverneur Morris described Paine as “a mere adventurer from England, without fortune, without family connections, ignorant even of grammar.” John Adams acknowledged Paine’s unmatched sway over the masses, but arrived at a colorful and telling conclusion, “I know not whether any man in the world has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs or the last thirty years than Tom Paine. There can be no severer satyr on the age. For such a mongrel between pig and puppy, begotten by a wild boar on a bitch wolf, never before in any age of the world was suffered by the poltroonery of mankind, to run through such a career of mischief,” so to have such influence over ordinary people is to indulge in a career of mischief? So Paine was little more than a demagogue from many elites’ perspective, but if he could get farmers and tradesmen to pick up rifles, then he had a temporary role to play.

    Paine gave the American Revolution a much more democratic veneer, and he’s still trotted out every now and them, in tiny doses, to give the impression that we have stayed true to his vision, but if Paine’s foundational ideas are really compared to the actual state of our union, it’s clear that we’ve gone from a flawed yet promising beginning to become this physically and mentally ill, insatiably rapacious yet raped nation. Throughout our entire history, the American underclass has been partially appeased by a trickled down prosperity achieved through endless plunder and conquest, but our rottenness is becoming harder to hide as our ship creaks, lists and sucks in cascades. Standing in this bilge, we can’t help but see our misfortune steadily rising to our ankles, shins, thighs and higher. It’s past time we act.

    [...]

    So Dinh, I have to ask you why you seem to focus on the downtrodden fringe of society rather than the middle class of this country where most of the “underclass” and readers of this blog reside.

    You’ve obviously recognized the lie this country has been for much longer than I have, but the truth was well hidden and difficult to find until the republicans and their media toadies began showing their true colors in the last election and entirely threw away their cloak of deceit for this one. However I think your dwelling at the bottom of society doesn’t help you get the message out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
    Hi woodNfish,

    First of, these people are rarely depicted accurately or with much empathy, since most writers don't associate with them.

    Secondly, these are the types of people I've known all my life. Many of them are my friends or drinking buddies.

    Thirdly, I've also interviewed people who are not "downtrodden," such as Rudy List, the retired math professor, or Amanda Zinoman, the film editor.

    The more refined people are routinely featured everywhere else on the internet, but regular Joe Sixpacks, of whatever race, are mostly caricatured.

    Finally, I don't have access to the higher strata. I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.


    Linh

    , @Linh Dinh
    Also, my 2000 collection of short stories, Fake House, is dedicated "To the Unchosen," and here's a sentence from my 2004 Blood and Soap, "He ignored public fascinations with movie stars, athletes, statesmen, revolutionaries, mass-murderers and poets by writing well-researched, footnoted and illustrated biographies of bus drivers, cashiers, beauticians, filing clerks, plumbers and roofers." I'm not quite doing that with these Obscured American pieces, but you know what I mean.

    I'm not a college graduate, much less an academic. Like Hank, I try to educate myself. For a decade, I was a housepainter.
  29. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @woodNfish
    So Dinh, I have to ask you why you seem to focus on the downtrodden fringe of society rather than the middle class of this country where most of the "underclass" and readers of this blog reside.

    You've obviously recognized the lie this country has been for much longer than I have, but the truth was well hidden and difficult to find until the republicans and their media toadies began showing their true colors in the last election and entirely threw away their cloak of deceit for this one. However I think your dwelling at the bottom of society doesn't help you get the message out.

    Hi woodNfish,

    First of, these people are rarely depicted accurately or with much empathy, since most writers don’t associate with them.

    Secondly, these are the types of people I’ve known all my life. Many of them are my friends or drinking buddies.

    Thirdly, I’ve also interviewed people who are not “downtrodden,” such as Rudy List, the retired math professor, or Amanda Zinoman, the film editor.

    The more refined people are routinely featured everywhere else on the internet, but regular Joe Sixpacks, of whatever race, are mostly caricatured.

    Finally, I don’t have access to the higher strata. I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.

    Linh

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @woodNfish
    Hi Linh,

    I am not sure how refined most of the middle class is, but I expect you are correct about the exposure they get elsewhere. That is not the type of reading I typically pursue.

    I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.
     
    Don't let that get out to all the wanna be writers in the world who think that if they write it, they will come.
    , @landlubber

    I don’t have access to the higher strata.
     
    Linh, any more teaching gigs in the pipeline?
  30. iffen says:
    @sturbain
    For its (minor) flaws, that is one of the best analyses of the decline of American culture that I've come across.

    Men are qualified for civil society in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites… in proportion as they are more disposed to listen to the counsel of the wise and good, in preference to the flattery of knaves. Society cannot exist, unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere; and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters.
    Edmund Burke

    We are doomed.

    The sycophant—who in the pay of the English oligarchy played the romantic laudator temporis acti against the French Revolution just as, in the pay of the North American colonies at the beginning of the American troubles, he had played the liberal against the English oligarchy—was an out-and-out vulgar bourgeois. “The laws of commerce are the laws of Nature, and therefore the laws of God.” (E. Burke, l.c., pp. 31, 32) No wonder that, true to the laws of God and Nature, he always sold himself in the best market.

    K.Marx

    Read More
  31. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @woodNfish
    So Dinh, I have to ask you why you seem to focus on the downtrodden fringe of society rather than the middle class of this country where most of the "underclass" and readers of this blog reside.

    You've obviously recognized the lie this country has been for much longer than I have, but the truth was well hidden and difficult to find until the republicans and their media toadies began showing their true colors in the last election and entirely threw away their cloak of deceit for this one. However I think your dwelling at the bottom of society doesn't help you get the message out.

    Also, my 2000 collection of short stories, Fake House, is dedicated “To the Unchosen,” and here’s a sentence from my 2004 Blood and Soap, “He ignored public fascinations with movie stars, athletes, statesmen, revolutionaries, mass-murderers and poets by writing well-researched, footnoted and illustrated biographies of bus drivers, cashiers, beauticians, filing clerks, plumbers and roofers.” I’m not quite doing that with these Obscured American pieces, but you know what I mean.

    I’m not a college graduate, much less an academic. Like Hank, I try to educate myself. For a decade, I was a housepainter.

    Read More
    • Replies: @woodNfish
    You seem to have learned more than most college grads who are lucky if they can figure out that many of their professors are/were idiots.
  32. @Linh Dinh
    I visited Paine's hometown, Thetford, in 2006; his American home, Bordentown, in 2014; then wrote about him. An excerpt:

    [...]

    Over and over again, Paine would speak and act from his firmest convictions, no matter the cost. A poor man, he gave his royalties from Common Sense and American Crisis to clothe the Continental Army, and even donated his life savings to it. As our first whistleblower, Paine exposed Silas Deane as an embezzler and war profiteer, thus provoking the wrath of not just Deane’s many powerful allies, but other corrupt officials as well. In Age of Reason, his dismantling of organized religions, Paine alienated many ordinary folks, his natural audience.

    Always blunt and upright, Paine annoyed or threatened many people, including erstwhile allies, like George Washington, for one. When Paine was imprisoned and almost killed during the French Revolution, Washington didn’t gnash his ivory, cow bone and black slave teeth in worries or sorrows, and this mean coldness destroyed their lopsided relationship. Paine had mistakenly considered Washington an intimate friend. Except for Paine, America’s Founding Fathers came from the wealthiest stratum of American society, so during and after the Revolutionary War, they sought to protect their privileges. They tolerated Paine since he could rally the ordinary people, “the grazing multitude” in Washington’s memorable phrase, but when the war had been won, they had no more use for him.

    Just as you and I inhabit a world entirely alien to those who rule over us, Paine was also viewed by the elites of his time as a clear outsider or pesty gadfly, if not outright freak. Speaking on the floor of Congress, Gouverneur Morris described Paine as “a mere adventurer from England, without fortune, without family connections, ignorant even of grammar.” John Adams acknowledged Paine’s unmatched sway over the masses, but arrived at a colorful and telling conclusion, “I know not whether any man in the world has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs or the last thirty years than Tom Paine. There can be no severer satyr on the age. For such a mongrel between pig and puppy, begotten by a wild boar on a bitch wolf, never before in any age of the world was suffered by the poltroonery of mankind, to run through such a career of mischief,” so to have such influence over ordinary people is to indulge in a career of mischief? So Paine was little more than a demagogue from many elites’ perspective, but if he could get farmers and tradesmen to pick up rifles, then he had a temporary role to play.

    Paine gave the American Revolution a much more democratic veneer, and he’s still trotted out every now and them, in tiny doses, to give the impression that we have stayed true to his vision, but if Paine’s foundational ideas are really compared to the actual state of our union, it’s clear that we’ve gone from a flawed yet promising beginning to become this physically and mentally ill, insatiably rapacious yet raped nation. Throughout our entire history, the American underclass has been partially appeased by a trickled down prosperity achieved through endless plunder and conquest, but our rottenness is becoming harder to hide as our ship creaks, lists and sucks in cascades. Standing in this bilge, we can’t help but see our misfortune steadily rising to our ankles, shins, thighs and higher. It’s past time we act.

    [...]

    I’m pretty much a “Paineophile” except for the fact that he was in favor of the constitution, and consider myself a minor scholar regarding the man, but your comment earns you an A+ in my book. Damn good stuff there including some things I was unaware of. Hank gets high grades too.

    It’s past time we act.

    For sure.

    Read More
  33. @Linh Dinh
    I visited Paine's hometown, Thetford, in 2006; his American home, Bordentown, in 2014; then wrote about him. An excerpt:

    [...]

    Over and over again, Paine would speak and act from his firmest convictions, no matter the cost. A poor man, he gave his royalties from Common Sense and American Crisis to clothe the Continental Army, and even donated his life savings to it. As our first whistleblower, Paine exposed Silas Deane as an embezzler and war profiteer, thus provoking the wrath of not just Deane’s many powerful allies, but other corrupt officials as well. In Age of Reason, his dismantling of organized religions, Paine alienated many ordinary folks, his natural audience.

    Always blunt and upright, Paine annoyed or threatened many people, including erstwhile allies, like George Washington, for one. When Paine was imprisoned and almost killed during the French Revolution, Washington didn’t gnash his ivory, cow bone and black slave teeth in worries or sorrows, and this mean coldness destroyed their lopsided relationship. Paine had mistakenly considered Washington an intimate friend. Except for Paine, America’s Founding Fathers came from the wealthiest stratum of American society, so during and after the Revolutionary War, they sought to protect their privileges. They tolerated Paine since he could rally the ordinary people, “the grazing multitude” in Washington’s memorable phrase, but when the war had been won, they had no more use for him.

    Just as you and I inhabit a world entirely alien to those who rule over us, Paine was also viewed by the elites of his time as a clear outsider or pesty gadfly, if not outright freak. Speaking on the floor of Congress, Gouverneur Morris described Paine as “a mere adventurer from England, without fortune, without family connections, ignorant even of grammar.” John Adams acknowledged Paine’s unmatched sway over the masses, but arrived at a colorful and telling conclusion, “I know not whether any man in the world has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs or the last thirty years than Tom Paine. There can be no severer satyr on the age. For such a mongrel between pig and puppy, begotten by a wild boar on a bitch wolf, never before in any age of the world was suffered by the poltroonery of mankind, to run through such a career of mischief,” so to have such influence over ordinary people is to indulge in a career of mischief? So Paine was little more than a demagogue from many elites’ perspective, but if he could get farmers and tradesmen to pick up rifles, then he had a temporary role to play.

    Paine gave the American Revolution a much more democratic veneer, and he’s still trotted out every now and them, in tiny doses, to give the impression that we have stayed true to his vision, but if Paine’s foundational ideas are really compared to the actual state of our union, it’s clear that we’ve gone from a flawed yet promising beginning to become this physically and mentally ill, insatiably rapacious yet raped nation. Throughout our entire history, the American underclass has been partially appeased by a trickled down prosperity achieved through endless plunder and conquest, but our rottenness is becoming harder to hide as our ship creaks, lists and sucks in cascades. Standing in this bilge, we can’t help but see our misfortune steadily rising to our ankles, shins, thighs and higher. It’s past time we act.

    [...]

    The life of Thomas Paine was a life of pain. An ordinary printer came to the land of brave and the free and if I remember correctly, died penniless and lonely.
    Come on America, bend down and tie those shoelaces. You really don’t want to walk with the Jidahists in Syria or fight the Russians, do you?

    Read More
  34. Rehmat says:
    @Sherman
    Hey Homer

    There's a mistake in your post.

    You left out the part about the Zionist Jews.

    Sherm

    Nyeth Sharon – As a typical Zionist bastard you’re even lying from your grave.

    Zionist Jews are very evil people. They collaborated with Nazi to push Jews from Iraq, Morocco, Tunis, and other Muslim countries to populate the Zionist state experiment on an Arab land. Once they succeeded fooling these Arab Jews – in 1960s, they killed 100,000 of them by using them guinea-pigs for testing nuclear radiation effects.

    In October 2013, Israeli historian professor Yigal Bin-Nun (Bar-Ilan University), in a study exposed Zionist lies about Jewish exodus from Morocco. Based on his study of Moroccan Jewish community, Bin-Nun has claimed that Mossad, the national intelligence agency of Israel, was behind the whole operation wherein about 160,000 Moroccan Jews left Morocco for the Zionist occupied Palestine…..

    https://rehmat1.com/2013/11/13/why-jews-left-morocco/

    Read More
  35. woodNfish says:
    @Linh Dinh
    Also, my 2000 collection of short stories, Fake House, is dedicated "To the Unchosen," and here's a sentence from my 2004 Blood and Soap, "He ignored public fascinations with movie stars, athletes, statesmen, revolutionaries, mass-murderers and poets by writing well-researched, footnoted and illustrated biographies of bus drivers, cashiers, beauticians, filing clerks, plumbers and roofers." I'm not quite doing that with these Obscured American pieces, but you know what I mean.

    I'm not a college graduate, much less an academic. Like Hank, I try to educate myself. For a decade, I was a housepainter.

    You seem to have learned more than most college grads who are lucky if they can figure out that many of their professors are/were idiots.

    Read More
  36. woodNfish says:
    @Linh Dinh
    Hi woodNfish,

    First of, these people are rarely depicted accurately or with much empathy, since most writers don't associate with them.

    Secondly, these are the types of people I've known all my life. Many of them are my friends or drinking buddies.

    Thirdly, I've also interviewed people who are not "downtrodden," such as Rudy List, the retired math professor, or Amanda Zinoman, the film editor.

    The more refined people are routinely featured everywhere else on the internet, but regular Joe Sixpacks, of whatever race, are mostly caricatured.

    Finally, I don't have access to the higher strata. I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.


    Linh

    Hi Linh,

    I am not sure how refined most of the middle class is, but I expect you are correct about the exposure they get elsewhere. That is not the type of reading I typically pursue.

    I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.

    Don’t let that get out to all the wanna be writers in the world who think that if they write it, they will come.

    Read More
  37. Ace says:
    @anonymous
    "Uncle Tom"? More like someone who hasn't let himself be divided and conquered by swilling the cheap liquor of "promoting his own racial interests."

    Too bad yours was the first comment. Hopefully, others will address what this man had to say, and not foul the thread with recycled race crap.

    Exactly. Liu’s comment was bizarre. This man is extraordinary in his knowledge and insight. I could hold forth like that without a day’s preparation and a handful of notes.

    It’s absurd to think that he can be dismissed as being “too Uncle Tom.”

    Read More
  38. Beenthere says:
    @OutWest
    Smart man. But he really needs some good conversation to refine his views. What he learned in grade school is unexamined and short of his more adult learning. His religious polemics are a tad weak.

    Many years of living have refined Hank’s clear words of wisdom. You have many many years of living to fully appreciate them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @OutWest
    Well, I’m ten years older than he is. I can remember when the principles he avows were taught in civics classes rather reviled as in today’s schools. But then us ole fuds longing for the old days can be a bore. And that’s to say nothing of the slipping grip on reality with age.

    That say, his take is a bit siloed if refreshing.
  39. Ace says:
    @Pat the Rat
    Nationalism is just another idol, like race.

    They all lead to massive conflict between nations and peoples. WWI and WWII weren't dreams, they happened because of Nationalism.

    The modern left idea is that we will not have Nationalism, just people, individual identities free to be and do whatever they want. Unfortunately some people don't care if they exploit others by lying to them and using them. Their view is if people are not smart enough to look after themselves then they deserve to be used and abused.

    Remember the degraded life of Amanda that L. wrote about a few posts back, drugs, prostitution, family breakdown.

    The modern lefty libertarian type just goes well that's her problem, I can do drugs and prostitution and divorce without becoming that, why should I stop watching porn even if I know that the making of p0rn causes great suffering and exploitation.

    In the end they deny evil and sin totally to justify their own choices in life no matter how much injustice and suffering they cause.

    Nationalism is not the problem. That’s the bogus justification employed by the E.U. autocrats to impose their straitjacket on the people of Europe.

    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers, compounded by the rulers losing their inner moral compass.

    Mexicans, Icelanders, Japanese, and New Zealanders are nationalistic but they aren’t a threat to world peace. Men who who can command armies and secret police to do what they in their sole discretion decide are the ones who cause human misery. I’m a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.

    Westerners are getting a bellyful of what happens when they lose control of government. For a long time I and, I believe, millions of other Westerners assumed that we still live in a civilization that is Western. We know now that we are no longer in Kansas and that the scum who control our governments are authoritarian, criminals whose parents were not married to each other.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Hey Ace,

    I’m a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.
     
    Isn't that more patriot than nationalist? At least that's what it is in my book.

    Peace.
    , @iffen
    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers

    I'm thinking that you need to work on what it is that you think defines rulers.
  40. Talha says:
    @Ace
    Nationalism is not the problem. That's the bogus justification employed by the E.U. autocrats to impose their straitjacket on the people of Europe.

    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers, compounded by the rulers losing their inner moral compass.

    Mexicans, Icelanders, Japanese, and New Zealanders are nationalistic but they aren't a threat to world peace. Men who who can command armies and secret police to do what they in their sole discretion decide are the ones who cause human misery. I'm a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.

    Westerners are getting a bellyful of what happens when they lose control of government. For a long time I and, I believe, millions of other Westerners assumed that we still live in a civilization that is Western. We know now that we are no longer in Kansas and that the scum who control our governments are authoritarian, criminals whose parents were not married to each other.

    Hey Ace,

    I’m a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.

    Isn’t that more patriot than nationalist? At least that’s what it is in my book.

    Peace.

    Read More
  41. Ace says:

    The difference between the two concepts is too subtle for my pedestrian mind to perceive, Talha.

    I’ll ponder it over a margarita tonight! :-)

    Read More
  42. BB753 says:

    A pleasant surprise, Linh Dinh! This Hank guy turned out to be a very interesting person. Glad to hear he’s not destitute as so many others of your interviewees.

    Read More
  43. utu says:
    @woodNfish
    Hank is a very smart and insightful man. I am having a hard time believing Dinh actually wrote this excellent piece. He usually finds worthless leftist turds who blame everyone else for the problems they created for themselves.

    Hank is completely right about slavery, trivializing our founders and what they were about and the great evil our country has become. There are no blinders on this fellow's eyes. The democrats have not fooled him at all.

    I do take issue with one part of his narrative concerning Thomas Paine. Yes Paine was British and they considered him a traitor. The Brits even raided his grave and stole his remains which have never been found. And Paine may have been a deist, but Paine told us, "Society is good. Government is evil." He was right, and those are words to live by.

    Hank is thoughtful and have good heart.

    Read More
  44. @restless94110
    This guy starts out well, but then devolves into fundamentalist Christian nonsense. Sure, Darwin was a commie and the provable-every-minute-of-everyday theory of evolution is hogwash (by everyday in every way I'm speaking of the rapid evolution of bacteria, and the not as rapid evolution of plant species as seen in hybrid forms of seed stock as well as the fairly rapid evolution of the sparrow as still studied on the Galapagos Islands.

    Thers is a place for Christian faith and a simultaneous place for science without throwing either one out the window (as the atheists are wont to do; as the Christians are wont to do). And without degrading the culture what this guy does accurately describe.

    There appears to be a seminal movement underfoot of people that are calling themselves "traditionalists" that may end up countering the decaying nonsense coming out via Beyonce, Madonna, Miley, et al.

    Personally, I'd like to see women smile again. That's not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the partriarchy. Perhaps, like Linh's subject in this interview, I am as lost as he is.

    “…Personally, I’d like to see women smile again. That’s not something you often see nowadays. I suppose it is now looked upon as a sign of weakness to the patriarchy”

    C'mon man, who put that in your head- some screwball feminist?

    This country has been taken over treasonously, by homos, trangenders, and other spineless, dilapidated lackeys for the NWO.

    …That ain't no Patriarchy!

    Read More
  45. iffen says:
    @Ace
    Nationalism is not the problem. That's the bogus justification employed by the E.U. autocrats to impose their straitjacket on the people of Europe.

    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers, compounded by the rulers losing their inner moral compass.

    Mexicans, Icelanders, Japanese, and New Zealanders are nationalistic but they aren't a threat to world peace. Men who who can command armies and secret police to do what they in their sole discretion decide are the ones who cause human misery. I'm a nationalist by any measure but I loathe the military adventurism of the present United States government.

    Westerners are getting a bellyful of what happens when they lose control of government. For a long time I and, I believe, millions of other Westerners assumed that we still live in a civilization that is Western. We know now that we are no longer in Kansas and that the scum who control our governments are authoritarian, criminals whose parents were not married to each other.

    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers

    I’m thinking that you need to work on what it is that you think defines rulers.

    Read More
  46. @Linh Dinh
    Hi woodNfish,

    First of, these people are rarely depicted accurately or with much empathy, since most writers don't associate with them.

    Secondly, these are the types of people I've known all my life. Many of them are my friends or drinking buddies.

    Thirdly, I've also interviewed people who are not "downtrodden," such as Rudy List, the retired math professor, or Amanda Zinoman, the film editor.

    The more refined people are routinely featured everywhere else on the internet, but regular Joe Sixpacks, of whatever race, are mostly caricatured.

    Finally, I don't have access to the higher strata. I can only afford beer in the cheapest joints, and often not even.


    Linh

    I don’t have access to the higher strata.

    Linh, any more teaching gigs in the pipeline?

    Read More
  47. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The reason the jews like the negros so much is their deep seated belief in the boogyman in the sky, the very story that the jew created. The jew has discovered that the negros are easy to hoodwink so why not allow them to amass a wallet full of prime USA jew confetti. The jew knows how easy that will be to steal.

    200 years of pent up demand.

    In contrast, just 20 years ago in China 1 Billion people had no beleif in the sky boogyman.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stonehands
    The Jews have quite a list of scientific achievements- despite their belief in "sky god"? Maybe you need Him too!

    I have been to China, and the Chinese yearn for Christ...The communist government fears God- but not you, Ha!
  48. Ace says:
    @iffen
    The problem is that people lose control of their rulers

    I'm thinking that you need to work on what it is that you think defines rulers.

    That must be a really deep comment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @iffen
    That must be a really deep comment.

    Not if you think so.
  49. Roofgoat says:
    @OutWest
    Smart man. But he really needs some good conversation to refine his views. What he learned in grade school is unexamined and short of his more adult learning. His religious polemics are a tad weak.

    Outwest, you wish you had a 1/10 of wisdom this guy possesses. But your are loaded with “intelligence” – and the gift of academic intelligence is a dime a dozen today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @OutWest
    Have to agree with you as to academia. I’ve always associate scholarship with credentials as opposed to wisdom.

    Actually, what insight I may have comes from listening to the adults from the mills and worksites recount their observations about life from maybe 1945 to 1950. There was a good deal of ignorance but also much intelligent insight borne from experience. Of course television killed this and substituted canned and manipulative marketing propaganda. In the old, pre-TV days the crap now pedaled would be a nonstarter. Hank is a bit of a throwback in this regard. But he would, in my opinion, benefit by sitting and arguing with a half dozen other Hanks – if such being still exist.

    But then he’d probably just end up in a silo.
  50. OutWest says:
    @Beenthere
    Many years of living have refined Hank's clear words of wisdom. You have many many years of living to fully appreciate them.

    Well, I’m ten years older than he is. I can remember when the principles he avows were taught in civics classes rather reviled as in today’s schools. But then us ole fuds longing for the old days can be a bore. And that’s to say nothing of the slipping grip on reality with age.

    That say, his take is a bit siloed if refreshing.

    Read More
  51. OutWest says:
    @Roofgoat
    Outwest, you wish you had a 1/10 of wisdom this guy possesses. But your are loaded with "intelligence" - and the gift of academic intelligence is a dime a dozen today.

    Have to agree with you as to academia. I’ve always associate scholarship with credentials as opposed to wisdom.

    Actually, what insight I may have comes from listening to the adults from the mills and worksites recount their observations about life from maybe 1945 to 1950. There was a good deal of ignorance but also much intelligent insight borne from experience. Of course television killed this and substituted canned and manipulative marketing propaganda. In the old, pre-TV days the crap now pedaled would be a nonstarter. Hank is a bit of a throwback in this regard. But he would, in my opinion, benefit by sitting and arguing with a half dozen other Hanks – if such being still exist.

    But then he’d probably just end up in a silo.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Roofgoat
    OK Outwest, then I ask, respectfully and without being argumentative, which of his views need refinement?

    I think the guy lays it out pretty well without trying to sound impressive.

  52. @Anonymous
    The reason the jews like the negros so much is their deep seated belief in the boogyman in the sky, the very story that the jew created. The jew has discovered that the negros are easy to hoodwink so why not allow them to amass a wallet full of prime USA jew confetti. The jew knows how easy that will be to steal.

    200 years of pent up demand.

    In contrast, just 20 years ago in China 1 Billion people had no beleif in the sky boogyman.

    The Jews have quite a list of scientific achievements- despite their belief in “sky god”? Maybe you need Him too!

    I have been to China, and the Chinese yearn for Christ…The communist government fears God- but not you, Ha!

    Read More
  53. Roofgoat says:
    @OutWest
    Have to agree with you as to academia. I’ve always associate scholarship with credentials as opposed to wisdom.

    Actually, what insight I may have comes from listening to the adults from the mills and worksites recount their observations about life from maybe 1945 to 1950. There was a good deal of ignorance but also much intelligent insight borne from experience. Of course television killed this and substituted canned and manipulative marketing propaganda. In the old, pre-TV days the crap now pedaled would be a nonstarter. Hank is a bit of a throwback in this regard. But he would, in my opinion, benefit by sitting and arguing with a half dozen other Hanks – if such being still exist.

    But then he’d probably just end up in a silo.

    OK Outwest, then I ask, respectfully and without being argumentative, which of his views need refinement?

    I think the guy lays it out pretty well without trying to sound impressive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @OutWest
    He has a right to any view he wishes as long as he affords me mutual respect. But he has tagged into various political and religious dogmas that are better understood in a broad context. Jacques’ From Dawn to Decadence would, for example, put some of his beliefs in historical context. What he defends are platitudes disavowed by our ruling class. We need to analyze the how and why of this.

    Or he could spend some time with Linh Dinh defending against critical comment.

    And remember did say he was a smart guy!
  54. iffen says:
    @Ace
    That must be a really deep comment.

    That must be a really deep comment.

    Not if you think so.

    Read More
  55. OutWest says:
    @Roofgoat
    OK Outwest, then I ask, respectfully and without being argumentative, which of his views need refinement?

    I think the guy lays it out pretty well without trying to sound impressive.

    He has a right to any view he wishes as long as he affords me mutual respect. But he has tagged into various political and religious dogmas that are better understood in a broad context. Jacques’ From Dawn to Decadence would, for example, put some of his beliefs in historical context. What he defends are platitudes disavowed by our ruling class. We need to analyze the how and why of this.

    Or he could spend some time with Linh Dinh defending against critical comment.

    And remember did say he was a smart guy!

    Read More
  56. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    So where did he get the supposed Stalin quotes from? Sounds apocryphal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
    Yes, though often quoted, it is apocryphal.

    In February, Ben Carson had this version, "Joseph Stalin said if you want to bring America down you have to undermine three things -- our spiritual life, our patriotism, and our morality."

    Hank's quotation from Franklin is also not exact, and he had the date wrong. On June 28th, 1787, Franklin said, "I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth that God Governs in the affairs of men."

    I mean, Hank is 70-years-old, and the dude was speaking impromptu on a busy sidewalk, with the wind blowing and much traffic noise. Hank talked so much, he started to mumble, so I had to ask him to speak up.

    With so many words tumbling out, Hank also stuttered at times, but his mind was always sharp. When Hank started to talk about the Founding Fathers as no Deists, I brought up Thomas Paine, and Hank launched right into his views on Thomas Paine without even a pause.

  57. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @anonymous
    So where did he get the supposed Stalin quotes from? Sounds apocryphal.

    Yes, though often quoted, it is apocryphal.

    In February, Ben Carson had this version, “Joseph Stalin said if you want to bring America down you have to undermine three things — our spiritual life, our patriotism, and our morality.”

    Hank’s quotation from Franklin is also not exact, and he had the date wrong. On June 28th, 1787, Franklin said, “I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth that God Governs in the affairs of men.”

    I mean, Hank is 70-years-old, and the dude was speaking impromptu on a busy sidewalk, with the wind blowing and much traffic noise. Hank talked so much, he started to mumble, so I had to ask him to speak up.

    With so many words tumbling out, Hank also stuttered at times, but his mind was always sharp. When Hank started to talk about the Founding Fathers as no Deists, I brought up Thomas Paine, and Hank launched right into his views on Thomas Paine without even a pause.

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  58. Klokman says:
    @Connecticut Famer
    Hank sounds like a latter-day Eric Hoffer, albeit with a more theological bent. Not sure I buy into everything he says but give him credit. He is, above all, a thinker...raising questions to which no one seems to have any answers.

    Not even close to Eric. But Eric described this character quite well in his writings.

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  59. Klokman says:

    Hank needs to spend a lot more time in a syndicated library to dispel the propaganda he was taught about the Federal government and its purveyors. The Anti-Federalist papers would make a good introduction. While there is some merit to his historical recollections on social behavior (I’m old enough to remember those social conditions also), for a Christian, he ought to remember the ancient euphemism: “There is nothing new under the sun.”

    “The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.” Allegedly, this came from an Assyrian tablet, ca. 2800 BCE.

    As for Hank’s religious beliefs–

    God—the entity of no name, undefined form, imputed to be all-powerful, all-knowing, and present everywhere, but needs an intermediary to convey the supplications of its worshippers to it. An entity that requires vicarious perfection for Man to be graced with its imputed glory, but has never revealed itself directly to anyone (despite its totality of power), and while claiming to be the embodiment of love, threatens Man with destruction for all manner of petty disobedience. At age four, I wondered who this entity was, composed of numerous contradictions, that I should bother speaking to, much less worship. By age ten, though I had only read about carnivals, I knew that Sunday School was just such an event.

    I spent the ensuing half century enmeshed in a religious cult, persuaded by the same kind of thinking as Hank, only in the end to return to the observations I made as a child, and finally got myself out. Paine saw through the ruse, but Hank conveniently neglects what else Paine said about God, and the contributions Paine made to bring about a less powerful Federal government than was intended by some of the Founders. Hank, like many Christians I’ve observed, has picked through the evidence to shore up his beliefs while consigning the rest to oblivion in order to feel right about himself. Hank cannot figure that his beliefs and his attitudes are part of what created the socio-political miasma he deprecates.

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