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Saigon, 2019

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I’ve spent 13 of the last 17 months outside the USA, and have no plan or wish to return.

I wouldn’t mind an honest cheeseburger now and then, however, but each version I’ve had here has been awful, with the worst something that came in a plastic bag, with the “burger” a brownish orange paste to be squeezed from a packet. Vietnamese pizzas, too, have been gross, with the crust too sweet and rubbery, the toppings scanty and scammy, and the no tomato, no cheese taste desperately jazzed up by squirts of mayonnaise and hot sauce. In downtown Saigon or Hanoi, there are first rate burger and pizza joints, I hear, but I rarely go there. In Osaka, Japan, I did have an excellent burger at a MOS.

My Americanness also surfaces in flash fantasies about baked macaroni and cheese, mashed potato with mushroom gravy and chicken fried steak, which I actually ordered at a Phnom Penh bar, only to have my spirit and dignity spat on, for everything about it was wrong. The best versions I’ve had were in San Antonio and Wolf Point. Richmond wasn’t bad. McCook was disappointing.

I also check on my Mariners and Seahawks, my writing audience remains primarily American and I get emails from American friends.

This morning, I got a distressing missive from “Beth,” not her real name, to say that her marriage with a Pakistani doctor is over, since he’s gotten his green card and doesn’t have to be nice to her anymore. “I suppose he only thought of me as an American woman to use up and throw away and then bring his Muslim family over here.”

There were many red flags. Younger, Farooq was better looking than Beth. Plus, he sounded quite gay bantering with his many Pakistani FaceBook buddies. “It’s a huge subculture,” Beth informed me. “They’re all married, they all fuck each other and they don’t think it’s cheating.” She pulled up page after page of guys striking cutesy poses. Every so often, a box of condoms would be delivered, but almost none was sheathed on their cold bed.

A white woman from semi-rural Pennsylvania, Beth always dated nonwhites, and I first met her 30 years ago through her Vietnamese boyfriend. She then married an older Japanese divorcee. After five years in Philly, they returned to Japan so he could see his two daughters before dying of cancer.

In an email, Beth describes his final moments, “In the hospital where he died (in Yoshida, a state hospital his sister-in-law put him in so as not to spend money on him), various ghosts visited his bedside. Some he wasn’t too impressed with, but one older couple that died at different times in the same hospital, were together and would visit dying people to comfort them. They often visited him. There are brown eagles that travel in pairs over the plains of Yoshida and they would fly slowly and gracefully from a long distance all the way to the hospital window. I never once thought of taking photos but now I wish I could look at them again. They were always a bit of magic in our day when they showed up.”

Beth’s second husband was a Venezuelan, and together, they composed songs in imitation of Cat Stevens. He also beat her up.

At 57, Beth’s looks have faded, her health’s shot and her spirit’s shredded. Still, she has had an interesting life, and she’s been loved, too, I believe, if only briefly or sporadically.

Most of my American friends are divorced or never married. When I was still in Philly, my friend Judith told me about her divorce, “I didn’t need to be around an angry man all the time. If I want to be angry, I can be angry by myself!” I never saw Judith enraged. Drunk, she would turn sweetly maudlin.

My buddy Felix Giordano claimed no woman had ever said she loved him, not even his wife of nearly a decade. Now 72, Felix lives alone and doesn’t even frequent our old haunt, the Friendly Lounge.

Felix, “i’m getting old and cranky too. and getting arthritis too. decided to go in to get an operation to get some metel out of my left foot that still is bothering me.. been avoiding the friendly crowd when dom’s not there.. they’re so leftist i can’t bare to be around them.. vern’s the worst, he frothed at the mouth with his hate shit.. so for old times sake i avoid him or leave when he starts his shit.. want to move away now… and my daughter is on a hate dad kick again. so she’s threatened that i’ll never see my grandkids again stuff.. i’m gonna look for some cheap place 30 or 40 miles out of philly, in the country.. and people are still real.. or maybe something cheap in bridesburg.. i have more friends up that way anyway.. and those great dive bars.. haven’t been to the pennsport lately… been to o’jung’s, nickles and the black cat… been meaning to go to fatso’s again.. but in truth without you around i’m afraid i’ll drink too much.. been mushrooming near billy boys, but didn’t go in for the same reason.. been trying to paint to not get depressed.. the hate climate in this neighborhood is so fucked up.. you are lucky you never had any kids.. the only reason mine ever bothered with me is she still thinks i’m rich… don’t know why i never became a junkie on kensington ave?”

When I last saw Kensington nine months ago, there were several tent cities there, filled with junkies, mostly white and under 35, and as the city cleared one after another, new encampments sprung up, for the hopelessness never went away. Some of these Kensington addicts wander onto Delaware Avenue to beg, and Felix would often say when he spotted one, “He’s sure enjoying his white privilege!”

Alas, Jack’s Famous Bar is no more. I took a Philadelphia Inquirer reporter to this Kensington institution and introduced her to Mel, its literate owner. On Christmas Eve of 2014, evangelists marched into Jack’s to give each cheap beer nurser a care package, and I opened mine to find bits of calories, Planters salted peanuts, TOP RAMEN instant noodles, Twizzlers “strawberry” licorice, Starburst “fruit” chews and Nerds gotta-have-grape candy pellets. Of course, there were also several Christian booklets, Let Not Your Heart Be Troubled, The Poor Revolutionist, Smile Jesus Love You and The Gospel According to Saint Luke, much condensed. Before I left Philly last year, Jack’s had just been bought by some “Asian guy,” who promised to keep the place intact, including all of its decades-old liquor bottles on the shelves. He lied.

In 2016, I interviewed a bartender, B.B., and the featured photo had her with her ex boyfriend, Josh. After he died of an overdose a year later, B.B. texted me, “his absence and the void it’s left in my heart is reverberating through every task and moment of my life, even when i’m sleeping, and it’s only been a few days. i have the rest of my meaningless, pitiful and pointless fucking existence still.”

ORDER IT NOW

Though B.B. wanted to become a writer, she could never compose even a single page, only bits of anguished texting, “iam a beggar searching for salvation, nothing more. i wish to be baptized in my own blood, to be released from this life, my body a cage to hold an animal spirit that would rather return to carbon and live forever as a molecule of stardust. i want to be a planet pulled into a black hole, then torn to pieces and savaged by the very same gravity that sustains me in this realm.. i do not belong.. here or anywhere else.” Poetry?

The creative impulse is natural and widespread. In the US, this is most conspicuous with garage bands and rapping, and poetry workshops are popular, though poetry readings are more shunned than Ebola. In Vietnam, people express themselves through endless karaoke singing. Encouragement of creativity shouldn’t be unequivocal, however, since we already have so many undiscovered stars. Billions of them. After getting fired from Friendly for her pill-induced confusion, Lisa texted me, “Let’s meet soon. I want to pick your brains about writing a book.” Though nice and pleasant enough, Lisa never said anything in conversations to suggest she could command a wider audience than, say, one, and only for half an hour at a time, tops. My own half brother wrote screen plays, and I have a stepsister who moved to Hollywood to become an actress.

Felix painted my ugly mug with the Friendly Lounge in the background, and that canvas is the only American memento I brought back to Vietnam. Everything else, as in all my books, are gone. I said goodbye to Felix outside Nickels. With all the logistics of moving and getting rid of my belongings, it had been a very stressful and hectic two weeks, so I was too dazed to fend off the motherfucker as he planted a pucker on my forehead.

Delivering grim news, Chuck Orloski stays cheerful in slag heaped Scranton, “Day-to-day, I check obituaries to learn if Carol, Dan, and Joe are alive. Florence too, as you know, Linh. Uh, Jamal Kashoggi was perhaps fortunate he got the ultimate divorce in Turkey. The lucky fucker.” The first four names are Chuck’s wife, sons and mother-in-law, none of whom is talking to him.

Sixty-seven-years old, Chuck lives at the Lighthouse, a group home run by a blind nun. Making but baked beans, he drives a school bus, even on weekends. In his tiny room, he has a donated TV to watch Bryce Harper strike out. Chuck chows regularly at soup kitchens, mostly St. Francis, where he also volunteers. You get by, until man or God does you in.

For three years, I interviewed many ordinary people for my series, Obscured Americans, which I hoped to turn into a book, and it was under consideration at Seven Stories Press, but it’s safe to say it won’t come out there, or anywhere else, now that I’m tarred as a Fascist, all for speaking out against truly Fascistic Jewish power. One doesn’t need the sanction of a publisher or editor to reach readers, however, so I’ve made three PDFs available online, Obscured Americans, BLACKS and Blue Threads to the Soul: Collected Poems of Linh Dinh, the last canceled by Chax Press just as it was about to be sent to the printer.

No matter how voluble and candid people may talk, they’ll never tell you everything, of course, even if they want to. In 2003, I got an email from a friend I met in 1982, my freshman year in college, “A lot has changed in my life since I left Philly in 1989. I’ve been married for the last 12 years to a wonderful woman named Julie and we have a 10 year-old son, Jason. Linh, I couldn’t ask for a better wife; I guess I got very lucky with that. I actually saw a picture of your wife somewhere on the Web. You and her were sitting at a table with some other people. I think it was taken in Saigon. I found you by simply putting your name in a search engine—you’ve had a very successful writing career so you were easy to find. I do a bit of that as well, but I’ve never been published. Hopefully, one day I’ll be able to quit my job and write full time. That is my goal right now. I’m very passionate about it. I found out very late in my life that this is what I wanted to do and I was shocked when I discovered that I actually had some talent for it. It kind of came out of nowhere. I regret that I didn’t know this earlier about myself.

“I live in Maine and I work in a factory. I get out of work at 6:30 a.m., come home, see the wife and kid off to work and school then settle down at the computer to work on my novel. I’ve done about 1000 pages and out of that I kept maybe 300. I still don’t have an ending yet. It eludes me. I’m hoping to finish it this summer but I’m scared shitless about what happens afterwards. I’ll deal with it. If you have any advice, I’ll listen.”

Blair, not his real name, looked a bit like grandpa of the Munsters, I’m not kidding, and I remember him telling me about his fondness for Kurt Vonnegut as we sat on the floor in Furness Hall. There were plenty of weirdos in art school, but Blaine got us howling when someone caught him taking a shower with his clothes on. After college, Blair got an apartment in an old high-rise, and during my one visit, I found the place completely empty, save for a television.

When I asked for some of Blair’s writing, he sent me a chapter that had a female protagonist who’s dressed as a man to enter a gay porn shop:

I always wear white, just like Emily Dickinson. Did I already tell you I’m fascinated with lesbian poets?

[…]

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The Stallion, as it was known to the people who went there, was a gay smut shop that specialized in peepshow booths showing short clips from 8mm films (they hadn’t moved up to video yet) and magazines with names like Inches, Torso and Uncut. I was on a sacred mission seeking my own personal equivalent the medieval knight’s holy grail and my long journey had wound it’s way across the North American continent to this unadorned place.

A tall, well dressed man wearing two pieces of a three piece suit walked through the swinging doors caring the suit’s jacket over his arm while the other arm gripped a battered briefcase of fake leather. As he walked past me, the man slowed his brisk walk, almost stopped then whispered in my direction, “I’ll pay for your mouth.”

After we exchanged a few more emails, Blair stopped replying because he apparently got upset over something I said, but since then, I would sometimes google his name just to see if Blair ever became a writer, but nothing turned up, until this week, so there he was, still the same face, more or less, but with gray hair, and I don’t remember his eyes being so crossed. Convicted for possession of child pornography, Blair served 33 months, and is now back in the same Maine town.

Not to make light of Blair’s offense, but when it comes to sex, most of us are far from tidy, and sanity is also very relative, with some form of madness, often multiple, afflicting everyone I’ve ever met. If you’re lucky, you’ll get to live out your days without arrest, disgrace or the permanent dissolution of your social armature. Nations, too, have plenty in their catacombs.

Linh Dinh’s latest book is Postcards from the End of America. He maintains a regularly updated photo blog.

 
• Category: Culture/Society • Tags: Poverty 
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  1. Rational says:

    LIBERAL WHITE WOMAN THINKS SHE BETTER TO MINGLE WITH ALIENS; ALIENS THINK SHE IS A WHORE TO MINGLE WITH THEM.

    Thanks for the interesting article, Sir. Good stories.

    This Beth, like most white women, is too gullible to realize some basic things.

    Many liberal white women are proud to mingle with aliens and blacks, showing off to their family and friends that they “not racists”, and therefore better.

    Having talked a lot with many foreign born and colored men, in the uni, liberal white women must know that most of them think of liberal white women as whores. Here is their logic:

    They see white women with blacks on TV, in ads and jumping up and down in sports and think they must be whores.

    In the store, they see liberal white women with black and foreign men, and think they must be whores.

    If the liberal white woman mingles with them, they are sure she must be a whore, because they realize that they are inferior and uglier looking, with darker skin, and the girl must certainly be a whore to stoop down so low.

    We have a sick society, with stupid gullible liberal white women.

    • Replies: @anonandanon
    , @Anonymous
  2. In the store, they see liberal white women with black and foreign men, and think they must be whores.
    If the liberal white woman mingles with them, they are sure she must be a whore, because they realize that they are inferior and uglier looking, with darker skin, and the girl must certainly be a whore to stoop down so low. We have a sick society, with stupid gullible liberal white women.

    Well, then there was Lindsay Vonn with her collection of Blacks. Saw a commercial with a nerdy, chubby male White 25 year old and a bossy Black wife, hair of brillo, forget what they were pitching with this commercial. From that to Black men and White women shopping matresses, it’s giving everyone permission to race mix. Want more of something? Put it on TV. Want nerdy white boys who can’t find even an ugly White wife to marry the even uglier single Black women with three children from three fathers? Put it in commercials, hell, do a sitcom. With sitcoms, they introduced us to the normalization of divorce, adultery, gay and tranny-folk, made it all normal, gave people permission. That’s all it is. Want the kids smoking more weed and the girls a little sluttier a little younger? Fast Times at Ridgemont High. Sex In The City was another landmark inspiration for another drop into depravity.

    As far as the gullible liberal White women, you know what they’re good for. And who wants them for other than that anyway? That they’re unfit to be around is a feature, not a flaw.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @buffalo dave
  3. Figured BB the bartender would end up that way. From that other article on her, it was “”WE will never have houses, WE would never retire, WE would never have nice jobs, referring of course to Gen X. BB never had that stuff but most others did. All good so far. Chicks with tatts live to complain as well as all others. Where BB the Bartendress can kiss my ass is wishing MY generation dead. Maybe she should focus on 80 Y-O Nancy Pelosi and ask pre-boomer Nancy Pelosi’s generation to step aside so X can have a chance. A fair take. Gen X is going to be bypasse entirely in the halls of power. The Boomers will NOT step aside in the House and Senate, it’s such a good life, retirement would pale by comparison. They never leave. But BB’s complaints? Hell with her. Go get some more tatts, sweetheart.

    Great article, Lindh. Amazing how easy to dispose and of how little value are even our best possessions, eh? And we never look back.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  4. Linh,

    I first spotted your writings when I lived in Manhattan in a squalid room in 2006. Then, for me, your observations were kind of off-putting, but still, something about it was unique enough that I would continue to return and read them (this was on a site that you had).

    At some point several years later, I discovered you on Unz and I don’t know if it was me that changed or you, but I’ve been liking your writing since then.

    This column in particular is specatcular. Seeing how things turned out for various people and places is alsways engrossing to me.

    Keep on, Linh, and thanks!

  5. Franz says:

    Linh Dinh —

    Gone, maybe, but you ain’t forgotten. “Postcards from the End…” still has a wide underground readership. Hope your getting some lucre from that!

    My copy has been lent numerous times, better still, “bought my own copy” time came for people who usually’d rather jump to the ground and chew sticks before they’d own up to reading a book.

    We have the trouble, here in the States, of stasis. If it were me I’d go all the way and call it Total Stagnation.

    It’s certain when it started: JFK’s Inaugural Address in 1961 put the nation in charge of World War II guys for an entire generation. From Kennedy (in, ’61), junior lieutenant, Pacific, till George H.W. Bush, junior lieutenant, Pacific (out, ’93), they mirrored the whole establishment perfectly. For good or ill they were mostly privileged boys, in the old sense, who thought the country was theirs to give away.

    And give it away they did.

    The rust belt years, the open border fiasco, the cultural collapse, were all set in stone on their watch. Banksters of the same generation allowed the money system to rot and die, and their free pass to the “secret” agencies (that everyone on Earth knows about) allowed a shadow dictatorship to fester till now a trip to the doctor (!) is a check-in to the security state.

    We live in the shadow of traitor giants. They weren’t working for the people you write about, and it’s not clear the people you write about can say much on their own behalf.

    An old factory hand near me wrote some riotous memoirs of the Downsize Years (1977-on) about what was briefly called “generation out” in the mid-80s book “Road to Nowhere.” I told him to pursue it, millions of people got cut off at the ankles from then on, there should be a market for that. He told me, “No way.”

    “Why, for Pete’s sake?”

    “The downsize years never stopped. And the information about them was reduced when Reagan got in, so it’s misrepresented as a short term, one time thing.”

    I checked and he’s right. False news was bad enough. The USA now has an ocean of False History.

    With luck, knowledgeable foreigners and ex-pats will at least tell non-Americans the truth. This country is lost.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    , @Feryl
    , @AceDeuce
  6. @Linh

    Pizza 4P’s in Saigon. 4 locations.

    It’s a Japanese ‘chain’ but with that same Japanese obsessive attention to detail that characterizes most of their food ventures.

    They brought the brick ovens in from Naples and actually figured out how to make bufala in Vietnam. Pricey (for Vietnam) but def worth the splurge if you are craving good pizza. Aside from the traditional toppings they also have some really interesting Japanese-Italian hybrid dishes.

    • Replies: @Linh Dinh
    , @Escher
    , @klcard
  7. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Anonmalayexp

    Hi Anonmalayexp,

    Thanks! Twenty years ago, I’d occasionally go to Annie’s Pizza, at the time the only acceptable pizza joint in all of Saigon, but now, there are several, I’m sure, but none in District 6, where I am. I’ll check out Pizza 4P.

    Linh

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  8. hey linh;old buddy..some of our drinking patners still ask for you..i wish i could run into bb again..she was a sweet kid..and real.when i go back to the nudie bar ,i’ll tell the girls that you asked for them..even tho you didn’t..the barmaids at fatso’s and o’jung’s ask for you..dom always does..thanks for showing my portrait of you..think i got it right..did a portrait of dom jr ,that i gave to dom at the funeral..it was young dom in his eagles sweatshirt..dom jr was a big eagles fan..miss that kid myself..yes harper is trying for the strikeout record in philly..gets bood too..but it’s still philly that way..wanna cheer failure?move to the west coast…as for me ..i’m still painting all the time..and turning some of those sketches i did while you talked to the barfies,into paintings..i look at out trips as a collaboration..i’m looking at the 2 sketches you did of me as i was drawing you ,at the friendly that winter day..you had your flyers hat on…i wont watch that team again until they bring back the kate smith statue..weasels..but that’s another story..an adendem..my kid isn’t mad at me again..love her..but what can ya do.?dogs love ya unconditionally..but they can’t talk to you about sports,and they die on you.you take care..i had great cheeseburgers and hot dogs for free at nickles on the holiday..and a hot barmaid with giant tits smiling at me as she served 3 dollar beers..some things are still not so bad in our PC police state..at least you have a homeland to go to.my ancesters moved here in 1900..i’m an american..but living in amerika now..big brother isn’t happy with either of us..hope this note isn’t shadow banned?

    • Replies: @Stonehands
  9. unit472 says:

    The ‘medium is the message’. Rap is performance, poetry is not. Follow the money like the negro. Gayle King and Anderson Cooper make $11 million so when I try and read a newspaper on line a video pops up above with the exact same story only in video. Have to hit the mute button so I can actually read what was going on. No money in print journalism so everyone wants to do video because ‘the medium is the money’ in 21st century America. A singer from Barbados is now compared to Coco Chanel not because she knows anything about design, fabric, fashion or even music but because she’s famous. Its a Michael Avenatti world our there and if you can’t adjust you just won’t make it.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  10. Stew11 says:

    I’ve always thought the o so popular image of black men with white women is something of a purposeful slap across the face of white men by those who despise them. Secondly it demeans black women with the message being you aren’t good enough, you are second choice at best, etc., thus further enhancing the hate whitey message.

  11. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:

    His foreign stories have more married people and less jaded divorcees, wallowing in the sorrows of forgotten false hope. I thought this American story was building to a feel-good crescendo with that last happy-marriage story at the end, but alas, no, it was another bummer. It’s interesting how the diverted martial ideals merge with the derailed fantasy careers, creating a forked set of dead-end roads.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  12. “Before I left Philly last year, Jack’s had just been bought by some “Asian guy,” who promised to keep the place intact, including all of its decades-old liquor bottles on the shelves. He lied.”

    I had a favourite schnitzel restaurant in Germany, and it was bought by a family of Indians. I should have taken the curtains on the windows and cushions on the benches as a reliable indicator that my old fave was gone.

    “… poetry readings are more shunned than Ebola.“

    I used to go to the occasional poetry reading in NYC: The most memorable was that of Quincy Troupe, who read his works with a passion that brought his words to life. Unfortunately most of what passes for poetry these days is rambling narrative with little technical or even artistic merit to distinguish it from mere short stories, and it is read by waifs (of both genders) who struggle to gasp the air to get it out of their troubled systems.

    • Replies: @Nosquat Loquat
  13. swamped says:

    “…and sanity is also very relative, with some form of madness, often multiple, afflicting everyone I’ve ever met”…is that what they mean by ‘intersectionality’ i.e. multiple madnesses? political correctness must be the ultimate form of all-encompassing madness (now afflicting, yes, almost everyone). Even in Maine, too? Isn’t any place sacred anymore?
    Actually, Maines’s ok, it’s just weirdo’s like Blair or Blaine or whatever his real pseudonym is who drop out from artholes in Philly & NY & then drift in looking for an unspoilt way of life to restore their lost sanity & instead spoil it for everyone else. Maybe that’s why ME has a much higher divorce rate than PA. And the U.S. as a whole & most of the other Western countries (EU, Canada, Aus/NZ) have a divorce to marriage ratio close to 50%, give or take a few pct. pts. by country; while Vietnam’s ratio is one of the lowest in the world, under 10%. Interestingly, Mexico’s ratio is among the world’s lowest too, at about 15%. What do they ever want to come here for? (In fact, the Vietnamese-American rate is rising steadily, closer to U.S. avg.;maybe the same fate will befall Mexican border-hoppers too – serve ’em right!).

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  14. Wow. I guess it’s not always sunny in Philadelphia.

    Bummer.

  15. @Franz

    Wasn’t the nation run by WWII guys since General Ike was elected in 1952? It’s true those men, all full of hubris for whipping and nuking the Japs, had the temerity to give the white nation away. How could they not know what they were doing when they passed the Hart-Celler Act of 1965? We can excuse Teddy, I guess, since he was drunk most of the time and later had his own problems with Chappaquiddick. But it was the Jew Emanuel Celler who spent his long 50-year career in Congress tirelessly working to get that nation-destroying law passed.

    These WWII ‘giants’ also stuck us with treaties and military obligations all over the planet. When we became the world’s policeman, starting on the Korean peninsula, the soul of a once-free America died. We became exactly what Washington had warned against. Sorry Tom Brokaw, but every time I hear them called “The Greatest Generation” it makes me want to hurl.

    Problem is, we demented, selfish Boomers, from Clinton to Bush II to Obama to Trump, only made things worse. Our smart phone obsessed children, drowning under piles of unpayable student debt, owed to colleges which wasted their time and taught them little of value, should cover our heads with blankets and beat us with sticks until dead.

    • Replies: @Franz
  16. Feryl says:
    @Franz

    Actually, it was Silents (born from 1925-1942) who effectively controlled many of these processes of which you speak, since Silents entered the halls of power at record speed in the 60’s and 70’s, due to the Silent focus on education and professional accomplishment. When the oldest GI’s began to retire in the late 60’s, it allowed Silents to rise up even faster. By 1980, America was controlled by Silents.

    “The Greatest Generation” is an idiotic term, not because it’s inaccurate per se, but because it came about in the 1990’s when many Silents and Boomers began to get nostalgic for life in America when GIs ruled (the 1950’s and 60’s). GI Generation is the best term, even more so than “WW2 Generation” because some early Silents actually served in WW2.

    In the mid-80’s, nearly all GIs were essentially absent from our public and private affairs (with Reagan and GHW Bush being representative of what Silents wanted, not representative of their own generation). The corporate raiding/mergers and acquisitions etc. of the 80’s was presided over by Silents and early Boomers. And early-mid Boomers further degenerated the situation in the 90’s (Larry Summers) and 2000’s (Ken Lay). Boomers Obama and Holder resolutely refused to prosecute anyone after 2008 meltdown. A lot of late Boomers/X-ers have been demoralized by the awful track record of Silents and Boomers.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    , @Franz
  17. Feryl says:
    @Jim Christian

    Jim, as the older posters on this website prove, Boomers are still fighting with their mostly dead parents instead of deigning to acknowledge the culture and opinions of the generation aborted at record high rates in the 70’s. And yeah, Millennials like me are also really sick and tired of Silents (like Pelosi) and Boomers holding onto their vanity/ego/jobs for eternity. I know, and understand, why people who were teenagers in the 80’s (and subsequent decades) lost interest in joining the rat race; too many Silents and Boomers corrupted “hard work” into a vehicle for greed and self-aggrandizement, turning society into a shameful free for all instead of promoting responsibility and loyalty.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  18. @Anonymous

    381

    From what I can gleam about writing careers, they seem to be reserved for Jews who attended the Bar Mitzvah of some publisher’s cousin and can call the guy up and get their book published. Sort of like LA, where the guy who writes some lousy screenplay is a part-time cocaine dealer who sells to the girlfriend of a mid-level film producer.

    If you are a Gentile with no connections and you are cold-calling publishers whose secretary’s jobs are too screen out the riff-raff, your great novel is probably going to remain a manuscript in your closet.

    Not always of course. From what I have read of Stephen King, he went through 50 publishers and finally one decided to print CARRIE.

    Chuck Norris, who worked at an airplane manufacturing plant for 10 years, happened to teach Steve McQueen karate.

    I remember the mechanic-turned-actor Ken Wahl from WISEGUY once said “I cannot understand why people out here spend 15 years trying to get into the business, I gave myself a year-and-a-half”.

    Even if you do get an agent are you going to wait around for years and years to see if he manages to get your book published?

    Personally, I knew a guy who borrowed $500,000 to make a slasher film. It was backyard Z-grade nonsense about kids who go digging for arrowheads in the Arizona desert and one of them is possessed by the spirit of a vengeful Indian shaman who transforms him into a vicious Indian zombie scalper. He actually managed to get the film distributed and hired some supporting actor from the film TOMBSTONE to show up for one day for $5000. Alas, he never made any money and had to move because he owed so much to so many people.

  19. @Linh Dinh

    DEAR MR. LINH

    Try a TESCO’s or ROBINSON’S (I know the Go family in the Philippines who started this chain which is now all over Asia).

    You can find a PIZZA HUT or PIZZA KING in these shopping malls.

    I’ve only been to Thailand, Philippines and Cambodia but I would have to assume that SOME shopping mall near you has a PIZZA KING or PIZZA HUT and certainly Vietnam has a few shopping malls, no?

  20. Franz says:
    @follyofwar

    Wasn’t the nation run by WWII guys since General Ike was elected in 1952?

    Eisenhower ran a training camp as an army officer in WWI. This is why outgoing president Harry Truman hated him, since Truman had been way overage for that war but volunteered anyway, ending up with an artillery unit. Truman was the only US president to see combat in WWI while guys like Ike stayed in the States. Ike’s job in WWII was political. FDR wanted to reduce Churchill’s role and wasn’t healthy enough to do it himself.

    How could they not know what they were doing when they passed the Hart-Celler Act of 1965?

    They had to make legal what they were already doing. Just like NAFTA.

    FDR started the bracero program at the end of 1942. Mexican “guest workers” came in at a rate of 200,ooo a year, especially after the war. Wiki has an interesting page on this, below, but even they admit the numbers were massive and Truman did nothing. Despite the fact it hurt US farmers, from 1948 to 1964, the U.S. allowed in on average 200,000 braceros in per year.

    Wiki admits to 3.8 million being “repatriated” in Ike’s famous operation wetback but my bet is most returned. The official numbers dropped in 1961 for legal reasons (and JFK wept… for the Mexicans). Most were likely not counted or just worked off the books, like now.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracero_program

    And… I’ve not been able to discover any single good source for all the other “special” refugee programs of that era. But quite a few Nationalist Chinese got in after they lost to Mao, also the DP (displaced persons) after the war and continuing until the mid-50s at least. Theodore H. White devotes a single footnote to one New York manufacturing town that was unable to cope with thousands of people simply dumped on the city in his book The Making of the President 1964.

    That date says it all. From the 1942 till 1964 the border was already down. The ’65 was rigged to make de jure what was already de facto. A generation later Clinton had to sign the Mexican version of NAFTA for the same reason. Big corporations had been relocating to Mexico for years before they made it legal. Ford Motor Company’s Hermosillo plant was state-of-the-art, and in the years before NAFTA, newer and better than anything in its class in the USA.

    every time I hear them called “The Greatest Generation” it makes me want to hurl.

    You can, but “generations” don’t make policy. The tiny clique that got Harry Truman to create the National Security State in February 1947 has been making policy since then. When one of their number dies, another takes his place. It was for their security, not ours.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  21. @Feryl

    Wow, sparkie! I can tell you have been waxing and polishing your little ageist theory for a long time now! The Silents? Anecdotal name-dropping to “illustrate’ ……? What were you trying (and failing) to illustrate again?

    The idea that, because of your age, you are a part of (and act and feel as one with) other people of that same age? I had not heard someone seriously spount such garbage since I used to hang out with Gen-X when they were in their 20s in the early-90s. They were ranting and raving like crazed loons openly to me because I looked to them at the time like I was Gen-X, too.

    I rolled my eyes then, and roll my eyes now. Grouping by age then disparaging by group is ageism, son. And using ageism as a lens through which you look at your world? How does that help you in your endless search to blame some other group of people for your own problems?

    As an aside, what moron would believe a thing that other moron (as proved in the past 3 years especially) Tom Brokaw says. The Greatest Generation? Complete bullshit when he said it then and anyone who says it now.

    Name dropping to prove anything is prone to converse name dropping by others to prove exactly the opposite.

    I will tell you one thing though: I noticed back in them ole 90s that my Gen-X friends? Many of them didn’t know geography, history (even recent history), American government. I found that something bad wrong had happened to American education since I had been in school. Later in those olden days of the late-90s I had a recent Stanford graduate as a girlfriend and she explained to me the wondrous concept of postmodernsm and Focault she had learned.

    I began to realize that we as a people are so screwed. Linh was smart to leave even if he kind of had to inorder to survive. What he left is this ageist nonsense that has now gone viral.

    We’re not Americans anymore. We are Silents, Greatest, Boomers, Gen-X, Gen-Y, Millenials, Gen-Z not one people. And according to you, each of the groups you have put us all in hate each other.

    How does that work for all of us or any of us, sparkie? I mean other than making you feel good for about 10 minutes.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  22. Franz says:
    @Feryl

    GI Generation is the best term, even more so than “WW2 Generation” because some early Silents actually served in WW2.

    It was funny when Norman Mailer and Gore Vidal — both young army guys, Vidal literally in his teens, in WWII, later slammed Reagan as a draft dodger during Reagan’s presidency. Mailer and Vidal might have hated each other, but they buried the hatchet where the National Security State was concerned. They knew it was in charge and tried to wake the dead, but…

    Easier to think in terms of class than generation. Wall Street loves the NSS, and everytime a new layer of collectivist claptrap arrives (for instance the “war on drugs”) the market spirals upward. As cannabis becomes legalized in more communities, crash warnings abound. They know what’s bad for them and it’s a very cross-generational thing.

    It is good to notice that it was the Silents who created Woodstock and all that fuzzy crap. Most Boomers were still watching cartoons during all that. It’s always seemed that the whole of it was a case of the relatively young stealing from the younger yet. Bob Dylan, the Beatles & Stones (etc) were all old enough to join daddy’s law firm when they “defined an era” which is why so many downsized boomers just stopped paying attention early and voted Republican later. Which clearly did no good.

    (I take back the insult to Bob Dylan: In a paperback puff piece from 1966 called Folk-Rock the Bob Dylan Story he actually says: “How can I be the voice of their generation? I ain’t even in their generation!” At least one was honest. Helps when you live next to a used/rare book collector.)

  23. @Feryl

    I know, and understand, why people who were teenagers in the 80’s (and subsequent decades) lost interest in joining the rat race

    I dunno, Feryl, I give em more credit than you, maybe. I went into the service of Naval Air in 1976 at 18. I was 20 when 1980 came along by then and going forward had more and more teens in my crew, they were ok. Perhaps the Navy sent their perceived-best to flight decks, but we always had excellent help from the guys the squadrons sent to the airwing LOX gang. Back at my squadron, we always had pretty good kids, good enough to handle the ejection seats and whatnot that we maintained. I was off to the reserves after 1981 and left altogether in 1982 when there was no opportunity for a billet ashore. They filled the Navair ranks with so many women (who couldn’t go to sea) a guy could only do a career at sea anymore, no shore-sea duty rotation at re-up time. I missed the women-at-sea experiment by ten years. For Christ’s sake they had female instructors at schools ashore teaching sea-going A-6 Intruder carrier operations for carriers when they’d never even been to sea operationally. It was illegal then. That was Carter and Zumwaldt, but Reagan and all who followed continued the trend. Greatest Generation guys.

    By the time I got back, the Greatest Generation had instituted such strict EEOC quotas, I didn’t even bother taking the fire fighter test cycle a second time. They were hiring 5, with the one or two Whites out of 5 they hired volunteer FFs, so off to the phone business I went. We had kids that were hard workers in the phone bizz, in the eighties. What I noticed was the kids in the movies portrayed as teens. Fast Times At Ridgemont High to me was a watershed for drugs and sexual promiscuity, especially for young girls. Earlier the shows of the sixties like All In the Family made hatred for Republicans and White men and also divorce, acceptable. Later, after Fast Times came gay-acceptance shows, 2-1/2 men being one that mocked gays and trannies mercilessly early on but then morphed into shows that really began pushing the gay agenda. Also, think MASH with Klinger. The adultery craze started about the MASH era too.

    Whatever depravities this country is afflicted with, be they drugs, slutty girls, lazy boys, abortions, the bar is raised each step of the way by television shows. A dissertation could be written mapping the destruction. If you want more depravity, just put it on TV, because people copy. But what happened to the women post-2000 is stunning. They copied SITCity to a fair thee well. It was really perfected with L.A. Ink and the various piercing shows with women getting 75% of the tatts these days. Fat chick shows, the women copied ALL of it.

    Teens in the 80s had it made, especially the boys. For the lower 80% of boys today, it’s pretty bleak-looking when it comes to chicks. Depravity. Want more? Do a series making it ok. The greatest Generation invented the concept of what I think of as societal depravity-injection (Think Carl Reiner and Norman Lear early), but it was perfected by the boomers who came after (think Rob Reiner and Chuck Lorre and Lee Aronsohn today). They are good at it.

    I’ll leave the notions of the (((who/whom))) of the matter to someone else.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @Sin City Milla
  24. I lived in the US for 18 years and in the mid 1990s I finally left. It was becoming a police state back then and I know that it is much worse now. I had spent a lot of time and effort getting my green card after I first arrived but I handed it back a few years after I left with no regret. I wouldn’t even visit the place now even if someone offered to pay for everything. The US government is essentially a criminal enterprise and is a threat to the entire world. I’m not surprised that you have no yearning to return either.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  25. That painting of Linh Dinh by Felix in front of the Friendly Lounge is quite a worthy work of art I think … maybe iconic for our author here

    Would not worry too much about the cancelling of the newer ‘books’ by the timid pubishing enterprises, the age of the ‘book’ is over in many ways … tho we seem to be close as well to having the age of ‘express yourself on the internet’ being over too

    Time now perhaps to be actually bold enough to draw on the hidden reserves of spiritual power, which some of our ancestors knew … the non-Abrahamic kind of spiritual wisdom that swept across Asia two and more millennia ago … this is perhaps the power we need to fight the behemoths threatening to swamp us all

    Linh Dinh is obviously a spiritually rich figure, tho maybe he doesn’t think of himself so much in that line … the spirits of his ancestors, tho, are no doubt smiling upon his good work … and perhaps eager to assist when asked to do so

  26. @Franz

    FRANZ

    Mailer did not have Reagan’s connections. He wasn’t an actor who could volunteer for entertainment services or whatever Reagan did. He was a teenager who was drafted and in those days deserters were executed.

    Let us remember that Mailer stabbed his wife with a pen and did time. He released a killer from prison who then stabbed a guy after 3 months (Jack Abbott).

    He made an incredibly lousy movie with Ryan O’Neal, wrote one novel about being a hipster and was basically a waste case who drank/drugged his entire life.

    • Replies: @Franz
  27. @brian boru

    BRIAN

    That is a double-edged sword. US police are awful. When they “detain” you it feels like a “stickup” by uneducated people with guns, unlike the literate and polite police in Europe. I’ve been detained. When US police realize you have done nothing and they are not going to make an arrest, they are sullen and unapologetic.

    On the other had, problem groups in Europe are better-behaved in the US. Less dangerous but still problematic groups like Gypsies or Albanians go straight in America. They know the US police won’t screw around and they know that being in a US prison is a nightmare of being a sex object for Africans.

    Try being a Pakistani pimp attempting to groom little white girls in a US neighborhood. It would never happen. Try being a Gypsy who goes around picking pockets. You’ll last a day, maybe less.

  28. @Franz

    Bob Dylan, the Beatles & Stones (etc) were all old enough to join daddy’s law firm when they “defined an era” which is why so many downsized boomers just stopped paying attention early and voted Republican later.

    Dude, what planet are you on? George Harrison was 20 when the Beatles became world famous. Bobby Dylan was 21. The Stones were the same age as that with Bill Wyman the oldest at 24.

    The Silents? What are the Silents? Are they related to the Talkies?

    The Boomers stopped paying attention after their leaders kept getting assassinated. It had nothing, nothing, nothing to do with the age of Bob Dylan.

    That quote you cited of Bob? That was in response to the gushy media he got in the very early 60s from the radio, tv, print media where you had older people in charge saying stupid stuff trying to label him as the “voice of a generation.” Dylan quite rightly said–since he was a very young person–that he was not part of that older overlay of media know nothings and he resented their labels.

    You misinterpretted it so it would fit into this idiotic ageist nonsense.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
    , @Feryl
  29. A white woman from semi-rural Pennsylvania, Beth always dated nonwhites, and I first met her 30 years ago through her Vietnamese boyfriend. She then married an older Japanese divorcee.
    …………….
    Beth’s second husband was a Venezuelan, and together, they composed songs in imitation of Cat Stevens. He also beat her up.

    At 57, Beth’s looks have faded, her health’s shot and her spirit’s shredded. Still, she has had an interesting life, and she’s been loved, too, I believe, if only briefly or sporadically.

    Most of my American friends are divorced or never married. When I was still in Philly, my friend Judith told me about her divorce, “I didn’t need to be around an angry man all the time. If I want to be angry, I can be angry by myself!” I never saw Judith enraged. Drunk, she would turn sweetly maudlin.

    I don’t know, but Linh company seems to me not very representative of a normal society.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  30. @restless94110

    Icons are usually slightly older than their audiences or listeners.

    Bob Dylan was born in 1941 and John Lennon in 1940. During the Summer of Love, Lennon was already 27. Bob Dylan was 26.

    Kurt Cobain was 25 when he became Gen X’s spokesperson.

    Charles Manson, the hippie cult leader, was nearly 35 at the time of the murders.

  31. @Bardon Kaldian

    BARDON

    Depends upon your socioeconomic status. If you are middle-class and grew up in the suburbs and are white-collar then indeed this would seem fairly squalid.

    I think Mr. Linh’s point is that life is getting much more difficult for the working and lower middle classes.

    Not as bad as the extremes of the Victorian era but no great shakes.

  32. @jeff stryker

    The Summer of Love was in 1966, 5 years after Dylan, The Beatles, The Stones had become world famous. Nevertheless, their audience was slightly younger, but barely. They inspired people who were in high school and middle school, just like Cobain did, just like Justin Beiber did.

    Charles Manson was not a hippie and the only cult was his personal cult of crime, conspiracy and madness. Due to his 12 year age advantage he was able to cow and bamboozle a coterie of middle class kids into doing his criminal and murederous will. Manson has nothing to do with anything. He was an anamoly. He was an icon to no one.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  33. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    The Silent Generation was born from 1925-1942. They are the most financially well-off Western generation in history. Most of them were too young to serve in WW2, but they all were old enough to remember the war. Most of them have vivid memories of the Depression, which caused them to be frugal and careful with their savings/investments. According to Neil Howe, Silents were the most likely to value generous pensions when looking for work. Silents were heavily responsible for the cultural shift of the 60’s and 70’s, being Civil Rights pioneers and quickly achieving dominance of the music and film industry (most Oscar winning movies of the 70’s were directed by Silents). Most baby Boomers looked up to the Silents, even though they often conflated the early Silents with the GI Generation (born from about 1900-1924). Silents have generally been financially supportive, but at times emotionally and physically distant from their kids and grandkids. Late Boomers and early Gen X-ers typically had Silent Gen parents; early Boomers generally had GI parents, late X-ers often have Boomer parents.

    Silents are much more culturally and politically active as elders than the GIs ever were. They’ve tried to stay in touch w/Boomer culture (while finding Gen X culture to be mostly repulsive, think of the Star Trek movie scene from 1986 where Silents Spock and Captain Kirk confront an obnoxious Gen X punk)), to the point that many people conflate Silent and Boomer culture (for example, how many people know that DePalma and Scorsese are Silents, while Spielberg and David Lynch are Boomers?)

    You misinterpretted it so it would fit into this idiotic ageist nonsense.

    Generation character is not “ageist”. Someone who was born in 1935 is going to have a much different background than someone born in 1955 or 1985. The Depression had a lasting effect on Silents, Vietnam had a lasting effect on Boomers, and NAFTA had a lasting effect on Gen X-ers.

    • Replies: @restless94110
    , @dfordoom
  34. Feryl says:
    @jeff stryker

    I think that the creators of youth culture and the consumers of youth culture often come from different generations, but this is not always really parsed out in our study of these eras. Silents dominated the pop culture of the 60’s, as creators , but popular history usually refers to the 60’s as the decade defined by the Boomers, with the vague sense that some “older generation” was being overtaken (yet, in the 1960’s Losts, GIs, and Silents were all alive and older than the Boomers, so uh, which older generation are we talking about?). The 1980’s were dominated by Boomer creators.

  35. @jeff stryker

    Please. Normal white working class is not trash. People Linh describes are, with a few exceptions, underclass, lumpenproletariat.

    The only “therapy” for them would be some kind of forced labor camp.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  36. Feryl says:
    @Jim Christian

    By the time I got back, the Greatest Generation had instituted such strict EEOC quotas, I didn’t even bother taking the fire fighter test cycle a second time. They were hiring 5, with the one or two Whites out of 5 they hired volunteer FFs, so off to the phone business I went.

    Yes, the GI and Silent Gen (born from 1900-1942) did indeed over-reach big-time in the 1970’s. But there are still differences between the GI and Silent Gen, that are worth pointing out.

    We had kids that were hard workers in the phone bizz, in the eighties. What I noticed was the kids in the movies portrayed as teens. Fast Times At Ridgemont High to me was a watershed for drugs and sexual promiscuity, especially for young girls.

    Real life measures of drug use, sex, etc. all increased heavily in the 70’s. Drug use declined slightly in the 80’s, mostly in the late 80’s, at that. Teen promiscuity was awful in the 70’s, 80’s, and early 90’s. Young Boomers and Gen X-ers made a lot of terrible decisions. I’ve noticed that many people born from about 1950-1968 have died young, over-dosed, etc. Those “wild teen” movies of the early 80’s were, unfortunately, not that far off the mark when it came to depicting reality. The youth zeigeist of about 1967-1983 was a train wreck, way more dangerous/rebellious/nihilistic than the youth culture of the Silents or Millennials. By the late 80’s, much of society’s dysfunction was being concentrated in inner city ghettos (each successive generation seems to have better behaved whites relative to what blacks are doing).

    Earlier the shows of the sixties like All In the Family made hatred for Republicans and White men and also divorce, acceptable. Later, after Fast Times came gay-acceptance shows, 2-1/2 men being one that mocked gays and trannies mercilessly early on but then morphed into shows that really began pushing the gay agenda. Also, think MASH with Klinger. The adultery craze started about the MASH era too.

    The “family values” craze of the 80’s and 90’s (when Millennials were born) tried to desperately back-track from the hedonism that was glorified in the late 60’s and 70’s. Not that it always succeeded, but at least we were trying.

    I dunno, Feryl, I give em more credit than you, maybe.

    I was getting at the fact that X-ers and Millennials don’t buy into the same sort of striving for “success” that Silents and Boomers did. Now I admit that more and more people have gone to college since the 60’s, but how do people feel about this sort of grasping? Late Boomers are more embarrased about it than early Boomers are. X-ers are more embarrassed than Boomers are. And Millennials/Gen Z are basically stressed out as hell about the “pressure” to succeed. Early Boomers set the template for what qualifies as a “normal” life in the modern West, beginning in the late 60’s. And each subsequent generation feels more anxiety and shame about the zombie culture of the early Boomers that refuses to go away. And the childish and apparently never-ending effort to “shock the squares” (by rebelling against traditional culture and being an arrogant jerk-off) that early Boomers started in the 60’s is now way past it’s sell-by date (and strangely many Boomers find it odd that their own children don’t want to live a “rock and roll” lifestyle, funny because these Boomers may not understand that being a “square” is rebellion against what today’s older generation stood for.

    • Agree: Jim Christian
  37. Feryl says:
    @Franz

    (I take back the insult to Bob Dylan: In a paperback puff piece from 1966 called Folk-Rock the Bob Dylan Story he actually says: “How can I be the voice of their generation? I ain’t even in their generation!” At least one was honest. Helps when you live next to a used/rare book collector.)

    Bob Dylan is a sort of dyspeptic artist, which is a pretty common sort of person in his generation*. Remember that Silents often created the new ideas of the 60’s, yet it typically was Boomers who lived these ideas (Silents were too busy, thinking, working, developing stuff etc. to really do all that much partying). Silents like Bob Dylan often admitted to being let-down by the hedonism of Boomers and Gen X-ers (So we create a more “vibrant” culture to enrich life, and all you wanna do is party?

    *A lot of Silents were successful and charming entertainers, however just barely concealed underneath was insecurity and worrying. This a stark contrast from unreflective and confident Boomers, who generally give the impression that they’re “living in the moment” and not hiding anything.

  38. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    Well, given your apparent prejudice against X-ers (even though you simultaneously deny the validity of generational tendencies), why do you suppose that later generations might feel as if today’s older generations selfishly turned their back on the future, leaving their kids and grand-kids to clean up the mess?

    Look, everything is cyclical. We can’t live in Silent or Boomer-world forever, since attrition is what it is and sooner or later, younger generations are going to assume positions of influence and shape society to their liking. Given how apparently horrified you are by what various generations did in the 80’s and 90’s (not that I blame you), you ought to be thankful that the future will at least be different (I’m not naive enough to say better, because I don’t have a crystal ball and nobody else does, either), because it was Silents and Boomers who created the tone of the 80’s and 90’s but they won’t remain dominant forever. Like it or not, the tone of the 2030’s is going to be set by X-ers and Millennials.

  39. @Feryl

    Silents were heavily responsible for the cultural shift of the 60’s and 70’s, being Civil Rights pioneers and quickly achieving dominance of the music and film industry (most Oscar winning movies of the 70’s were directed by Silents).

    This is untrue. The cultural shift of the 60s and 70s came from the Boomers who had been raised by the Silents who were extremely fearful of not having a job due to their being raised during the Depression and the post-War unemployment and thus were extremely conformist and “uptight.”

    Their children–the Boomers–had been raised with none of that, had been raised in the golden age of prosperity that the US experienced in the 50s, and even though they knew of their parents’ problems when they were children in the 30s and 40s, that did not apply to them and they believed there were new ways to do things. What also provoked this schism between the Silents and Boomers was the Brown v Board decision in the early 50s, the Supreme Court legalizing pornography in the mid-60s and the draft into the Vietnam War. These events gave direction to the Boomers who were creating music and alternative life styles such as the hippies.

    This spread in the 60s and then came to flower in the 70s when the early Boomers graduated from film schools and began directing those classics so you have got it wrong again.

    Most baby Boomers looked up to the Silents, even though they often conflated the early Silents with the GI Generation (born from about 1900-1924).

    They most certianly did no such thing. The Silents were considered completely out of touch and many of the Silents were openly hostile to the Boomers. In Boomers eyes there was absolutely no demcarcation between the so called Silents and the GI Generation. Moreoever, who ever told you that the Silent Generation started at 1942 was wrong. Boomers included all of the early 40s born musicians, directors, etc., etc. Those early 40s born people had the same thoughts as the Boomers and there were other far seeing artists of the 50s (the beats) who pointed the way out of the uptight fearful conformist 50s into the 60s and 70s. These 50s beat artists were older but they came to prominance because they touched on the obsolete ideas of a generation that had gone through severe economic hardship and massive war, and suggested other ways of thinking and living. It had nothing to do with ageist tropes.

    Silents have generally been financially supportive, but at times emotionally and physically distant from their kids and grandkids. Late Boomers and early Gen X-ers typically had Silent Gen parents; early Boomers generally had GI parents, late X-ers often have Boomer parents.

    What on Earth are you going on about? How would you know that? Your sentences here are a mish mash of nonsense. I thought I was looking at a Mitryoshka doll: first you open the Silent and there’s a Boomer doll, then you open the Boomer and there’s a Gen-X doll or maybe if you open the Silent doll there’s a Gen-X doll instaed. This is preposterous nonsense for the simple fact that what you are saying boils down to people had babies at different ages. You are over-stereoptying to the point of utter meaninglessness.

    Silents are much more culturally and politically active as elders than the GIs ever were. They’ve tried to stay in touch w/Boomer culture

    No they haven’t and no they didn’t. My Mother never became a Rolling Stones fan.

    while finding Gen X culture to be mostly repulsive, think of the Star Trek movie scene from 1986 where Silents Spock and Captain Kirk confront an obnoxious Gen X punk)),

    I’ve seen all the episodes but that one is not to be interpretted in ageist terms. It’s just a drama, buddy, not an ageist contruct.

    to the point that many people conflate Silent and Boomer culture

    Young people conflate all previous cultures as one. Almost all people don’t consider older generations to be any different from one another. I’m not sure what your banal observation has to do with anything.

    (for example, how many people know that DePalma and Scorsese are Silents, while Spielberg and David Lynch are Boomers?)

    Answer: No one. Reason: DePalma and Scorsese are Boomers.

    Generation character is not “ageist”. Someone who was born in 1935 is going to have a much different background than someone born in 1955 or 1985. The Depression had a lasting effect on Silents, Vietnam had a lasting effect on Boomers, and NAFTA had a lasting effect on Gen X-ers.

    Having a different experience growing up is a big who cares? Thus it is ageist to attempt to separate people according to age. It leads to division and to disparagement and it simply is not the way people think. The Depression did have an affect on the Silents, but many Boomers were too young to have the Vietnam War affect them, and there were many other major events that affected the Boomers in the 60s and early 70s so you are completely off there. And all of the Gen-Xers I’ve ever known have never mentioned NAFTA even once.

    No one was affected by NAFTA.

    You are historically and logically wrong at most every point.

    Stop with the ageist tropes. That’s just more post-modernist and metaphisical bullshit meaning nothing and leading to nowhere.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @Feryl
  40. Feryl says:
    @Franz

    That date says it all. From the 1942 till 1964 the border was already down. The ’65 was rigged to make de jure what was already de facto. A generation later Clinton had to sign the Mexican version of NAFTA for the same reason. Big corporations had been relocating to Mexico for years before they made it legal. Ford Motor Company’s Hermosillo plant was state-of-the-art, and in the years before NAFTA, newer and better than anything in its class in the USA.

    Well, if we go all the way back to 1942, then we’d have to place most of the blame on Missionaries and Losts, because the youngest GI Generation person in 1942 was only about 40 years old. But you do say, to your credit, that you can’t blame a group of people born in a 20 year span for any particular problem (sheesh, the Warren Court was comprised mostly of Losts in the 1960’s; so much for the idea that the GI generation was responsible for every government failure of the 60’s)

    Seriously, folks, you can’t (and shouldn’t) place everyone born from 1880-1940 in the same generation. Knock off the derisive use of “greatest generation”, which Boomer storytellers coined in the 90’s as they wistfully recounted the New Deal era; and besides, these Boomers of course screwed up by not making it clear that middle-aged people during the 1930’s were actually Missionaries and Losts, not even the “greatest” Gen anyway). The mythical “older generation” is a lousy way to characterize the many generations who shaped society (for good or for ill) in the early to mid-20the century.

  41. @Feryl

    I have rarely read such utter looney nonsense. Dylan was dyspeptic? So you were his doctor? Someone born in 1941 was creative while someone born in 1945 unreflective?

    Do you read the things you write?

    How could you write this utter horseshit?

    Someone born in 1941 was too busy developing stuff to really do that much partying? So you were there in Malibu in the 70s while famous people born in the early 40s were partying all day and all night? No you weren’t. Because they were partying just like other people were. Some of them were born in 1945, some in 1955.

    You sound like you have had your mind zapped somewhere. Someone has explained recent history to you and you were conned and swallowed it hook, line, and sinker.

    Don’t trust those sources. They have misled you.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  42. @jeff stryker

    Correction: the Stones, Dylan and Beatles came to prominance 3 years not 5 years before the Summer of Love.

  43. @Feryl

    Well, given your apparent prejudice against X-ers (even though you simultaneously deny the validity of generational tendencies), why do you suppose that later generations might feel as if today’s older generations selfishly turned their back on the future, leaving their kids and grand-kids to clean up the mess?

    I have no prejudice against any age group. My experience wth Gen-X was that they were mal-educated, but there were many interesting ways of looking at things that I saw in their art and music.

    The reason that later generations might feel soemthing as untrue as today’s older generatons selfishly turned their back on the future, is that ageists have been pushing their tropes of ageist division for about 25 years now.

    Older generations didn’t turn their backs on anyone selfishly. They were just trying to live and get by. They are just people at the whim and will of forces of economics and obsolete policiies and thought.

    I have no idea what mess the kids and the grandkids have been left to clean up? What are you talking about?

    Are you saying that my mother who went through the Depression and WWII is guilty of turning her back on someone? How? Because she did not offer her grandsons milk and cookies when they came to see her?

    I’ve been scanning your other verbose theories and you just never stop like the Everready Bunny, you keep going and going and going spewing one inaccuracy after another, like a bot or a post-modernist academy fellow.

    You’ve missed the plain fact that all of us in every generation have to take things as they are when we are alive and all of us are just trying to survive. Things that were done, laws that were passed, policies that were installed, were all done because in the time that they were done that seemed like the way to do them or that seemed like that way should be tried. If it did not work out the way it was intended to work out, that’s not the fault of the age of the people that installed the policy or passed the law.

    And therefore, every generation has to “clean up” the remains of the previous generations throughout time and history.

    The problems come when policies and thoughts and laws become ossified and changes cannot be made.

    But even if and when that happens (and it has happened and is happening now) you see that change comes from cataclysmic events, just as you saw happen in the 20th century.

    It has nothing to do with generations and guilt cannot be heaped on anyone for decisions and policies made sincerely in the past.

    • Replies: @Franz
  44. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    Their children–the Boomers–had been raised with none of that, had been raised in the golden age of prosperity that the US experienced in the 50s, and even though they knew of their parents’ problems when they were children in the 30s and 40s, that did not apply to them and they believed there were new ways to do things. What also provoked this schism between the Silents and Boomers was the Brown v Board decision in the early 50s, the Supreme Court legalizing pornography in the mid-60s and the draft into the Vietnam War. These events gave direction to the Boomers who were creating music and alternative life styles such as the hippies.

    Dude, in the 70’s Harvey Milk was called an “aging hippie”, and he was born in the late 1920’s! Boomers were too young in the 60’s to effectively form any kind of creative vanguard; it was unusually liberal/free wheeling GIs and especially Silents who became role models for Boomers, and often led Boomers as well. Martin Luther King was a Silent.

    “Creating music”? Most charting hits of the early-mid 1960’s were written by Silents (the eldest Boomers were barely out of high school in the early 60’s). Elvis was a Silent. By the late 60’s, music was beginning to reflect the tastes of very late Silents/very early Boomers, but still, it wasn’t until the early 80’s that Silents were completely evicted from the pop charts. The utter sappiness of Silent Gen music was hated by Gen X-ers, but is more fondly remembered by some Boomers.

    Porno and rough grindhouse movies were a specialty of the Silents. Wes Craven was born in the late 30’s. Roger Corman was born in 1926, and he demanded that all of his movies made after 1970 would feature regular nudity.

    Moreoever, who ever told you that the Silent Generation started at 1942 was wrong. Boomers included all of the early 40s born musicians, directors, etc., etc. Those early 40s born people had the same thoughts as the Boomers and there were other far seeing artists of the 50s (the beats) who pointed the way out of the uptight fearful conformist 50s into the 60s and 70s.

    Strauss/Howe, in their extensive interviews and study of cultural eras, came to the conclusion that people born in 1943 and thereafter tended to me much less careful than those born from 1925-1942, because the former had no memory at all of WW2. They also found that endorsement of violence, anger, rage, etc. was much more common with people born after 1942.

    This is untrue. The cultural shift of the 60s and 70s came from the Boomers who had been raised by the Silents who were extremely fearful of not having a job due to their being raised during the Depression and the post-War unemployment and thus were extremely conformist and “uptight.”

    High school age people don’t “shift” cultures. Those rising through the ranks of institutions, however, do exert more and more influence. Silents were vital figures to every cultural movement of the 60’s and 70’s. I don’t get it; why does nearly every generation understand it’s role, while Boomers stubbornly insist that they single-handedly shifted the entire course of our culture when most of them were in college or even younger? I don’t hear Gen X-ers boasting about “changing everything” in the 80’s or 90’s. I don’t hear Millennials say that they “changed everything” in the 2000’s.

    Also, Boomers were raised by GIs and Silents. A generation has parents belonging to two generations (e.g., Gen X had Silent and Boomer parents, while Millennials had Boomer and X parents).

    • Replies: @restless94110
  45. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    Young people conflate all previous cultures as one. Almost all people don’t consider older generations to be any different from one another. I’m not sure what your banal observation has to do with anything.

    Millennials don’t conflate Kurt Cobain with Elvis. Most people intuitively understand the rhythm of historical and generational cycles, even if they glibly pretend otherwise. But perhaps Boomers who had no recollection of the 1910’s or 20’s, were clueless enough to act as if the 1960’s were “wild”*, when in reality the 1910’s and 20’s were far bloodier and unstable (per Peter Turchin’s research on civic instability).

    *The peak year of serial killing was 1985, but how one judges “wildness” will vary depending on whether we’re talking about collective violence (riots, terrorism etc.) or individual violence (“one on one” murders, robberies, rapes, etc.).

    • Replies: @restless94110
  46. @Feryl

    I am horrified at only one thing:

    That a foolish emphasis on ageists tropes will shift the blame for failed policies and ossified thinking onto some mythical “generation” of people, instead of onto the failed policies themselves.

    For example, after WWII the United States, instead of instigating government health care, chose (the politicians and intellectuals at that time) to attach health care to one’s job.

    This critical flaw has done more damage to America than perhaps anything. That mess needs to be cleaned up, but people of all generations are still spouting the socialized medicine doesn’t work idiocies. Every age group has members who say and think that. Good luck with cleaning that up when opposition crosses all generations and has nothing to do with one’s age.

    Take another: in the Drepression the government at the time instigated Social Security. However what they did not take into account was that in later times, policymakers, politicians and intellectuals would think it necessary to spend huge amounts of money on military adventures and armaments.

    This critical flaw has done immense damage to America, but you will find many in all generations who spout the line that Social Security is entitlement and can’t continue to work.

    The ageist tropes have camoflaged the plain reasons for both programs I mention above: a prosperous and humane society takes cere of its elderly and takes care of the health of its working force in order to remain prosperous.

    The only thing that “horrifies” me (that overused word is dropped 200 times a day by those who haven’t learned to think) is that ageist tropes have separated people so severely and so well that they have forgotten about taking care of people so that their country (the United States) can remain healthy, strong and competitive in the world.

    But that is what is happening. The mal-education of the 90s has matastized 25 years later leaving a confused populace hating your granny becuase she was a Boomer or the girl down the street because she is a Gen-Z.

    Forget about broad, bold policy directives that will help the people who literally are the country, all of them. We have rambling ageist theories to explain everything, and blame everybody.

    Instead we have arrogant ageist trope philosophers claiming that everyone is huddling horrified in their hovels waiting for Gen-Z to come for them and their starving kittens.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  47. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    “Someone born in 1941 was too busy developing stuff to really do that much partying? So you were there in Malibu in the 70s while famous people born in the early 40s were partying all day and all night? No you weren’t. Because they were partying just like other people were. Some of them were born in 1945, some in 1955.”

    Boomers are far more unhealthy (higher levels of obesity, more STDS, better odds of dying young) than the Silents. So it’s fair to say that Boomers did a lot more partying (and general self-indulgence) than the Silents ever did. We often get the (sometimes broken) body and fate we deserve.

    As for “patrolling” when a generation begins and ends, that’s all subjective and based on what data you want to emphasize. Not much point in trying to endlessly hash out exactly when a generation begins or ends (and in any event, neighboring generations generally have some things in common

    I used the word developing to emphasize that GIs and Silents actually built a lot of things. Perhaps they didn’t always work well, but at least they tried. Whereas Boomers and X-ers* thus far have broken a lot of things, and not shown much interest in building much beyond their own immediate family.

    *X-ers will get their shot at redemption, but the Boomers blew their chance, as is evident from Clinton-Bush-Obama-Trump being a horrible series of presidents, and it was Silent and Boomer political leaders who created this state of affairs with some less than stellar input from X-ers.

    • Replies: @restless94110
  48. @Feryl

    I did not say they conflate rock stars from different generations. I said generations.

    So you are saying that no one knows that the 1920s when Prohibiton caused wild mob violence occurred?

    Breathtaking stupidity.

  49. @Feryl

    Boomers are far more unhealthy (higher levels of obesity, more STDS, better odds of dying young) than the Silents. So it’s fair to say that Boomers did a lot more partying (and general self-indulgence) than the Silents ever did. We often get the (sometimes broken) body and fate we deserve.

    No it’s fair to say that American diet standards changed in the 70s due to a misinterpretation of food pyramids and mistakenly thinking that it was carbs not fats that was the problem I had nothing at all to do with previous generations.

    As for “patrolling” when a generation begins and ends, that’s all subjective and based on what data you want to emphasize. Not much point in trying to endlessly hash out exactly when a generation begins or ends (and in any event, neighboring generations generally have some things in common

    My criteria is not subjective. The artists you mention were but 1 or 2 years younger and clearly reflected the Boomer experience.

    I used the word developing to emphasize that GIs and Silents actually built a lot of things. Perhaps they didn’t always work well, but at least they tried. Whereas Boomers and X-ers* thus far have broken a lot of things, and not shown much interest in building much beyond their own immediate family

    Absolutely untrue. Boomers built much of what is used in the 21st century. You have no evidence whatsoever and can easily be proved completely wrong.

    *X-ers will get their shot at redemption, but the Boomers blew their chance, as is evident from Clinton-Bush-Obama-Trump being a horrible series of presidents, and it was Silent and Boomer political leaders who created this state of affairs with some less than stellar input from X-ers.

    No one then could hae known Obama would not do any of what he pledged. Bush was pledged to be against war, Trump is a great president so far but it’s too early to know. Blowing it would mean making bad desicsions when given the chance. No one could have known in advance their “decision” was wrong. No one.

    Once again, you’re reaching conclusions in hind sight and guess what? Hindsight is always 20-20. You’ve just making more of a fool of yoursel.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  50. @Feryl

    Dude, in the 70’s Harvey Milk was called an “aging hippie”, and he was born in the late 1920’s! Boomers were too young in the 60’s to effectively form any kind of creative vanguard; it was unusually liberal/free wheeling GIs and especially Silents who became role models for Boomers, and often led Boomers as well. Martin Luther King was a Silent.

    Dude. I knew Harvey Milk and no one ever called him an aging hippy. Silents did not become role models for Boomers, did not lead Boomers.

    A leader’s age has nothing to do with who follows him. It is his ideas and ideas are not contingent on age.

    but still, it wasn’t until the early 80’s that Silents were completely evicted from the pop charts.

    Well I done seen everything now. Ma, get packed we got to go! An idiot applying ageist tropes to popular American music. He clearly knows nothing of American music, but he doesn’t let that stop him.

    Porno and rough grindhouse movies were a specialty of the Silents.

    Yeah, buddy! Silents like Roberty Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino. You really need to turn your minor in Film History back into whatever grindhouse university you got it from: you was robbed!

    Strauss/Howe, in their extensive interviews and study of cultural eras, came to the conclusion that people born in 1943 and thereafter tended to me much less careful

    Straiss has been discredited and no one with any intelligence would listen to what he says about anything.

    High school age people don’t “shift” cultures. Those rising through the ranks of institutions, however, do exert more and more influence.

    So only institutional technocrats can change culture? I did not know that. I guess JD Sallinger (1 book), Jack Kerooac (1 book) should have waited the years necessary before you would have qualified them for the right to change the culture. No one in high school could ever ever ever possibly do that.

    So now you have switched from ageist tropes to ageism against high school students?

    Well, that’s all your ageist theories are any way: thinly disguised ageism that mean nothing, serve only to divide and distract people from real issues, and are total and complete garbage. You’re like that woman in the Public Enemy song: She watch Channel 0.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @jeff stryker
  51. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    Yeah, buddy! Silents like Roberty Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino. You really need to turn your minor in Film History back into whatever grindhouse university you got it from: you was robbed!

    The “grindhouse” is a 1970’s term for urban theaters that played z-grade movies to a highly questionable audience. Grindhouses mostly disappeared by the late 80’s, due to the home video market making it possible to watch weird B movies without having to worry about getting mugged. There were a lot of sicko movies made in the 70’s, featuring rape, cannibalism, scenes of protracted violence and suffering, etc. 1970’s pop culture could be quite nasty (the 1980’s are notable for the fact that nearly all horror movies made from about 1983-1989 did not feature scenes of protracted pain and suffering). Most of the seedy 70’s movies were written and/or directed by Silents (and virtually all of the money men/producers in the 70’s were Silents along with some GIs). In the early 80’s, there was a (heavily Boomer driven) effort to stigmatize horror movies, probably because once Millennials started being born there was essentially the birth of PC/safety culture, sort of an over-correction to the 70’s, the decade of historic abortion rates.

    Dude. I knew Harvey Milk and no one ever called him an aging hippy. Silents did not become role models for Boomers, did not lead Boomers.

    I got that quote from a mainstream source from the 70’s, which talked about his effort to “market” himself in the mid-late 70’s.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  52. Feryl says:
    @restless94110

    Well, I actually agree with you on these points. I don’t believe in “savior” generations either, anymore than I blame GIs, or Silents, or Boomers for being “destroyer” generations. The older and the younger need to cooperate to be most effective. If the preceding generations are morons, why expect the next one to be much different? Furthermore, I know that a lot X-ers and Millennials often felt like they were judged to be a “disappointment”, as if they alone were obligated to find a way to reverse the slide we’ve been in since 1970. Reversing the slide is going to require lots of good decisions by 3-4 generations. Be that as it may, a generation reaches peak power when it’s around 50-70 years old, so the clock has been ticking for Boomers for a while, and it’s starting to tick for X-ers. Time to put up or shut up, and that goes for every generation.

    For example, after WWII the United States, instead of instigating government health care, chose (the politicians and intellectuals at that time) to attach health care to one’s job.

    Here is a folly that both the Left and the Right have grounds to criticize (the Left from the viewpoint of healthcare not being socialistic enough; the Right from the viewpoint that the government was doing unnecessary meddling). Decades later, it’s pretty obvious that the insurance companies like it this way (if they didn’t they would lobby to change the law), which makes me ask the Right: Is it “big government” protecting a stupid policy in this case (that discourages employers from hiring people full time, and burdens employers w/the headache of managing benefits), or is it greedy insurance companies?

    Take another: in the Drepression the government at the time instigated Social Security. However what they did not take into account was that in later times, policymakers, politicians and intellectuals would think it necessary to spend huge amounts of money on military adventures and armaments.

    This critical flaw has done immense damage to America, but you will find many in all generations who spout the line that Social Security is entitlement and can’t continue to work.

    Something that conservatives are chronically clueless about is the idea that “we” don’t have enough to feasibly take care of people better. In fact, as long as we tax and spend responsibly, we ought to have enough. But in practice, many of our industries get lots of pork/tax breaks for no good reason, while the wealthy have fought to keep their share of the tax burden relatively low since the 80’s (and this while they off-shore, monopolize, jack housing values way up, and so forth).

    WRT the Pentagon, a lot of mainstream Repubs don’t seem to get that their cherished sense of fiscal responsiblity ought to apply as much to the Pentagon as anyone else. Nope, we instead get cliches about the GOP “rebuilding” the military as soon as a Republican get into the White House. Laughable. Hell, by the Obama era the Pentagon were such pigs that even a Democrat couldn’t do much to reduce the pork (and had he done so, like Bill Clinton did in order to retaliate against the Pentagon’s massive 1980’s turn to the GOP, no doubt the Righties would’ve lost their crap and accused Obama of “destroying” the military.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  53. @restless94110

    He’s always portrayed as a mad hippie who “ended the sixties” which makes his age of 35 at the time of the killings quite surprising.

    Abbie Hoffman was another example. He was already 30 years old in 1966 when the hippie movement began.

    Tom Hayden, whom my parents knew slightly in Ann Arbor, was 30 years old in 1969 when the hippie movement reached its peak.

    Dustin Hoffman, whose film THE GRADUATE apparently had some cultural importance, was 30 years old in 1937.

    Dennis Hopper was 33 when EASY RIDER was released in 1969 and Peter Fonda was 30.

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  54. @Feryl

    FERYL

    Drive-ins and grind-houses were on their way out earlier than that. By 1984 or so.

    George Romero had been a news producer and his zombie cannibal films were an attempt to imitate WAR OF THE WORLDS by crouching the subject in a mockumentary style while Tom Savini, who did most of the effects on the worst horror films of the seventies and eighties was a Vietnam Vet.

    The urban/rural class divides are laid fairly bare in some of these films. Craven’s middle-class family is assaulted by the worst rural hillbillies in HILLS HAVE EYES while his middle-class exurbanites are victims of the most unfettered white urban underclass in LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, a film that began the torture porn genre and was obviously inspired by Vietnam.

    Tobe Hooper, another news producer, also made TEXAS CHAINSAW.

    All of this sort of ended with the slasher genre which Carpenter began in 1978. No need for a convoluted backstory about jungle cannibals or zombies. Just give some large man in a mask some flimsy motivation and hire Tom Savini.

    Porn also benefited from VHS. Perhaps more than any other type of film.

    I was born in 1974 and of course came of age during the Mom and Pop video store era.

    I’m old enough to remember when a couple of Detroit guys named Raimi and Bruce Campbell were in the local newspapers over “Video Nasty” allegations because of a $100,000 film they shot in the woods called EVIL DEAD.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  55. @Feryl

    FERYL

    I was born in 1974 and Gen X was simply a victim of circumstances-people tend to reflect the generation they were born and Gen X reflected the cynicism and malaise of Vietnam and Watergate that stretched from about 1965 to 1981.

  56. @restless94110

    RESTLESS

    You’ve got your generations mixed up. Rodriguez was born in 1970 which is pure Gen X. Quentin Tarantino was born in 1963 and while considered a spokesperson for Generation X was about 10 years older than his audience.

    The same was ALWAYS true. Jack Kerouac was born in 1922 and was older than most of the Beats. He was already 47 in 1969 when he finally died after a lifetime of non-stop drinking and drugs. He was old enough to have served in World War II in the Navy.

    Eminem was born in 1972 and I remember being surprised when his first video on MTV premiered that he was much older than I expected him to be in 1998 (26 years old!).

    Abbie Hoffman was 33 when STEAL THIS BOOK was published. Again, about 10 years older than most hippies.

    • Replies: @Feryl
    , @AceDeuce
  57. @jeff stryker

    You’ll get no argument from me on that Jeff on how the street scum only understand one thing, violence. If I was given the power I would solve the crime problem in short order. It would involve pyramids of heads all over the Western world though as the full spectrum of criminals paid the price; bankers, politicians, judges, ‘educators’, media bosses and all the sex criminals and other scum who have destroyed our societies. After that we wouldn’t need police at all. Unfortunately, in all the wars and revolutions the ones who really deserve to die the most rarely do.

  58. Franz says:
    @jeff stryker

    Let us remember that Mailer stabbed his wife with a pen and did time. He released a killer from prison who then stabbed a guy after 3 months (Jack Abbott).

    He did that for sure. Led to the ugliest story, maybe, in the history of literature:

    Alan Dershowitz, in his book, Taking the Stand, recounts when Claus von Bülow had a dinner party after he was found not guilty at his trial. Dershowitz countered that he would not attend if it was a “victory party”, and von Bulow assured him that it was only a dinner for “several interesting friends”. Norman Mailer attended the dinner where, among other things, Dershowitz explained why the evidence pointed to von Bülow’s innocence. As Dershowitz recounted, Mailer grabbed his wife, Norris Church Mailer’s, arm and said: “Let’s get out of here. I think this guy is innocent. I thought we were going to be having dinner with a man who actually tried to kill his wife. This is boring.”

    Amazing what people who get away with things say. Generation matters? No.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Mailer#Decorations_and_awards

  59. Franz says:
    @restless94110

    Knock off the derisive use of “greatest generation”, which Boomer storytellers coined in the 90’s

    Tom Brokaw (b. 1940) was the one who coined it. Or if he didn’t, he spread it far and wide.

    But when has a date-of-birth ever defined human identity? If you go that route you end up with more answers than questions.

    Next we’ll be blaming the whole generation that allowed the creation of the Fed in 1913-14 and the US entry into WWI for all that came after. Worst, we’ll have to blame everyone alive for the Cold War and the national security state came with it in 1947-48. No generation can be responsible for all that.

    When you look closer, you see that the same sort of high-ranking financiers who rigged the Fed in 1913-14 was responsible for the National Security Act in 47-48. Only a tiny number of people make decisions and, at least since Plato’s Republic, everyone else tries to get by.

    People define themselves by which branch of the service we were in, where we came from, the work we do, out family heritage, our current locus, our language (for instance, quite a few people where I work know no English, a fact only made possible by several generations of plutocratic traitors.) Real nations protect their native-born.

    My guess is a handful of people buy into the talk that others make of their generation. But smart ones object anyway. When Ernest Hemingway first heard an older writer named Gertrude Stein call his World War I veteran age group “the lost generation” he objected mightily for to it, and made fun of the whole idea and even insulted her about it.

    Hemingway won. “The lost generation” tag never caught on. Good for Ernest.

  60. Feryl says:

    But when has a date-of-birth ever defined human identity? If you go that route you end up with more answers than questions.

    Generation is important, but not the be all, end all. Certainly I think that most people, when they see their parents and grandparents, are well aware that they represent a particular attitude or set of experiences that the youngest people will never be able to fully relate to. This doesn’t mean they will hate older generations and refuse to co-operate with them (although the zeitgeist sometimes encourages this, see the late 60’s), but you’re never going feel the same sort of alignment with them that you do with your like-aged peers. The modern Western conception of early life (nuclear family bond, than regular socializing with people your exact age from Kindergarten-High School/College) seems to have strengthened generational ID; primitive civilizations may have had a sense of young and old, and certain rites of passage, yet this sort of tribal life had a different vibe.

    Generations are a useful concept as a way of understanding the rhythms of culture and history. While no generation can “own” an era, or an idea, it’s still true that each generation is informed by a particular set of experiences and moods that they go through that are distinct for that generation, because children, teenagers, young adults, and older adults will have different responses to the same thing. And some powerful events/ideas will be missed by some generations altogether; Millennials generally didn’t have to worry about Mom and Dad joining some flaky cult or “spiritualist” movement, whereas Gen X-ers in the 1970’s did have to worry about that sort of thing. Boomers came of age largely taking for granted a stable and happy home life; X-ers, on the other hand, were kids during the divorce revolution, when lots of women joined the workforce, and parents were frequently absent.

    Oh, and accents, slang, cultural references, sense of personal/moral boundaries etc. are all closely tied to generation. There’s a limit to how much people can relate to each other, which has a lot to do with age. It’s going to be hard for someone born in 1950 to understand, relate to, and to some extent effectively communicate with someone born in 1990. Part of this is the pattern we often see throughout history of generations raising kids who grow to be the opposite of their parents. Sensitive Silents set the tone for parenting in the 60’s and 70’s, and they raised the kids who would create thrash metal and grunge. Flaky and rebellious Boomers, in the 80’s and 90’s, have raised kids who are remarkably predictable and community-oriented (in the 90’s, crime remained high among Boomer adults and and Gen X teenagers, but the behavior of children improved a great deal). Gen X parents over the last 20 years have taken the Boomer parenting style and pushed it further, yet this has it’s drawbacks as Gen Z appears to be burdened by their lack of hardship in their youth. Sensitive/moody kids raised by a coarse generation? That happened already with Lost parents and their Silent kids, and it’s happening again with Gen X/Gen Z.

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  61. Feryl says:
    @jeff stryker

    You’ve got your generations mixed up. Rodriguez was born in 1970 which is pure Gen X. Quentin Tarantino was born in 1963 and while considered a spokesperson for Generation X was about 10 years older than his audience.

    It seems like mostly Boomers who make a big deal about Tarantino, and I’m not really sure that he’s ever been all that pedestalized as a Gen X icon by actual X-ers(certainly, his obsessive trawling of the 60’s and 70’s says nothing at all about Gen X-ers, who had nothing to do with the overall thrust of pre-1980 culture). Whereas Kevin Smith often jokes about being “stuck” in the 90’s, and would get more academic attention if he’d made more movies like Clerks. I remember Pulp Fiction getting a fair amount of attention from Boomers, who did often say that the movie represented the general zeitgeist of the 90’s, as opposed to being focused on any generation (since Tarantino prefers to cast older actors, anyway, how are Steve Buscemie, Travolta, and Sam Jackson supposed to represent any aspect of Gen X culture?). Also, I think Tarantino is a weirdo who lives in his own world, and who wants to consider him representative of anything but his own ego and fantasies?

    Eminem was born in 1972 and I remember being surprised when his first video on MTV premiered that he was much older than I expected him to be in 1998 (26 years old!).

    Eminem looked pretty gawky back then, and he started taking roids several years later out of insecurity. Even Kurt Cobain, before the heroin got really bad, looked a lot more well-built. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions about the rumors regarding Eminem going gay for Dre in order to advance his career; Eminem doesn’t exactly have the phenotype of an alpha who would never stoop to that.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  62. Feryl says:
    @jeff stryker

    George Romero had been a news producer and his zombie cannibal films were an attempt to imitate WAR OF THE WORLDS by crouching the subject in a mockumentary style while Tom Savini, who did most of the effects on the worst horror films of the seventies and eighties was a Vietnam Vet.

    A common explanation for the rough movies of the very late 60’s and 70’s is that the Silent Generation wanted to put on screen the violence and sex which youngsters had been shielded from in the 1940’s and 50’s. But this also had the effect of indicating to impressionable young Boomers that sex and violence (“wildness”) are sort of cool. That was the trend in the 60’s and 70’s; the Silent Gen broke down barriers to behavioral inhibition, yet it was Boomers who fell for the trend the hardest, collecting STDs and frying their brains on drugs. In the 80’s, a lot of Boomers would start to consider the Silents to be sort of like the pervy/voyeuristic type, and would resent Silents for sleazing society up (scenes of torture and sexual assault would be essentially gone from horror movies and porno by the late 80’s, because the puritan wing of the Boomers didn’t want such material to be produced, even under the ostensible guise of “portraying the full spectrum of human sexuality and violence”. And neither X-ers nor Millennials want to be accused of perving society up, lest we experience another decade like the leering 70’s, where middle aged people got off on defying social norms.

    The urban/rural class divides are laid fairly bare in some of these films. Craven’s middle-class family is assaulted by the worst rural hillbillies in HILLS HAVE EYES while his middle-class exurbanites are victims of the most unfettered white urban underclass in LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, a film that began the torture porn genre and was obviously inspired by Vietnam.

    Predators attacking people really started to become apparent in the early-mid 70’s, and these movies capitalized on these trends. America was 85% white in the early 70’s, and many notorious deviants and criminals were white. Dean Corrll was a white homo pedophile/killer who killed at least 25 young males in the early 70’s. It”s with Gen X that criminals start to become almost uniformly black, and some of this can be attributed to white X-ers (and white Millennials) being smaller cohorts within their generation than Silents and Boomers were.

    The sympathetic victims in 70’s and 80’s movies simply reflected the strong middle class country that we were at the time. Not until the 90’s would much of the mainstream audience be very prole-ish, and not necessarily sympathetic to clean cut people. Remember that in the Great Compression (1930-1980), Americans came to increasingly look like and act like Ordinary People. Other than a handful of misfits (criminals, bikers, hippies, beatniks), most people had a similar build, similar cultural tastes, and no particular desire to stand out*. Compare that to many X-ers and Millennials who look like they belong in a death metal band or as bad guy extras in a Mad Max movie. During the globalist new gilded age that’s happened over the last 40 years, people have felt less and less pressure to conform to an agreed upon standard of how to operate. Dissolution. Wonder why so many people are fat, these days?

    *The 70’s were a transition decade, with more and more people just doing their own thing, instead of trying to conform to New Deal standards. Yet it took some time for this attitude to fully take effect; not until the 90’s would lots of Americans be fatties in cargo shorts.

  63. @felix giordano

    Hey buddy, l really like that portrait- and l live in Philly. I own the best hole in the wall pizzeria in Old City. Just ask around for the nutcase owner who plays jazz guitar… Stop by- you can draw my semblance on a pizza plate- pizzas on me, of course…

  64. @Feryl

    Kevin Smith was indeed stuck in the 90’s. Being a slacker went out of style in about 1996 when the roaring economic 90’s really took hold. Being a cynical nihilistic 25 year old in he mid-90’s dressed in flannel suddenly became extremely passe.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  65. Feryl says:
    @jeff stryker

    Clerks at least presents what Gen X-ers were really doing and saying in the early 90’s, since it was made by a X-er who had been doing a normal job and hanging around with normal people during this time. But yeah, it dated pretty fast, because the early 90’s era of recession/sky high rates of crime/the drug war/youth affecting detachment etc. gave way to the “party” atmosphere of the late 90’s (pop punk, boy bands, safer streets, flippant youth, etc.). Not unlike how the dreadful Carter/early Reagan era gave way to the neon synthed up mid 80’s.

    It seems like most decades can be split roughly in half, anyway, from a cultural perspective, with it taking 4-5 years for a decade to really develop it’s identity. Oddly, though, sometimes it’s the earliest part of a decade which “sticks” in the popular memory. The 90’s is the decade which most people seem to misunderstand, since the flannel/Doc Marten/grunge/recession malaise typically dominates our understanding of the decade, while the flippant and sort of “glammy” late 90’s is ignored.

  66. cowboy says:

    “If you’re lucky, you’ll get to live out your days without arrest, disgrace or the permanent dissolution of your social armature.”

    city folk don’t know how to die

  67. We will all have our 15 minutes of infamy. It’s the nature of democracy.

  68. @unit472

    I write books. Agents tell me that if I want people to read them I must make Youtube videos. I have already dumbed down my books to a six grade level. Still, when I show my books to people I often discover they can’t get through the first few pages without consulting a dictionary, which for most is too much trouble.

    Video is the most superficial and least intellectual way to convey information. Are IQs dropping, or are Americans just no longer interested in thinking?

    • Replies: @Fuerchtegott
  69. Escher says:
    @Anonmalayexp

    Agreed. 4Ps is excellent. I read that the guy imported cows into Vietnam to get the right quality of milk for bufala.

  70. sb says:

    Always enjoy reading Linh’s pieces .

    They always reinforce my long time view that while the US is indeed a fascinating place full of interesting people I wouldn’t want to permanently live there .

    Which is possibly a majority view here irrespective of domicile ?
    Living on the edge isn’t for everyone

  71. @Franz

    Kind of proves the point. Mailer n Dylan were both Jews, thus had a leg-up in getting published or plastic platters printed. Gore Vidal published early (1940s), before publishing became dominated by the tribe, but I note that his first hit, The City and the Pillar, was about homosexuality, which is another sure-fire attraction for Jewish publishers.

    Interesting side note: The Great Gatsby was a flop when it was first published in the late 1920s. It savaged white racial theorists. Not the theory, of course, but ad hominem versus the theorists. The sudden popularity of the Great Gatsby a couple of decades later likely designates the watershed moment for when publishing came to be controlled by the tribe.

    I object to Bob Dylan. His raucous ‘music’ n inane lyrics could only get find a home in plastic for someone who had back-room ties.

    • Replies: @mcohen
    , @Republic
  72. @Jim Christian

    I think the change in Hollywood came around 1965. i read somewhere that several Jewish orgs had campaigned to loosen the movie censorship rules n finally succeeded in 1965. After that the dam burst n everything became permissible, the only obstacle being whether the product made money.

    Now that is all people are: passive consumers of trash. The home TV screen is the new altar dedicated to receiving 24/7 conditioning by the PC Cult.

    • Replies: @Republic
    , @Feryl
    , @dfordoom
  73. @jeff stryker

    The police act differently depending on which part of the US you’re in. The US is still to some extent 6 different countries. They are usually very polite here in Texas. Just don’t run afoul of MeToo, the police are quick to arrest if they even suspect one of harassing a woman, no questions are asked.

    Did you mean to say that crime in general is less in the US than in Europe? I would not agree with that. The vast majority of violent crime hereabouts is done by blacks. Pakis n Arabs don’t go in for stick-ups. They’re smarter than that, they run insurance scams.

    I know one Paki, a nice guy, but I saw up close n personal how he swindled people left n right. When Obama came to our town to visit, guess whose house he stayed at?

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  74. @jeff stryker

    Mr. Linh’s point is that life is getting much more difficult for the working and lower middle classes.

    That is exactly the point of globalism. Linh’s personal stories are the future that is coming to many more Americans. That’s why he is relevant.

  75. @jeff stryker

    Mr. Linh’s point is that life is getting much more difficult for the working and lower middle classes.

    That is exactly the point of globalism. Linh’s personal stories are the future that is coming to many more Americans. That’s why he is relevant.

  76. iffen says:

    Sorry to hear that you can’t get decent burgers or pizza.

    I’ve asked before if you were a fascist speaking about fascist Jews before or after your writing career went South.

    Maybe you should have played your POC card. You know, demanded that they make you a POC Studs Terkel or Philip Levine. Then again, maybe the new rules do apply and you are not allowed to give voice to discarded people not of your race.

    • Replies: @Old Jew
  77. @Rational

    When the women go so does the nation. A good gloss on Dinh’s thesis.

  78. Anonymous[469] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rational

    If the liberal white woman mingles with them, they are sure she must be a whore, because they realize that they are inferior and uglier looking, with darker skin, and the girl must certainly be a whore to stoop down so low.

    It sounds strange but it rings true in my experience.

    Asians also consider white women whores because of the sheer number of sexual partners they have. 10-20 may be considered normal in the West but it’d make her the whore of Lahore!

    White women are also reputed to have somewhat lackluster personal hygiene, partially because they’re lazy and partially because they don’t know how to use water to clean properly after going to the toilet. This doesn’t help their image at all.

    • LOL: eah
  79. mcohen says:

    Just watched a movie “the revenant” and read a book “the savage detectives”.So there is still hope for fresh cultural narratives beyond the “west”.Today people are obsessed about the worth of things but not the value.

    A pound of flesh
    An eye of rib
    A knuckle of beef
    An inch of nail
    A finger of salt
    An ear of corn
    A foot of earth
    What are we worth.

  80. @Sin City Milla

    No, I said that minor problem groups like Gypsies or whoever that do extremely petty crimes like pickpocket 12 year old Gypsy girls in Rome cannot do that on US streets. For whatever reason, Pakistanis and Gypsies behave better in the US.

    Civilly, I mean. Of course they commit Medicaid Fraud or chain migration scams or whatever but don’t go out rob people like they do in UK.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  81. mcohen says:
    @Sin City Milla

    Bob dylan got a nobel prize in the mail.Evidently it stated on the box that he won it because he was born of nobility which is short for “no ability”.That ring a bell with you.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  82. AceDeuce says:
    @Franz

    LBJ, Nixon, Ford, and Reagan were certainly not “privileged boys”. Nor was Carter. So, you’re left with Kennedy and Bush for your yammering purposes.

    • Replies: @Franz
  83. AceDeuce says:
    @jeff stryker

    While your main point is about Kerouac’s age, and while, technically, he did “serve in the Navy during WW II”, his naval career lasted exactly 10 days before he was given a psychiatric discharge.

    He did serve in the Merchant Marine the year before.

  84. “If you’re lucky, you’ll get to live out your days without arrest, disgrace or the permanent dissolution of your social armature.”

    Today, in America, a day is successful if you can make it from dawn to sunset without committing suicide or homicide.

    Thanks for the writing, Mr. Dinh. Bonne merde, as they say. My condolences regarding that hamburger, geez!

  85. @restless94110

    Trump is a great president so far but it’s too early to know.

    Great for Israel perhaps. Is that your criteria?

    Blowing it would mean making bad desicsions when given the chance. No one could have known in advance their “decision” was wrong. No one.

    Right, because nobody could possibly suspect that throwing open the floodgates to third world savages who, within living memory at the time, had not developed past the Neolithic would have a disastrous negative impact on our Space Age civilization. That was a concept far too difficult to grasp, let alone discern – like discovering the ground is wet after a thunderstorm. Forcing the progeny of Newton and Galileo to sit in classrooms with the progeny of OokOok and EekEek (famous cannibals and architects of mud huts) just made sense in 1965 right?

    And then there’s the colossal surprise that pretending men are women and vice versa would have corrosive effects on human institutions in existence since the dawn of time. Who could have known?

    In generations past, when the elites failed the people acted (see lynching of negro rapists). But the Silents and Boomers sat on their asses while the Jewish communists and nation-wreckers promoted and passed laws so monstrously evil as to destroy an entire civilization. You want to give them a pass for this.

    Western Civilization was completely fucked before Gen-X was born. With a much smaller birth cohort, X-ers never stood a chance to contemplate fixing the damage. And Millennials, due to advancement in the surveillance state and never having seen even the vestiges of greatness, couldn’t resist what they didn’t know had been dispossessed in the first place.

    When you shit all over your children and grandchildren you don’t get to whine “ageism!” when you’re called on it. You sound like a negro.

  86. @Sin City Milla

    “I often discover they can’t get through the first few pages without consulting a dictionary, which for most is too much trouble.

    Here, I’ll help for free.

    “I often discover they can’t get through the first few pages without consulting a dictionary*, which for most is too much trouble. ”

    *Dictionary: A book where you can look shit up

    How I love smart people.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  87. Republic says:
    @Sin City Milla

    It savaged white racial theorists

    The great Gatsby novel made a reference to Stoddard’s 1925 best selling book, The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy.

    This book is available in HTML format here on Unz

    The reference in The Great Gatsby was neutral in tone.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  88. Republic says:
    @Sin City Milla

    I think the change in Hollywood came around 1965. i read somewhere that several Jewish orgs had campaigned to loosen the movie censorship rules n finally succeeded in 1965.

    That is correct, there was a movie code of decency in effect from the mid 1930s up unto 1965 when the movie,The Pawnbroker first allowed naked breasts to be shown on screen which of course broke that code.

    • Replies: @Feryl
  89. Anon[310] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    • Replies: @eah
  90. klcard says:
    @Anonmalayexp

    I tried this place yesterday in Saigon..Little Hanoi Egg Coffee, 165 Bùi Viện, Phường Phạm Ngũ Lão, Quận 1, Hồ Chí Minh. Blew me away, really distinctive drink..unparalleled in my view.

  91. Agent76 says:

    Oct 22, 2018 HO CHI MINH CITY (SAIGON) CRAZY NIGHTLIFE 🇻🇳

    I soak in the nightlife of Vietnam’s energetic Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon), exploring its food, markets, famous boulevards and walking bar street, Bui Vien.

  92. TKK says:

    This is one of the best pieces of writing I have ever read on the Internet.

    Slowly, you are crafting the eulogy of America. The only one that will be true.

  93. Agent76 says:

    Mar 14, 2019 $25 Vietnam Capsule Hotel

    SAIGON, VIETNAM: Not having seen a capsule hotel since my first trip to Japan in 2001, I became pretty excited when I learnt that Saigon actually has one.

  94. eah says:
    @Anon

    NAMs — there aren’t many in Vietnam.

  95. SafeNow says:

    “the eulogy of America”

    Yes, that’s the essay. Although Brazil/Mexico/Harvard/Idiotocracy should be added to the picture. Together with the observant and insightful commentary to the essay. All I can add is that a trip to my gym in S. California would be illustrative. I wear noise-suppressing gunrange headphones over my ipod’s oldtime music. That takes care of sound. But where to look…. Tatted, pierced, grave cellphone people who don’t know how to exercise. Can’t look up at the tv above my cardio machine…It’s a soap, or worse, “The View.” (That would be my punishment at a Supermax..a tv that only plays The View.) As a southern Californian, I should change my user name. It is autobiographical — that’s the source; but alas it is misleading now.

    • Replies: @TKK
  96. utu says:

    BEST All You Can Eat SEAFOOD Buffet in Saigon VIETNAM!

    • Agree: Agent76
  97. @jeff stryker

    Jeff wrote:

    Dustin Hoffman, whose film THE GRADUATE apparently had some cultural importance, was 30 years old in 1937.

    Dustin Hoffman was born in 1937, so he can’t be 112 years old today, unless he’s been using some secret elixir. I suppose you meant to say he was 30 years old in 1967.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  98. @Feryl

    Oh well, I’ve been a victim of the “generation gap” twice, once in my youth when old age was favoured and now in my old age when youth is favoured.

  99. @Commentator Mike

    MIKE

    Yes, exactly. He’s 10 years older than a boomer.

  100. Feryl says:
    @Republic

    That was the New Deal era. Keep the border shut, promote cultural conservatism along w/gibs to the (then heavily white) working/lower middle class, in order to keep the peace and keep the elite’s heads off the guillotine. Since that era ended, each decade is a greater affront to stability and sanity.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  101. eah says:

    Stay where you are Linh — despite the generally lousy cheeseburgers and pizza.

  102. Feryl says:
    @Sin City Milla

    You can’t expect to keep repeating the same era over and over again. We go through periods of roughly 20 years, upon this period ending we start a different one. If you look at political/cultural cycles, almost always 1929-1944 is regarded as increasingly populist and conservative. 1945-1964(ish) is regarded as stable and tentatively experimental. 1965-1983 is when all hell breaks loose, when rules and authority are ignored. 1984-2001(ish) is when people began to “conform” again to an individualist ideology of success, and there is very little interest in collective works; it’s hard to find “joiners” in this period. 2002-present has been a phase of rising dissatisfaction with the “system”, but importantly, it’s taking a turn toward collectivism, away from the rising individualism of 1965-2001. Going by the 4 part cycle theory, the present period is similar to what we went through in the 1930’s and early 40’s, in it’s overall tone of people asking their leaders to do something, whereas 1965-2001 was about increasing skepticism about the utility of relying on authority.

  103. TKK says:
    @SafeNow

    Yes, on all counts. Micro events, building up- our death by a billion cuts.

    My elderly mother hurt her ankle. I called a urgent care clinic to ask if they had the capability to x-ray her ankle.

    The bored troglodyte on the phone said and I quote: that depends on what type of insurance she has.

    Hoping she misunderstood I said: no I need to know if you have the medical equipment, the capability to x-ray someone’s ankle.

    And she replied with that Southern uneducated aggressive snarl of the obese female: And I’m telling you it depends on what type of insurance she has.

    Sick or in pain? You better be rich or famous. You know the dumb bitch working on the front desk makes minimum-wage. But she has been trained by the corporation she works for to stab the working class in the back.

    I actually contracted a terrible case of food poisoning in Turkey. I have also been sick in Greece. The two times I had to go to the hospital no one was badgering me about how I was going to pay. It was dealt with afterward.

    Can a country survive that has surgically removed all human compassion and then replaced with the rabid pursuit of profit above all things? Does it deserve to?

  104. Kevinator says:

    San Antonio is for puffy tacos @ Ray’s…. chicken fried steak? Bring your ass to Dallas and we’ll blow your mind! Love your stuff broheem!

  105. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Feryl

    Silents were heavily responsible for the cultural shift of the 60’s and 70’s, being Civil Rights pioneers and quickly achieving dominance of the music and film industry (most Oscar winning movies of the 70’s were directed by Silents).

    It was a fairly small group of people responsible for that cultural shift. They were a new emerging elite. Claiming that an entire generation was responsible is utter lunacy.

    History is always made by elites, either established elites or rising elites seeking to join or displace the established elite. Ordinary people are just spectators (if they’re lucky) or victims (if they’re not lucky).

    Seeing entire generations as being responsible for major social and cultural changes is pitifully naïve.

    Elites do not see themselves as members of a particular generation (or a particular race or ethnic group). They see themselves as members of the elites. Their identities are class and ideological.

  106. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Sin City Milla

    I think the change in Hollywood came around 1965. i read somewhere that several Jewish orgs had campaigned to loosen the movie censorship rules n finally succeeded in 1965.

    The main factor was television. By the mid-50s television had had a catastrophic effect on the movie industry. The studios were desperate for anything that would attract audiences back to movie theatres. They tried gimmicks like Cinemascope and 3D but the obvious answer (as far as the studios were concerned) was a massive increase in sex and violence since that was forbidden territory to television in the 50s.

    So Hollywood was incredibly keen to get rid of the Production Code so they could add lots of sex and violence. By the early 60s they thought they could get away with it, and they were right. They introduced the ratings system which allowed them to show much more sex and violence. That still wasn’t enough for them so they introduced the X rating in the late 60s so they could push things even further.

    Low budget movie-makers could already get away with more than the studios could because they were not bound by the Production Code, hence the boom in sexploitation movies in the 60s. The X rating allowed sex movies to go mainstream.

    So the tidal wave of graphic violence, sex and nudity in movies from the late 60s to the late 70s was driven by a desire to do anything that might attract audiences. It was Hollywood trying to save itself.

    Then in the 70s Steven Spielberg and George Lucas came up with an alternative solution – make big-budget blockbuster movies aimed at 12-year-old boys. Dumbing down the product proved to be even more successful than sex and violence.

    It wasn’t so much a fiendish conspiracy as a desperate bid for commercial survival.

    • Replies: @Sin City Milla
  107. Anonymous[548] • Disclaimer says:

    @Linh Dinh:

    My Filipina wife and I are planning to visit Saigon for the very first time, between September 3rd and 13th . If there is any chance of meeting with you over a coffee, a beer, I would consider that a truly great honor. I notice you said you live in District 6 of Saigon. Our hotel is on De Tham Str. Distr. 1, District 1. The district map seems to indicate the two districts are neighbors. If your time does not allow it, I can understand. Please let me know first, before exchanging contact info. Thanks.

    “…it was under consideration at Seven Stories Press, but it’s safe to say it won’t come out there, or anywhere else, now that I’m tarred as a Fascist, all for speaking out against truly Fascistic Jewish power.”

    I would have thought that the last place and people on earth with little to no anti-Semitic agendas would be Vietnam and Vietnamese. How naive of me! The real challenge then is to find societies that have no axes to grind with the abuses of Jewish power. No other group has come even close to achieving the gagging, suffocating power that Zionism and its puppet, the US, have in stifling voices of reason, critical thinking and free expression. The long arm of Jewish reach keeps getting longer. Have you tried any authentic Asian publishers? I mean non-affiliates of the major Western publishing houses. Would using a pen name change anything?

    By the way, reading through your character sketches shows the depth of understanding of human nature in all its subtleties. Your writing evinces curiosity about the average Joe; in their character sketches you bring out some literary flavor that makes the reader crave more. Thank you Sir!

    Regarding liberal White women who marry foreigners then get dumped, here in the Philippines, the reverse appears to be the case; typically it it is the White elderly males seeking young pussy that (after getting married) get fleeced, dumped then deported. Reading through some of the harrowing accounts in an expatriate website can be quite depressing. Others though will swear by their local wives, having lived and worked here for over twenty years.

  108. @Feryl

    Strauss and Howe’s generational theory was certainly a magnum opus that, upon reading it, opens one’s eyes to many things. However, I think it has quite signally failed to predict anything about the future since the time of its publication. According to the timeline, we ought to be well into a 4th Turning by now; in fact, we ought to be almost out of it. But the mood in America is still decisively 3rd Turning-ish, and this despite the fact that we’ve had at least two catalysts come along straight out of Strauss-and-Howian central casting, in just the right time and in just the right way, to usher in the predicted cultural sea change (9/11 being one and the Global Financial Crisis being the other).

    Both of these events were received by the government and by the population at large with characteristic Unraveling-era individualism, cynicism, and opportunism, and that mood has never yet shifted even unto this very day. We’re stuck in the 3rd Turning that never ends. This may be due to the unprecedented size and wealth of the Baby Boom generation disrupting the generational rhythm, giving them the ability to prolong their Grey Champion phase far longer than any other Prophet generation could have done. However, I think there is something else at work here, some flaw in the theory itself that is causing the model to break down.

    We’ve reached the end of meaningful historical development within the Western cultural sphere. The generational cycle, to the extent that it ever existed, was a secondary pulse-beat within the great arch of the Faustian civilization. Now that the major life course is waning, its own minor rhythms are growing weaker and more incoherent. This is precisely what allowed Strauss and Howe to write their books in the first place. Before the present time, men were too caught up in the generational ebb and flow, too immersed in its overpowering currents, to take any sort of detached and scholarly notice of it. Generational theory was able to emerge into consciousness as a possible historiography only as its grip on the spirits of men began to relax. As with every period and era and movement, a sort of philosophical looking backward is symptomatic of the end of the life course.

    We are currently in the longest and last 3rd Turning. The crisis that succeeds this era will not culminate in any renewal or creative synthesis, but will begin a long and historyless phase of mankind in which the cycle of generations sinks into “natural” insignificance, as grand and timeless as the alternation of ice and virgin forest upon the globe. For it is the sweeping arch of the culture which imparts meaning to the generations, not the generations to the culture. With that great force spent, the generations, too, settle down into stillness.

    • Replies: @AaronB
    , @Feryl
  109. Franz says:
    @AceDeuce

    LBJ, Nixon, Ford, and Reagan were certainly not “privileged boys”. Nor was Carter.

    I wrote as follows:

    …For good or ill they were mostly privileged boys, in the old sense, who thought the country was theirs to give away…

    The point was their timing allowed them, like the Chinese “frogs at the bottom of the well who see part of the sky clearly” ran away with their judgement. They had a suddenly a rich nation, few rivals of real clout, and in the sphere of foreign power allowed this skewed judgement to overestimate how much they could do in the world.

    Ford and Carter were exceptions only because Ford was a placeholder between Nixon and Carter; Carter was a one-term disaster because he was sabotaged by the National Security State and apparently by his own administration.

    Nixon was “privileged” book deal payoff after he got out; similar to Reagan’s Japanese payoff for two speeches in Japan (20 minutes each of old boilerplate) which gave him a few million dollars for helping the Japanese economy while in office. Japanese joke ca. 1989: “Thank God Reagan is the USA’s leader. Thank God he’s not ours!”

    Lyndon Johnson is the case of cases. Jerry Pournelle (RIP) spoke for conservatives everywhere when he noted that Lyndon’s only non-political job was as a Texas schoolteacher. The minute he got into high office his meter was running, leaving office with millions of dollars after Nixon took over in 1969. Pournelle was furious that Johnson’s wealth was all due to kickbacks from… right… the Military Industial Complex (among others).

    Pournelle, wherever he might be, can take comfort that even wiki now puts Lydon’s total take a 100 million dollars. Not bad for a part time schoolteacher.

    Lyndon “prvileged” himslf fairly well, and the right can take comfort knowing their suspicions about where all the “Great Society” program millions really went were correct. Recall, Lyndon had lots of cronies. For them business was always good. And payoffs were better.

  110. @Anonymous

    548

    It is rare for foreigners to be deported from the Philippines. You’d really have to be convicted of a serious crime. One Korean neighbor in my gated subdivision, an online trader and cocaine addict, was finally busted at a road checkpoint by the PNP with a gram of blow in his pocket. We were all glad the guy was out of the neighborhood but IMMIGRATION PHILIPPINES is really reluctant to deport a Korean because Korean tourism is the economic anchor…so he paid bail and remained in Cebu.

    The only guy I ever heard of who was deported was an Iranian married to some Chinese-Filipino woman who paid 300,000 Peso to Immigration.

    Bribes are not cheap. A Chinese Filipino businesswoman might get you deported, but most Filipinas married to older foreigners are poor squatters or bar girls who won’t spend the money to deport them. The going rate there is 300,000 Pesos.

  111. @jeff stryker

    Jeff,

    I knew a guy who overstayed his visa for four years in the Philippines and eventually he walked into Immigration himself asking to resolve his status. They just told him to pay a 30,000 pesos fine (or something thereabouts, I can’r remember the precise sum) for overstaying and thereafter they’ll proceed with giving him a visa extension for an appropriate fee. He told them he had no money so they just told him to go away and come back when he had it. Thailand used to be the same a few decades ago but I hear these days they are far more serious and over-stayers are regularly deported.

  112. @Anonymous

    If you want to escape Jewish influence the best place to move to is Malaysia. But if Israel considers you a serious threat, Mossad may send a hit squad to eliminate you even there as they did to a Palestinian professor teaching at a Malaysian university.

  113. Linh Dinh says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Hi,

    I have no idea where I’ll be on those dates, but if I’m in Saigon, then let’s meet for a few Tigers. Just email me at [email protected] when you’re in town.

    As for Israel and Jews, it should be noted that Vietnam was one of the first countries to recognize the State of Palestine, and Yasser Arafat visited Vietnam at least ten times.

    Linh

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  114. Anonymous[548] • Disclaimer says:
    @jeff stryker

    I can’t argue with your post. I am going by the expat blog I had read a couple of years back. Some of the stories, regardless of their credibility, seemed pretty grim. I have no idea why some of the “victims” of scams would go into such harrowing details of their travails. Based on some retirees I have met here, you are right about the age disparities of their spouses or partners, but income wise — by Filipino or any other standard, some retirees, especially retired vets, make a lot of money and live pretty luxurious lifestyles. My neighbor, a retired vet, 89 years old, recently married a Filipina of 36 years old. Interesting story of the Korean caught with blow. All despite Duterte’s ruthless “war on drugs”which by some estimates has claimed between 5,000 – 12,000 lives.

    It took some time for me to realize the extent of corruption here. The more I looked, the more pervasive it appeared. On the subject, recently there was a report of 8 Israelis nabbed for scams worth millions. For some bizarre reason, little else was said about that operation aside from the fact that 7 of the 8 arrested (among over 400 majority being locals) “escaped” to Hong Kong. They must have paid the going rate you mention.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  115. AaronB says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    We’ve reached the end of meaningful historical development within the Western cultural sphere. The generational cycle, to the extent that it ever existed, was a secondary pulse-beat within the great arch of the Faustian civilization. Now that the major life course is waning, its own minor rhythms are growing weaker and more incoherent.

    Brilliant comment.

    Generational theory was able to emerge into consciousness as a possible historiography only as its grip on the spirits of men began to relax. As with every period and era and movement, a sort of philosophical looking backward is symptomatic of the end of the life course

    .

    Another brilliant comment.

    We are currently in the longest and last 3rd Turning. The crisis that succeeds this era will not culminate in any renewal or creative synthesis

    If history is any guide, we are at a point where renewal is not possible – but breakdown and complete reinvention is possible.

    And true religion is always possible at any time.

    • Replies: @buffalo dave
  116. @Anonymous

    548

    …The Israelis paid more than that. Filipino cops are like some local mafia don who hears that a local punk just robbed a bank…they want their taste, so to speak. The Israelis simply handed over the loot and the PNP were done with them. It happens to high-level Korean and Chinese meth cooks too (Or used to happen, I was in Cebu from 2010 to 2013).

    …The Korean was caught with cocaine in 2013 not long before I left Cebu which was before Duterte was president. Supposedly, and this is probably true, a dealer turned him in.

    …The victims of the scams go into tremendous detail about the loss of their life savings to some callow 23 year old because it has ruined their life and they have to tell someone.

    …Remember how CALLOW a 23 year old Filipina girl is. Or most of them. These guys cannot imagine that because it has been so long since they were 23. You’ve got a young girl stuck with some “Viagra Queen” in his sixties and quite a few former paramours telling her “This is the law, you get everything”.

    …The Korean was arrested before Duterte in 2013.

    …One retired vet I knew had a pension of $4,000 a month. I would not say I met anyone close to a millionaire in the Philippines. But $48,000 is a quite a bit of money in the Philippines and this particular guy-an Air Force retiree, was fairly popular with the young ladies.

  117. GMC says:

    I haven’t missed the Lower forty eight or the US/NWO since 1974 – Spasibo

  118. Old Jew says:

    Mr. Linh Dinh,

    All you wrote about Chuck O. makes him more dear to my heart.

    Check his latest posts on unz.com.

    He sounds alive. Not at all discouraged.

    Cheers,
    sf

    • Replies: @ChuckOrloski
  119. Old Jew says:
    @iffen

    There was no reason for Linh being ” a fascist speaking about fascist Jews”

    The Talmud has nothing to say about Vietnam or Vietnamese…

    Who the hell needed that “Rara Avis” a “Vietnamese antiSemite”?

    • Replies: @iffen
    , @eah
  120. @Jim Christian

    It seems half the couples in commercials these days are mixed race or same sex or even both.

    who knows if it’s good or bad?

    • Replies: @Commentator Mike
  121. @AaronB

    “breakdown and complete reinvention”

    look at the metamorphosis of a butterfly – basically the entire caterpillar is turned into soup and a new embryo grows in it. That’s what’s happening to so-called western civilization.

  122. @buffalo dave

    who knows if it’s good or bad?

    I suppose for, some reason, those putting them out think it’s good. I think it’s bad. Can’t you make up your mind about it?

    But do they reflect reality, or is it how they would like reality to be? Someone who knows people working in the advertisement industry should ask them about how and why they choose to place the ads they do.

    Funny enough, in Asia many commercials use Eurasians with white skin and many of the models, even in India, are almost European looking. I found that very strange, as if they were gearing their commercials towards a very small fraction of their population rather than the general public. But then there’d be some adverts for skin whitening products inter-dispersed among all the rest as their concept of beauty generally involves white skin, and I suppose they prefer to use models that conform to their generally accepted concept of what is good looking.

  123. @jeff stryker

    I’ve heard of gypsy clans in the US, known as “Travelers” because they travel in caravans n don’t stay in one place for long. They do ID scams, but you’re right they aren’t known for violence just frauds.

  124. @Feryl

    I very much agree. US society was so much safer before 1965 that if you wanted to know someone’s phone number you just looked up their name in the local phone book, which was provided to every home for free, n you just called them up. If they didn’t answer, their home address was also there n you just went to their home n knocked on their door. Blind fences were a rarity. Milk bottles delivered each day at dawn. Kids walked to school without escort. Divorce was rare n required a lawsuit with a jury to implement. Taxes on the rich were 90%. Violent crime was even more rare than divorce. Nothing antisocial allowed on TV or the movies. Unless you lived close to the border, everyone spoke the same language n had the same values. Everything was designed to foster raising kids, not the selfish happiness of the parents.

    That was civilization. Then the Supreme Court turned activist n we can all see the result.

  125. Anonymous[825] • Disclaimer says:
    @Linh Dinh

    Thanks Linh. I do hope you will be available. Can’t wait for my first Tiger. Will write soon after our arrival. As for Vietnam and Palestine, what you say is not surprising. Nelson Mandela, another leader committed to Justice for Palestinians had to travel overland to Libya to thank Muammar Qaddafi for his material support of the fight against apartheid rule. Libya was a no-fly zone at the time. He made a point to thank Arafat, the anti-apartheid warrior, for the same reason. Mandela’s trip to Cuba to thank Castro for his material support during the liberation struggles did not go well with the Batista crowd in Miami, where I was living at the time. They were livid he made that visit, some echoing Dick Cheney’s remarks of labeling Mandela a “terrorist”.

  126. @Feryl

    I have to go with Intelligent Dasein on this. Having spent a lifetime studying history I’ve traced the rise n fall of many civilizations. Generations don’t have as much impact as the collapse of the civilization’s original values, except that the process today seems accelerated compared to ancient times. We are in something much more sweeping than a generational change, we are in the declining period of Spengler’s Faustian Europe, that is the last 600 years of Western Civilization. It was 500 but Spengler wrote a century ago, so now we are deep in the decline. I call it civilizational exhaustion. The Faustian framework is not just gone, it’s now considered pure evil, n given labels such as colonialist, imperialist, racist, anti-environmental, toxic masculinity, etc. These are all code for Faustian.

    • Agree: AaronB
  127. @dfordoom

    But none of this would have made any difference if the censors had kept the Production Code in place n policed it. It was the fragmentation of society n the resulting impotence of the regulators that allowed this to happen.

    The fragmentation of society (Protestant consumers versus Jewish media magnates) was a direct result of the Cold War as the US abandoned its happy isolation with a cohesive society sharing the same values for a multi-ethnic, multilingual, highly militarized global corporate empire that ignores national boundaries n seeks to transfer hundreds of millions of people between continents without regard for culture, religion, or background.

    1965 was the watershed.

  128. @mcohen

    Sorry, doesn’t ring a bell. I mentally block all things having to do with Boob Dylan.

  129. @Republic

    Not at all neutral! By having the chief “villain” of the book propound the strawman Stoddard, Fitz made the book one of the first examples of PC, which is exactly why it was resurrected n is now required reading in most schools, an excellent propaganda piece for today’s uninformed generation.

    The interwar period was the changeover from when a century of rational scientific investigation of human biological diversity came under attack by Jewish academics n book publishers in the US. By 1945 all such research had been suppressed. Only recently has this kind of research made a comeback tho mostly outside of academia where a near total blacklisting is still in place.

    The Great Gatsby really is not a great book. Like To Kill A Mockingbird, its popularity was a mystery to me until I learned the political background.

  130. @Fuerchtegott

    Almost, but not quite.

    “Alexa: what is the meaning of the word ‘dictionary’?”

    Now we’re making progress!

  131. Feryl says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    The “unraveling” is over. People reported feeling generally confident from 1984-2001 (nobodby seriously opposed neo-liberal capitalism, look at what happened to Russia in the 90’s), while 2002-present, has been marked by both unwelcome surges in neo-liberalism (heavily opposed by a substantial number of people) and certain governments capitalizing on a new nationalist sentiment (primarily Russia and China).

    If you understand the cycle theory, you’d know that America failed the Civil War crisis era; we emerged a weakened and depressed country. When elites in countries like America and England refuse to address globalist excess WRT trade, immigration, and foreign policy, that’s indicative of the growing possibility that the current crisis era will conclude with widespread agreement that institutions failed to restore their credibility.

    The cycles haven’t stopped. Generations aren’t duplicates of each other, and once a society reaches a certain level of sophistication, people tend to get bored with the culture of a particular era, and start pressing for changes. Sure, Silents and Boomers began an all-new culture in the mid-1960’s, but that culture actually died in the mid-80’s (we went from radical “free speech” in the 60’s to corporate approved speech codes written up by hippies turned money hungry yuppies). Society broadly accepted PC globalism from 1984-2001. Then 9/11 happened, Islam became much more threatening to erstwhile “white” countries, Euro globalists/George Soros helped spark the refugee crisis, the opioid crisis is well, a crisis, and so forth. These events have all driven a lot of consternation. But whereas in the 1930’s and 40’s we had populist minded elites in the West, we now have arrogant fools running our countries. Also, both conformists and rebels are in agreement that BAU is now being seriously threatened; the conformists are ratcheting up crack downs on dissent (in “centrist” outlets, it’s now commonly reported that the post-1989 neo-liberal order is facing many challenges, while in the 90’s it was commonly believed that this new order would be permanent), the rebels are increasingly hostile and paranoid.

    This may be due to the unprecedented size and wealth of the Baby Boom generation disrupting the generational rhythm, giving them the ability to prolong their Grey Champion phase far longer than any other Prophet generation could have done.

    Lincoln’s job as Grey Champion was to pick up the pieces of America after it had totally fallen apart, on account of his own generation being a bunch of blowhards incapable of compromise. We’re now seeing a similar situation with most white Western countries, where narcissistic Boomers can’t get along to solve important problems, which is threatening to shatter countries like America and England. The Grey Champion won’t necessarily keep a society together; when crises are handled properly, we fight together. When handled poorly, we fight each other and a Lincoln or a Trump is relegated to desperately trying to keep society functioning at a minimal level when morale and cooperation are at a low point.

  132. eah says:
    @Anonymous

    Your writing evinces curiosity about the average Joe;

    I would say it is more the below average Joe, but perhaps the distinction is not so significant.

  133. @Old Jew

    As Old Jew & I have collided during past U.R. comment exchanges, I am humbled by his following words which suggest the existence of decency & maturity among people who have stark ideological differences:
    “Mr. Linh Dinh,
    All you wrote about Chuck O. makes him more dear to my heart.
    Check his latest posts on unz.com.
    He sounds alive. Not at all discouraged.
    Cheers,”

    Hello, Old Jew!

    At this writing, I am alive, & fyi, am recovering from a morphine (addiction) destroyed marriage, & recent lower back HUGE ruptured disk & pinched nerve surgery.

    Of course flesh & bone, I endure periods of “discouragement” but so far, I do have the mental & inner strength which assists my avoidance of falling into despair, subsequent loss of faith and hope.

    Linh Dinh visited me at my present Lighthouse apartment which is certainly far from fulfillment of a retiree’s “American Dream.” But I cope, and doubtless, my ultimate fate is the same as the that of people who luxuriate at Mar a Lago.

    And yes, a blind, lovesick, & troubled, Carmelite Nun is my landlord now, but for me, such situation could be worse given the existence of Scranton’s governmental / financial collapse & proliferating homeowner outdoor signs, “For Sale,” and sorrowful project housing “Broken Family” apocalypse.

    Am now in a battle to survive & possibly move forward, and as you know O.J., no one gets out of this life of ours “alive.” Nonetheless, I learned that the only battles really worth fighting are the ones you cannot win. This attitude, is at the heart of my tenacity to hold on.

    Thanks very much, and my respect, Mr. Old Jew.

  134. @swamped

    In the USA, people who don’t marry very young, and who DO attend church regularly together, divorce at much lower rates than others, much lower than fifty percent.

    We could strongly educate and encourage our people not to marry very young, and then to practice Christianity and attend church together. Their odds at staying married increase enormously with those to factors in place.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  135. @RadicalCenter

    RADICAL

    Marriages at 20 are a result of lust, those of 30 a result of strategy.

    Another words, people who marry (Always within their social class and education) at 30 have more than sex as a reason for their matrimony. Shared objectives; a desire to split expenses; an acceptalbe partner with whom to have children who is capable of hauling their freight.

    People who marry at 20 are generally poorer and less educated and do so out of love. The love fades. The marriage dissolves. It is inevitable.

    Generally, the former group of people who marry at 30 already went through a long period of promiscuity in college or post-college. That is already out of their system. When you are a businessman married to a female lawyer and both of you are 35 and have two kids you are less likely to want to throw it away with infidelities at low bars.

  136. @Bardon Kaldian

    Many of the people whom linh knows and write about, haven’t just fallen on hard times; they display a level of stupidity, ignorance, and rationalization / excuse making, and sometimes laziness and self-indulgence, that’s cringeworthy.

    Invest even $50 per month instead of drinking it up, over four to five decades, and you’ll at least have SOMETHING meaningful to fall back on besides social security and whining.

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  137. @RadicalCenter

    RADICAL

    I can relate to the lumpen prole female who lived in Japan. For years, she lived a privileged lifestyle in a clean and safe country with a high standard of living.

    Then one day it is all over and at an advanced age she has to return to some lousy neighborhood her looks and charm got her out of.

    When you have traveled the world and lived in other countries, believe me, the Rustbelt is a depressing and cold and godawful place.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  138. iffen says:
    @Old Jew

    Who the hell needed that “Rara Avis” a “Vietnamese antiSemite”?

    Evidently R. Unz has a use for one.

  139. Linh,

    You are very talented writer, I enjoy your work. Sort of. Your work in Vietnam is so much more positive than that of the US.. Evidently you’ve sought out the most depressing, sordid venues you could find and then people them with “charming” losers and expect those of us who know better to accept your judgement. Does the US have problems? Oh, hell yes! But to paint the dismal picture you do without seeing the real US of A and at least giving a closer look at the positives here is, as a writer and commentator of the incredibly complicated culture of this country? Well, sorry but you fail.

    In my 72 years as a citizen, family man, sailor, union member and college student in the crazy ’60s, I have to say you’ve missed the boat. I’ve been to seedier places than you can imagine, but that’s not what the US is about. Sadly, I saw war in your native land. I see the same foolish policies that got us into that disaster still going on today. The biggest problem with the USA is not its ordinary people, like the ones you knew and write about. Come see us in the real USA. I live a stones throw from farmers who feed half the world. My christian church sponsors missionaries across the world.
    Most of the folks in my community volunteer to help those less fortunate in many areas.

    The America I know is full of generous, giving people who would welcome you into their homes and show you that this is not a country of dive bars and unemployed losers. You got it all wrong, Linh.

    Come see me some time and I’ll show you.

    Uncle Bill

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @eah
  140. @jeff stryker

    Yep, you have a point there.

    There are tens of millions of Americans elsewhere living better than the area you describe, though, so we should focus on both the good and the bad when comparing to other countries. (And I’m sure that there are a billion to a billion and a half poor Indians, Africans, Pakistanis, Bangladeshis, etc. who’d still love to move the rust belt, and will if we are suicidal enough to let them.)

    But admittedly, the high levels of long-term unemployment, underemployment, poverty, hard-drug addiction, and suicide are by no means confined to the rust belt or to our deadly and disgusting African cities. And the way our demographics, government debt, and culture are heading — on balance — much of the country outside the coasts will look like today’s rust belt and much worse.

    Time to stop spending trillions on invasions and occupations, and spend some of it here at home to help Americans in hundreds of smaller cities and towns in flyover country.

    Rather than bomb and then rebuild a hospital in Iraq, build a hospital in a poor town in Kentucky that needs it.

    Rather than build a bridge or base in Afghanistan, build or repair roads and bridges in Minnesota and Michigan and Arkansas.

    Rather than brag about building schools in Mosul, fix the school buildings in Mississippi and expand the libraries in Ohio.

    Those things would put regular US Citizens of all backgrounds back to work and not feeling desperate, hopeless, and useless, many of them no longer so prone to drug abuse and other selfdestructive family-destroying behavior. And avoid your comparison becoming appropriate for the whole noncoastal USA.

    • Replies: @Biff
  141. eah says:
    @Uncle Bill

    dive bars and unemployed losers

    See my “below average Joe” comment above — I tend to agree that Linh often appears to be suffering from what I will call ‘extrapolationitis’.

    Perhaps Linh should have bought a decent vehicle and taken an extended road trip on the ‘blue highways’ of America:

    William Least Heat-Moon — Blue Highways

    • Replies: @jeff stryker
  142. eah says:
    @Old Jew

    The Talmud has nothing to say about Vietnam or Vietnamese…

    Look, it isn’t about theoretical Judaism — what’s written in some old book — no one cares about that — it’s about the political behavior of diaspora Jews — noticing or criticizing some of this behavior does not make one a “fascist” or an “antiSemite”.

    Make a note of it.

  143. @eah

    EAH

    There is a reason why urban-born Americans are more likely to be expats than rural or suburban ones-barring the career military hicks in the Philippines who retire there.

    If you grew up in a suburb and you are a white-collar worker then the standard of living in your community is probably fairly high. This is what makes the US unique (And I am from Southeast Michigan) in that you can drive from third or second world cities into nice suburbs in 20 minutes.

    Some guys just want to get laid. If you are 50, fat and were never handsome in America your chances of getting sex are very slim. College meat market bars? You’ll just end up buying drinks. Crack row street prostitutes? This can turn into the hotel scene in SCARFACE fairly quickly when you are in some drug hotel and the junkie’s pimp decides to rob you with your pants down. Craiglist? Half the women on there are police officers. There are legal consequences to this in the US. You’ll never have a relationship with a young woman in the US if you are 50 and divorced.

    Southeast Asia is safer than lower income neighborhoods.

    Your money goes further. You can live in a nice penthouse apartment, eat out everyday and drive a fairly nice car in SEA for $1500 a month. In the US you’ll be in destitute poverty. Many pensioners and disability (Fraud or not) claimers live in Southeast Asia for the currency exchange.

    Most urban whites of the lower middle class grew up in apartments. This does not create as many fond memories as being raised from birth in a nice house in a suburban cul-de-sac.

    Some Americans just cannot stand to be around other poor people i.e. black thugs, Cholos, whiggers, rednecks, single mother sluts, tweakers, hicks, SJW Leftists…whoever. And most of the worst Americans who are capable of really making life miserable for passerby cannot obtain passports and travel freely because they cannot go without drugs for 14 hours on a plane and cannot leave the state due to parole/probation. I’ve never MET a female black Hoodrat overseas. So being an expat is a cut-rate version of the elitist jet set.

    People who have grown up lower middle class or lower class have never developed any real deep attachments to their birthplace. Why would they? Maybe if you are a small town middle class white you cannot bear to miss your high school basketball games. But urban poor have other priorities.

    Overall, urban and educated people are not as patriotic. If the US gets 200% worse, you’ll find that out when the top 20 leave the US in private jets and take their money with them.

    Growing up on the streets of Philly or Chicago will prepare you to adapt easily to life overseas. You’re already street-smart. You know people and how to handle people and are distrustful. These are good qualities to have in a place like Philippines, believe me. Rural and exurban whites tend to feel uncomfortable in new environments and have less ability to make the adjustment. This is why enlisted US military personnel need MP’s overseas and civilian workers/expats who choose to be there do not.

    The white urban underclass or middle-class own little anyhow. So they quit some job and move overseas? What else do they have? A lousy apartment? A few belongings? A suitcase full of clothes?

    I’ve known a few guys who just hated the weather of Buffalo or Chicago but could not afford to live in Florida comfortably. If you can afford to live in a gated subdivision in Philippines, why would you live like a heel in some trailer in Florida?

  144. Biff says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Time to stop spending trillions on invasions and occupations, and spend some of it here at home to help Americans in hundreds of smaller cities and towns in flyover country.

    Rather than bomb and then rebuild a hospital in Iraq, build a hospital in a poor town in Kentucky that needs it.

    Rather than build a bridge or base in Afghanistan, build or repair roads and bridges in Minnesota and Michigan and Arkansas.

    Rather than brag about building schools in Mosul, fix the school buildings in Mississippi and expand the libraries in Ohio.

    Apparently, you don’t understand empire.

  145. anon[370] • Disclaimer says:

    Uncle bill what you are saying is true but you are wasting your time with this author. Bashing Jews gets you noticed these days.Hanging out in seedy places gives him a quick fake skin of the “underbelly writer”. The real deal went to Vietnam to fight a war.He went to work in a plastics factory after doing a “dangerous thing” by tripping on his lip.
    Dangerous pseudo Hemingway stuff.lol.
    Want to read about someone who counted.check this lady out

    Marie colvin
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Colvin

  146. @The Alarmist

    Excellent characterization of today’s poets (of which I am one). I tend to shun narrative, however, and like to highlight sound and rhythm, so perhaps you would approve of my work.

    (I dropped out of the NY poetry scene about 20 years ago, and now live abroad.)

  147. @Feryl

    You write: “Silents like Bob Dylan often admitted to being let-down by the hedonism of Boomers and Gen X-ers (So we create a more “vibrant” culture to enrich life, and all you wanna do is party?)”

    Dylan, by the way, is a notorious lifelong pothead. He is also famous for having introduced the Beatles to pot and LSD.

    Hardly the monk-like individual you are evoking here. And he is, moreover, a classic Boomer.

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