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I just spent a week in Macau and Hong Kong, the West’s last two possessions in Asia. There, I heard an Indian joke from Filipino writer Charlson Ong, “You Brits think you can just come and take our chicken biryani and chicken tandoori? No, we’re coming with you!”

A great irony of colonialism is that many of the colonized nations have managed to stay more coherent, intact and true to themselves than the colonizers, so that seven decades after the Indians kicked out the Brits, for example, India is still essentially India, if not more so, while England has become relentlessly less English. Despite all the physical and psychological violence of colonialism and its aftermath, Morocco, Algeria, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam have retained much more of their heritage than France, incredibly.

Ong and I were in Macau as guests of the Asia Pacific Writers and Translators conference. Preparing for my trip, I went on Duolingo to learn bits of Portuguese, a totally unnecessary task since through several days of walking many miles through various Macau neighborhoods, I didn’t hear Portuguese once.

I asked a Macau-born taxi driver, “Do you speak any Portuguese?”

“Obrigado!”

“Parabens!”

“That means ‘You’re welcome,’ right?”

In Cathedral Parish, I did see some Portuguese schoolchildren in uniform, for the Escola Portuguesa de Macau was there. Since these girls were sitting on benches and minding their own business, I didn’t inch up to overhear what waxed from their mouths. News, “Vietnamese-American creep arrested in Macau for aiming unclean ear at terrified white teens, now recovering in hospital.”

At Hou Fung Cafe on Alameda Dr Carlos d’Assumpção, there was a tall and hefty waitress who appeared to be Macanese. The rest of the staff were obviously Chinese, as were all the customers. On the menu, there were “Portuguese Specialties,” so I tried the bacalhau and mashed potato casserole, then Portuguese fried rice, which contained bits of a Portuguese sausage, onion, tomato and a single black olive.

One of the conference organizers was Portuguese Helder Beja, but he’s a recent immigrant who arrived long after Macau had been returned to China. Whites on the streets were likely to be tourists. There are more Filipinos in Macau than Portuguese, I’m sure, for I saw Pinoys all over, working in hotels, casinos and bars. At the American themed Roadhouse, there were Filipino bartenders and a Filipino band, singing Dire Straits, Eric Clapton and other classic rock hits. (A side note: as others in our group sat at tables, I found myself at the bar with Ed and Ravi Shankar, and though none of us were white, we were Americans, damn it, and American men tend to sit on high stools at the bar. Born in Detroit, ethnic Chinese Ed began each day with oatmeal, which he had to buy in bulk in Macau.)

Long a Cantonese city, Macau is now swarmed by mainland visitors, mostly provincials, judging by their tacky clothing, but that’s true of most casino visitors anywhere. On Rua de São Domingos, I stood near a middle-aged man in matching T-shirt and sweatpants that were like black velvet paintings, with a lurid yellow sun, tigers and roses, and a large black purse draped around his neck. A woman wore a salmon colored hoodie emblazoned with a young white girl sticking her tongue out sideway, “YOU’VE GOT TO GET SID OF THE DRAINS EN YOUR LIFE. ONLY DEAL, WITR FOUNTAINS.” Did I just see a yellow jaguar on a white T-shirt, with “THANK YOU HAVE A NICE DAY” in primary colors? The bare shouldered peekaboo blouse with fluffy arm holes was clearly in fashion. Large man in a pink muscle-T, “BIGGER THAN SATAN BIEBRE [sic].” Slurping noodles, women squatted next to baby strollers, with the boy toddler sporting that familiar military crew cut.

Suckers all, they’re enthralled by the grand settings, so swarm into casinos to squander their hard earned Yuans, or they splurge at the many glittery brand name boutiques, with some boasting tall and handsome white greeters in suits. Wandering wide eyed through faux palaces, these peasants are happy to be fleeced, so they can go home and boast of having been to Macau, where there’s the Palazzo Ducale, Rialto Bridge, Saint Mark’s Campanile, Place Vendôme, Arc de Triomphe and Eiffel Tower, etc. They have been to something like Europe. And America, too. At Joyride, they can manspread in a convertible and chomp on a burger, hot dog or an authentic ice cream sundae. They’ve seen it all.

In December of 1966, Macau Chinese demonstrated then rioted against their Portuguese overlords. The mob toppled the statue of Colonel Vincente Nicolas de Mesquita and broke the arm from one of Jorge Alvares. They tore oil portraits from the walls of City Hall, and flung books and records onto the street, and set them on fire. After eight protesters were killed and 212 injured by police, four Chinese warships appeared offshore and thousands of Red Guards threatened to invade. Forced to back down, the Portuguese governor signed a letter of apologies under a portrait of Mao Zedong, no less. Afterwards, Portugal’s foreign minister described his country’s role in Macau as “a caretaker of a condominium under foreign supervision.”

Vox populi, so these folks got to be Chinese in Macau, without suffering under a Chinese government. The Cultural Revolution didn’t rape them.

In Hong Kong, Macau, Singapore and everywhere else they’re left alone to do business, Chinese have always thrived, and for the longest time, the showcase Chinese city was Hong Kong, and many will argue it still is, with some claiming it’s simply the best fuckin’ city anywhere, period, ever, for it is as sophisticated and beautiful as any, with all amenities readily available, and perfectly safe. Until very recently, that is.

Hong Kong is livelier than Singapore or Tokyo, has much better weather than London, and is not blighted by the types of run down or dreary neighborhoods you must dodge in New York or Paris. Granted, it has no world-class museums, but few live in a place to be near great art. Restaurants matter much more to daily living, and Hong Kong is second to none when it comes to satisfying chowing, and we’re not just talking Cantonese, of course. On a brief stroll through SoHo, I passed mostly packed restaurants offering Persian Fusion, Peruvian, Greek, Italian, Italian American, French, Vietnamese, Malaysian, Japanese, Portuguese, American Smokehouse and Californian dishes, etc.

On High Street in Sai Wan, the range was more limited, but still staggeringly diverse and impressive, with even a Vietnamese craft beer available. I took the train to some generic shopping mall in Tsing Yi. There, I could choose from Taiwanese, Thai, Japanese, Korean, Malaysian, American steaks, Western Seafood or Italian, etc. For less than $9, I had a pretty good plate of fettucine with steak strips and mushroom in a pesto sauce thickened with parmesan. Compared with the pasta I had been eating in Vietnam, this was nirvana.

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On Wyndham Street, I noticed Frank’s, Italian American, so had to walk in. In Philadelphia, one of my regular haunts was Dirty Frank’s, and I lived among Italians in South Philly for over two decades. Hong Kong’s Frank’s was owned by two brothers from New Jersey, and I quickly found out, but they weren’t Italian. The cook was a black guy from Queens, and the manager was a Chinese Canadian. The featured beer was Brooklyn Pale Ale. There was a middle-aged black man at the bar, so I said to him, “We’re probably more Italian than any of these motherfuckers!”

“I agree.”

Born and raised in rural Saskatchewan, David taught English in Korea for 18 years, so spoke Korean fluently, he said, and had just moved to Changchun. China is fine, but Shanghai or Beijing can’t touch Hong Kong as far as worldliness, David asserted.

So Hong Kong enjoys the best of multiculturalism, a great variety of food from all over, without having to import many foreigners. Ninety two percent of Hongkongers are Han Chinese. By comparison, about 40% of Londoners are foreign-born.

On Hong Kong streets, the most conspicuous outsiders are Filipinas and Indonesians. Many of these are domestic servants who, by law, must live with their employers, with Sunday their only day off. Needing to escape their daily confines, yet with no shelter of their own, these women congregate at any large public space, where they sit or lie on pieces of cardboard, chatting, playing cards, putting on makeup, doing their hair, sleeping or just staring into space. It is a startling sight to visitors, and at first, one naturally assumes they’re homeless, until one notices they’re too clean and neat to be long-term sidewalk dwellers.

With 7.4 million residents, Hong Kong has roughly 2,000 homeless people, an astonishing low number compared to American cities. With a population of 8.5 million, New York has 61,000, and Los Angeles (pop. 4 million) tallies 59,000. About 200,000 Hongkongers must endure absurdly tiny and sometimes squalid living spaces, however, with bed, kitchen and toilet all in one room, so to bathe, one must squat and keep the shower head close to one’s scrawny body, to not splatter water onto one’s bok choy or whatever. Many have no room at all, just a coffin like cubicle or wire netting around a bed, like a chicken coop.

So what’s causing the Hong Kong protest/riot, now over six-months-old? The extradition bill that triggered it doesn’t sound unreasonable, for any suspect should be put on trial where the crime was committed, so Hong Kong can’t be a haven for financial criminals, for example. The territory is a major hub of banking shenanigans. This bill doesn’t mean Chinese security thugs can come into Hong Kong to snatch dissidents or whoever, although this apparently happened in 2015 with Lee Bo, a British citizen who was associated with Mighty Current, a publishing house specializing on political, personal and sexual dirt among the Chinese Communist leadership. Four other Mighty Current directors also disappeared at the same time, with one dragged from his home in Thailand, and the rest nabbed in China itself.

With the extradition bill scrapped, the only substantial demand is for universal suffrage for Legislative Council and Chief Executive elections, that is, for direct democracy, but even if this is conceded, I suspect this protest will continue, or others will flare up down the line, for this simple reason, many Hongkongers can’t stand the thought of being absorbed into China, and the United States is exploiting this sentiment to provoke and discredit China. Although many protesters are appealing to the US for help, with some even waving the American flag, Uncle Sam would like nothing better than for them to be massacred by China, the more the merrier, so that China could be condemned as a moral pariah.

Knowing this, China has not intervened, for the longer this protest/riot drags on, the less support it will receive from ordinary Hongkongers, for already, they must deal with damaged or shut down subway stations, paralyzed airport, blocked streets, reduced business income and chaos that can erupt anywhere, anytime, with all of it instigated by the protesters/rioters.

With its extrajudicial killings that respect no borders, and now the seizing and public humiliation of a famous political opponent, Julian Assange, the United States should be the last to lecture anyone about dodgy extraditions.

Graffiti, “Free always,” “Free HK,” “NO CHINA,” “ANTICHINAZI,” “HK IS NOT CHINA,” but of course, Hong Kong is China, and not just legally, but geographically, historically and, most importantly, demographically. Hong Kong is not just Chinese, but China, and it is not Singapore or even Taiwan. You must remember that Hong Kong has no history of self-rule. Occupied by the UK, it always had a British governor appointed by London. Although Hongkongers enjoyed freedoms, it was never democratic. Hong Kong protesters who wave the British flag are screaming out to the world, “We’re missing our white daddy,” and this act is so pathetic, I half suspect it’s done by Beijing agents.

Who wants to be Chinese anyway?

At the Macau conference, there was a panel, Multifaceted China, and this is how it’s described in the official program, “China may appear monolithic externally but within lies a deep diversity of ideas, writing and opinion—a multiplicity further complicated by the plethora of Chinese communities living throughout Asia and the world. Get a taste of the immensity and the paradoxes of the country in the 21st century through this panel featuring award-winning authors and scholars representing various aspects of Chinese writing and experience.”

One of the featured writers was a very young woman, Shen Xingzhou, who immediately stated that she didn’t understand why she was on this panel, since she didn’t feel very Chinese, and frankly didn’t feel like she was anything at all, and though she had lived in Shanghai, Hong Kong, London and Singapore, she didn’t belong to any of those cities. Moreover, she wished that all traces of her in all those places would just disappear.

ORDER IT NOW

Later, I met an even more rootless writer, and this is his bio in the program, “Kiran Bhat is a global citizen formed in a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia, in the USA, to parents from South Canara, in India. A world traveler, polyglot, teacher, and digital nomad, he has travelled to about 130 countries, lived in 18 different places, and speaks 12 languages. Whether it is in his mother tongue Kannada, or in languages as intellectually distant as Mandarin or Portuguese, he uses these experiences to dismantle literary borders and create globalised art. He has called too many places at the moment home to do justice to a list, but he considers Mumbai the only place that he wants to settle down in. He currently lives in Melbourne.”

Shen Xingzhou is also called Jojo. Cornering her during a break, I asked this striking woman, “So Jojo, where will you go next?”

“Maybe Japan.”

“Do you speak Japanese?”

“No, but I can learn.”

“Amazing,” I chuckled, jangling my bad, loose teeth, accentuating our age gap.

Gucci ad spotted in a high-end Hong Kong mall showed a gorgeous Chinese woman marvelously dressed. Standing in the middle of an American Southwest desert, she was hitchhiking with a cardboard sign, “SOMEWHERE.” The American romance of the open road has been drafted to glamorize universal alienation.

Surfing over this entire globe, Jojo and Khiran represent an ideal of the latest generations. Two years ago, I met a 23-year-old poet in Toluca, Mexico, who spoke nearly flawless English. “I would like nothing better,” Oscar Cortes declared, “than to move from hotel room to hotel room.” Except for a couple of pimples, his face was remarkably smooth, unmarked, uncreased and unscarred.

“Jojo, you’re very much like that guy, Khiran.”

“No, I’m not.”

“Of course, you are. You both think you can be at home anywhere. He told me he could speak 12 languages, but I’m sure that’s bullshit. No one can do that. Still, he’s moving from place to place, a global citizen, just like you.”

“But I don’t belong anywhere, and I don’t want to be anywhere.”

“That sounds so depressing, but you don’t look at all depressed!”

“You don’t know me,” she smiled.

In Macau, we all stayed at the same hotel, Grand Lapa, which featured a rather impressive breakfast buffet, with Chinese, English, Portuguese and American offerings. We stuffed ourselves in a grand, high ceilinged room with airy arches, fluted columns, louvered windows, amphora shaped balusters and cushioned rattan chairs. There were flowers at each table, and visible from each was the semitropical lushness, just outside.

To my eternal shame, I must admit that each morning, I just couldn’t wait to taste the hash browns with ketchup, then baked beans. Jojo, though, always went for the congee, dim sum or fried rice noodles, and she never touched, I noticed, any of the Western items.

Just like the Hong Kong protesters, she is essentially, unmistakably and eternally Chinese, albeit uneasily. Lin Yutang, “What is patriotism but love of the foods one had as a child?”

Linh Dinh’s latest book is Postcards from the End of America. He maintains a regularly updated photo blog.

 
• Category: Culture/Society • Tags: China, Hong Kong, Macau 
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  1. Kannada? Is that how they spell it in Atlanta? Is this some kind of meme? Who’s this guy think he is, Don Cherry?

  2. Of note, the Ong family are Chinese-Filipinos of Hakkan descent from Cebu. So technically, Charleson was probably an ethnic Chinese himself.

    As for Portuguese in Macau, or Spanish in Philippines, the natives seem to have mixed-feelings towards them.

    Unlike the stiff Brits, who were stuffy queers who liked to import staid English wives or more often have sex with one another in their gin palaces, the Portuguese and Spanish quickly created a mixed-blood class of landowners.

    So Macau and Philippines have a well-entrenched mixed-race landowning class.

  3. Haha says:

    You have outdone yourself in this piece, Linh.

    So perceptive, so tender, as you look at the world and some of its Chinese and global citizens. Loved your observation “The American romance of the open road has been drafted to glamorize universal alienation”. True and profound. Equals tomes of social psychology texts in wisdom and perception.

    But where you can look at homo sapiens a la global with open curiosity, I have come to detest these global citizens. They epitomize our age of decadence and alienation, irresponsibility and selfishness.

    “She didn’t feel very Chinese, and frankly didn’t feel like she was anything at all, and though she had lived in Shanghai, Hong Kong, London and Singapore, she didn’t belong to any of those cities. Moreover, she wished that all traces of her in all those places would just disappear.” Alienated and depressed – and completely devoid of any sense of responsibility and belonging. A true atomic individual of our global age. She is perhaps outdone in selfish irresponsibility by “Kiran Bhat, a global citizen formed in a suburb of Atlanta, Georgia, in the USA, to parents from South Canara, in India. A world traveler, polyglot, teacher, and digital nomad, he has travelled to about 130 countries, lived in 18 different places. .. he considers Mumbai the only place that he wants to settle down in. He currently lives in Melbourne.”

    Could this kind of selfish, alienated globalism, made up of unstable atomic individuals, be the reason for the rise in woke ideologies, SJWs, and the dismantling of reason and common sense? If I can be here, there, and everywhere, then surely I can don any identity, take on whatever gender I feel like today, pick fights over what bathroom I wish to use, and fight battles to bring down borders so more people like me can flood in. Does it not seem to hang together – the age of decay and the age of global citizens?

  4. Did I just see a yellow jaguar on a white T-shirt, with “THANK YOU HAVE A NICE DAY” in primary colors?

    No, that’s a slightly tortured Puma logo:

  5. PPB says:

    Beautifully observed and written— an essay which could easily serve as an exemplar and standard reference work within the travel writing genre, notably for its superb demonstration of how diverse gleanings from an extended journey can be astutely and without pretense woven into a rich and panoramic whole in which the silence between the words speaks as loudly as the words themselves.

    Thank you, Linh— this made my morning.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
    • Replies: @White Monkey
  6. What destroyed the West was a process arising from historically unprecedented prosperity. It acquired this prosperity after the Industrial Revolution. An equivalent process has been studied in a laboratory, see Calhoun’s “mouse utopia”.

    Since HK didn’t go through the rigours of communism, they have a head start on mainland China in terms of prosperity. The hatred that HKers show for China is similar to the hatred that progressive western whites show towards their “redneck” counterparts, i.e. towards white people who are insufficiently progressive.

    Taiwan and Japan also show signs of dying from the same forces that killed western civilisation. China and Vietnam have a few decades to go before they start down the same path.

    • Agree: Marshall Lentini
  7. Beautiful writing as always, Linh. Thanks.

    Some weeks ago Israel Shamir posted this about the HK riots http://www.unz.com/ishamir/house-niggers-mutiny/ and it sounds very true.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  8. @Haha

    Anomie.

    You shall know horrors beyond your imagination.

    • Agree: Marshall Lentini
  9. I stood near a middle-aged man in matching T-shirt and sweatpants that were like black velvet paintings

    Man, you can write.

    • Agree: Blinky Bill
  10. Liberate Hong Kong from globo-homo imperialism.

    Send in the tanks and send Hong Cucks to the gulag.

  11. unit472 says:

    I was somewhat taken aback by the xenophobia of the Hong Kong protestors. Apparently Taiwanese students had to be evacuated as their version of Chinese was mistaken as Mandarin and Cantonese is the native tongue in Hong Kong. Of course the ‘xenophobia’ was not anti foreigner but anti China which the people of Hong Kong do not wish to be ruled by. “One Country Two Systems” was a delicate bit of diplomatese by which the British could relinquish sovereignty to China and avoid the messy problem of who rules Hong Kong.

    Like Taiwan, Hong Kong has no living memory of Chinese rule and see no need for it today especially now that China has made clear it will remain a one party dictatorship. Unlike Taiwan, Hong Kong has no ocean between it and China and cannot fight back. I do applaud the restraint China has shown so far but the rioting will test that. Its a long time between now and 2047 and the people of Hong Kong need to husband their demands and not provoke China to seize control of their city.

  12. Well…two comments here. I’m just coming off of revising my daughter’s English essay, so forgive me: I’m feeling professorial this morning.

    First, the piece starts out talking about how various former colonies retain more of their pre-colonial character than their erstwhile colonizers do — then rather inconsistently lurches into a description of Macau — was there even a Macau before the Portuguese? If there was, it most assuredly didn’t even resemble what Linh describes. Macau most definitely is not an example of a place retaining its pre-colonial character.

    Second, I disagree with the whole thesis. Linh may perceive Algeria et al as having retained more of their pre-colonial character than France, Britain, etc.

    I think that’s bumph. Linh is just focusing on what has remained in the one case, but what has changed in the other. I think an eighteenth century Algerian bey would find modern Algeria at least as alien as an eighteen century Parisian burgher would find modern Paris. Whatever Viet Nam was like before the French showed up, it is not like what is there now. Linh has a very clear idea of what Britain, France, and the West used to be like — and notices how much they’ve changed. He has a much hazier notion of Mughal India, etc, etc — and fails to realize just how radically those societies have been transformed.

    He tells of his life in modern Viet Nam — where he seems to feel entirely comfortable. Indeed, he describes several whites who feel comfortable there as well. Does he think this would still be the case if the could be teleported back to the Viet Nam of the early nineteenth century? If he must go back there, wouldn’t he really find it much easier to adjust to a Dublin coffee house? If we have changed, they have changed at least as much — and I suspect more.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
  13. Muggles says:
    @Rev. Spooner

    A note about Rev. Spooner’s link to “Israel Shamir’s” article.

    I suspect this author is a pseudonym for the numerous mainland Chinese propaganda teams which both author and comment here on Unz. They usually use fake non Chinese names and I suspect are organized into teams (the Chinese CCP loves teamwork) and are always unfailing pro China with zero tolerance in their writing for any criticisms.

    This lack of any sort of balance or concession to any shortcomings here is an obvious tell.

    This doesn’t mean what they say is always false or worthless. They often make valid points. But Hitler’s autobahns were pretty good too.

    I wonder how much the Chinese government spends on this sort of “internet work?”

  14. Muggles says:

    Another very interesting and readable article by Mr. Linh. He has the poet’s eye for language and insightful observations.

  15. @Haha

    The wokester should leave Melbourne and leave Melbourne alone.

    • Agree: Alfred
  16. AaronB says:

    Sounds like the classic Buddhist ideal, the “homeless life” that is recommended so strongly in Buddhism as the quintessence of the spiritual life.

    Also reminds me of the old Hindu practice of abandoning ones roots and wandering the mountains late in life, after one has worked and had a family.

    Also of the colorful world of the Middle Ages, with its endless streams of joyful pilgrims and cheerful wandering mendicants.

    I feel so sorry for those who cannot revel in freedom but need to feel “attached” – all the spiritual traditions warm this is the source of suffering, but many people cannot learn.

    In Zen, the ideal life is to be Nobody, from Nowhere. But this is too much for some.

    Why is it that those, like Linh Dinh, who sing the praises of “attachment” are always the most gloomy and depressed, cantankerous and surly?

    Well, it is just as the Buddha said – attachment is the source of suffering.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Colin Wright
    , @PPB
    , @gT
  17. jo6pac says:

    Please put the ketchup down and slowly walk away;-)

  18. Anonymous[253] • Disclaimer says:
    @AaronB

    Attachment is suffering, but non-suffering is non-existence. I, and I don’t think the buddha did either, will make a judgement on which is good or bad. But I think the emphasis on removal of suffering leads to a removal of joy or being.

    Also of the colorful world of the Middle Ages, with its endless streams of joyful pilgrims and cheerful wandering mendicants.

    that seems to be a pretty bold assertion.

    Rootlessness really is only bearable if you have enough money for a nice life where you go. but if you’re poor and you don’t fit in or find community within any community. life sucks. This is based on the assumption that humans are social animals that need roots and familiar faces

    Thanks for bringing your perspective, it is a nice and insightful view into the opposite side of what I believe.

    Here is a nice video you might like to see https://digitalcollections.lib.rochester.edu/ur/future-self-march-1987

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @animalogic
  19. @Haha

    The common thread between them all is that there are all broke. Nothing buy over-educated coolies, without the self-reflection to realize it. True tools of the capitalistic nightmare. The ‘rolling stone grows no moss’ parable is merely an edit from the entire statement. The basic idea is that the moss, and related biome are growths related to one sinking roots and growing in a fertile field. The rolling stone has nothing but whatever rolls with it. These ‘people’ are examples of such rolling stones. They have nothing and aspire to nothing. Living from hotel to hotel? We used to call those people homeless. The Federal definition still is. To aspire to short term lifestyles is to question the worth of the human spirit. These are merely examples of random and useless people, nothing to aspire to. Life without meaning, life without living.

    • Replies: @Haha
  20. @AaronB

    ‘… In Zen, the ideal life is to be Nobody, from Nowhere. But this is too much for some.

    Why is it that those, like Linh Dinh, who sing the praises of “attachment” are always the most gloomy and depressed, cantankerous and surly?’

    So you’re abandoning your Jewish identity and cancelling your plans to return to Israel?

    …or are you just full of shit?

    • Replies: @AaronB
  21. AaronB says:
    @Anonymous

    Correct, Buddhism is often misinterpreted as being against suffering, but it actually recognizes that a life without suffering is impossible. Might as well ask for a life without short, but only up.

    A better interpretation of Buddhism is that it is against the kind of frustration that comes from clinging to things that are impermanent – and seeking to eradicate suffering is a form of clinging.

    As for being a cheerful nomad with no roots, such a life can be fun not only if you have enough money, but also if money isn’t very important to you and you can be content with little – modern people have forgotten that it is actually an option to not care about money too much, and our discussions of happiness seem always to predicate that lots of money is inevitably needed. But it isn’t.

    As for a rooted community, the truth is that some people need this more than others, and there is a sort of community among wandering nomads.

    I’m happy I gave you a different perspective – I am not against the perspective that rooted community is what people need, but there is another tradition with a rich and ancient pedigree that is just as valid and interesting.

    Perhaps, like the Hindus, one can experience each tradition at a different time in life.

    In the end, I think the full richness of human types should be accommodated, and there may be no one type good for all. And if you try and force one lifestyle on everyone, you get revolutions.

    I think the Middle Ages was much better at accomodating all kinds of different human lifestyles – one could be a wandering beggar or a merchant. And that modern times became very repressive about what sorts of life were permitted. Productive consumer – thats about it.

    Hence all the revolutions, starting in the 60s, against the repressiveness of modern life.

  22. @Global citizen

    Hah, Don Cherry. Odd you mentioned the great hockey player, as he was recently fired from his media gig for suggesting immigrants to Canada should assimilate. How dare them. What’s next genocide?

    • Replies: @Curmudgeon
    , @bike-anarkist
  23. PPB says:
    @AaronB

    Why not let quality art and craftsmanship speak for themselves, especially when the art is artless and the craftsmanship without artifice— a skill that only a small elite of creative individuals have mastered to the extent on display here. Why not simply give credit where credit is due, instead of exercising a compulsive need to impose “spiritual” ideals onto a wonderfully-written, colorful (and underneath all, sympathetic) display of the human world in all of its gritty particularity, its quirks and foibles, and its joys, struggles and disappointments— as though this Divine/Human Comedy wasn’t at least equally a creative expression of the indefinable and unquantifiable Reality that you glorify by seeming contrast, and as though detachment and nobodiness were in need of some axe to grind or required some sort of invective to support them.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Colin Wright
  24. @Haha

    I don’t know about you, but as an expat in Asia I was not going to spend my life in Southeast Michigan AKA the anus of the Rustbelt.

    Once I accidentally stumbled into a job in Dubai twenty years ago, I realized that life as an employed expat in warm countries with low-crime is better than living through frigid winters in Michigan and living in dread of chimp outs on buses.

    Tried Phoenix, but there were too many Cholos. Minorities aside, you have to contend with redneck white trash as a lower middle class male in the US. Like the pot dealer next door in my college apartment. Or the meth-addled tweaker who used to follow me outside my apartment in Tempe. The scum of US society cannot travel. You’re never going to see some whigger overdosing on Opoids in Hong Kong or Manila or Dubai.

    Its like this, man. Every so often I would communicate with people I knew in Michigan. What happened to Scott the off-campus pot dealer? Oh, he went to jail. What happened to Stanley from Flint? Oh, he’s stuck in a house nobody will buy in Flint drinking poisonous sludge. What happened to Tasha? Oh, she got pregnant and the father went to jail. What happened to so and so?

    Overseas, you are immune from all this.

  25. Anon[291] • Disclaimer says:

    Rootlessness is the source of unhappiness. People who are rooted among their own extended family and who are religious are the happiest. Most of these people don’t make much money either, but they have a community, passed down through generations. Read: Tim Carney’s Alienated America.

    Rootless cosmopolitans in big metropolitan areas, the well educated and immigrants can never be truly happy, no matter how much money they make. Rootlessness = soullessness. Trouble with money is, the more you make, the more you want, and the more you want, the unhappier you get. Also the amount of education one gets is in inverse proportion to happiness. The more educated you are, the less happy you get.

    • Replies: @Stonehands
  26. AaronB says:
    @PPB

    Why are you trying to police what I can and cannot say 🙂

    I have my perspective on Linh Dinh, and you have yours. I have no problem with you expressing your views, defending him, celebrating his banal prose, etc. More power to you.

    I never understood people who try and shut others up. It betrays a fundamental insecurity. I may despise Dinh and his petty mindset, but I have no desire to shut him up or make him stop writing.

    I think my take on Lin’s views can be a useful counterpoint to what he is offering as necessary for human happiness. There is an alternative tradition that celebrates the homeless life.

    You can take it or leave it.

  27. AaronB says:
    @Colin Wright

    No. I believe both rootedness and rootlessness have their place.

    And I am following the advice of the Sixth Patriarch of Zen. When someone celebrates rootlessness, talk about roots. When someone celebrates roots, talk about rootlessness.

    As they say in the Zen monasteries in Japan – the opposite of a great truth is also true.

    I am and will remain a Jew – those are my roots. But we Jews have also been the greatest rootless nomads in history. We are both the most rooted and least rooted people on earth.

    But you will not understand any of this Colin 🙂 You are a simple man, and know only how to hate.

  28. @AaronB

    My objection is with people who have never traveled, much less been expats, commenting on people who actually get off their backside and liquidate and take the plunge overseas and adapt to other countries.

    What does a person know if they are 30 and have lived on the same street in the same community their entire lives? What do they know about being employed in other countries?

    It is all well and good to talk about “roots” when you are some middle class American who has lived in the same suburb your entire life in a crime free community. But try talking to the black retiree in the Philippines who could choose between a nice tropical setting and clean bungalow or the Hood.

    • Replies: @Haha
    , @AaronB
  29. @Haha

    Great comment, haha.
    “They epitomize our age of decadence and alienation, irresponsibility and selfishness.
    “She didn’t feel very Chinese, and frankly didn’t feel like she was anything at all”
    I suspect she’s just an egotist & narcissist. “look at me, look at me! I’m sooooo cosmopolitan…how dare you think you know ME! “

  30. @Colin Wright

    You at age 50 is different from you at age 15.

    You go through war and torture and amputation also makes you a different person.

    They are different differences.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  31. @Anonymous

    Bang! Spot on —
    “Rootlessness really is only bearable if you have enough money for a nice life where you go. “

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @TKK
  32. @Muggles

    I suspect this author is a pseudonym for the numerous mainland Chinese propaganda teams

    The author, Linh, writes extensively and take pictures. If you cannot see the authenticity and sincerity, I cannot believe you have solid conviction in freedom and democracy and all that. The moment someone disagrees with you, you label them a spy.

    • Replies: @Muggles
  33. @AaronB

    … But you will not understand any of this Colin…”

    You are just full of shit.

  34. @AaronB

    ‘… I think my take on Lin’s views can be a useful counterpoint to what he is offering as necessary for human happiness. There is an alternative tradition that celebrates the homeless life…’

    This explains why you’ve decided against returning to Israel.

  35. @PPB

    ‘Why not let quality art and craftsmanship speak for themselves, especially when the art is artless and the craftsmanship without artifice— a skill that only a small elite of creative individuals have mastered to the extent on display here. Why not…’

    Why not? Because Aaron is being completely disingenuous. He simply attacks Linh Dinh in any way he can think of, and he does it because Dinh was critical of Jews and Israel. Months ago, Dinh attacked Israel, and so Aaron attacks Dinh at every opportunity. Had Dinh once praised Israel and expressed a love of Jews, Aaron would be agreeing with every word he just wrote.

    None of this has anything to do with anything Dinh has said here, and Aaron doesn’t believe a word he had said himself.

    You need to realize how absolutely and perfectly dishonest this guy is. Only once you do, will what he writes and why he writes it will become comprehensible.

    He’s a glib little pea-brain with an IQ of about 115, a need to pretend that its actually about 150, a compulsion to defend the indefensible, and a need to assuage his awareness of his own utter mediocrity by substituting an identity as one of an imaginary race of Jewish Herrenvolk for his own grotesquely inadequate individuality.

    The guy manages to be pathetic, repulsive, and vicious all at once.

    • Agree: Poco
    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Anonymous
  36. swamped says:

    “Just like the Hong Kong protesters, she is essentially, unmistakably and eternally Chinese”…poor kid! ” Lin Yutang, ‘What is patriotism but love of the foods one had as a child?’”…then patriotism is at record highs in the U.S. judging by the levels of obesity. Nice to know we can eat our way to love of country. All those fallen heroes sacrificed their lives for Kool-Aid & Jello?
    And a very patriotic post this – it begins and ends with food – & along the way we’re trying “bacalhau and mashed potato casserole, then Portuguese fried rice, which contained bits of a Portuguese sausage, onion, tomato and a single black olive”; & then chomping “on a burger, hot dog or an authentic ice cream sundae”; then on to a “pretty good plate of fettucine with steak strips and mushroom in a pesto sauce thickened with parmesan”;&next, stuffing oneself with “a rather impressive breakfast buffet, with Chinese, English, Portuguese and American offerings”; & still not satisfied after such voracious exertions, patriotically “couldn’t wait to taste the hash browns with ketchup, then baked beans.” Phew, looks like the American romance of the open mouth has been drafted to glamorize universal overeating everywhere. How much longer before those wispy Asians all start resembling Kim Jong-Un?

    • Replies: @Haha
  37. Biff says:

    So what’s causing the Hong Kong protest/riot, now over six-months-old?

    Follow the money – it leads you too a CIA front group called the NED(National Endowment for Democracy) among other alphabet soup U.S. government agencies.

    The (NED Financed) Hong Kong Riots

    https://www.moonofalabama.org/2014/09/the-ned-hong-kong-riots.html

    National Democratic Institute for International Affairs – $460,000
    To foster awareness regarding Hong Kong’s political institutions and constitutional reform process and to develop the capacity of citizens – particularly university students – to more effectively participate in the public debate on political reform, NDI will work with civil society organizations on parliamentary monitoring, a survey, and development of an Internet portal, allowing students and citizens to explore possible reforms leading to universal suffrage.

    • Agree: Agent76
  38. @animalogic

    You can live better in the Philippines for $1000 a month than you could for $3000 a month in the US.

    Ask any pensioner who lives there.

    My brother, an urban planner, makes a ton more money than I do. But he had to leave LA to send his kids to a decent public school because a private school was more expensive. That is not a problem I have with mine in Asia. They are not going to be bullied or sexually harassed in Asian schools.

    My brother would actually call me and tell me that my grandmother’s property value for her condo in Greater Detroit had plummeted to 1/5 of what she paid in 1986-twenty years earlier. Again, in Asia property values only rise.

  39. Haha says:
    @Rafeal Ismael

    We are very much on the same page here. Loved your line “These ‘people’ are examples of such rolling stones. They have nothing and aspire to nothing. Living from hotel to hotel? We used to call those people homeless”. Homeless and soulless comes to mind.

  40. Haha says:
    @swamped

    “Phew, looks like the American romance of the open mouth has been drafted to glamorize universal overeating everywhere.” LOL, well observed and even better said. LOL!

  41. Haha says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    My critique of the rootless, global footloose lost souls was not intended to apply to people who make conscious decisions to work as expats based on rational considerations of income and life style. The expat does have to demonstrate loyalty to work (he better perform or there goes his work visa), the laws and social customs of the locale, and a coherent life of work, perhaps specialized sort of work that gets you expat pay packets.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  42. gT says:
    @AaronB

    “Its the happy, cheerful folks who tend to think things are going well and that there are no problems to be solved … they often don’t see problems until there is a crises”.

    Cantankerous people on the other hand always have issues, and try to find ways to solve those issues, so they are more creative. It might even be that grumpy people are more beneficial to humanity. Imagine a caveman, hunting with a spear. The usual technique was to run the spear into an animal, Neanderthal style, but the animals are fast and the caveman slow. So one day a caveman got so pissed off that he threw his spear at the animal that was getting away, killing it. Then some other grumpy people invented the bow and arrow because the animals were getting away from the thrown spear too often. So grumpiness leads to progress, leads to change.

    “Attachment” people always fear that others are going to steal their land, replace their language and culture, etc, etc. And they are correct to think this way because that is the way things go historically, unless sufficient levels of resistance are achieved. “Attachment” people are all for Nationalism, and don’t want to kowtow to Globalization. Hence the Cantonese in Hong Kong’s dislike for the Mandarin.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @AaronB
  43. @yakushimaru

    ‘You at age 50 is different from you at age 15.

    You go through war and torture and amputation also makes you a different person.

    They are different differences.

    Yeah — but common threads continue. I’ve had a fairly traumatic life — but Colin at sixty is identifiably the same Colin that existed at six. I’ve come to express some of them differently; but I still have the same strengths, and the same weaknesses.

    Ditto, say, for sixteenth century France and twenty first century France. Many of the same features, good and bad.

    On the other hand, modern Mexico really owes very little to Aztec Mexico. India is more dogged by her pre-British past than characterized by it. Does China still have a landlord class, a government staffed by academics, and a cultural center-tributary relationship with everyone in the immediate vicinity?

    This is one of those discussions where one could take either side and cheerfully maintain it forever — but I hold that Dinh’s notion that the colonized have changed less than the colonizers is mistaken. It’s a function of Dinh’s familiarity with the objects in question and his perspective, not of anything inherent in them.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
  44. @AaronB

    There is also a tradition of tossing people like you into wells. It can bring much celebration.

    • LOL: AaronB
  45. AaronB says:
    @gT

    No, the thing is to be a cheerful pessimist. What is the point of life, if it isn’t fun?

    You’ll just be this miserable unhappy person like Linh Dinh or Daniel Chieh, if you take things seriously. The thing is to accept the world can seem pretty awful, but to not really care, to not take it all seriously. That none of it is really real. That’s the Buddhist attitude.

    Your attitude is exactly the misery creating attitude – being too concerned with “survival”, taking it all seriously.

    So yes, absolutely you gotta be a pessimist – that’s the first step in being spiritual. The world seems awful. But dig a bit deeper, and the world seems marvellous. And none of it is serious, or real, beneath the surface.

    Only the dull witted – like Daniel Chieh – take it seriously 🙂

  46. AaronB says:
    @gT

    Its the happy, cheerful folks who tend to think things are going well and that there are no problems to be solved … they often don’t see problems until there is a crises

    ”.

    I guess your basic mistake – and this is huge – is that you think being cheerful must be a result of things going well, and being unhappy the result of things going poorly.

    But in fact, one can be extremely cheerful and happy when things go poorly, and anxious when things go well.

    It all depends on attitude.

    A different person than Linh Dinh, would not mind his poverty and failure, would see it as a joke or an adventure, and wouldn’t break down in Jew hatred and nurse revenge fantasies of white people getting humiliated.

  47. Muggles says:
    @yakushimaru

    Re: yakushimaru’s comment.

    My comment to which he is responding about “this author….” etc. is not about Linh. He is definitely who he says he is.

    My original comment was responding to @Rev. Spooner’s comment and link to an article written by one “Israel Shamir.” My comment about “this author” was referencing “Israel Shamir”, not Linh. Sorry if this was unclear.

    If you go to that article Rev. Spooner linked to (by “Shamir”) you will find it extremely pro CCP and anti HK protest. I found that article so one sided and propagandistic that it prompted my comment. I don’t label everyone I disagree with a spy. But when you find rather stilted and one sided items that lack any kind of balance, in this instance by an author using what seems to be a pseudonym suggesting a non Chinese writer, I suspect a Trojan author.

    One “Godfree Roberts” contributes on Unz and also comments. He is clearly Chinese and another commentator and defender of “Mr. Roberts” claimed in response on my comment about him that he is actually a Chinese national living in Thailand. I still doubt that. You can judge for yourself about authorship and hidden agendas. What is true is that the CCP employs tens of thousands of Chinese, if not more, to scour the Internet in China and elsewhere looking for things the government doesn’t like.

    The easily available (in China) Chinese Internet is heavily censored and names of dissenters carefully monitored, censored and sanctioned for “incorrect” thoughts. I suspect teams of such censors also look at websites outside of China to monitor opinion and post commentary pro CCP. Other nations may do this but not to the massive extent of mainland China. My hunch is that these folks operate under work teams using various pseudonyms with non Chinese names.

    They can be sometimes spotted because the content is well written but lacks personality and the ones I’ve noticed are devoid of any of the slightest acknowledgement of any faults in China. This is not how regular people write. You might choose to defend your national policies but when doing so normal people would also acknowledge flaws and obvious room for change/improvements. Since most Unz articles and comments are written by Americans, you would have nothing here at all if the comments and articles were all slavishly pro American government policy.

    When reading about China, use your critical thinking and judge for yourself who is behind the name.

  48. @AaronB

    ‘…Only the dull witted – like Daniel Chieh – take it seriously’

    You certainly manage to abuse a lot of people. Where do you get the chutzpah to accuse others of ‘only knowing how to hate’?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  49. AaronB says:
    @Colin Wright

    While I admit analyzing me is endlessly fascinating Colin, do you have anything to contribute to the actual topic? 🙂

    What do you think about the themes of this essay – do people need roots, or is the Buddhist/Hindu idea of the “homeless life” ultimately more satisfying if embraced enthusiastically? Or perhaps both, at different times of life?

    What about the ancient Stoic and Epicurean idea that “nothing human is alien to me”, and wherever I lay my head is home.

    The idea of being a global citizen ultimately comes from ancient Greek/Roman culture, at least in the West.

    Were the Romans right?

    And the conversation took a fascinating turn, Colin, when we began discussing the relationship of pessimism to happiness, and whether the world should be taken seriously in the end at all.

    This is all fascinating stuff, Colin, and I’d love to hear your contributions.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  50. @AaronB

    You make me want to barf.

    • LOL: AaronB
  51. @Colin Wright

    He’s just working to get the gumption to part with his material earnings for Mr. Karlin as I gently encourage him toward enlightenment to become the great Buddha incarnation Prince Sattva.

    He is correct on one thing: it is a mistake to engage with him seriously. He’s not really trying to say anything substantial, appearances to the otherwise. He’s simply trying to provoke a reaction.

    Pretty much in summation, that’s why people like him get tossed into wells, although lately I’ve been thinking of solar ovens for a more modern version of burnings.

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/19/business/heliogen-solar-energy-bill-gates/index.html

    Imagine the poetry of the rising sunbeams melting away the annoying hypocrite. I think it’ll be a lot of fun, and what’s the point of life if it isn’t to be fun?

    • Replies: @AaronB
  52. AaronB says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    I agree. I appreciate roots, but I love travel and have traveled extensively.

    I think the narrative about needing roots is a bit simple minded. People who haven’t traveled don’t know what its like in other parts of the world.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  53. @Muggles

    One “Godfree Roberts” contributes on Unz and also comments. He is clearly Chinese and another commentator and defender of “Mr. Roberts” claimed in response on my comment about him that he is actually a Chinese national living in Thailand

    Godfree is not Chinese – he’s posted in many places, not just here. He’s pretty passionate, but he’s not Chinese. He’s an old-school communist. Those exist, you know.

    Actual Chinese nationalistic accounts are dang emotional for self-evident reasons. Denk is a good example.

  54. AaronB says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    I am completely serious, and also completely not serious. But you are too thick witted to grasp this – you probably also believe in the law of non contradiction lol 🙂

    Now, people, I realize you poor slow witted fools find me extremely fascinating because I am too elusive for your blunt intellects, but how about actually discussing the themes raised in Linh’s magnificent meditation on the need for roots?

    I’ve already made seminal contributions on this thread – which, frankly, should be published in book form – and developed dimensions of the problem you nitwits could not even have suspected existed, not to mention provided crucial historical references and perspectives from the history of religion.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  55. @Muggles

    I believe the only obvious CCP propaganda team on Unz is Godfree Roberts.

  56. @Haha

    Every subject in Linh’s article has made a rational decision to live overseas. The black guy who owns the Macau restaurant saw the size of his pension, saw the Section 8 neighborhood he lived in in the US and decided to become an expat.

    You’re wrong about the visa-most expats don’t get jobs on the local labor force except as English teachers and they either own their own business or work for other expats.

    You’re also incorrect about adapting the local language and customs. I know Americans who lived in Dubai for decades and are not Muslim and don’t speak Arabic.

    As for making more money than locals, this is sometimes the case but the motivation of the American is JUST TO GET THE HELL OUT.

    For example, I knew an African-American who operated a hot dog vending business in the Philippines. He did not make a great deal of money but was not living in a Section 8 ghetto. He would have had to in the US.

    But in Asia with the currency exchange, you can live in a nice bungalow or modest apartment.

    When you think about it, the US is just an awful place to live for many people. Imagine being a black retiree. You live in some hood with subarctic winters. Crime is constant. Cops are rude and uncivil. Junkies and gangs are everywhere.

    Much is made about Americans going to Southeast Asia for sex but this is not the reason. The reason is that for many people America is a dark and dangerous place to live with a cold climate.

    Of course young posters here who live in the suburbs with their parents will not know anything about this. And I was born middle-class and only slipped into the lower middle-class as an adult so I’ve lived in both middle-class and lower-class urban environments. I know the difference. Your average exurban white might not have as much reason to move to Southeast Asia.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
  57. “A great irony of colonialism is that many of the colonized nations have managed to stay more coherent, intact and true to themselves than the colonizers”

    What a weird statement.

    Is Mongolia not Mongolian anymore? They had the world’s largest Empire.

    Is the Arab world full of black citizens on welfare? They had a pretty big empire.

    Is Turkey no longer Turkish?

    The authors seems to omit rather prominent colonizers.

  58. @AaronB

    Expats fit a profile. They are mostly male. Generally, you don’t meet many Western women overseas. There are virtually zero white women permanently based in the Philippines.

    They are usually of above average IQ and education. The truly dim from the depths of the lower class end up with kids out-of-wedlock to support at an early age, or are in minor trouble with the law (Probation, parole), or strung out on drugs, or just plain lethargic. You cannot be any of these things and run a business in Asia or be employable in Dubai.

    Expats are usually individualistic. But then again, what is the point of being community-orientated when the ruling elite do not care about you anyhow? Urban working class whites stuck in places like Flint, Michigan will tell you that the state government does not care. Americans operate under the assumption that society and the government cares. It doesn’t. It does not care if you did not sell your house in time and are trapped somewhere like Flint. It does not care if your neighborhood has become a gang-infested barrio. It does not care if your 12 year old daughter is sexually bullied in public schools.

    Also, certain groups have little attachment to the host culture anyhow. A black expat from the Hood never belonged to a country club or the Jaycees or any other civic organization. Their community is lousy anyhow. So what do they lose by moving overseas?

    Much is made about Jews being rootless or whatever but actually Jews tend to be very attached to New York, for example. Take Long Island. Jews are as rooted there as Native Americans. I’ve never met a single Jewish woman who lived overseas. Jewish women tend to be attached to their community. Israelis, of course, are more mobile. Even so, I have met very few in Asia and none were female. I personally never found Jews to be “rootless cosmopolitans”. The Jew I knew in Philippines from Long Island just wanted to get back there. He felt uncomfortable outside his familiar surroundings.

    Your average American expat won’t be Jewish. Jews have a pretty good gig in the US.

    • Replies: @yakushimaru
  59. @Jeff Stryker

    This guy actually ventures outside.

    I left Hawaii where whites are a hated minority hoping to find “my” people on the mainland, and well, by and large, “my” people just plain suck.

    There might be “cool” whites somewhere, maybe the Amish, but I’m not gonna run into ’em. I actually go out of my way to avoid white people because they’re the cause of the majority – vast majority – of “chimp outs” I’ve experienced.

    Whatever “the 14 words” are, do the opposite. And get the hell out of the US in particular and the Anglosphere in general if you can.

  60. @alex in San Jose AKA Digital Detroit

    Funny, I have never heard anything but stories about Haole-hating natives in Hawaii.

    If you’re looking to be around fellow Europeans in the US it won’t be California. It has to be the Upper Midwest or East Coast.

    Somewhere like Boston or New Jersey or New England. Unless you are Spanish, of course. Then Florida or New Mexico.

    Where have white people been responsible for the majority of chimp outs in public? I’m not saying that there are not some godawful white tweakers out there but out of curiosity, where was this?

  61. @Jeff Stryker

    Expats fit a profile. They are mostly male. Generally, you don’t meet many Western women overseas. There are virtually zero white women permanently based in the Philippines.

    Barack Obama’s mother.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  62. @Muggles

    I suspect teams of such censors also look at websites outside of China

    I used to believe that a site like unz.com was probably off the radar of CCP until one day a few months ago I saw on sina.com.cn a crop of a screenshot with Anatoly Karlin’s icon picture up there. If I remember, the name was mosaic’d but the icon pic was unmistakable. I forget the content now. Probably some nice witty things said by Karlin about China.

    Now thinking back, I think it’s Karlin’s twitter instead of his unz content. I still tend to believe that unz.com is simply too small and too much off the western mainstream to attract any CCP attention.

    A recent example was in a Chinese translation of some article. The Chinese translator clearly did not know, for example, what R-Ohio means and assumed it to be a somebody’s name like Tom R. Ohio. I cannot remember where I saw this but it’s in a major China website. What I mean is, those people hired by CCP to do this kind of jobs, their English skill and all around talent cannot be too high given the job opportunities in China.

    So, this and other examples and considerations make me think that, still, unz.com is probably off the radar of CCP. I mean, regarding the commenters. The situation for the authors is of course different.

  63. @Jeff Stryker

    ‘Funny, I have never heard anything but stories about Haole-hating natives in Hawaii.’

    As a note, my wife and I lived in rural Hawaii for a year and a half.

    I can think of a couple of incidents of intangible hostility, and one definitely sulky neighbor — but personally, that really was it. Generally, and only in our experience, the locals on Hawaii are very…different, but perfectly good natured and friendly.

    Others, of course, have had worse experiences.

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  64. TKK says:
    @animalogic

    And even then, you can still be lonely and miserable at The Peninsula in Bangkok, ordering $12 glasses of orange juice in luxury- by yourself.

    One of our most ancient needs is to have someone care if we don’t show up at the end of the day- someone to leave the fire burning for you.

    That rootlessness prevents connection- unless its based on commerce. The desk clerk might feign concern when you have a problem, but you are just another face to manage and perhaps hustle a few more dollars before his shift ends.

  65. Agent76 says:

    Nov 9, 2019 Hong Konger Gets His Ear Bitten Off | Carrie Lam is here to stay: Xi Jinping

    The situation in Hong Kong is getting worse. Protester Chow Tsz-lok fell to his death during a police encounter.

    • Troll: d dan
    • Replies: @Biff
  66. @Haha

    speed up the popular revolution, blue collar and working class, relentlessly ordinary…popular revolution, its success and ideological wholesomeness should destabilize terminally, on all levels of their existence, Jojo, Kiran and their ilk with their bags of ‘Woke’ watever.

    the open road as romance and american? hhhhmm!

    I don’t know about that: maybe the development of a strand of flavor, a romantic aside that is american relative to the open road and what it has meant to everyone everyone all times.

    I came from far from America and a lot smaller but the roads there were open too and they struck me hard as a boy same way. and those roads caught me whole then as a little boy, gripped my soul instituted its meaning deeply. even now as I speak I remember as a little boy climbing up on a box by the window to watch the road that passed my house, sparse flow so that I could count and remember how many had passed by that day

    my conception of the road for a long time had nothing to do with American road romance…never occurred within my event horizon until much much later. but open it was.. and the possibilities!! maaan! the possibilities in and of that road, all roads were the stuff of my dreams..all the dreams of all I knew for a long time.

    the road as romance seems to me to be universal and opens onto the heavens. now the possibilities of the heavens and the travel and possibilities inherent strike me as of those ancient days and my dreams of going to the end of my country, then any country, the end of the world.

    the americans know the open road and their flavor is unique. but there is more to the open road than just the american flavor. the road was always there, everywhere..will always be there, everywhere, here and now, open and ready………..

  67. @Colin Wright

    There’s this one great Chinese, Wang Guowei, his China included the institution, mannerism, and style, and things that’s clearly beyond my English skill to describe. When the modernization flared up in all seriousness, he’s so sad he killed himself in 1927. Wang was the first Chinese to seriously study Schoppenhauer. He knew and can appreciate the West, way more than most of the other elite Chinese of his time.

    Then there’s Cheng Yinke, a younger friend of Wang. Unlike virtually all of his contemporaries, he’s about the only one who understood Wang’s suicide and yet he himself put less weight on the old institutions etc. His China was about the people, the land, and the heritage, or memory, or the very Chinese emphasis on or even reverance of History. He studied in America and Europe extensively and was regarded as a great scholar. When 1949 came, he had every opportunity to escape and yet he decided to not go, for he knew that CCP was different and he would not be able to come back. His China cannot be without the land. He stayed and eventually died a horrible death in Cult Revolution.

    Among Cheng’s early colleagues, there’s Zhao Yuanren, a one of a kind, extremely talented linguist. His China was less than that of Cheng. For example, Zhao advocated giving up the Chinese language, using Latin letters to remake it, like in Viet Nam. He cannot be ignorant of the consequent cutting off of Chinese history when it would be very hard for later Chinese people to read it. He thought it would’ve helped the people.

    Later on, among the younger generation, there’s Yu Yinshi. When he moved from HK to the US in the 1950s, he felt the anxiety, but he soon found comfort in being persuaded by an older Chinese friend in Harvard so he’s able to study China like a museum piece. His China can be without the people, the land, and a lively practice of ways of China in any scale bigger than his desk.

    Today we have an even more extreme example in Andrew Yang. Unlike Gary Locke, Yang was barely American, heritage wise. We might say, his China completely vanished.

    So, what’s all this got to do with Dinh’s the Colonized and the Colonizers? You see there’s a long and tortured Chain. Up and down, the relations can be like a bird and a dinosaur, a chimp and a man, or a wolf and a dog, it can be wildly unrecognizable but each link on the chain is strong and you can trace it. The absurdity is to believe that from Andrew Yang, one can trace back, link after link, to Thomas Jefferson. Even Barack Obama had to marry Michelle.

    China is still China, so far, good and bad, and strange. But there is no China among a group of, no matter how great, China Study scholars when it is only a subject matter. If, in the future, the Andrew Yang’s of the world win and they rule, their world would be as alienated to us as if it’s a world of robots. They might be smarter, stronger, more beautiful, and even morally superior, like I care.

    So, it is not familiarity on a personal scale. You touch your mother. You love her. It is not because she is a great woman or that you stay with her often.

    • Replies: @Sol
  68. awry says:
    @Haha

    Could this kind of selfish, alienated globalism, made up of unstable atomic individuals, be the reason for the rise in woke ideologies, SJWs, and the dismantling of reason and common sense? If I can be here, there, and everywhere, then surely I can don any identity, take on whatever gender I feel like today, pick fights over what bathroom I wish to use, and fight battles to bring down borders so more people like me can flood in. Does it not seem to hang together – the age of decay and the age of global citizens?

    Look up the SF novels of Iain M. Banks for example, especially his “the Culture” series, he is an exemplary of this feeling. No wonder he is so much liked by many leftists.

  69. @Colin Wright

    What is the ratio of real genuine native Hawaiians to outsiders (mainland Americans, Filipinos, Koreans, Japs, etc.)? Maybe they’re right to feel resentful if they have been turned into a minority in their own homeland.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  70. @Jeff Stryker

    What’s wrong with colder climates? For many of us used to a change of seasons with snow in the winter, living in Florida or the tropics year round would be like living in Hell.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
    , @Dumbo
  71. @the grand wazoo

    He wasn’t a great hockey player, he was very average. His claim to fame was coaching a talent laden Boston Bruins teams to the Stanley Cup a couple of times in the 70s.
    That said, he was, and still is, a master of observing the minutia during the game, and very nationalistic to boot.
    You can sign a petition here:
    https://www.truenorthinitiative.com/i_stand_with_don_cherry?recruiter_id=56557

    There is another one at (((Rebel Media))) that has over 90k

  72. @alex in San Jose AKA Digital Detroit

    If whites are hated in Hawaii, that is yet another reason why it should have never been made a state. Apparently, from what I’ve read, many native Hawaiians think so as well. Now they are again thinking of granting statehood to Puerto Rico, whose people also hate white America. The USA has a death wish.

  73. Vincente? I thought the Portuguese spelled that name “Vicente.” Sure enough:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vicente_Nicolau_de_Mesquita

    And notice that “Nicolas” changes to “Nicolau.” However, the Vincente spelling does have a presence on the Internet, so it’s not wrong, but I can’t think why it was changed.

  74. @Commentator Mike

    ‘What is the ratio of real genuine native Hawaiians to outsiders (mainland Americans, Filipinos, Koreans, Japs, etc.)? Maybe they’re right to feel resentful if they have been turned into a minority in their own homeland.’

    They’re worse than a minority — actual, full-blooded Hawaiians are quite rare.

    The inhabitants of Hawaii are a polyglot blend of everyone: ask a random non-white his ancestry and you’ll get something like ‘Filipino, Portuguese, Scots, Japanese…and oh yeah, Hawaiian.’ We lived up the road from Milolii — a genuine original Hawaiian fishing village, and about as aboriginal as you could get.

    Even discounting the white immigrants, it was a lot of things genetically — but not particularly ‘Hawaiian.’ Pele, the rather large woman I sold my generator to when I left, was actually Samoan. Spider — who I nicknamed ‘the great brown hunter’ — well, his last name was “Gomes.’ His wife/girlfriend looked essentially white, or maybe kind of Hispanic. My barber was Japanese — genetically. Etc.

    It’s one of the irritating things about the whole ‘Aloha’ schick. You might as well give everything Mohawk names in upstate New York. That isn’t the people, it isn’t the culture, and it’s not much to do with many at all. There’s certainly a distinctive culture on the islands — but it owes little to the Hawaiians who were there two hundred years ago, and less to their way of life and beliefs.

    Another sore point: the whole ‘aloha’ thing. People say it all the time — but I counted. In a year and a half, I heard exactly four people say it who weren’t saying it in the course of trade. So what does ‘aloha’ mean?

    For all practical purposes, it means, ‘I’m being paid to say aloha.’

    Nice place, but full of it in a lot of ways.

    …and another thing. The precious frigging Hawaiians aren’t even the original inhabitants. They were the second wave. The first wave was from the Marquesas. Our Hawaiians appear to have exterminated those natives completely.

    …plus, they practiced human sacrifice…and had a nobility that calmly worked the population of commoners to death when it transpired the fruits of their labor could be exchanged for whiskey.

    Things are tough all over, as they say. It’s interesting, and if someone had told me we had to stay there for the rest of our lives, I wouldn’t have been too disturbed by the prospect, but please — no guilt trips about the poor ‘Hawaiians.’ Hell, they can get a special deal on land. Look up ‘Hawaiian homelands.’ They’re doing fine — all twelve of them.

  75. Anon[147] • Disclaimer says:

    I’ve been to HK, and I live in an area where there are many recent mainland Chinese transplants. I honestly don’t know which group is worse. All are such crass, classless, unpleasant people. If mainland China and HK both sink to the bottom of the ocean tomorrow, no one will miss those billion plus people much. In fact, the world might become a nicer place to live. I’m glad we finally have a president with enough balls to take on this trade war with China. It’s time for a total, complete decoupling, and it’s time to send the Chinese locusts packing. Stop giving them student visas, tourist visas, work visas, business visas, investor visas or green cards. Stop the invasion of this toxic invasive species on the West.

    • Troll: d dan
  76. @Curmudgeon

    Thanks for the links. I signed the petition. And, your right, Cherry wasn’t great. Just solid. I’m a Sabres fan, and Boston is our nemesis,

    • Replies: @bike-anarkist
  77. @follyofwar

    ‘If whites are hated in Hawaii, that is yet another reason why it should have never been made a state.’

    Well, first off, whites aren’t ‘hated’ — not that I saw. There’s a kind of cultural apartheid, and some serious culture clashes, but ‘hate’? You take the blacks on the mainland — I’ll take the Locals on Hawaii any day. Of course, I spent all my time on the Big Island. Maybe things are different in Honolulu.

    Secondly, the white/non-white division is hardly the only one. The Japanese — who run everything — form a very distinct group. Then there are also very noticeable ‘Portuguese,’ and Filipino communities, and various discrete groups from elsewhere in Polynesia. Chinese, a bit of an Indian presence — and finally, the vast, indeterminate pool of offspring of all of the above known as ‘locals.’ And oh yeah — a few Hawaiians.

    …and if people can be resentful of whites, they say the ‘Portuguese’ (I’m not sure what they actually are, but they don’t look Portuguese) are thieves, and the Filipinos are vermin.

    So it’s lotsa fun — but they’re all ‘Hawaiian,’ all united, and all hate whites? Not exactly. On the whole, pretty nice, but they can be decidedly light-fingered. Lock up your tools, and don’t leave your house vacant.

    Someone’s likely to move into it. Aloha.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Sol
    , @follyofwar
  78. @the grand wazoo

    No! Don Cherry was NOT a great player! He palyed only1 (one) game in the NHL!
    But was a great coach, and had some of the greatest players of the time on the Boston Bruins. On “Coaches Corner”, the media gig, he knew his hockey.

    He got de-platformed becuase he stated his disappointment in Canadians that do not wear the Rememberance Day poppy, but he used a phrase, “you people”, added a vague indication that the “you people” also included immigrants.

    So the reverse-bigot-meisters got offended, like they will, and through all the hand wringing and lack of self-reflection, had pressured the network to fire him.

    • Replies: @Escher
  79. Dumbo says:

    A great irony of colonialism is that many of the colonized nations have managed to stay more coherent, intact and true to themselves than the colonizers, so that seven decades after the Indians kicked out the Brits, for example, India is still essentially India, if not more so, while England has become relentlessly less English

    The colonized countries changed externally – architecture, roads, etc. But they kept most of their traditions and original population. (Referring here to Indian, African and Asian countries; Latin America is a different issue because colonization was much longer). But the colonizer countries changed internally – they kept their architecture (except where it is being replaced by modernist trash), but their tradition was erased and now their population is suffering a replacement. So in the end it was/is worse for them. Of course, the “great replacement” could have happened without colonialism, but it seems unlikely; it seems that “invade the world-invite the world” is an inseparable duo.

    “But I don’t belong anywhere, and I don’t want to be anywhere.”

    I can relate to this feeling, even though I don’t necessarily like it, and I think most people really want to “belong”. To something. A nation, a community, a sect, or just a criminal gang.

    The problem is that now with globalization, even if you’re a native in your own “home country” you’re no longer at home, but also if you’re an immigrant, there are so many other immigrants that even if you sincerely love or admire the country, what difference does it make?

    For instance, someone who is not French but loves France and French culture, in the 1930s he could go there and have that experience of living in France and loving French culture even if he was an expat, but if a Hemingway-wannabe goes to live in Paris now, he will live among a large number of non-whites, a lot of non-French food restaurants, not to mention McDonald’s, Starbucks, and all the elements of globalized culture.

    Soon all places start to look the same. So even if you want to experience different cultures and “not belong anywhere”, you end up belonging to the inescapable globo-world.

  80. Anon[147] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Hawaii is turning into a third world shit hole, looking more and more like Manila by the day, only a lot more expensive. That’s what happens when you import too many Filipinos(or any third world vermins), you slowly turn into their home country. And given their stupid left wing politicians and judges like Mazie Hirono and Derrick Watson, I say it’s time to cut them loose, give them their independence.

  81. @AaronB

    Only the dull witted – like Daniel Chieh – take it seriously”

    You certainly seem to take it seriously, because, on nearly every Linh Dinh article, here you are, lashing out in comments strewn all over the comments thread. Doesn’t seem very cheerful. Your comments are like shopping carts people leave strewn about the parking lots of grocery stores. Unsightly, empty, but no real hazard. It just means everyone else has to walk a little farther to get what we came for.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • LOL: Pincher Martin
    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Johan
  82. GFHÄNDEL says:

    A beautifully written essay. And what a gift it’s free to read.

    Clearly someone is fomenting the current sad conflict in HK. Or maybe I’m too conspiratorial.

    I just find it odd that it’s not petered out when the purported trigger has been addressed.

    China & USA are in the grips of a trade war.

  83. AaronB says:
    @craig nelsen

    Well, of course I take it seriously – I said as much. I also don’t take it seriously 🙂 I see this is really difficult for squares to understand.

    As for what you came here for, it obviously isn’t to discuss the interesting themes raised by Dinh in his essay.

    And that’s a pity.

    The need for roots is a fascinating topic. The perennial appeal of the nomadic life that has historically inspired so many adventurous souls, is also a fascinating topic. The connection between spirituality and the wandering homeless life is also fascinating. And finally, whether life is really serious at all – or, like the Hindus thought, just God playing a game – is also fascinating.

    I am dismayed that so many people would rather snipe at me that actually discuss what could have been – and maybe still can be – one of the most interesting threads on the history of this site.

    If the philosophers and wits of Unz.com could take a break from sniping at me long enough to think about these topics, maybe some we can put together some good insights.

  84. Johan says:
    @Haha

    They are strong representatives of a global phenomenon. Oscar Wilde already noted over a century ago that modernity is always old-fashioned. Meaning that everything changes very fast, that said over a century ago, during the twentieth century it has been accelerating.
    We are all to some extent rootless, the whole world is on drift, cult, hype and bubbles everywhere. This is represented already in consumer goods, low quality stuff which is soon outdated or of low quality, goods glamorized through marketing. It is represented in the ubiquitous grip of a vast commerce and marketing industry which adds glamour to things (an industry of fiction and glamour which is x times larger than the production industry), represented in targeted gigantic value creation (climate change hoax for instance), represented in the screens everywhere, in the financial industry, the tech cult, in the media, in politics, aesthetics, modern arts and etc.
    The world today is one big market place of hyped products, artificially created values, theories and ideas, bubbles of glamour in a world likely to crash big time one day. Then ephemeral, decadent and rootless modernity will burst into oblivion.
    These digital nomads are merely pretentious vagabonds parasiting on the situation, floating in a bubble, a temporary phenomenon.

    • Replies: @Haha
  85. @Lord Palmerston

    Doubt China would ever go through that phase. They don’t have a hostile foreign power/religion controlling the media and information flow, creating a narrative that is akin to suicide.

    Hong Kong has that. That is why few thousand brain washed idiots can cause all this.

  86. @AaronB

    It just means this anonymous handle of yours has too strong of a zionist stink stemming from your comment history.

    Good conversation requires two sincere participants.

  87. Anon[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Trouble with the Asians, they love to eat but don’t care about cleanliness. They could eat in the filthiest of places, but as long as the food is good, they seem completely oblivious to all the filth around them. That’s why all of Asia is so disgustingly filthy, from Southeast Asia to China/HK to South Asia. And they bring that filthy habit with them wherever they go. Most Asian restaurants in the US have filthy bathrooms and kitchens, they also spit and litter. They also don’t know ambiance if it hits them in the face. All Asian restaurants are always so loud and noisy, not just people talking loudly while they eat, but the bus boys always make sure they make as much noise as possible while they clear the table. It’s as if they are all half deaf.

    The only exception is the Japanese. They’re the only clean/polite/pleasant/orderly people in Asia.

    • Agree: Marshall Lentini
    • Troll: d dan
    • Replies: @Anon
  88. Johan says:
    @Haha

    “the age of global citizens”

    The global citizen does not exist in itself, individuality which is required for citizenship is rooted per definition in the local and the particular. It grows like a tree from the richness and particulars of locality. The ‘global citizen’ is an invention of political and commercial marketing, he is merely a self-image, a package delivered by marketeers, it is created for him in order that instead of the hard road of developing individuality, the global citizen can easily obtain (buy) a ready made but customizable package, a package of glamour which allows him a self-image of being more evolved than those allegedly petty small local crawlers.

    It is a crowd package for the uprooted and that which has no individual character, they do not ‘walk the lanes’ on real soil:

    “The witness for the truth – who naturally will have nothing to do with politics, and to the utmost of his ability is careful not to be confused with a politician – the godfearing work of the witness to the truth is to have dealings with all, if possible, but always individually, to talk with each privately, on the streets and lanes – to split up the crowd, or to talk to it, not to form a crowd, but so that one or another individual might go home from the assembly and become a single individual.” – Kierkegaard

    http://manteau.nl/philosophy/soren-aabye-kierkegaard-on-the-dedication-single-individual

  89. @follyofwar

    ‘… If whites are hated in Hawaii, that is yet another reason why it should have never been made a state…’

    As I’ve said, in my experience too much is made of this. However, to the extent that there is resentment, I think it’s something we ourselves have told the locals to feel.

    This is almost pure speculation, but I was watching a segment of Mad Men in which Don Draper visits the Hawaii of the Sixties. Hula dancers, Mai Tais, and sexy Hawaiian women (ahem).

    …and they tried to comply. In the Sixties, Hawaii was all about beaches, bikinis, and little paper umbrellas in your drink. A hundred years ago it was about working in that sugar cane field. A hundred years before that it was about dressing like a Christian and going to church. Now it’s about Hawaiian culture and resentment.

    My theory is that they’re always just doing as they’re told. All that changes is what we tell them to do.

    So if you get ‘stink eye’ from a local, hey. You told him to do that. What’s your complaint?

  90. Johan says:
    @craig nelsen

    ” It just means everyone else has to walk a little farther to get what we came for.”

    On the democratic publication system called the internet, due to the ubiquitous noise of the masses, you have to walk a thousand extended miles to get what you came for anyway. More likely you will never arrive. So far for blaming one individual…

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  91. Anon[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Asians’ lack of care for their environment goes beyond restaurants. Chinatowns all over the world are run down, filthy and disgusting. Wherever Asians live, their homes and their neighborhoods begin to go downhill. Even when they move into million dollar homes, these people do not take care of their yards, or their roofs, power wash their driveways, paint their fences or even clean their gutters. No matter how rich or well educated they are, they live like trailer trash. That’s why the more of them we let in, the more they’ll turn the US into the turd world from whence they came.

    • Troll: d dan
  92. Johan says:

    Always entertaining and interesting, these travel narratives from Linh Dinh. His stomach and its appetite is always there too, sort of fundamental.

  93. Wally says:
    @Muggles

    said:
    “This doesn’t mean what they say is always false or worthless. They often make valid points. But Hitler’s autobahns were pretty good too. ”

    You’re trying to say something, please do.

    Be forewarned, free speech allowed at this site.

  94. @Anon

    Excellent, my friend!

    ….but all l hear are crickets amongst the “educated” bon vivants, here at the big U..

  95. aspnaz says:

    Although Hongkongers enjoyed freedoms, it was never democratic. Hong Kong protesters who wave the British flag are screaming out to the world, “We’re missing our white daddy,” and this act is so pathetic, I half suspect it’s done by Beijing agents.

    Arrogance and ignorance flowing off the page.

    Did you speak to any protesters? You were there for a week and they have at least two protests a week.

    Do you understand the relationship between the British and the Hong Kongers, most of whom were born under British rule? Your simplistic interpretation of an appeal to the west is somewhat disturbing: loathing of the white man combined with disgust at a Hong Konger calling out for help from a white man.

    Why did the Hong Kongers prefer British rule? They did not have democracy, but the people of Singapore do not have democracy but are happy. Why?

    Your very appealing writing style belies an inadequate thought process.

  96. Haha says:
    @Johan

    Yes, as you astutely perceive, our hyper-commercialized age does foster decadence and rootless modernity. Perhaps also the oxymoron claims to being “global citizens”. But I am not sure it is a temporary phenomena. It could be the evolutionary path of mankind. Evolution need not always be for the better, it is a trial and error process, with many false paths that could lead to the extinction of the species or its major modification. Perhaps our atomic, self-absorbed, gender-neutral homo sapiens are the first evolutionary step towards non-social homo sapiens?

  97. @alex in San Jose AKA Digital Detroit

    I guess you’re going to tell that same tale a few more times yet. Face it: nobody gives a shit whether or not you hate white people, least of all any white people.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  98. Sol says:
    @Colin Wright

    How are the social dynamics of such a multiethnic/multicultural society? I notice the Japanese-Americans in California may socialize with other groups but tend to marry their own.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
    , @Dainagon
  99. @Lord Palmerston

    Since HK didn’t go through the rigours of communism, they have a head start on mainland China in terms of prosperity.

    Thing is, HK protests have a real reason: HK is losing the competition with Shanghai, in prosperity, economy, finance, science, education, and prospects of the young people. The real tragedy is that the more young HK hoodlums “protest”, the more they ruin HK prospects, and the less likely it becomes that HK will ever catch up with Shanghai. In HK the US backed the losing horse again. I guess that’s the main reason why central Chinese authorities don’t do much: when you see your enemy committing suicide, do not interfere.

    • Replies: @Frankie P
  100. ‘How are the social dynamics of such a multiethnic/multicultural society? ‘

    They’re pretty awful.

    I subsequently moved to provincial Oregon — and the contrast is refreshing.

    These aren’t precisely my people, but at least I fairly quickly acquired some idea of what to expect from them, and in turn, what the expectations were I should meet. Of course, I’m white and so are they, but still…

    Hawaii’s not like that. In some intangible sense, it’s a Tower of Babel. What worsens matters is a lot of the whites who move there are fairly screwy to start with — and come in multiple flavors themselves.

    Hawaii’s okay — but it’s definitely not a community. There’s no getting away from that.

  101. @Sol

    How are the social dynamics of such a multiethnic/multicultural society? I notice the Japanese-Americans in California may socialize with other groups but tend to marry their own.

    Not true. From the 2018 article “Patterns of Interracial and Interethnic Marriages among Foreign-Born Asians in the United States”

    “Among all foreign-born Asian groups, Japanese were most likely to marry interracially and interethnically [which means to marry other Asians rather than Japanese], while Asian Indians had the lowest rates of interracial marriage and interethnic marriage.”

    I doubt the Japanese in California are somehow special in the way they are likely to marry.

  102. Rootless? Yea, we saw this in American college kids post 9/11. It was fashionable to declare oneself a “citizen of the world” and hold oneself at a intellectual distance from their family and nation in mourning. Most of these now 40 year olds are still rootless, bouncing from job to job, town to town, relationship to relationship….all of it coming with some grand explanation how they are “free”.

  103. @Twodees Partain

    ‘I guess you’re going to tell that same tale a few more times yet. Face it: nobody gives a shit whether or not you hate white people, least of all any white people.’

    What’s interesting is that for the first time in my life, I’m living in an overwhelmingly white environment, and…

    I’ve decided I like white people! They’re really great!

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  104. @Anon

    ‘Asians’ lack of care for their environment goes beyond restaurants..’

    So Japan isn’t in Asia?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Twodees Partain
  105. Biff says:
    @Agent76

    Nov 9, 2019 Hong Konger Gets His Ear Bitten Off

    I can’t hear you!!!

    • Replies: @Agent76
  106. swarm into casinos to squander their hard earned Yuans [sic]

    yuan even if plural does not take an “s”

  107. Anon[681] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    The Japs are the only exception.

    d dan is a typical thin skin Chinese, can’t handle any criticism, completely lacks introspection, like the typical over sensitive Jew.

    • Replies: @d dan
    , @Colin Wright
  108. Biff says:
    @Anon

    Asians’ lack of care for their environment goes beyond restaurants. Chinatowns all over the world are run down, filthy and disgusting. Wherever Asians live, their homes and their neighborhoods begin to go downhill. Even when they move into million dollar homes, these people do not take care of their yards, or their roofs, power wash their driveways, paint their fences or even clean their gutters. No matter how rich or well educated they are, they live like trailer trash. That’s why the more of them we let in, the more they’ll turn the US into the turd world from whence they came.

    Some people only see what they want to see to confirm their prejudice.

    PS
    I’ve never power washed my driveway either.

  109. Frankie P says:
    @AnonFromTN

    Most of your comment is laser-like in its accuracy. My major disagreement is how you frame your first statement. It’s not right to make such a surface analysis such as HK is losing the competition with Shanghai. Circumstances must be put into perspective in order to facilitate a deeper understanding among the plebs. To wit, Hong Kong benefited for years from its position as the “doorway to China”. Before China was welcomed into the WTO, multinational companies seeking to minimize risk planted their regional headquarters in HK to take advantage of the stability of the British court system. Understand one thing though: these companies were profiting from the rise of China, not from the rise of Britain or Hong Kong. Of course the people of Hong Kong also profited, scoring good jobs in foreign run companies, working in the busiest port in the world (1997), trading in the flow of products coming from China. Some facts:

    In 1997, Hong Kong generated approximately 20% of China’s GDP.
    That figure is now down below 3%.
    In 1997, about 50% of China’s international trade used to pass through Hong Kong. That has now fallen to about 12%.
    Until about 20 years ago, Hong Kong’s stock market was twice the size of China’s other stock markets. That has changed, and today Hong Kong’s market has been bypassed by Shanghai’s, and Shenzhen’s is also poised to eclipse it. Until about 15 years ago, Hong Kong’s port was the largest in the world. Today, there are three ports within China, Shanghai, Ningbo and Shenzhen, which are larger, and Chingdao is rapidly gaining on Hong Kong. A new port will open soon in Guangzhou, which will also have a large impact on Hong Kong’s port.

    So it’s not quite accurate to say that Hong Kong is losing the competition. It’s more accurate to say that Hong Kong lost its enviable, privileged economic position due to the natural consequences of China’s growth and acceptance by the global community.

    The violent protesters should be burning down the HK offices of the WTO, IMF and World Bank if they are angry about their situation. And you’re right, Beijing will let the violent protesters destroy HK’s future instead of following the logical course of action, which would be economic integration with the growing Pearl River Delta economic region, one of the most prosperous economic areas of the world. Grow with Shenzhen and Guangzhou or fall with the support of the decaying US Empire, what is your choice?

  110. @Johan

    ‘More likely you will never arrive. So far for blaming one individual…’

    Yeah, but some stand out…really, really stand out.

  111. @Jeff Stryker

    California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico.

    In other words, the West.

    I was just talking tonight with the Japanese-American owner of a small vintage clothing store in “Japantown” which is close to me and a place I regularly go to eat, shop, etc., and he said that places outside California were much better, and I said “Which places?” and he came back with places that were all east of the Rockies. I said that my experience is pretty much limited to west of the Rockies.

    I’ve been wondering lately if, the US being an atomized, hustler nation (see Morris Berman of “Why America Failed” fame for more on this), if the West might be the most hustle-y part of it and if things might be a bit more human back East, being so much closer to Europe.

    I don’t thing one really gets away from the dog-eat-dog social Darwinism of the modern English-speaking world except by actually leaving it, which requires learning another language and adopting another culture, something 99.95% of Americans will never do.

    Berman’s been quite happy with Mexico, but he is Jewish and Mexican Nazis are a thing, and while he’s got the money and resources to jump outta there if things get hot, those of more modest means may have to choose wisely, having just enough “gunpowder for one shot” or money, resources, health, etc for one major move and that’s it.

  112. @follyofwar

    The browner, “thug” groups like Hawaiians, Samoans, etc have quite a dislike of whites but it’s because the groups really in power, namely the Japanese and to some extent the Chinese, like it that way. In other words, if the Hawaiian thugs are the hammer, the hand on the hammer is Japanese.

    And if you look at Hawaiian history, not only was traditional culture rather ghastly, but it was the Hawaiians’ own royalty who couldn’t wait to effectively sell ’em downriver for a few baubles.

  113. @Colin Wright

    The Hawaii I miss is long, long gone. We used to just go to Hanauma Bay. Now you have to watch a movie, pay a fee you could eat for a week on, etc.

    Anyone who’s brown, from Hispanic to Middle-Eastern, can get off the plane in Hawaii and be met with more welcome than a white person whose family moved there in the 1840s and have been there ever since.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
  114. @Frankie P

    You are right that HK lost its unique position as a non-Chinese gateway to China. I was talking about the other side of the same coin: without this unique position, HK turned out to be not good enough to compete with other Chinese cities. HK protests have about as much chance to succeed as protests against Earth gravity. In fact, the hoodlums are speeding up its demise. I guess that’s why Chinese government looks the other way: HK would fade into irrelevance and, as an added bonus, the US would show once again its cluelessness. It’s basically like in Kipling’s Jungle book: Akela missed. Except that the Empire missed quite a few times already. Even subservient Saudis noticed and started negotiating the purchase of Russian S-400 in earnest.

  115. d dan says:
    @Frankie P

    The economic situation you described is correct and probably the concerns of the majority of Hong Kongers. But I doubt those terrorists (a.k.a. “protesters”) care much about them – just look at their “5 demands”, none of them is about economic issue. They should just be thrown to prison for a long time, don’t need to listen to their stupid demands.

  116. @Jeff Stryker

    In the U. S. the malice and sorrow of the small businessman begins and ends with the unlimited capacity of .gov to harass and hector through ever increasing procedures, policies and protocols.

    Survivors will be greeted with weekly/ monthly/quarterly/yearly extractions of plunder, e.g.- 15.2% SS, 3% Medicaid, 25%fed, 10% state/city/local, as well as sales tax ( I’m an unpaid tax collector), sugar tax, property tax, and so on-and so forth. A good accountant (my “minder”)will claw back some, and he’ll glom a grand or two for the pleasure.

    With all that said, there are still opportunities in the “penumbra” – partial and imperfect properties- that through the power of the internet are to be exploited while sitting on my ass here in my pizzeria in Philly. I bought property for 17k ( 5 yrs ago)and rehabbed it myself and live in hoi poloi elegance ( l am now the self crowned King of duh row home, lol) with my wife and son-who is off in college. No mortgage, no college debt, great neighbors- we are truly blessed.

    From our bolt hole, wifey and l will travel- dear friends in metro Manila, Cambodia and family in China. If people would curb their vanities- and realize less is truly more- there are practical ways to become unfettered from the Western Condition.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  117. d dan says:
    @Anon

    “d dan is a typical thin skin Chinese, can’t handle any criticism…”

    Don’t flatter yourself. You are not even capable of writing a “criticism”.

    p/s: I am “replying” only because I am running out of Troll flag.

  118. I think that it’s wrong to think HK was the last Western colony in Asia. There are tens of thousands of Americans in Korea and Japan. The Koreans are now circumcised Christians. And worse, there’s Taiwan.

    • Replies: @Pincher Martin
  119. @Frankie P

    And you’re right, Beijing will let the violent protesters destroy HK’s future instead of following the logical course of action, which would be economic integration with the growing Pearl River Delta economic region

    You can’t save people who don’t want to be saved. The entire point was economic integration but the HK’ers were upset at the idea of losing their specialness.

    There really wasn’t a lot Beijing could have done.

  120. @AaronB

    Aaron, I just finished a fascinating biography about Quanah Parker- the Rise and Fall of the Comanches -the Most Powerful Indian nation- by S.C. Gwynn “Empire of the Summer Moon.”

    It is about cultural pollution and the cross- cultural pollination that decayed and degenerated the wild Comanches of the plains, the last truly nomad, stone- age People in the Americas.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  121. @AaronB

    It’s fine to talk about Buddhism and not being tied down, but conflating it with “Shen Xingzhou” and “Kiran Bhat” is an injustice to the very idea.

    People like that haven’t attained selflessness, much less nirvana; they’re young, pampered self-promoters who happen to have enough money to travel endlessly, slyly touting their race as a credential. You won’t find takers for the notion of resembling them here.

    Having said that, now that nearly every white nation has been destroyed, self-respecting white men with no attachments at home have no choice but to go abroad.

    Someone who really wants to lose himself goes to Laos to find an obscure ārāma, or works on a reindeer farm in Sápmi, or even, like Dinh, travels around destroying his body and writing funny articles full of self-deprecation.

    They don’t have weird little biographies they hawk at bullshit “conferences”.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  122. @follyofwar

    For me, Florida was very much hell on earth. Hard to think of a more antithetical environment and I regret almost every hour I spent there.

  123. SafeNow says:

    Great travel writing — the telling anecdotes, the place descriptions, a bit of history, and the engaging style. I am reminded of Paul Theroux, the greatest travel writer of modern times. I wonder if Linh read Theroux’s works to polish his own God-given knack for this.

  124. @Dacian Julien Soros

    And worse, there’s Taiwan.

    Why is it worse? There are neither U.S. soldiers nor very many Christians in Taiwan. Nor is there an official U.S. policy mandating that it must come to Taiwan’s aide if it is attacked by China, even if some people assume that is the case.

  125. @Anon

    ‘The Japs are the only exception.’

    Isn’t Singapore the place where you fined for littering — I mean, you really do get fined?

    Then, too, I vaguely recall Thailand as being pretty clean. Of course, that was forty years ago.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  126. @yakushimaru

    Very, very rarely a white woman will marry a foreigner and move overseas as a result. Outside matrimony, few white women choose to live overseas. And I have met no African-American female expats in Southeast Asia. Zero. And no Mexican-Americans. Definitely no Mexican women.

  127. @Stonehands

    I wouldn’t know. I never owned an apartment. And to be honest, my grandmother’s condo in Greater Detroit was $400,000 when she bought it in 1986 and when it was sold twenty years later we got $70,000. And my brother told me we were lucky to get that much.

    Cities go through a renaissance. I remember the old Tom Skerrit film FIGHTING BACK which depicted Philly as a crime-infested hellhole and of course Jim Goad has not had anything good to write about it (And he seems to dislike Italian-Americans as well).

    But from what I can see, Philly went through a cultural renaissance.

    Every deal is different.

    If I am correct in assuming you are Asian-American than possibly the cultural forces that affect whites have not really pulled you under.

    Asia is a good place to be an expat.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
    , @Stonehands
  128. Hacienda says:

    Lin Yutang, “What is patriotism but love of the foods one had as a child?”

    I think I like White Castle, like most midwesterners. I think I like the corny architecture, the grease, the fluffiness. I know I like the nostalgia of White Castle. If you go to a White Castle in parts of Indianapolis, you’ll see whitey and blackie (crackers and niggers) sometimes eating together and talking about real estate. I think it’s the Jews that turned White Castle into some racial aspirational meme. And just for fuck’s sake, not because Jews are Satanic, although some are crazy. Real estate is all about patriotism too. Real estate is all about territories, the more and bigger you own, the bigger man you are, at least in your own head. Real estate can make people autistic, too, but is a great tonic for the social media world. I buy frozen White Castle at Walmart now, since I live in California. There’s a lot of Californians with residual “love” for White Castle, the food one “loves” as a child. Do people really “love” the foods of their childhood? I call bullshit. Only in mass communication settings do people “love” the foods of their youth. Dunkin Donuts are starting to pop up in Southern California, will White Castles too? I hope so. My guess is that Mexicans would take to White Castle, seeing as the experience of a slider resembles a taco. A kind of midwesterner, low flavor profile whitey taco. Asians would take to White Castle, too. Whatever, nothing hangs on it. If no White Castles come to California, I wouldn’t care.

    • Replies: @utu
  129. Anon[707] • Disclaimer says:

    “A great irony of colonialism is that many of the colonized nations have managed to stay more coherent, intact and true to themselves than the colonizers, so that seven decades after the Indians kicked out the Brits, for example, India is still essentially India, if not more so, while England has become relentlessly less English.”

    In reality, large parts of India do not resemble the old India at all. There are many more mosques in India than during the British rule, and the Muslim and Christian population is growing at a much faster pace than the Hindu population each year. Like in Europe, Islam could become the majority religion in India in the near future. And the eastern and western parts of India (Pakistan and Bangladesh) certainly are not anymore “essentially India”.

    I wonder if the rest of the article contains similar falsehoods, or if this is just a one-off.

    • Replies: @Dumbo
  130. @PPB

    I agree,this piece made my swiss morning also.

  131. Dumbo says:
    @Anon

    None of those changes have to do with British colonialism, having happened after the English left. The point is that the former colonizer countries changed much more. I’ve never been to India, but it seems to me that it still pretty much Indian and does not attract many immigrants.

  132. utu says:
    @Hacienda

    You can have White Castle in California if you give us In-N-Out.

    • Replies: @Hacienda
  133. Dumbo says:
    @follyofwar

    Florida is too hot, too humid, has bugs, etc. And hurricanes. I don’t know how people lived in Florida before AC. Best weather in the U.S. is in SoCal (similar to Mediterranean climate in Europe), because it’s warm but drier, and you have at least some semblance of seasons, or you can go to the mountains if you really want snow. On the other hand, California has a water shortage problem, and traffic, and earthquakes. And the worst, Californians.

    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
  134. Dainagon says:
    @Sol

    I am of the demographic you are referencing. What you say may have been true 50 years ago… it isn’t now.

  135. @Colin Wright

    Not being any kind of expert on Hawaii, I had no idea that the Japanese ran things there. Apparently, they not only won the battle of Pearl Harbor, but, after war criminal Truman needlessly dropped the two Big Bombs near the end of the war, they got their revenge by coming back to take over the islands. Good for them, I say.

    The democrats must love the one-party state of Hawaii. It hasn’t voted GOP since Reagan in 1984, when all but one state did the same. I’ll bet they won’t make that mistake again. Poor Tulsi Gabbard. If she was from a contested continental state like mine (PA), I think she’d be doing much better.

    I saw that Mad Men segment too. That was when flying was sexy and fun.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  136. Escher says:
    @bike-anarkist

    Immigrants are assimilating in the only way that matters, by embracing the religion of mindless consumerism and debt slavery.

  137. @Colin Wright

    China has pretty clean streets now too.

    That said, there does seem to be a certain attitude difference toward cleanliness, even as it is gradually shifted these days via force. Attitudes toward cleanliness are definitely something I think would be worth researching in. China was indeed mentioned even historically as being less excited about cleanliness, while the Japanese were much more focused on it. Dinh has mentioned at least one restaurant where debris in Vietnam is littered on the floor with little concern, and even in the West, prior to labor-saving devices, specific standards of cleanliness were quite different.

    Ultimately, cleanliness is a function of societal standards, enforcement ability and free time to upkeep. Societies heavily emphasized on conformity with unspecified but potentially ruthless punishment for stepping out of line – very Puritan societies, and very collectivistic societies, do well at it and ultimately this is why China can do well at it too.

    Dinh often celebrates against that, for better or worse. He does not particularly celebrate the domestication and mechanization of humanity(though that is, in some ways, the very force of civilization).

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  138. Hacienda says:
    @utu

    That’s a deal. But, the midwest already has (Bob’s) Big Boy, which is much better.

  139. HaHa (lol?) astute observation on Linh and our current global denizens too. Sometimes I learn more see more and now know more by reading Linh’s work than sitting in a classroom for a year (or two). Your comment is very perceptive too. Thanks for posting it.

  140. @follyofwar

    ‘Not being any kind of expert on Hawaii, I had no idea that the Japanese ran things there. Apparently, they not only won the battle of Pearl Harbor, but, after war criminal Truman needlessly dropped the two Big Bombs near the end of the war, they got their revenge by coming back to take over the islands. Good for them, I say.’

    No; these are the Japanese who had been there since the end of the nineteenth century; first as sugar cane workers, then as the owners of small stores, then as local politicians.

    They were (and are) the largest ethnic group in Hawaii, and they vote. Look at the list of Hawaii’s senators: one has always been white, one Japanese. Always. What’s more, they’ve always been firm supporters of Israel. There’s a definite deal with the mainland power structure there. Why the f____ should ethnic Japanese on islands in the middle of the Pacific care about Israel?

    Got me. But meanwhile, back at the ranch…

    As a neighbor of mine put it, if you want to change anything, you’ll run into the County Board of Supervisors — and that is a bunch of old Japanese guys saying ‘we gotta follow the general plan.’

    …which, of course, they themselves wrote. But there’s no particular connection to modern Japan. These people would be more like the Boers of South Africa as compared to the modern Dutch. About the only similarity is a knack for politely getting their own way — but getting their own way.

    It’s okay with me. Just don’t take those promotional clips on the flight over too seriously. That’s not Hawaii. It never was Hawaii.

  141. @Daniel Chieh

    ‘… Ultimately, cleanliness is a function of societal standards, enforcement ability and free time to upkeep…’

    Incongruously, cleanliness can also be a function of extreme poverty. Compare modern Turkey and Morocco. There is no litter in Morocco. On the other hand, one of my memories of Turkey is of frigging drifts of empty plastic water bottles.

    Why? Are Moroccans just naturally clean and Turks filthy?

    No. It’s because Morocco is so poor that for any given article of litter, there is someone who is making a living picking it up — if only as kindling for fires. Turks have yet to all learn they mustn’t litter — but they have become affluent enough so that they can afford bottled water yet no one is reduced to gathering up the empties.

    …It’s actually kind of interesting to compare Turkey and China. In both cases, the ordinary citizen — as opposed to the members of the elite — is finally acquiring a measure of prosperity. Moreover, in both cases, the nations are ceasing to simply mindlessly obey the ideological dictates of the West and are starting to pick out their own paths. Of course, China’s path is far more secular than Turkey’s, which is taking the form of the one of the more constructive developments of Islam going on at the moment — but there are similarities in terms of what stage of historical evolution this would be.

    My impression is that Turkey at least is rapidly becoming a nation culturally dominated by a burgeoning lower middle class and those who at least aspire to join it. Is China at the same place?

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  142. stevecel says:

    Asiatics, Chinese in particular, are too obsessed with food. Food explains much of their history. Until they get past that they will never amount to anything and be continually beaten down.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  143. JUAN says:

    you say that “New York has 61,000” homeless but the NY Times recently had an article about the ~ 120,000 children that are homeless and go to school. Otherwise and as usual, all very interesting. Great work.

  144. @Muggles

    Muggles, the problem is that the more I read about recent history, the more I learn that it’s written by the victors.
    To be honest, I’m beginning to like Hitler.
    I read about Germany in the 1920’s and the havoc caused by the Jews there. Tell me honestly, were the Germans racist or the Jews at fault?
    Sure they wanted the Jews out but the Holocaust is and will always be a Holohoax. No thinking person will ever take it seriously from now on.

    • Agree: Sunshine
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  145. Richard B says:
    @Haha

    But where you can look at homo sapiens a la global with open curiosity, I have come to detest these global citizens. They epitomize our age of decadence and alienation, irresponsibility and selfishness.

    Self-Righteousness is always a cover for Self-Loathing.

  146. AaronB says:
    @Marshall Lentini

    That’s a great point. These people certainly aren’t Nobodies from Nowhere, and I’m not suggesting they are any kind of Buddhist ideal.

    But I did use these examples as a starting point for a broader inquiry into roots and rootlessness, which my own life history has made a fascinating subject.

    More people are travelling than ever before right now, and there is a sort of mass pilgrimage on an unprecedented scale going on. There are also more expats and digital nomads and the like than ever before.

    This is an extraordinary phenomenon that I often feel is examined from one side only. But the very real exhilaration of nomadism is overlooked. Roots can be stifling and oppressive, and escaping them can be the most incredible liberation.

    To elaborate on the underlying Buddhist theme here, there is an analogous situation with regard to our attitude towards concepts and thoughts. There are many people who feel a need to cling to concepts and ideas. They need to feel “rooted” and secure in concepts, which they take as reality. Otherwise they feel terrified and adrift.

    Daniel Chieh is such a person, and perhaps a majority of people on this site (in the world, most humans are mediocre). But Buddhism suggests that being “rooted” in concepts and ideas is not just illogical and superficial, but that there is an extraordinary freedom and liberation in not clinging to concepts, in recognizing their contingency.

    So “rootlessness”, from anything and everything, from physical place or from mental place, from the Buddhist perspective, is the source of the most exhilarating freedom one could have.

    Which is not to say, of course, that roots don’t have their place, just as concepts are necessary and serve a function for us. The thing is to not take either too seriously – to not reify either. Use concepts to order the world, sure, but realize they don’t really represent reality, which cannot be grasped. Have roots and a sense of place, but don’t idolize them, and appreciate the need for freedom from roots as well or they will become stifling and oppressive.

    In the end, Buddhism is the Middle Way – any time you completely choose one side over another, you are clinging to something that does not exist on its own and so cannot be clung to.

  147. AaronB says:
    @Stonehands

    Interesting. I will take a look at it. I’m fascinated by the American Indians in general. Lately I am spending more time in the West and its incredible landscapes, and I find myself more and more thinking about the American Indians.

    Thomas Merton has a great little book of essays on American Indians and the Mayan world as well, topics he doesn’t usually write about.

    I think there is a correlative between spirituality and the Stone Age lifestyle – they almost seem to imply each other, just as logical realism implies the modern world of technology. And Buddhist and Eastern spiritual works recommend essentially a Stone Age lifestyle, hermits and wanderers in the mountains and forests etc.

    In Judaism also the ideal life is a sort of mild pastoral or nomadic anarchism, with no king, each man in his tent or under his vine tree, doing as is right in his eyes and living in harmony with nature. Certain Jewish holidays, like Succot, seek to recall the nomadic shelterless life of an idealized Stone Age.

    I think all spirituality is like this, really.

  148. Dinh feigns the perceptive abilities of a retarded child. 100% of social media essayists who work for state intelligence play moron in real time for your thoughts and feelings. Missing is the discussion of gender identity problems the young people in the street are facing because of China. Hong Kong has super modern security as a police state. Unless of course you’re Ed Snowden who made a daring escape completely undetected.

    • LOL: Daniel Chieh
    • Troll: Twodees Partain
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  149. @Colin Wright

    So do I…at least the few of them I know, I like. The first time I ever saw a white people, I said, “Dad, is that a white people guy?”. Now I see a few of them a month.

  150. @Colin Wright

    “So Japan isn’t in Asia?”

    Of course not. It’s a bunch of islands out in the ocean somewhere. Sheesh.

  151. @Dumbo

    “And the worst, Californians.”

    That’s the real deal breaker for me. The trouble with California is the fucking Californians, and always has been.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  152. @Colin Wright

    Chinese culture is not heavily influenced by the lower middle class, I’ll say. Its pretty messy, but its some mixture of modern attitudes(often Western), classical ideas(typically all called Confucian), and whatever is the latest fad that the CCP is adopting. There’s a lot of “technological optimism.”

  153. PPB says:
    @AaronB

    “Why are you trying to police what I can and cannot say?”

    Who in the world is doing anything of the sort, and why would I have any interest in doing so? How did you ever read this into the words that I had posted? And the imputation of insecurity??? Where did that one come from?

    My intent was to defend Linh– justly from my perspective– from criticizm that appeared to originate more from a past grudge of some sort than from the content of his current essay.

    So a bit less spirituality and a bit more generosity of spirit might be in order here. The former, in its truest sense, is rarely enhanced by being placed in the service of petty polemicism.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  154. @AaronB

    You’ll be much closer to the Stone Age if you gave away all of your material possessions to Mr. Karlin.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  155. AaronB says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    If that were true, I’d gladly do it.

    But I would just become a destitute homeless person in a modern technological civilization – which, while it may have an underappreciated appeal (there is an interesting article about street kids in San Francisco who love the life), isn’t quite living a Stone Age lifestyle.

    All of society needs to participate. What say you and I form the nucleus of this new movement….

  156. AaronB says:
    @PPB

    Ok, sounds good.

    But there is more than just a petty grudge against Linh at work here.

    His attitude to life, his underlying metaphysics, seem peculiarly petty, small minded, and humorless to me, to be peculiarly lacking in joy and breadth of vision and generosity of mind. His Jew hatred is just an expected corollary.

    Here is someone who is writing about the side of life Henry Miller did – yet with how much more gusto and joie de vivre did Miller write about these things! How much joy, generosity, and sense of beauty in the seedy and ugly!

    So I guess you can say I am peculiarly offended by Linh – he takes precisely the wrong approach, the pathetic approach. Miller can make a pigsty seem full of vigor and fascination – Linh makes Japan seem depressing and dull.

    And I think its really important that I provide this other perspective, so people can see the joy and beauty even in the imperfect, seedy side of life.

    That being said, Linh wrote essay after essay against Jews, but no complaint from you – but you imagine I have a grudge against him on this score, and only this bothers you.

    Hardly seems reven handed.

    Finally, I agree I should be generous spirited, but how to convey that the ugly underseam of life can be beautiful, without making clear Linh’s depressing attitude is rather pathetic?

    • Replies: @PPB
    , @Jeff Stryker
  157. @AaronB

    Don’t hesitate, action is of the essence. Embrace the fluidity of change. You too can find cheer and joy among the modern day scavengers of derelict and ruin. Leave the material to the dull and foolish like Karlin and myself.

  158. @Betty Hung

    Google translate leaves much to be desired.

  159. PPB says:
    @AaronB

    “That being said, Linh wrote essay after essay against Jews, but no complaint from you.”

    While my interactions, ascquantanceships and friendships with Jews have been overall positive, and in the best cases much more than that, I have no issue or agenda one way or the other regarding Jews in the abstract or as a collectivity, any more than I do with any large group taken as a whole, some members of which will inevitably tend to be more chauvinistic than others regarding their group identity. Accordingly, I prefer to stay out of the contentious dialogues regarding the “Jewish Question”, not the least reason for which is that I really have nothing to contribute to them that hasn’t already been said on behalf of one side or the other, or even from a more balanced perspective. It’s also not my preferred role to take exception to every comment or attitude that I might disagree with, Linh’s or anyone else’s. Individuals have a right to speak for themselves, however lucidly and convincingly, or however foolishly. So while I might occasionally be found sniping from the peanut gallery, I prefer not to waste my ammo.

    “Here is someone who is writing about the side of life Henry Miller did – yet with how much more gusto and joie de vivre did Miller write about these things! How much joy, generosity, and sense of beauty in the seedy and ugly!”

    While I appreciate Miller’s writing, spirit and style– and did so especially during my younger years, when I was still quite the adventure seeker that such writing would naturally appeal to– it even then came across to me sometimes as a bit forced, as involving the deliberate adaptation of an energy and persona that didn’t always present itself naturally. On the other hand, I suspect that few people go and view a Clint Eastwood Western expecting Clint to play anything other than Clint. So I have no problem with Miller doing the same. Although I must add that I found this latest piece by Linh to be charmingly life-affirming. Maybe you have to read between and around the lines to get that part of it, or appreciate the East Asian genius for ellipsis, whereas Miller’s life-affirmation is more overt, like eating a hearty meal at a brew pub. For what it matters, I’ve got plenty of room for both approaches.

  160. @AaronB

    You can also unpack the history of civilization and the erasure of the hunter- gatherers in Daniel Quinn’s gem Ishmael. What we call civilization is not, as most of us have been trained to believe, an evolutionary pinnacle at the tip of a human-advancement graph with our club-wielding antecedents at one end and machine-human-hybridism at the other. Rather, it is a single, unsustainable lifestyle that in ten thousand years metastasized over the earth, erasing from memory other forms of life in its path. And this slavery-dependent, earth-destroying civilization is doomed to collapse.

    I am familiar with Gods admonition to the Hebrews through the aging prophet Samuel, (The Hebrews didn’t trust that God would act through Samuels sons-who didn’t walk in his ways) when they petitioned him to appoint a King, “ just like the other nations. “
    God warns them of the tax burden they will be saddled with, military conscription, their women being enticed and enslaved to become confectioners, bakers, and perfumers for the King.
    Prior to this we have the book of judges, and as you have noted, a pastoral anarchic life, each man under his own vine and fig tree.

    This theme repeats among indigenous people worldwide. In Hinduism, the Sannyasa stage of life, the retreat to the forest, the toning down of desire, status, and attachment. ( This theme is developed for the Western mind through Ernst Jungers the “Forest Dweller”) There is also the earlier initiation of this stage of life- and the stilling of sexual desire-among the Brahmacharya.

    The creation myth, our culture, and our gods, are a story ( game) that we enact in concordance with the rest of The Community of Life.

    Agriculture- ( and the teeming well-armed cities that are based on it)is the consequence of eating from the tree of Good and Evil (and “imagining” that we have the power to decide who lives and who dies) and the subsequent ejection/fall from the Garden ( where God bore the burden of this knowledge) and the pastoral life-has indeed left nature conquered and bloodied at our feet.

  161. PPB says:

    I sometimes wonder if an inchoate nostalgia hinting at a purer or more complete mode of existence in a dimly-perceived and subconsciously mythologized “past” doesn’t at times cause us to denigrate some of the blessings of civilizational development, as though the latter was merely some kind of cosmic error or unequivocal human failing. This isn’t to ignore the negative consequences of this development and the errant tangents that it has often taken, but to point to a sentimental prejudice that can lead to throwing out the baby with the bathwater, as though we had to either swallow the whole enchilada of post-whatever civilization or else abandon it completely, when a bit of discernment and a sense of proportion might instead allow for a more fulfilling and humanity-serving balance. And what could more naturally produce a toning down of deisre later in life, a gradual distillation of all that has been lived and experienced, than a cultural foundation that allows humans to live and explore life to the fullest during their most vigorous years?

  162. @AaronB

    There is a difference between an expat running a business in Hong Kong or Philippines and a “crusty punk” (As they were referred to in the late nineties when I was young) who begs for change outside stores so he can do heroin.

    I knew a crusty punk-an awful one-in my twenties when I lived in Phoenix. He was a friend of my roommate Mike, himself a NOFX-loving beer-swilling punk. This punk was banned from donating blood for money after becoming convinced the plasma worker was hitting on him and assaulting him right in the office. He was incredibly anti-social and violent and we actually kicked Mike out simply so that his crusty friends would not drop by our apartment.

    Crusty punks are another American specimen I was glad to get away from by moving overseas.

    You cannot compare expats-all of whom are educated and intelligent enough to make a living and adapt overseas-to useless American dropouts who glom change for heroin or cheap liquor outside convenience stores in the US.

    Most people from the lower classes and working classes would not and cannot travel overseas. They don’t have the money for a plane ticket because they always have child support payments to make, or are marginally employed, or on probation or parole. Or they are too drunk or have drug addictions to support.

    Expats are not the same. Expats build new lives somewhere else.

    As a young man on the margins of US society myself for a short period of time after college and before fleeing to Dubai, I knew “crusty punks” and other US dropouts. Believe me, none of them would last five minutes overseas.

    They are too poorly socialized, too uneducated, too dependent upon substances, too possessed of a bad attitude…

    Remember, I know of what I speak. I intentionally left America to get away from these sorts of people. As an adult in lower middle class circumstances in Phoenix Arizona (Though not Michigan, which was too cold for crusty punks) you ran into crusty punks a great deal. Some were heroin addicts but most were just sullen potentially violent drunks.

  163. @stevecel

    ‘Asiatics, Chinese in particular, are too obsessed with food. Food explains much of their history. Until they get past that they will never amount to anything and be continually beaten down.’

    All this suggests is that you come from a people that can’t cook. Scots? Jewish?

  164. @Rev. Spooner

    ‘… I read about Germany in the 1920’s and the havoc caused by the Jews there…’

    Always interested in that topic. Any credible sources on the period?

  165. @AaronB

    ‘… In the end, Buddhism is the Middle Way – any time you completely choose one side over another, you are clinging to something that does not exist on its own and so cannot be clung to.’

    Aaron’s back to ‘Buddhism’ again. He always seems to revert to this after he trots ‘Jewish supremacist Aaron’ out and gets a bloody nose.

    Go ahead. Poke your muzzle out again. Maybe no one will be watching. Damn, I love smacking that snout…

  166. @AaronB

    Actually, it is unusual for an Asian-American to harbor antipathy towards Jews.

    In some ways, both are similar. Jews and Asians are both primarily urban and cluster in cities on the East Coast and West Coast axis. Jews and Asians are usually intelligent in IQ on average. Jews and Asians tend to be educated and white collar. Jews and Asians are usually middle-class and often high earners. Jews and Asians are both accused of being cunning and underhanded. Jews and Asians have both been unpopular as store owners and landlords in the black ghetto.

    Asians and Jews both have low indexes of commonplace social pathology. Out-of-wedlock birthrates, street crime, family dysfunction, drug addiction, homelessness are generally low for both groups.

    You get out of expat life what you put into it. Personally, all I care about is not having to witness chimpouts on buses by 300 pounders on the way to work. That won’t happen in Asia. Another Cholo Mestizo gang member won’t be menacing me in Asia. I won’t share an apartment with some beer-drunk whose friends are “crusty punks”. Gone are the swaggering hillbillies I met in Southeast Michigan. Gone are the meth-addled homeless who would follow me and hassle me.

    If all you wish is to get away from these people, then living overseas is a paradise for a lower middle class white American male.

    I’ve known many white Americans on disability pensions in Philippines. So why live in a trailer or bad apartment in the frigid Midwest when the currency exchange allows you to live in a nice bungalow in Philippines? The weather is nicer, you are not living in complete squalor etc.

    But Mr. Linh’s expectations were clearly higher. Having won the PEW Award, he was poised to be the next great literary voice of Asian-America-sort of an authorial love child of Amy Tan and Bob Seger.

  167. @AaronB

    ‘Interesting. I will take a look at it. I’m fascinated by the American Indians in general. Lately I am spending more time in the West and its incredible landscapes, and I find myself more and more thinking about the American Indians…’

    LOL!

    There I was, thinking, ‘who is this idiot?’

    …and I looked up at the name. Should I get you a wind catcher for Christmas, you pathetic jerk-off?

  168. denk says:

    Whiteys keep telling us about their jp goddess, the only Asians resembling human beings, in fact, the only Asians worthy of the ‘honorable whitey role.

    and yet whiteys just couldnt leave well alone.
    robbing jp land and defiling their women.

    The Rev. Taira

    ‘ the islanders have had enough. “The soldiers get drunk and crash their cars. There are four accidents a day; two rapes a month. Almost every person on Okinawa has a family member who has been assaulted. Then the soldiers go off to kill poor people in Iraq and Afghanistan. It makes my blood boil.”

    NATSUMI TAKAO

    ‘U.S. retreat not soon enough how much of the world’s population longs to see such a sight in their homeland

    http://web.archive.org/web/20080213091020/http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/rc20060709a4.html

  169. @Twodees Partain

    ‘“And the worst, Californians.”

    That’s the real deal breaker for me. The trouble with California is the fucking Californians, and always has been.’

    Actually, we were pretty nice. Educated, as a rule, but unpretentious about it. Virtually classless. Relatively receptive to people of other races.

    We are, however, long gone. You might as well be referring to some race wiped out by Genghis Khan.

    • Agree: Pincher Martin
  170. denk says:

    Rubio, Pompeo, BOlton, Trump, Pence, Bannon, Pelsoi,…….
    YIKES !
    ……
    Every swamp thing in the Washington shit hole have ‘shown solidarity’ to their ‘HK freedom fighters’.
    HIllary [we come, we see, he dies] Clinton of course isnt gonna left behind.
    https://www.rt.com/news/466629-china-mocks-hillary-clinton/

    Yet,
    when The hapless OKinawans , after exhausting all available means without success, wrote a letter appealing to mdm dowager Clinton’s ‘conscience’ [cough cough] the bitch didnt even bother to reply.
    According to a leaked doc, the bitch dumped the letter straight into the basket without opening.

    https://theunpeople.blogspot.com/2009/03/an-open-letter-from-okinawa-to.html

    Sheesh,
    As if we need more proof of [[[five liars]]] hypocrisy.

  171. @AaronB

    ‘… But I would just become a destitute homeless person in a modern technological civilization – which, while it may have an underappreciated appeal…’

    Oh, Aaron, please try it out.

    It’s a really good idea. Trust me.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  172. @Colin Wright

    In my opinion, that is Mestizos. Wherever there are Mexicans, a Banana Republic life-is-cheap drug-gangs-are-everywhere machismo-is-everything tinpot dictatorship cloud rolls in.

    Californian whites never had a chance. Mexicans moving North into the East Coast were up against deeply-entrenched competing white ethnic cartels like the Irish, Italians, Jews, Slavs. The Sicilian mafia held their gangs in check (Though now that RICO has put them away MS-13 is roaming Long Island with machetes) and controlled the drug trade leaving small-time Latino gangs no economy to stand on. Polish, Jews, Italians, Russians, Germans like Frederick Trump could all agree to speak English.

    And most importantly, the East Coast had an insurmountable class system. These were all discouraging to Mexicans.

    But California, as you say, is classless and egalitarian. So the whites did not stand a chance.

    Also, it has a contiguous boundary with Mexico.

  173. @denk

    I agree Denk. Let Japan run itself. Problem is, the rest of you Asians are afraid Japanese will get militaristic again (Which they probably will) and go on the rampage like they did in Nanking (Which they might).

    Lee Kwan Yew, who had been beaten and enslaved by Japanese in WWII, was especially adamant that the US remain in Japan to hold them in check.

    In my opinion, policing Japan should be your job. Meaning China, South Korea, Singapore.

    • Replies: @denk
    , @Daniel Chieh
  174. @Colin Wright

    Actually, we were pretty nice. Educated, as a rule, but unpretentious about it. Virtually classless. Relatively receptive to people of other races.

    Both sides of my family are multi-generational white Californians. The state used to be a great place to live, and conservatives had a strong voice here. The state was purple, but conservatives could win in some cases. This was the home of Reagan and Nixon. And Democrats were generally more worried about the working man’s welfare and building great infrastructure than they were about identity politics.

  175. denk says:

    Then we’ve that Pelosi bitch,

    ‘My admiration goes to those non violent protestors who take to the streets week after week to fight for freedom and democracy’

    Good to know there’r still decent people around,,,

    ‘YOu lying piece of shit, those protestors have been anything but non violent’

    ‘What I admire about murikkan politicians is the way they can tell a bald faced lie while looking you straight in the eyes, without a hint of shame’
    [BTW, thats the def of a psychopath]

    Shame ?
    Hell, they wear it like a batch of honor !
    Pompous Pompeo

    ”We cheat, we lie, we kill’

    https://news.cgtn.com/news/2019-10-24/Internet-users-show-Pelosi-how-violent-Hong-Kong-protests-are-L3xttSfGU0/index.html

    • Replies: @Stonehands
  176. PPB says:
    @Colin Wright

    “Actually, we were pretty nice. Educated, as a rule, but unpretentious about it. Virtually classless. Relatively receptive to people of other races.”

    Yup– good characterizaion. Those were the days when living in California was something to appreciate and be grateful for.

    “We are, however, long gone.”

    It was an undulating though progressive (no irony intended) slide downward, with a couple of reprieves that unsurprisingly coincided with economic downturns of the kind that were at least good for dispersing a gaggle of carpetbaggers and freeing up traffic. Few of us who exited the State during the past decade or more have regretted it, although CA still has some beautiful expanses that have remained relatively untouched by the overall cultural/political/civic decline.

  177. Jason Liu says:

    Universal suffrage is absolutely unacceptable and the government should not grant it under any circumstance. I would rather have PLA boots in HK than full democracy. If on the other hand, HK just wants cultural and regional homogeneity, the preservation of Cantonese, fewer mainland migrants, that’s perfectly fine and doable. But they need to drop this bullshit act of kissing up to liberal democracy.

    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @denk
  178. @Colin Wright

    It isn’t, actually.

    I’ve known one or two American expats who hit rock-bottom in the US before laying hands on something they could liquidate (One guy had a Harley Classic his Dad had bought him another simply reached retirement age) and were briefly homeless.

    One, as I mentioned, checked into a homeless facility in the dead of a Connecticut winter and a huge black crackhead masturbated over his head as he lay on his cot. The other was in the park for a while and simply told me that I had no idea nor most middle-class people what happens at night in any US city when the feral animals come out.

    Many of the expats in Philippines would be homeless in the US. Their social security checks are just not big enough to cover food and rent.

    While I was never homeless or utterly destitute in the US, I was near enough the poverty-line in Phoenix to encounter the worst of the white urban underclass and many of them were scary. One meth head who knew I was one of the few employed, college-educated whites in rundown apartment complex would follow me every day to the bus stop demanding money. He stopped short of mugging me simply because I am a muscular if short and squat Mark Wahlberg-type German who at age 25 had 18 inch biceps.

    Two Cholo Mestizos-two brothers-would come out of the Guadalupe barrio beside my low-rent condominium complex in Tempe and for no particular reason would assault middle-class Anglos. They belonged to “Brown Pride” which was a Mestizo gang at that time on the Tempe streets.

    To be homeless in the US is a dangerous proposition.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  179. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    All these conflicts are courtesy of US
    divide and conquer skullduggery.

    Dont you worry.
    The moment uncle scam , the professional arsonist, leave Asia, there’ll be no wars on the Eastern front.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  180. @denk

    Lee Kwan Yew didn’t think so. Being a Chinese-Singaporean, you should know that.

    • Replies: @denk
  181. Anonymous[112] • Disclaimer says:
    @denk

    Sure there is the アメリカ 反対 ! crowd, but plenty of Japanese love America, just as plenty of Americans love Japan. And lots of Japanese love the American armed forces.

    • Replies: @denk
  182. Anon[123] • Disclaimer says:

    @Dumbo

    “None of those changes have to do with British colonialism, having happened after the English left. The point is that the former colonizer countries changed much more. I’ve never been to India, but it seems to me that it still pretty much Indian and does not attract many immigrants.”

    Where did I say that these changes have to do with British colonialism?

    I only said that India since Independence has changed and has become much less Indian, contrary to what the author of this article wants us to believe. For example, the Christianization of India was much less massive during British India, when the British often prevented missionaries from operating. Indian states like Kashmir, Kerala, or West Bengal are islamized to a large degree with only traces of the original Indian culture, not to speak of the western and eastern parts of the country (now known as Pakistan and Bangladesh). Also India attracts massive illegal immigration from Bangladesh, and if one compares India with other countries which have a similar poverty level, legal immigration is also big.

  183. @AaronB

    In fact I agree with you almost completely, though more about attachment to ideologies, and “concepts” in the Buddhist sense, than about place; although in my own life I’ve been more or less unwillingly rootless geographically, and grew “roots” in my impulse to abandon one thing for something, if not anything else.

    For a long time I idealized being rooted geographically, I suppose because I found it impossible to achieve on my own.

    I’m currently rooted somewhere more than I’ve ever been since early childhood, with a pretty decent chance even to improve things, and am finding it rather difficult to adjust. The pressure in my head seems to build with each day just knowing that that’s that, I’m here and can’t go anywhere for now. I knew that I’d grown accustomed to being mobile, ready to escape, but I didn’t fully understand how deep it goes.

    So my life too is illustrative of this phenomenon. One day reading my grandfather’s obituary, which indirectly reported that his restaurant closed due to what we now call “diversity”, I realized how I became the victim of this long before I knew it had a name.

    Although I came to “no concepts” through Nietzsche’s refutation of metaphysics, of course I recognize the congruence of Buddhism, in particular Theravada. There’s also of course the more extreme Cārvāka school from India which is more in line with Sextus Empiricus and Carnap.

    As for the general fact of more people traveling than ever and modern “nomadism”, it’s a bubble that’s going to burst sooner or later with modern civilization itself. That certainly doesn’t apply to non-white migrants making their way from fallout zones north; there’s no end in sight to that, and it will probably get much worse.

    Anyway, I’m not sure the comments Unz are the best place for this sort of discussion. I gather you’re Jewish, so anything you say here will be labeled satanic misguidance.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  184. @denk

    We don’t need no steenking batches.

    • Replies: @denk
  185. @Jeff Stryker

    Yep. It’s a horror show unlike any other country.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  186. @AaronB

    I think there is a correlative between spirituality and the Stone Age lifestyle – they almost seem to imply each other, just as logical realism implies the modern world of technology.

    Two books I love:

    Carlton Coon – The Hunting Peoples
    Kirkpatrick Sale – After Eden

    The former should interest you, as it’s about the technology and habits of West Coast Indian tribes.

    The latter is a bit fanciful, but it makes a compelling argument for H. erectus as a pre-linguistic but spiritual species in balance with the environment, à la Golding’s The Inheritors. Nearly wept when I read it, close to homelessness one winter in Caribou, ME, haunting the Tim Horton’s early morning to get warm.

    I probably don’t need to tell you, but “Primitive Technology” on YouTube is great.

  187. Dumbo says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Jim Goad has not had anything good to write about it (And he seems to dislike Italian-Americans as well).

    Is there anyone or anything that Jim Goad likes?

    Philly went through a cultural renaissance.

    I visited there in the early 2000s and it didn’t seem to me to be very much in renaissance, or maybe I went to the wrong neighborhoods. Where did Linh used to live? I think I went there.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  188. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    Aaron is being completely disingenuous. He simply attacks Linh Dinh in any way he can think of, and he does it because Dinh was critical of Jews and Israel.

    Oh is that why?

    You need to realize how absolutely and perfectly dishonest this guy is. Only once you do, will what he writes and why he writes it will become comprehensible.

    It seems to be a Jewish thing. Their ideal of truth seems to be different from ours. We aim for objectivity, they aim for “what’s good for the Jews?”

  189. @Marshall Lentini

    I’ve met homeless in India and they can pick fruit off trees to live. But your average white man who ends up homeless on the streets of anywhere USA…he is pretty screwed.

    Millions in India and Philippines are homeless but few of them are raped. Whereas a white woman who is homeless in any US city is going to be raped by blacks sooner or later. Sometimes homeless males are raped. Heck, Richard Speck was an ugly white serial killer and he was raped repeatedly by blacks in prison.

    Also, authorities in third world countries are accepting of homeless because they comprise a large segment of the population. Entire Indian castes are homeless.

    In the US, if you are homeless and try to move out of the US cities into rural areas where it might be safer the local police are going to give you the old Sheriff Teasle treatment Rambo got. A free ride out of town and a “we don’t want vagrants” speech. Also, there are no soup kitchens or shelters in rural areas. Which means if you are suddenly homeless you are stuck in the worst parts of US cities.

    America is a worse place to be poor than Australia or Western Europe. Capitalism is rawer in the US. More people are more likely to be homeless in the US.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  190. denk says:
    @Jason Liu

    NOW you’r talking man.

  191. denk says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    LKY was right to worry about jp re-militarisation.
    jp was Asia’s per-eminant military/economic power back then.

    FFW 2019.
    China’s military power is at par or perhaps superior to jp.
    Tokyo wouldnt dare try a re-match with China unless back up by the US led QUAD posse.

    IOW, Asia is safer without the US, a notorious shit stirrer/

    ‘Chinese Singaporean’

    Dont presume too much,

  192. denk says:
    @Stonehands

    I presume you mean bitches ?

    In which case, good for you !

    • Replies: @Stonehands
  193. @Dumbo

    Having grown up middle class (Albeit a child of divorce) and entered adult life totally destitute (My parents lost everything down to the house) I’m not as sympathetic to rednecks as I should be.

    Not until I was an adult on the poverty line did I really realize how the lower class lives and it is mostly as Goad described himself. They have kids young and poor and then abuse them. Their kids, like Goad, get into drugs fairly young. Goad spent years of his life doing everything from PCP to crack cocaine to acid and had many bad experiences along the way.

    Yeah, well, when I was in my twenties and living in a bad area I was offered crack and meth at least twice a day. But instead of becoming a junkie, I got on a plane to Dubai and became an expat in life as soon as humanly possible.

    It was hard work remaining overseas, living from contract to contract. You have to want to get away from blacks and Mexicans and white trash really badly. But where there is a will there is a way.

    You don’t have to be like Goad and spend the prime of your life abusing every drug you can lay your hands on (Most people leave the drug experimentation behind them in college) and beating up your female partners everyday of your life.

    You can simply leave America. I did. Then the police don’t own you, the courts don’t own you, the blacks and white trash and Mexicans won’t menace you…You are free.

    I could have made poor choices. I could have accepted the free offer of heroin or meth in Phoenix. I was offered both everyday. I could have gotten into bad relationships.

    Many of the foreigners in the Philippines could have remained in the US and been homeless or near enough. Instead they got on a plane. Six hundred dollars a month in Cebu is pretty good money-you can live in a nice clean bungalow on the beach, have an attractive sex partner, own a motorcycle, eat well.

    Living overseas is an option.

    Sorry, but I just don’t have a great deal of patience for people who spend their entire lives in an unsatisfactory situation and complain about it like Jim Goad. Get off your ass and leave. I did.

    Since moving overseas, I have had no problems with the Cholos or the trailer trash or the blacks who disgusted me so much in the US urban hellscape. I’ve had no more problems with lousy slumlords like the one Goad assaulted (In Arizona, I caught my landlord trying to break the sink so I would lose my security deposit). When I arrived in Dubai the heroin addicts and tweakers and crackheads disappeared.

    You can choose to simply leave. I did. Personally, I’m much happier to be in Asia than Mr. Linh appears to be. The particulars really don’t matter to me.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  194. @Jeff Stryker

    That is probably going to happen inevitably, especially if China returns to a preeminent position. That is how it worked pre-1800s.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  195. @Curmudgeon

    I would add that Cherry’s Boston teams lost to powerhouse Montreal teams coached by Scotty Bowman.

    Bowman is the greatest hockey coach of all time.

    Bowman is in the conversation for the greatest sports coach of all time.

    Cherry could have had a Cup had someone else been coaching those Montreal teams.

  196. denk says:
    @Anonymous

    This aint NO way to ‘love ‘ your jp goddess !

    ‘ One recent survey by a school teacher on Okinawa found a third of his female high school students had been sexually molested by U.S. soldiers, a violation U.S. base officers have often dismissed as flirting, because boys will be boys.’

    http://www.uli-schmetzer.com/vicenza.html

    As for the jps love of murikkans…
    Ever heard of Stockholm syndrome ?
    Thats kind of perversion.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  197. @Daniel Chieh

    In all fairness, Lee Kwan Yew was a Japanese POW. I don’t blame his apprehension.

    By the time this happens, US as a Superpower will be long gone. Some “Pardo” tri-racial will be in the White House and Salvadoran cartels will be selling heroin out of the Pentagon. The US is sliding into a Brazil with bad weather quickly. Even Israel will be floundering as tax paying productive working citizens are no longer born.

    Which means that China and Asia will be on their own against Japanese militarism.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  198. @Jeff Stryker

    I did once see an old black man in Austin shake some walnuts off of a tree. It stuck in my memory due to its rarity.

  199. @Jeff Stryker

    You have to want to get away from blacks and Mexicans and white trash really badly.

    I went back recently after a job in Poland to get some things together. Never again.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  200. @Marshall Lentini

    ‘… Anyway, I’m not sure the comments Unz are the best place for this sort of discussion. I gather you’re Jewish, so anything you say here will be labeled satanic misguidance.’

    If Aaron was Satan, we could all pretty much relax.

    • LOL: Biff
  201. @denk

    ‘and yet whiteys just couldnt leave well alone.…
    robbing jp land and defiling their women…’

    The irony here is that while there are certainly rapists, they are usually blacks, not ‘whiteys’.

    …that detail gets politely papered over.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @denk
  202. @Colin Wright

    The most famous case of a GI on a rampage in Japan involved a Nigerian who was serving in the US military in order to acquire a Green Card.

    Rapes by whites are rare. They happen. Jeffrey Dahmer, the son of a German chemist and a Norwegian-American woman, raped several fellow GI’s in Germany. But rapes by white GI’s are rare.

    But white rapists tend to be acting out obsessive-compulsive masturbatory ritualistic fantasies. They tend to do this in civilian life, after military service. Gary Ridgeway, David Berkowitz, Jeffrey Dahmer all had ordinary service records. Military rapes are generally “hit and run”. For one thing, there are curfews. Black rape is simply a sudden and impulsive crime driven by the desire to penetrate females of other races. There is no psychological component that drives a Jeffrey Dahmer.

  203. @denk

    ‘As for the jps love of murikkans…
    Ever heard of Stockholm syndrome ?
    Thats kind of perversion.’

    I think the Japanese at some profound level may yet still be struggling to come to terms with the fact that there are people in the world who aren’t Japanese.

    All nationalities of course have ways of handling the gap between ‘them’ and ‘us.’ Americans tend towards an assumption that everyone would be American if only they could — and in our generosity, we usually try to help them have the first soft ice cream stand in Asia, etc. Doesn’t work out — but that tends to be our approach. Germans seem to assume everyone is trying to be German and failing badly, the French take it for granted that everyone is admiring them.

    Etc. But the Japanese may have yet to work out a paradigm they can fit foreigners into. One telling story I’ve heard is that in the Second World War, ordinary Japanese soldiers simply couldn’t grasp that the peoples they were dealing with didn’t speak Japanese. The notion that there was such a thing as another language was just something they had never encountered before.

    …and it’s possible they haven’t progressed too far since. Foreigners are still very rare in Japan. In 2015, my wife and I were in Kyushu for a week before we saw another Westerner.

    • Agree: Marshall Lentini
  204. Dumbo says:

    There is no psychological component that drives a Jeffrey Dahmer.

    Huh? …Perhaps he fact that he was a demented pederast psychopath? Black rapists in general prefer women, and don’t always kill them after. Now, hetero rapist whites in the US Army are probably rare. But they may exist.

  205. @Marshall Lentini

    ‘I went back recently after a job in Poland to get some things together. Never again.’

    Well, lessee. Altogether, I’ve spent a year traveling overseas, and have been in twenty seven countries, but prefer America, on the whole, so perhaps I’m a good choice to play devil’s advocate. Let me sum up the advantages still accruing to America.

    Decent plumbing.

    Friendly, helpful, honest people who speak English. You have to choose your region with care, of course.

    Not crowded. The rest of the world is flooded with tourists…not so bad here.

    Guns. You can have guns. Guns are good.

    You can fish and hunt all over the place. The default in the US is that if there’s a body of water, you can try to catch the fish that are in it. I still can’t wrap my head around the fact that this isn’t the case in, say, Britain. What do you mean I can’t try to catch that trout? That’s ridiculous…

    Free water in restaurants.

    Plenty of public bathrooms.

    Less sales tax…although again, you have to choose where you go.

    Less mindless worship of the cognoscenti. Europeans would never elect a Trump. So much the worse for them. Here, no one even listens to the chattering classes. For better or worse, it’s a democracy in the fullest sense of the term.

    Freedom of speech. Okay, that’s declining — but it’s still the assumption in the US is that you should be able to say whatever you wish. That’s simply not the case elsewhere.

    Hawaii. Hawaii is part of the United States — and comes with all the amenities. The drawbacks will be borne in on you if you live there or make the mistake of going to Oahu, but otherwise…

    Ridiculous. Always 75 degrees, a beautiful, warm tropical sea, reasonably affordable campgrounds, and rental cars. There aren’t even any snakes, for Chris’sake. What more could you want?

    I’ve looked at pictures of the Canary Islands. Like Hawaii, but twice as crowded, twice as expensive, and poisonous snakes. We’ve got Hawaii. You suck.

    Plenty of downsides to the US, of course…no need for a list. I’m not denying it. It’s just that it’s not all negative.

  206. @Jeff Stryker

    Hey Jeff, l am Italian- American; my wife and step- son are from Chongqing. I also have an adult daughter from a previous marriage, which is a serious tie that binds; and led me to find a better and affordable way to thrive here.
    I’ve been to China and everything you say about the mildness and politeness of Asian public behavior is true, however, through our faith and again “the power of the internet” l was able to secure outright ownership of property and a debt- free long lease business. You certainly have to have a certain proclivity for a “good scrap” to be a habitant here, but l consider that my entertainment!

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  207. @Colin Wright

    You stated some unusual and prescient advantages.
    Here in the heart of Philly l can go a couple of blocks and drop a Hopkins plug in the Delaware and take 2 20 – 26 inch striped bass per day during our excellent spring run. You can also drive 1 hour out of the city and be in Amish country and peruse an ACTUAL alternative lifestyle.
    Each of our States are as big as most other countries and makes “ the road trip” in any direction a joy. Breezing along perhaps Skyline Drive, camping on the Appalachian Trail. I could go on and on.

  208. ‘You stated some unusual and prescient advantages.
    Here in the heart of Philly l can go a couple of blocks and drop a Hopkins plug in the Delaware and take 2 20 – 26 inch striped bass per day during our excellent spring run…’

    I still need to catch a decent striper. That, my first deer, and a free Palestine, and I can die happy.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  209. @Colin Wright

    I’ll list them. I’m an American expat. Granted, my own early twenties were an inordinately unhappy time and I was only too happy to move to Dubai. My own perspective of the US is clouded by my own experience.

    ….True, parts of the US are not uncrowded. There is not really decent public transport in those places and you need a vehicle. Europe and most other countries have public transport but in the US you have to have a vehicle.

    ….Guns. Well, yes. But conceal carry permits are difficult to obtain and trouble usually happens on the street. In Europe and certainly in Asia, you can keep a gun in your house. But the chances of needing a gun in your house are less likely than on the street.

    …Parts of Spain are completely uncrowded. They filmed the Clint Eastwood Spaghetti Westerns there. US cities are crowded. Or sometimes not, because so many of them like Detroit are now half-abandoned. New York City is crowded.

    …You can fish and hunt in Asia. I’ve spearfished all the time. I’ve fished in Wales, when I visited the UK. There is nothing to hunt, if shooting twelve-point buck is your obsession. My family had a cottage in Northern Michigan UP and my grandfather killed a moose up there. But the economy of Northern Michigan is horrendously bad. Throughout much of the rural US the economy is bad. There is no money for startup.

    …In America people don’t worship the cognoscenti. They worship jackass celebrities who don’t know anything about anything. The Kardashians for example. Lady Gaga. Eminem. Is Europe less of a Democracy? Certainly in Western Europe poorer people are better off and can access free education.

    …Cannot fish in Britain? That is untrue. I wouldn’t fish in Detroit or even Ann Arbor, where I grew up. You eat a catfish in Southeast Michigan and you will probably die. Northern Michigan is different, of course. I caught Perch, Bluegill, even a Bass when I was kid up there. But, um, nobody has a job.

    …Freedom of speech? Well, I can say whatever I want in Asia and often do. Not about them, of course. And what freedom of speech does a person have in the US? If a gay coworker hits on you and you call him a “fag” you’re probably fired.

    Free water in restaurants? Yeah, that makes up for how dangerous and violent urban or suburban public schools are in the US. Of course if your schools have a 4-H Club than this is not as big of an issue.

    Which parts of the US are warm? I grew up in Southeast Michigan and I would say that winters in Western Europe are mild in comparison. Of course if you live in the Florida Keys, this is not the case. However, the problem with warmer states is that they have so many Latinos. I spent a single year in Phoenix and the winter was mild but the Mestizos were particularly bad down there. The states that are warm are heavily Cholo Mestizo. Wherever there are Mestizos, there are gangs. I accidentally crossed the path of “Brown Pride” in Phoenix. See, that is the difference between the blacks and Hispanics. Blacks are sort of zoned. Mestizo gangs pop up in the strangest places. I would not live in a border state if you paid me. And these are the warmest.

    America has Hawaii? Okay, yes. Europe has no Hawaii. That is why white Americans are white-and I am assuming you are white yourself.

    I have a different perspective on the United States than you do, of course. I am a working middle class white man from post-industrial Rustbelt Michigan who lived at the near poverty line for awhile in Arizona. I had bad experiences with criminals of every color, but the Brown Pride gang members I encountered were most lethal. I knew some serious urban white underclass white trash. I did not go to Dubai particularly missing any of it. I did not miss the chimp outs on public buses. I did not miss the air of menace of black thugs glomming change at the bus stop. I did not miss the constant offers of crack, heroin. I did not miss the white tweakers wired-up on meth. I did not miss the threat of racial violence which requires far more diplomacy in America to avoid than the diplomacy I’ve needed overseas to do business, in fact. I’ve known a few white girls whose lives were ruined when they drifted into the orbit of black thugs.

    Now don’t get me wrong. People who live in the middle-class suburbs of Idaho don’t have these problems. If your kids go to a public school with a 4-H club then chances are the hallways are not awash with gangs or drugs. The urban vs rural experience in America is very different.

  210. denk says:
    @Colin Wright

    Blacks

    no HIspanics, whites…..?
    Who send them over there and let loose
    on the community ?

    Every time we’ve a China thread, the whiteys would play that broken record….’japs are the only Asians acceptable to our high quality society’.

    This is immediately belied by the way they call them…japs !
    They use it subconsciously, but its revealing !
    japs, chinks, gooks, ragheads ...!
    it spell contempt !

    US has about 200 bases all over the world, but ONLY in jp we heard about all those assaults, abuse, serial raping, mayhems !

    Coincidence ?
    Ian Fleming’s law of probability says this must be enemy action. !

    The murkkans ship out these yahoos to jp..
    cuz they wouldnt dare bringing them to Germany for example, why, the Germans would kick them out in no time .

    Using jp as the dumping ground for social misfits speak volumns about the whites ‘love‘ of the jp goddess .

  211. @Stonehands

    My only knowledge of Philly comes from that old Tom Skerrit film FIGHTING BACK where he played the Italian deli owner who became a vigilante. I’ve spent no time in the city.

    I speak only from the perspective of someone who grew up in Southeast Michigan. There is very little back there I miss. The economy was bad and I actually held better jobs overseas than I could have had in Michigan. Nobody has any damn money there.

    For a small amount of money you can start a business in Asia. I’ve known a few Americans who did quite well in Southeast Asia relatively late in life.

    Mostly it is quality of life.

    However, prospective expats should take note. At 45, I’ve never owned anything in the US. I have no house to return to. I have no wife or kids in the US. I bank my money in Asia. Everything that adults do-buy a house, own a business, marry, have kids-I’ve done overseas. I was only 25 when I left in 1999.

    So the positive side is that I missed out on the grim Bush years. I did not experience the paranoia of 9-11 (I was in Dubai but never felt paranoid). I avoided the Great Recession which did not affect my job in Dubai. I moved to Southeast Asia and never experienced another cold winter.

    But I have little in the US after a lifetime overseas. When offered the chance to move overseas I did not look back. But the downside to avoiding divorce rape, rednecks, black thugs, Cholo Mestizos, taxes, declining property value etc is that I have zero in the US.

    • Replies: @Stonehands
  212. I could repeat or even amplify Jeff, as I’m older and have more experience at the bottom rung, but I’ll stick to your points.

    Your argument boils down to: America is better because fishing, guns, public toilets, free tap water, English, and Hawaii.

    Someone who isn’t me can’t own guns, so that’s out; not that I even wanted to get in a shoot-out with groids or cholos, which is pretty much what that amounts to. Never had a desire to “bag white-tail”. Also I never had the disposable income for guns.

    Fishing is great, wish I could have done more, but it’s fairly expensive between the license, the gear, the truck or vehicle you need to get out there, and so on. While not as easily accomplished as in America, where I am now has way more fishing opportunities.

    Free tap water is admittedly a nice touch, as I hate being charged $2 for water at a restaurant. And I admit that carrying a backpack and water bottle everywhere isn’t my ideal form of getting around.

    Using toilets where I am isn’t as tricky as western Europe. It may take some doing, but social trust is relatively high here, surprisingly, so either they don’t ask what you’re up to, or you grease the wheels with a few polite words in the language: problem solved.

    Almost everyone prefers speaking their own language, I guess, but I don’t miss the American dialect, which is overloaded with sarcasm, evasiveness, passive-aggression, PC Tourette’s, and all sorts of other shit I don’t even want to think about.

    I won’t even dignify “Hawaii” as a reason. As Jeff hinted, white men weren’t made to lie about in the sun all day, and even if I wanted to, I wouldn’t take a transoceanic flight to do it. Besides, Southeast Asia is a better deal, not that I care about it, and without the hatred for “haolis” or whatever those fat retarded untermenschen call us.

    What I do miss about America:

    – You can hide, short or long term; in most other places, it’s hard to find a place even to pick your nose or take a leak, population density being greater
    – It’s easier to shoplift if you need to
    – Americans are punctual, forthright, efficent, more cheerful, and honest; where I am, efficiency suffers from an entrenched need to be or act miserable
    – The respect for lines observed by nearly everyone of any race
    – Blacks are obnoxious but funny: I miss bullshitting with the brothers, and I miss the sweetness and humor of sisters, when they’re not chimping out
    – Cheap Mexican food, sue me

  213. Ok, you’re older, but I stand by my greater wealth of bad experiences in America, as you left for good sooner than I did.

    Nothing to go back to, same. Never had anything to begin with. Most people here assume there’s something and have trouble understanding that there’s nothing. But I’m meeting more and more people who are beginning to understand how bad it is in America for white people.

  214. A lot of palaver about how great America is comes from people who already have it made, usually boomers or those close to them in age. But if you don’t have it made, you never will. Unless you’re Latrino or something.

    And if you don’t have that truck or that rifle or trade job or you can’t afford to have a tooth fixed, they whip out the old dogma on you: “You must not want it / be working hard enough.”

    After all, Joe Everyman has three jobs, five trucks, ten mouths to feed, sleeps just four hours a night, does MMA and powerlifting, and consumes ten gallons of coffee per day. He’s the model. If you’re not him, it’s your own damn fault.

    The one thing worse than being down-and-out is the well-off constantly telling you it’s your fault for being so, and that’s pretty much the only logical option for the rhetoric of American capitalism. How are you not completely self-actualized and able to afford everything I can afford, you fucking loser. This is America.

    Even if it were half-true, it’d be repugnant and reason enough to get the fuck out of there.

    Social mobility for white men is as dead there as it is for laundry-beaters in Bombay.

  215. @Jeff Stryker

    I understand totally. I get fed up with the Byzantine compliance systems here, pure bull-shit. In addition to the people acquiescing to the electronic boot on the neck, credit cards usage is at 80%. That maximizes confiscatory taxes.
    If you yourself have cut your ties here, and you have no family here, then who cares about having something to return to? You’ll have a potential tax nightmare if you ever come back, don’t do it!

    I’ve looked into every angle of opening a business in Cambodia- l have some friends in Phnom Penh. Cambodia business visa is the most easily accessible year to year for a small fee at a local travel agency. With the internet l can scour what’s really going on with someone’s restaurant in PP, or Kep, Kampot even Sihanoukville. I’m originally from NYC and when the biz atmosphere became too stifling l divested of everything and settled on Philly after much tire kicking. The point being- is l vote with my feet much like yourself.
    Although the political and retail climate here is the absolute pits, l still really enjoy the shore and the Poconos and driving fast and fishing and all that good stuff here. But it would also be nice to be surfing in the Philippines or Bali or Vietnam for a month or two a year. You’ve got the right idea- it’s a completely different vibe anywhere in Asia, and saying farewell to the complete clusterfuck that the West has become is always an option.

  216. Biff says:
    @Colin Wright

    Less sales tax

    Don’t call me worldly, but the U.S. is the only country I know of that does have sales tax(and they make the buyer pay it!). The U.S. has so many different taxes that they are categorized with specific names, in a tax structure that is the largest, and most complicated in the whole world – it’s no contest. It’s what I hated most about America – paying all the taxes, and when you do happen to meet up with the State’s personal you are treated like a dirt-bag. No fucking way am I going to play that game again. Good luck and all the best.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  217. @Global citizen

    Kannada is a south Indian language.

    • Replies: @Global Citizen
  218. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    I still need to catch a decent striper. That, my first deer, and a free Palestine, and I can die happy.

    So you dream of killing, killing, and an end to killing?

    Humans…

    • Troll: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  219. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Biff

    You must be joking. I can think of tons of countries with sales tax. In English speaking countries, it’s sometimes called GST, sometimes called VAT

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @Biff
  220. @Anonymous

    Agreed. I’ve lived in Canada.

    But the question is why US taxes are so misspent. Our infrastructure is awful. Bridges collapse. Airports have potholes. Detroit reverts to nature.

    In other countries taxes are spent on public transport, a sufficient social safety net, infrastructure…

    Where do US taxes go?

    Can someone answer that?

    Why is the average citizen in Australia better off than the average American? Why is the infrastructure so awful in America considering the taxes.

    Can some amateur economist here answer that?

  221. @Anonymous

    ‘So you dream of killing, killing, and an end to killing?

    Humans…’

    I do. Please post a recent photo of yourself together with your home address.

  222. @Jeff Stryker

    Where do US taxes go?

    Are you kidding here? you can’t think of where it all goes?

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  223. @Marshall Lentini

    I won’t even dignify “Hawaii” as a reason. As Jeff hinted, white men weren’t made to lie about in the sun all day, and even if I wanted to, I wouldn’t take a transoceanic flight to do it. Besides, Southeast Asia is a better deal, not that I care about it, and without the hatred for “haolis” or whatever those fat retarded untermenschen call us.

    I highly recommend Bali as a Hawaii substitute.

    Very friendly locals, favorable exchange rate, plenty of great diving/snorkeling, exotic cultural sites, and excellent food. There are enough Aussie expats and good burger joints around if you suddenly crave a typical Western experience.

    The local hospitality is so warm it feels genuine, even if it is not.

  224. @Jeff Stryker

    Where do US taxes go?

    Can someone answer that?

    There is a lot more bureaucracy, waste, and fraud going on in the US than TPTB would have you believe.

    I say this as someone who has spent almost 20 years in the defense industry.

    The US’ defense budget may be larger, but it is perfectly clear to me the US gets far less value per dollar spent than Russia does per ruble and China does per yuan.

    The US’ current mad scramble to field its own hypersonic weapons is largely an excuse for Lockheed, Raytheon, and Northrup to further gorge themselves at the taxpayer trough.

    • Replies: @Loremipsum
  225. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Yea, it’s very popular with Russians. I’m not a tropics guy, but maybe I should reconsider.

  226. Global Citizen [AKA "Globalist Citizen"] says:
    @East Indian

    Thank you very much! I Googled it already. Kannada is a vibrant neighborhood in Toronto. Don Cherry came from there and spoke that dialect.

  227. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Marshall Lentini

    Also consider Phuket, Thailand’s version of Bali.

    Pros: cleaner than Bali, more first world amenities, more hookers, cheaper beer, cheaper accommodation, got 7/11

    Cons: more Russians, less genuine locals, harder language, less great scenery, no indomaret/alfamart.

  228. @Jeff Stryker

    I really don’t think that Japanese militarism will be a problem for anyone anytime soon.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  229. @Marshall Lentini

    I’m not a tropics guy, but maybe I should reconsider.

    Me neither, but I found Bali a great change of pace versus my usual vacation destinations.

    If you are into any type of watersport, they have it.

    The Nusa and Gili islands are also worth checking out. My biggest bang for the buck lodgings on Earth are a little family run place on Nusa Lembongan.

  230. Biff says:
    @Anonymous

    Is the product taxed, or is the transaction taxed?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  231. denk says:

    Your tax $$$ at work….

    https://www.thedailysheeple.com/crimes-of-a-monster-your-tax-dollars-at-work/

    We are living in an age of war profiteers.

    We are living in an age of scoundrels, liars, brutes and thugs. Many of them work for the U.S. government.

    We are living in an age of monsters.

    Ask Donald Trump. He knows all about monsters.

  232. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Hawaii is in the United States.

    No matter where you go in the United States, the prevailing conditions under that economic system are the same. Same taxes, same cultural degradation, same post-911 Big Brother paranoia, same long war in Afghanistan dragged out for 18 years long after many people have any idea why it happened in the first place (Can you imagine still being in Grenada in 2001 eighteen years after the US invaded in 83? I could not have in 2001), same ruling elite plutocracy, same culture wars…okay, there are less black thugs and Cholos (Though a glance at a Dog The Bounty Hunter show reveals Hawaii has them) but still the same white tweakers and a hostile local population who really dislike Haole or whatever whites are called.

    Most career expats like myself would live in Eastern Europe before we would live in Hawaii or Florida simply because of their weather.

    Southeast Asia has the same weather and you can meet women easier and the prices are not astronomical.

    Also, you can start a micro business in Asia but Hawaii is purely corporate owned. Which, for me, is one reason I won’t live in the United States. Corporations don’t do jack for their employees these days anyhow. No healthcare, CEO’s that pilfer the 401K when they need to bail out (Like we saw in the Great Recession)…and so on.

    So the fact that Hawaii is tropical is sort of irrelevant to me. The fact that Dubai and later Southeast Asia had nicer weather than Greater Detroit was a bonus, but hardly the motivating factor. Arizona had nicer weather than Southeast Michigan and I would not go near that Cholo Mestizo Aztec Zombie Red Indian Scalper crossbreed and meth-addled redneck tweaker infested state if you paid me six figures a year.

    Expats live overseas not for women-which some would like you to think in order to avoid rankling the patriot townies who have no choice but stick it out in their birthplace because they lack the money or freedom or adaptation skills to move overseas. Or for weather. Or for the local culture.

    Deep down, we just want to get away from our birthplaces. Some expat posters here went through a protracted decade-long bad experience. I only experienced a few bad years before a chance invitation to Dubai at age 25 in 1999 got me out of the US forever.

    A curious transformation takes place for some Americans when they go overseas. A few Americans are homesick. They want to get back to their neighborhood and their community as soon as possible. Then you have the people in the middle-of-the-road; they go overseas and have interesting experiences and enjoy themselves but five years later these are simply photos in their study back home…and then you have the third group like myself, who spend a single day overseas and don’t want to return to the US no matter what and will spend the rest of their life doing any work contract to contract or even operating girly bars just to never return to the US again.

    Possibly the latter group, which I belong to, are people who were never really happy in America to begin with.

    For example, most long-term expats are working-class or lower middle-class males as oppose to the upper-middle-class. We are more likely to be bachelors who had no great share in the American Dream to begin with.

    This is most apparent with black retirees who would rather live in a Neepah Hut in Philippines than the Hood because, well, it is much safer. Few African-Americans I have met care at all about the US. Why should they? What would they miss? The Hood is often more third world than Southeast Asia.

    I live overseas because to me America is fundamentally inferior and fundamentally unpleasant for someone like myself of modest means. Overseas, I answer to nobody. I sneer at posters who complain that Hollywood forms their opinions…an expat believes nothing except what they can see. I scoff at the notions put forth by the MSM. I won’t spend another day in America fearing a chimp out in the streets. And while I am not exactly afraid of ghetto blacks or Cholo Mestizos and I’m only contemptuous of white trash tweakers, I cannot bear the thought of spending another hour riding a bus with them. Life is too short and must be spent maximizing one’s potential. Nobody is going to do that in Southeast Michigan if they are working middle class like me.

    Imagine if every white man felt like me or some of the other posters on Mr. Linh’s threads. Or every Asian-American man for that matter. What if we all left? What if half of us left America. Personally, I don’t know why more white men in places like Michigan who are working class or lower middle class like me don’t just liquidate and pack it in and move overseas.

  233. @Marshall Lentini

    Sigh.

    I conclude: ‘Plenty of downsides to the US, of course…no need for a list. I’m not denying it. It’s just that it’s not all negative.’

    You say: ‘your argument boils down to America is better…’

    No, I didn’t say that. I said what I said. Is that so fucking hard to accept?

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  234. @Jeff Stryker

    Lack of culture or example / sunk cost fallacy. Anyway, those people up in Michigan are as lost as the injuns were. Let them go.

  235. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Biff

    How does one separate those two concepts? They’re meaningless in isolation.

    • Replies: @Biff
  236. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jeff Stryker

    Also, you can start a micro business in Asia but Hawaii is purely corporate owned.

    You can generalise this to most of the West. Pervasive and universally enforced laws and regulations hinder small entrepreneurs and favour big businesses. Asia’s ambiguous laws and selective enforcement give an advantage to businesses small enough to slip under the radar, which can operate illegally until they’ve built up enough capital to do things properly. It’s a fantastic system for encouraging growth.

    Personally, I don’t know why more white men in places like Michigan who are working class or lower middle class like me don’t just liquidate and pack it in and move overseas.

    Because they must have nothing left to lose, but still enough motivation and money to buy a ticket over. Most people are either able to bear life and carry on, or are so depressed or impoverished that they no longer have the means to escape.

  237. aspnaz says:

    Election result: pro-democracy 388, pro-Beijing 59.

    Here’s a suggestion, next time you are in the city where political things are happening, why not try to talk to the locals involved before casting them in such a negative light? From the election result we can see that you didn’t talk to anybody? Hang on aspnaz, who am I to tell you what to do, I am a reader and here you are a professional journalist.

    Shame because I used to enjoy your writing style. Just to satisfy my own curiosity, did you actually go to HK or was that just artistic license?

    • Replies: @Showmethereal
  238. Biff says:
    @Anonymous

    How does one separate those two concepts? They’re meaningless in isolation.

    If an item is labeled $10.00, and you take it up to the counter to pay, and they want an additional 8% in money for a product that already has a value added tax added inside the original $10.00, what do you call that additional 8%?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  239. @Marshall Lentini

    Despite taxes rivaling a socialist country the US has homeless everywhere, a decaying infrastructure, bridges collapsing, incredible poverty among employed people, urban guerrilla warfare, terrible public schools ruled by vicious gangs, MS-13 roaming suburbs of Long Island swinging machetes, post-industrial wastelands like Detroit, massive illegal immigration of Aztec savages…

    Why doesn’t the US have bullet trains like Japan for all of the taxes it spends. Many places don’t even have public transport at all. Not even a city bus.

    Why is there is so much homelessness in America compared to Australia or Canada or other developed first world countries?

    Why is university now impossibly expensive?

    Simply put, why does the US suck for all the taxes that are siphoned out of productive people?

    • Replies: @dfordoom
  240. @Colin Wright

    My expression was careless, I apologize.

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  241. @Marshall Lentini

    ‘My expression was careless, I apologize.’

    No need for that. When I saw your post, I thought you’d abused me personally.

  242. @Jeff Stryker

    Wow. Thank you for the extended, detailed reply.

    Believe it or not, I also grew up a GenX white male in Michigan, in the tip of the mitten.

    I have not had your awful US experiences, but I am very much a realist.

    I was an expat in North Africa for 4 years. I miss it very much.

    I have the opportunity to return and I am taking it.

    I will brag a little and say I had terrific, unforgettable experiences with the charming young women in the Maghrebi part of the world.

    I agree that the US has transmogrified into something unrecognizable compared to the country we were born into.

    Best of luck!

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
    , @Anonymous
  243. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Michigan vs Overseas?

    Well I never felt as endangered in Asia or Dubai or India as I did in Ypsilanti when I was a Freshman at Eastern (I transferred to Central after an attempted mugging).

    Hmm. I was born and raised middle-class in Ann Arbor. I’ve spent my life overseas and have a valid opinion.

    Should you live in Houghton Lake or Alpena than you are not going to experience much crime. But there is five feet of snow in the winter and you spend six months indoors. Black ice in the winter and jackknifing trucks are the worst you have to worry about. Still, rural poverty is fairly harsh. Forty year old college graduates working retail.

    Black violence does not go farther North than the tri-cities. However, it is potentially lethal. And often unprovoked. When black thugs attack, they intend to cause serious injury or death. This is rare in Southeast Asia or even the Arab world. In Michigan cities, common. Rape of white women is also common in Michigan cities with significant black populations of the random, blitz variety.

    In Asia random vicious violence with the intent to commit murder is far rarer. Put another way, I’ve never felt as endangered by it.

    Years after Central, I spoke to a Polish-American I knew from Flint named Stanley. He played football for CMU, dropped out when he got a Polish Catholic girl pregnant. His account of Flint was bleak. I asked him why he stayed there and he told me he could not give his house away. And that is the problem with cities like Flint or Ypsi. If you were born there, you cannot give your house away.

    My own grandmother’s condo in Warren-Detroit border sold for only 20 percent of what it was worth when she bought it in 1986.

    I’ve only visited Cairo. So I don’t know much about North Africa, though I enjoyed Egypt. Again, Cairo was not very dangerous and was a thriving city. Michigan cities even when not dangerous are bleak and rundown. The roads are awful in Michigan.

    One of the problems with the US is depending on your income you are always in harm’s way. Unless you want to live out in the middle of nowhere on Houghton Lake with five feet of snow. Okay, fine. But in that case you are like Jack Nicholson in THE SHINING. Isolated.

    I lived in Phoenix on $1000 a month in 1998-a common entry-level salary at that time-and was menaced by Mexican Cholos more than once. Brown Pride and other Mexican gangs infested the lower-income areas.

    Of course, the US is a great place to be upper middle class. Land is cheap and plentiful. Suburbs very nice. Wages low so employees can be paid a pittance. Small towns are frequently idyllic. But US underclass Mexicans and blacks are deadly. They are the most deadly people in the world. And the unfettered white urban trash can also be lethal.

    But tell me you’d really want your daughter to go to the average Flint or Detroit public school. Public schools are awful in the US. Sixteen year old black thugs still in the ninth grade roam middle school hallways sexually bullying seventh grade white girls. Or any girl for that matter.

    Michigan cities are bleak. The odd thing is that their ominous quality is a lack of population and not overpopulation. I’ve been in overpopulated cities in India and Asia. But Michigan cities are half-deserted/abandoned subarctic ghost towns. Detroit is world famous for this.

    The interesting thing about states like Michigan is that they don’t produce the same sort of fervent love of the place and patriotism that inhabitants of the South or New York have. Michigan is so bleak that even people born and raised there don’t develop the love of the place that Texans seem to have, for example. An expat from Michigan is not as fraught with patriotism and love of his birthplace as someone from other parts of the US…its hard to love Michigan.

    • Agree: Marshall Lentini
  244. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Jeff Stryker

    Simply put, why does the US suck for all the taxes that are siphoned out of productive people?

    But at least the military-industrial complex is doing really well. That’s all that really matters.

  245. utu says:
    @Marshall Lentini

    Almost everyone prefers speaking their own language, I guess, but I don’t miss the American dialect, which is overloaded with sarcasm, evasiveness, passive-aggression, PC Tourette’s, and all sorts of other shit I don’t even want to think about

    .

    Very good point. This is one reason people like to travel and be among people who they do not understand. It’s somewhat liberating. More you understand what they say less you respect them. Familiarity breeds contempt.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  246. @Marshall Lentini

    Almost everyone prefers speaking their own language, I guess, but I don’t miss the American dialect, which is overloaded with sarcasm, evasiveness, passive-aggression, PC Tourette’s, and all sorts of other shit I don’t even want to think about.

    Missed this my first scan through.

    You left out uptalking and vocal fry, especially amongst young American females, two of the most horrific speaking traits to ever enter this world.

    • Replies: @Marshall Lentini
  247. Chinaman says:

    Chinese city was Hong Kong, and many will argue it still is, with some claiming it’s simply the best fuckin’ city anywhere, period, ever, for it is as sophisticated and beautiful as any, with all amenities readily available, and perfectly safe.

    Thank you, sir. I arrived at the same conclusion as a born and bred HKer after living overseas and doing business all over the world. You are also spot on that the protest won’t stop even if the government relent since the root cause of the problem is deep rooted, down at the the genetic level. HKer are descended from people who escaped from China during the turmoil in the last century. They turned their back to the motherland and rejected their identities as Chinese.

    What they hate about the Chinaman is what they hate about themselves. The foul mainlander in Versace remind them too much of themselves. Their humble beginnings and humiliating past. The house nigger syndrome as Israel Shamir put it.

    The solution is to send all of these kids to live in America for awhile. To see Philly, Bronx and Detroit with their own eyes and to gain some perspective. They will all come crawling back with a new found sense of appreciation of the best city in the world..like I did.

    If you are ever in town in HK again. I would love to buy you a beer and show you another side of HK. We get a yacht and go to Repluse bay, dine in the country clubs. It will be my pleasure. You will see why they are revolting.

    Let me know how to contact you.

  248. @Chinaman

    I would not advise their kids to spend too much time in Detroit.

    Really, they only have to spend a day on the streets of any US city to get the idea.

    Believe me…they’ll be glad to get back to Hong Kong.

    Heck, most expats Linh meets are glad to live in Hong Kong.

  249. @utu

    At this point I am purposely not practicing Russian just because I enjoy tuning out and not speaking.

    • Replies: @AaronB
  250. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Absolutely. I’m sure you’ve experienced this, but it’s very jarring to hear American females talk after not hearing it for months. My girlfriend can’t believe it exists.

  251. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Chinaman

    Sir,

    Here’s my email, [email protected] . I would love to have a better look at Hong Kong. Amazing place, and let’s hope it’ll stay that way, no matter what.

    Linh

  252. @Chinaman

    Your idea of The Bronx is outdated. Philly and Detroit still are in shambles… But the Bronx has been rebuilt. A good number of Chinese have now moved into East Harlem – which was a former no-go. Like other groups they will sokn make the short hop over into The Bronx. That said – in the 70’s when The Bronx was at its worst – Hong Kong also was rife with street violemce and corruption in governmemt and squalid housing in many places. People tend to have a biased view of history one way or another. The utopia that was British Hong Kong never existed. What it did provide though was a haven of capitalism and security for Chinese to hustle hard and achieve. But yes now that the mainland embraced capitalism and many of them have more money than Hong Kongers now – yes the hatred developed. They used to be sad and pity mainlanders – even up into the late 80’s and early 90’s. Indeed – how quickly things have changed.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  253. @aspnaz

    Thats one of the funny things about elections. You will have millions of people who will vote for ANYBODY but Trump. Just as you had many millions who would for for ANYBODY who wasnt a democrat after 8 years of Obama. Electorates are .ike sheep. Many know the pro dems have no solutions. Thats why they are a minority in the legislative council. Did the world suddenly just turn upside down since 2014??? You had the Occupy Riots and now these extradition riots. Chinese people are pragmatic. The Hong Kong voters simply voting pro dem party this year just in the hope the rioters will stop. The rioters blame the gov for everything. So the sheep mentality persists. Havent you lived through enough elections to know they are RARELY about substance and mostly about incorrect sentiment…???

  254. Learner says:

    A very interesting article.

  255. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @Biff

    I’d call that two separate taxes. Countries with sales tax usually (but not always) include it in the price. It varies, depending on the sales outlet and the country in question, but I’d guess two separate sales taxes is rare.

  256. Anonymous[343] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    I will brag a little and say I had terrific, unforgettable experiences with the charming young women in the Maghrebi part of the world.

    This sounds very interesting. How are these Maghrebi girls? On paper it’s a Muslim culture but I’d love to hear the reality.

  257. @Chinaman

    That will not change much, unfortunately. Their self-hate is more deeply rooted than we can easily conceive.

  258. @Global citizen

    It is not the country of Canada. That doesn’t even fit into the context.

    • Replies: @Global Citizen
  259. AaronB says:
    @Marshall Lentini

    Brilliant.

    When I lived overseas, at first I learned the language and tried speaking it.

    Then I realized the pleasures of not 🙂

  260. Global Citizen [AKA "Globalist Citizex"] says:
    @Rabbitnexus

    Hi. I very humbly apologize for any ambiguity I may have caused. The fellow said he was from Atlanta, USA, but spoke Kannada. I thought there was a spelling error.

    Kannada is a dialect of Canada which is spoken in the nominally Canadian Kannada district of Toronto. The residents of Kannada, in Toronto, Canada, speak Kannada. The Kannada dialect of Canadian is employed by the CBC on Hockey Night in Canada. It is considered to be very masculine.

    Hope this clears it all up.

  261. @The Wild Geese Howard

    I’m likely in a different boat than many of you, but I’ve come to very similar conclusions as @jeffstryker.

    I left the US 4 years ago. I was solid upper-middle class: making 380k/yr in NYC as a senior level manager at a major media company, right in the center of the American propaganda nexus. Wife made 100k. So at close to a half million dollars a year, and living in Manhattan, we were doing just fine. Didn’t feel rich, by any means, but I never had to think about my bank account balance.

    But I took a look at what I had to do to make that relatively paltry amount of money (compared to the financial predatory class in the city) and it just stopped making sense.

    12 hr days. On call all day long for emails from my boss, the CEO. Sickening ‘parties’ where children were abused in front of me that I had to pretend to enjoy. Perpetually lying to the 100 people that worked for me about how great things were, how exciting the company was, how innovative we all were. I couldn’t square the deceit with the creeping moral rot. Not to mention 50% of my income going to the government. For what? Bombing goat-herders?

    So I got out. Moved ‘abroad’. I’ve had the luxury of being able to pick where I live for the past 4 years. We are too young to retire (both 40) so we’ve visited 50 countries or so in the past 4 years to try and decide our next steps.

    Maybe my perspective has changed, but I miss nothing about the United States. I rarely read an article about Israel in my local English paper. I don’t encounter transexual story hour at the local library. I’ve never felt unsafe (barring the few soi dogs in my little town). I don’t have to look at disgusting obese people (unless I visit Pattaya or Angeles). If ask someone to clarify what they are saying it’s because they are speaking a legitimate foreign language that I am trying to understand, not Ebonics or Adorno-inflected #metoo garbage.

    SEA is still the best value for the money. I work 2-3 hours a day maximum. We both earn around 100k a year remotely. Since we don’t return to the States, we don’t pay taxes on this. 200k in SEA allows you to live like a minor dictator if you’re smart about it. We bank our savings in bank accounts that actually earn interest. I have enough from investments to actually invest in countries that don’t have a paltry, and falsified 2% GDP growth. Have you ever lived somewhere where the GDP is 7 or 8%? It’s enervating.

    I chat with friends all the time back in the US and when they aren’t drowning their misery in alcohol or getting ‘creative’ with pot and none of them seem to realize that anyone can do what we are doing.

    Travel has never been easier. Finding long-term apartments in foreign countries doesn’t require learning a language. Just click a button. You don’t even have to explain to taxi drivers where you are going. Again, click a button.

    I have a higher quality of life and more interesting experiences in cities like Bangkok, Shenzhen, Istanbul, Kuala Lumpur, Taipei, Busan, not to mention smaller towns like Bansko, Batumi, Turin, or Antalya. There’s just no comparison.

    My only regret is that I didn’t do it sooner.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  262. @Loremipsum

    Sir, your points are better made than my rambling but allow me to respond in bullet point-

    …I was never going to be anything middle class. Or lower middle class. I almost married a girl in college who became a science teacher. We got in touch over social media years later well into my career as an expat. She told me her bio. After a series of bad experiences teaching kids in public schools in Southeast Michigan outside Detroit where both of us were from things reached a nadir when a black ninth grader brandished a knife in class. She moved to Idaho and now teaches in a tiny town. Fine. There are rural places in America so remote and isolated that the urban underclass won’t live there for lack of amenities like public transportation…but I like living in cities with a lively buzz and don’t want to be isolated and snowbound like Jack Nicholson in The Shining. Asian cities are reasonably safe and always lively and the weather is pleasant. Rural life in America can be rugged. You have to own a four wheel. You wake up in the morning and shovel snow off your car. You live in some drafty farmhouse and drive a mile down a rutted dirt road to get to town.

    Second point you make is about endless expenses in ME wars. Compare the infrastructure of America with that of Dubai-a Mideast country I lived in for ten years. In the time that the US expenditures in ME toilet bowls have left America with rotting bridges, collapsing infrastructure, huge potholes in roads, decaying buildings…Dubai and other oil rich countries have prospered. And I know, because I worked in Dubai and Oman. Compare the US in 1999 with its surplus budget to the deficit it has now. And Trump talks of invading Mexico? Good idea.

    When adults on this site get on here and complain that Hollywood is forming their opinions it is pitiful. Pitiful. A bunch of pedophile coke heads writing leftist drivel over Tequila shooters in Malibu or San Fernando where the villains are always played by Shakespearean British actors like the DIE HARD and the blacks and Mexicans are heroic and adults believe that garbage. Spend a day riding the public bus in any US city to see how different reality is. Who has time to sit and watch some middle-aged slut named Sarah Silverman ramble on about the sordid details of her perverted sex life and how many Gentiles like Jimmy Kimmel have exploited her sexually? I’d rather be exploring a new country, thanks. When I did, my time was not spent watching Sarah Silverman talk about how Gentiles misused her anus and rectum. When I was a young man in America, pornography was a mob-financed business for serial killers and horny teens and now Americans are complaining about being “addicted to porn”.

    When I was a young man, people quit smoking marijuana after college. Anybody getting stoned everyday after the age of 30 was a loser. Pot was for teenage Sean Penn surfer types and college-age hippies.

    I left the US young in life. I was only 25. And I am thankful now that my college girlfriend broke up with me. She can be a small-town eighth grade science teacher in Idaho and shovel snow off her car in the morning six months a year. Or learn Spanish so that she can live in some warmer state like Florida or Arizona. The way New Mexico is headed the drug cartels will be selling heroin out of the Governor’s Mansion before long.

    It seems as if the year I left the US went downhill when they elected an alcoholic bum. Twenty years later entire white families are homeless in every city. Back in 1999, the only whites who were homeless were crackheads and winos. Nobody can afford to go to college. Back when I was young in the 1990’s anybody could graduate from a Diploma Mill. Harvard was too expensive for most, but anyone could attend Central Michigan University. Back in 1999, only pure white trash had kids out-of-wedlock. Now everyone is.

    I’ve never been wealthy but I feel fortunate anyhow. A chance opportunity led me overseas when I was a young man and had no spouse, dependents, mortgage, debt or anything else to keep me in America.

    Here’s my prediction, too. Many Gen X and Gen Y males will liquidate and end up retiring in Southeast Asia or Eastern Europe. They won’t have a choice. They won’t be able to afford to retire in the US and why share some rundown co-op with other retirees when you can lounge about in Southeast Asia on a tropical beach with a dusky beauty beside you watching the sun disappear into the sea?

    In another 20 years the economies of Asia and Eastern Europe are going to expand as millions of Gen X retirees living on $1000 a month pour into the Philippines.

  263. @Muggles

    I have noticed this on Facebook too. It comes up when the article is about immigration and similar topics. Generally local news stories.

    You see accounts making comments with regular white guy names – “Dan Smith”, for instance. They always make a pro-globalist comment in some way, with strange, over-polished English for what you would expect to be a blue collar white guy.

    I was piqued by this slightly off English, so I checked the account. And on every single one of these accounts, there are photos that kind of look like what might be on a regular guy’s account – a house, a snowman, a lake, a photo of somebody’s back. But it’s clear that they have no real identity. And I see them pop up over and over. Different names. Same stuff.

    Be on the lookout. I don’t know if they are Chinese, or Indian, or Canadian. But there are alot of globalist paid trolls out there for sure. Thanks for bringing this up.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  264. @alex in San Jose AKA Digital Detroit

    Any sane people would just form a close-knit ethnic community in this kind of situation.

    For some reason whites seem incapable of doing this.

    If you have a close-knit community, it frankly doesn’t matter too much what outside groups think of you. Whites seem to have the old-fashioned view where they think the country or state will be their community. But it is now 2019, everybody hates us (including muh model minorities) so it’s time to realize we need to form our own communities.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  265. @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    I’d white but lived in India and many of the posters impersonating whites are Indian. They are actually apolitical, have never left India and barely understand the issues discussed.

    Chinese? Possibly. But Chinese don’t care what white people feel about them. Indians do. A few Chinese are paranoiacs who think the US is going to invade China-which would never happen-but most self-identify as Chinese.

    Some are white teenagers pretending to be blue-collar adult whites. The guy claiming to be a 60 year old vet is actually 17 and his room is locked so his parents won’t catch him masturbating.

    A few are professional Social Justice Warriors. They are the ones on this site who use ethnic slurs and generally come on way too strong. Many, I sense, are women.

  266. @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    Well the Italians and Greeks and Jews form ethnic communities. Toronto has some. And the Italians have not been ravaged by anti-white quite as much as other groups.

    In general though, whites arrived in the US when it was a white colony and opportunity took them where it took them.

    The 17th century Brittany emigrant to Quebec never foresaw a war on whites in Montreal, for example.

  267. @Jeff Stryker

    I think there’s a massive opportunity helping others escape. Not merely as a business or source of enrichment but as a moral and political reckoning.

    As long as the dollar still has some notional value, those that are young and skilled, or middle-aged and skilled, can build real businesses overseas. Or invest and arbitrage.

    America will not vote its way out of its problems.

    Those days–if they ever existed–are long gone.

    There is no political fix for the rot. The rot has eaten away at everything. It has become the structure.

    Maybe it’s a boomer fallacy, or really, a form of prayer, that every four years one anointed geriatric on the Red Team is somehow going to make life better than the other geriatric on the Blue Team. I can’t believe people still fall for it, but they do. Some are able to see through it. More will follow.

    By all accounts I’d made it in the US. MBA and undergrad from the top two schools in the US. 8 digits liquid in a bank account. I was a good little goy for my tax-farming masters.

    But I think when guys like me peel back the curtain and see what’s on the other side one of two things happen: we either get a hard-on for more and dive deep into the degeneracy. Or we are sickened and run.

    I chose the latter.

    There are plenty more back in the US that I worry about. Good, successful goys, saddled with 30-yr mortgages, autistic children, “chronic pain syndrome”, wives with pointless purse collections. Killing themselves with prescription drugs, numbing curious intellects with Netflix ‘binge-watching’, sating their powerlessness with a Red/Blue political theater.

    If they could leave, they would. But they’ve been paralyzed. This isn’t an accident.

    But there are still plenty that can be reached. That can be helped. I’m not special. I just saw through it. I think others will as well.

  268. @Jeff Stryker

    In another 20 years the economies of Asia and Eastern Europe are going to expand as millions of Gen X retirees living on $1000 a month pour into the Philippines.

    They’d better visit Eastern Europe first before making that decision. And if you mean Russia, they’d better live here for a full year before deciding. Only Poland is truly normal, and eventually it will fall to the western horde.

    • Replies: @Jeff Stryker
  269. @Marshall Lentini

    I knew a Polish-American pharmacist from Detroit’s Polish community who moved back to Krakow (Most Polish-Americans from the Midwest are from Krakow while most Polish-Americans on the East Coast are from Northern Poland).

    He had no regrets. He was overjoyed to be out of Detroit.

    Believe me…and you already know this…there is no fate worse that what befalls the Polish elderly trapped in semi-abandoned rust belt auto towns like Detroit. Except maybe being a Boer in South Africa.

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