The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 BlogviewJames Petras Archive
Rise and Decline of the Welfare State
Class Struggle and Imperial Wars as the Motor Force of US History
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
shutterstock_237229381

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Introduction

The American welfare state was created in 1935 and continued to develop through 1973. Since then, over a prolonged period, the capitalist class has been steadily dismantling the entire welfare state.

Between the mid 1970’s to the present (2017) labor laws, welfare rights and benefits and the construction of and subsidies for affordable housing have been gutted. ‘Workfare’ (under President ‘Bill’ Clinton) ended welfare for the poor and displaced workers. Meanwhile the shift to regressive taxation and the steadily declining real wages have increased corporate profits to an astronomical degree.

What started as incremental reversals during the 1990’s under Clinton has snowballed over the last two decades decimating welfare legislation and institutions.

The earlier welfare ‘reforms’ and the current anti-welfare legislation and austerity practices have been accompanied by a series of endless imperial wars, especially in the Middle East.

In the 1940’s through the 1960’s, world and regional wars (Korea and Indo-China) were combined with significant welfare program – a form of ‘social imperialism’, which ‘buy off’ the working class while expanding the empire. However, recent decades are characterized by multiple regional wars and the reduction or elimination of welfare programs – and a massive growth in poverty, domestic insecurity and poor health.

New Deals and Big Wars

The 1930’s witnessed the advent of social legislation and action, which laid the foundations of what is called the ‘modern welfare state’.

Labor unions were organized as working class strikes and progressive legislation facilitated trade union organization, elections, collective bargaining rights and a steady increase in union membership. Improved work conditions, rising wages, pension plans and benefits, employer or union-provided health care and protective legislation improved the standard of living for the working class and provided for 2 generations of upward mobility.

Social Security legislation was approved along with workers’ compensation and the forty-hour workweek. Jobs were created through federal programs (WPA, CCC, etc.). Protectionist legislation facilitated the growth of domestic markets for US manufacturers. Workplace shop steward councils organized ‘on the spot’ job action to protect safe working conditions.

World War II led to full employment and increases in union membership, as well as legislation restricting workers’ collective bargaining rights and enforcing wage freezes. Hundreds of thousands of Americans found jobs in the war economy but a huge number were also killed or wounded in the war.

The post-war period witnessed a contradictory process: wages and salaries increased while legislation curtailed union rights via the Taft Hartley Act and the McCarthyist purge of leftwing trade union activists. So-called ‘right to work’ laws effectively outlawed unionization mostly in southern states, which drove industries to relocate to the anti-union states.

Welfare reforms, in the form of the GI bill, provided educational opportunities for working class and rural veterans, while federal-subsidized low interest mortgages encourage home-ownership, especially for veterans.

The New Deal created concrete improvements but did not consolidate labor influence at any level. Capitalists and management still retained control over capital, the workplace and plant location of production.

Trade union officials signed pacts with capital: higher pay for the workers and greater control of the workplace for the bosses. Trade union officials joined management in repressing rank and file movements seeking to control technological changes by reducing hours (“thirty hours work for forty hours pay”). Dissident local unions were seized and gutted by the trade union bosses – sometimes through violence.

Trade union activists, community organizers for rent control and other grassroots movements lost both the capacity and the will to advance toward large-scale structural changes of US capitalism. Living standards improved for a few decades but the capitalist class consolidated strategic control over labor relations. While unionized workers’ incomes, increased, inequalities, especially in the non-union sectors began to grow. With the end of the GI bill, veterans’ access to high-quality subsidized education declined.

While a new wave of social welfare legislation and programs began in the 1960’s and early 1970’s it was no longer a result of a mass trade union or workers’ “class struggle”. Moreover, trade union collaboration with the capitalist regional war policies led to the killing and maiming of hundreds of thousands of workers in two wars – the Korean and Vietnamese wars.

Much of social legislation resulted from the civil and welfare rights movements. While specific programs were helpful, none of them addressed structural racism and poverty.

The Last Wave of Social Welfarism

The 1960’a witnessed the greatest racial war in modern US history: Mass movements in the South and North rocked state and federal governments, while advancing the cause of civil, social and political rights. Millions of black citizens, joined by white activists and, in many cases, led by African American Viet Nam War veterans, confronted the state. At the same time, millions of students and young workers, threatened by military conscription, challenged the military and social order.

Energized by mass movements, a new wave of social welfare legislation was launched by the federal government to pacify mass opposition among blacks, students, community organizers and middle class Americans. Despite this mass popular movement, the union bosses at the AFL-CIO openly supported the war, police repression and the military, or at best, were passive impotent spectators of the drama unfolding in the nation’s streets. Dissident union members and activists were the exception, as many had multiple identities to represent: African American, Hispanic, draft resisters, etc.

Under Presidents Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, Medicare, Medicaid, OSHA, the EPA and multiple poverty programs were implemented. A national health program, expanding Medicare for all Americans, was introduced by President Nixon and sabotaged by the Kennedy Democrats and the AFL-CIO. Overall, social and economic inequalities diminished during this period.

The Vietnam War ended in defeat for the American militarist empire. This coincided with the beginning of the end of social welfare as we knew it – as the bill for militarism placed even greater demands on the public treasury.

With the election of President Carter, social welfare in the US began its long decline. The next series of regional wars were accompanied by even greater attacks on welfare via the “Volker Plan” – freezing workers’ wages as a means to combat inflation.

Guns without butter’ became the legislative policy of the Carter and Reagan Administrations. The welfare programs were based on politically fragile foundations.

The Debacle of Welfarism

ORDER IT NOW

Private sector trade union membership declined from a post-world war peak of 30% falling to 12% in the 1990’s. Today it has sunk to 7%. Capitalists embarked on a massive program of closing thousands of factories in the unionized North which were then relocated to the non-unionized low wage southern states and then overseas to Mexico and Asia. Millions of stable jobs disappeared.

Following the election of ‘Jimmy Carter’, neither Democratic nor Republican Presidents felt any need to support labor organizations. On the contrary, they facilitated contracts dictated by management, which reduced wages, job security, benefits and social welfare.

The anti-labor offensive from the ‘Oval Office’ intensified under President Reagan with his direct intervention firing tens of thousands of striking air controllers and arresting union leaders. Under Presidents Carter, Reagan, George H.W. Bush and William Clinton cost of living adjustments failed to keep up with prices of vital goods and services. Health care inflation was astronomical. Financial deregulation led to the subordination of American industry to finance and the Wall Street banks. De-industrialization, capital flight and massive tax evasion reduced labor’s share of national income.

The capitalist class followed a trajectory of decline, recovery and ascendance. Moreover, during the earlier world depression, at the height of labor mobilization and organization, the capitalist class never faced any significant political threat over its control of the commanding heights of the economy.

The ‘New Deal’ was, at best, a de facto ‘historical compromise’ between the capitalist class and the labor unions, mediated by the Democratic Party elite. It was a temporary pact in which the unions secured legal recognition while the capitalists retained their executive prerogatives.

The Second World War secured the economic recovery for capital and subordinated labor through a federally mandated no strike production agreement. There were a few notable exceptions: The coal miners’ union organized strikes in strategic sectors and some leftist leaders and organizers encouraged slow-downs, work to rule and other in-plant actions when employers ran roughshod with special brutality over the workers. The recovery of capital was the prelude to a post-war offensive against independent labor-based political organizations. The quality of labor organization declined even as the quantity of trade union membership increased.

Labor union officials consolidated internal control in collaboration with the capitalist elite. Capitalist class-labor official collaboration was extended overseas with strategic consequences.

The post-war corporate alliance between the state and capital led to a global offensive – the replacement of European-Japanese colonial control and exploitation by US business and bankers. Imperialism was later ‘re-branded’ as ‘globalization’. It pried open markets, secured cheap docile labor and pillaged resources for US manufacturers and importers.

US labor unions played a major role by sabotaging militant unions abroad in cooperation with the US security apparatus: They worked to coopt and bribe nationalist and leftist labor leaders and supported police-state regime repression and assassination of recalcitrant militants.

Hand in bloody glove’ with the US Empire, the American trade unions planted the seeds of their own destruction at home. The local capitalists in newly emerging independent nations established industries and supply chains in cooperation with US manufacturers. Attracted to these sources of low-wage, violently repressed workers, US capitalists subsequently relocated their factories overseas and turned their backs on labor at home.

Labor union officials had laid the groundwork for the demise of stable jobs and social benefits for American workers. Their collaboration increased the rate of capitalist profit and overall power in the political system. Their complicity in the brutal purges of militants, activists and leftist union members and leaders at home and abroad put an end to labor’s capacity to sustain and expand the welfare state.

Trade unions in the US did not use their collaboration with empire in its bloody regional wars to win social benefits for the rank and file workers. The time of social-imperialism, where workers within the empire benefited from imperialism’s pillage, was over. Gains in social welfare henceforth could result only from mass struggles led by the urban poor, especially Afro-Americans, community-based working poor and militant youth organizers.

The last significant social welfare reforms were implemented in the early 1970’s – coinciding with the end of the Vietnam War (and victory for the Vietnamese people) and ended with the absorption of the urban and anti-war movements into the Democratic Party.

Henceforward the US corporate state advanced through the overseas expansion of the multi-national corporations and via large-scale, non-unionized production at home.

The technological changes of this period did not benefit labor. The belief, common in the 1950’s, that science and technology would increase leisure, decrease work and improve living standards for the working class, was shattered. Instead technological changes displaced well-paid industrial labor while increasing the number of mind-numbing, poorly paid, and politically impotent jobs in the so-called ‘service sector’ – a rapidly growing section of unorganized and vulnerable workers – especially including women and minorities.

Labor union membership declined precipitously. The demise of the USSR and China’s turn to capitalism had a dual effect: It eliminated collectivist (socialist) pressure for social welfare and opened their labor markets with cheap, disciplined workers for foreign manufacturers. Labor as a political force disappeared on every count. The US Federal Reserve and President ‘Bill’ Clinton deregulated financial capital leading to a frenzy of speculation. Congress wrote laws, which permitted overseas tax evasion – especially in Caribbean tax havens. Regional free-trade agreements, like NAFTA, spurred the relocation of jobs abroad. De-industrialization accompanied the decline of wages, living standards and social benefits for millions of American workers.

The New Abolitionists: Trillionaires

The New Deal, the Great Society, trade unions, and the anti-war and urban movements were in retreat and primed for abolition.

Wars without welfare (or guns without butter) replaced earlier ‘social imperialism’ with a huge growth of poverty and homelessness. Domestic labor was now exploited to finance overseas wars not vice versa. The fruits of imperial plunder were not shared.

As the working and middle classes drifted downward, they were used up, abandoned and deceived on all sides – especially by the Democratic Party. They elected militarists and demagogues as their new presidents.

President ‘Bill’ Clinton ravaged Russia, Yugoslavia, Iraq and Somalia and liberated Wall Street. His regime gave birth to the prototype billionaire swindlers: Michael Milken and Bernard ‘Bernie’ Madoff.

Clinton converted welfare into cheap labor ‘workfare’, exploiting the poorest and most vulnerable and condemning the next generations to grinding poverty. Under Clinton the prison population of mostly African Americans expanded and the breakup of families ravaged the urban communities.

Provoked by an act of terrorism (9/11) President G.W. Bush Jr. launched the ‘endless’ wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and deepened the police state (Patriot Act). Wages for American workers and profits for American capitalist moved in opposite directions.

ORDER IT NOW

The Great Financial Crash of 2008-2011 shook the paper economy to its roots and led to the greatest shakedown of any national treasury in history directed by the First Black American President. Trillions of public wealth were funneled into the criminal banks on Wall Street – which were ‘just too big to fail.’ Millions of American workers and homeowners, however, were ‘just too small to matter’.

The Age of Demagogues

President Obama transferred 2 trillion dollars to the ten biggest bankers and swindlers on Wall Street, and another trillion to the Pentagon to pursue the Democrats version of foreign policy: from Bush’s two overseas wars to Obama’s seven.

Obama’s electoral ‘donor-owners’ stashed away two trillion dollars in overseas tax havens and looked forward to global free trade pacts – pushed by the eloquent African American President.

Obama was elected to two terms. His liberal Democratic Party supporters swooned over his peace and justice rhetoric while swallowing his militarist escalation into seven overseas wars as well as the foreclosure of two million American householders. Obama completely failed to honor his campaign promise to reduce wage inequality between black and white wage earners while he continued to moralize to black families about ‘values’.

Obama’s war against Libya led to the killing and displacement of millions of black Libyans and workers from Sub-Saharan Africa. The smiling Nobel Peace Prize President created more desperate refugees than any previous US head of state – including millions of Africans flooding Europe.

Obamacare’, his imitation of an earlier Republican governor’s health plan, was formulated by the private corporate health industry (private insurance, Big Pharma and the for-profit hospitals), to mandate enrollment and ensure triple digit profits with double digit increases in premiums. By the 2016 Presidential elections, ‘Obama-care’ was opposed by a 45%-43% margin of the American people. Obama’s propagandists could not show any improvement of life expectancy or decrease in infant and maternal mortality as a result of his ‘health care reform’. Indeed the opposite occurred among the marginalized working class in the old ‘rust belt’ and in the rural areas. This failure to show any significant health improvement for the masses of Americans is in stark contrast to LBJ’s Medicare program of the 1960’s, which continues to receive massive popular support.

Forty-years of anti welfare legislation and pro-business regimes paved the golden road for the election of Donald Trump

Trump and the Republicans are focusing on the tattered remnants of the social welfare system: Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security. The remains of FDR’s New Deal and LBJ’s Great Society— are on the chopping block.

The moribund (but well-paid) labor leadership has been notable by its absence in the ensuing collapse of the social welfare state. The liberal left Democrats embraced the platitudinous Obama/Clinton team as the ‘Great Society’s’ gravediggers, while wailing at Trump’s allies for shoving the corpse of welfare state into its grave.

Conclusion

Over the past forty years the working class and the rump of what was once referred to as the ‘labor movement’ has contributed to the dismantling of the social welfare state, voting for ‘strike-breaker’ Reagan, ‘workfare’ Clinton, ‘Wall Street crash’ Bush, ‘Wall Street savior’ Obama and ‘Trickle-down’ Trump.

Gone are the days when social welfare and profitable wars raised US living standards and transformed American trade unions into an appendage of the Democratic Party and a handmaiden of Empire. The Democratic Party rescued capitalism from its collapse in the Great Depression, incorporated labor into the war economy and the post- colonial global empire, and resurrected Wall Street from the ‘Great Financial Meltdown’ of the 21st century.

The war economy no longer fuels social welfare. The military-industrial complex has found new partners on Wall Street and among the globalized multi-national corporations. Profits rise while wages fall. Low paying compulsive labor (workfare) lopped off state transfers to the poor. Technology – IT, robotics, artificial intelligence and electronic gadgets – has created the most class polarized social system in history. The first trillionaire and multi-billionaire tax evaders rose on the backs of a miserable standing army of tens of millions of low-wage workers, stripped of rights and representation. State subsidies eliminate virtually all risk to capital. The end of social welfare coerced labor (including young mother with children) to seek insecure low-income employment while slashing education and health – cementing the feet of generations into poverty. Regional wars abroad have depleted the Treasury and robbed the country of productive investment. Economic imperialism exports profits, reversing the historic relation of the past.

Labor is left without compass or direction; it flails in all directions and falls deeper in the web of deception and demagogy. To escape from Reagan and the strike breakers, labor embraced the cheap-labor predator Clinton; black and white workers united to elect Obama who expelled millions of immigrant workers, pursued 7 wars, abandoned black workers and enriched the already filthy rich. Deception and demagogy of the labor-liberals bred the ugly and unlikely plutocrat-populist demagogue: labor voted for Trump.

The demise of welfare and the rise of the opioid epidemic killing close to one million (mostly working class) Americans occurred mostly under Democratic regimes. The collaboration of liberals and unions in promoting endless wars opened the door to Trump’s mirage of a stateless, tax-less, ruling class.

Who will the Democrats choose as their next demagogue champion to challenge the ‘Donald’ – one who will speak to the ‘deplorables’ and work for the trillionaires?

 
• Category: Economics, History • Tags: Capitalism, Neoliberalism, Unions, Workers 
Hide 77 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Issac says:

    “The military-industrial complex has found new partners on Wall Street and among the globalized multi-national corporations.”

    “The collaboration of liberals and unions in promoting endless wars opened the door to Trump’s mirage of a stateless, tax-less, ruling class.”

    A mirage so real, it even has you convinced.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Colleen Pater
    Nice try jewboy
    the unions were sued by jews into destruction by affirmative action the few whites that remain are living on the reduced buying power the alliance between cult marx jews and tech globalist jews. You have played whites against each other using 70s era lib v con arguments but the conservatives are cucked neocon jew running dogs its falling apart as white pride is rising world wide, its unfortunate that many whites will fall for socialism but as long as its racial national socialism at least they will get it half right later we can purge the commies
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that’s one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they’ve been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I’ve been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It’s probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don’t know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, “Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Issac
    If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse.
    , @Realist
    "If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground."

    I fail to see the problem....unless you live in one of the shitholes.
    , @Neuday
    What part of "Gibsmedat" do you not understand?
    , @Wally
    "“Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today."

    Nailed it.

    Add to that:
    'when unwanted low IQ "immigrants" figure out they can simply get generous benefits by crossing the border'.

    , @Grandpa Charlie

    “Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last. -- whyanihere
     
    It's perfectly natural and healthy for the people in any democracy -- especially an electoral democracy -- to vote themselves some portion of the wealth of the nation. Consider, what was the winning slogan of the Republican Party when it started out in 1856?

    "Free labor, free land, free men" -- Republican Party Slogan 1856
     
    That did not mean "free labor" in the Soviet sense of "we pretended to work and they pretended to pay us." No, it meant free labor as in "right to work".

    How long could that last? Well, how long did the GOP's hegemony last after 1856?

    As for our immigration problem, consider this idea from a comment by 'Third world nationalist', #29 at Derb's Time to Stop Importing an Immigrant Overclass

    "I think America should follow China’s system, don’t give citizenship no matter what, not even marriage. But allow foreigners to have residency permits for doing business, work, marriage etc. "-- Third world nationalist
     
    Of course, we would have to clear out the debris and eliminate birthright citizenship at the very first, but everyone knows that has to go. Thereafter, we would find ourselves with a nation once again.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iickNtK5Ivw

    After that, it's simple. Only resident citizens can vote. No dual citizenship -- not even for Ireland. Oh sure, you could keep your Ireland passport, but you couldn't vote for Sinn Fein or even for the Social Democratic and Labour Party ... nor should you, unless you really want to be a full-time resident citizen of Ireland and not of USA.
    , @jacques sheete

    If the welfare state in America was abolished...
     
    If the corporate welfare state were abolished, Amerika wouldn't exist. Hell, North America it's possible would not have been colonized by Europeans!*

    *A bit of hyperbole for emphasis, :)
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, “Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.”
     
    Some French aristocrat put it as, once the gates to the treasury have been breached, they can only be closed again with gunpowder.

    Anyone recognize the author?
    , @bluedog
    Utter nonsense WHEN have the people been able to vote themselves anything,they run down and pull the lever for the candidate of the party they belong to and that is the end of lol people power,as they say money talks and bullshit walks ,and that my friend is the government we live under...
    , @ScarletNumber

    Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury
     
    This was never said by anyone famous, but is true nonetheless.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Issac says:
    @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    "If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse."

    "before total economic collapse"?

    Lack of whites will cause economic collapse.

    , @HallParvey
    In 100 years everybody alive today, with few exceptions, will be dead. Cease to exist. The future will belong to those who show up. These are absolutes.

    Good Day.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Realist says:
    @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    “If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground.”

    I fail to see the problem….unless you live in one of the shitholes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    LOL a million times
    , @RadicalCenter
    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person's mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s---holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don't fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don't want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a "soft landing" for our economy and society, if at all possible. It's in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say "screw it, let it collapse, bring it on" -- especially if you have children. We do.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Ben Frank says:

    You get what you pay for. If you pay people who don’t work, do crimes and develop addictions, then you will have more.

    Worse than that, we are importing millions of new clients for the welfare state.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greg Fraser
    "When you subsidize something, you get more of it" - Ronald Reagan
    , @bluedog
    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars,park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. Alden says:
    @Realist
    "If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground."

    I fail to see the problem....unless you live in one of the shitholes.

    LOL a million times

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Alden says:

    ” black and white workers united to elect Obama who expelled millions of immigrant workers”

    If indeed he did that, good for Obama.

    I wish Petras would mention that most immigrant workers are supported by the welfare their women and children get. Were it not for the immigrant women and children welfare, most of the male immigrant low level workers wouldn’t even have a car to sleep in, let alone a government paid for house or apartment.

    The basic expenses of the hispanic immigrants, housing, food, utility bills pre school and day care school breakfast and lunch and medical care are paid by the state. The minimum wage jobs pay for cars, bus fare, toys, clothes, furniture and massive remittances to their home country. What is it, 20 billion a year sent to Mexico by dishwashers and day laborers? If they had to spend their own money on housing and food, they would not have 20 billion a year to spend to Mexico.

    It’s true that Clinton put a 5 year limit on TANF, the woman and child welfare benefit. But they are all on disability now. Instead of getting about $250 in food stamps and cash per kid every month, they get $600 to $900 depending on the state they are in disability every month.

    All those ads by disability attorneys aren’t just for adults. There is a huge business in certifying children as disabled so the Moms can get that money. And of course the Asian, Persian,
    armenian, Russian, Israeli Drs create disability medical records by the thousands.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Our friends whose kids attend government school ("public school") in the LA area tell us that the taxpayers provide free breakfast and lunch to all the kids.

    No need to request it and verify income -- let alone a need to verify that the parents are in the damn country legally in the first place. Is there a damn minute of the Mexicans' life that we DON'T pay for?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. @Realist
    "If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground."

    I fail to see the problem....unless you live in one of the shitholes.

    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person’s mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s—holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don’t want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a “soft landing” for our economy and society, if at all possible. It’s in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say “screw it, let it collapse, bring it on” — especially if you have children. We do.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist
    "Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event?"

    Die

    "They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. "

    The dumb bastards would be lost...while the locals know where they are and know how to hit a target. Being armed means nothing if you can't shoot straight.
    , @Jim
    I don't know about California but the scenario you talk about won't happen in Texas. The mobs you talk about require purposeful leadership and organization which will not exist. Some years ago in Waco a motor-bike gang had a little run with the McLennan County Sheriff's Department. The motor-bike gang lost. A battle between the McLennan County Sheriff's Department and the mobs you talk about would be a massacre of the mob. And there's nothing that special in Texas about McLennan County.
    , @Anonymous
    I would love to see some of you transgenered pan- whatever snowakes get a dose of some real world problems.

    Trying any of that shit here without the fed to protect you will get you the 3s treatment.
    , @Delinquent Snail
    This right here. Few people think about the week after the cities burn.
    There will be survivors, and they will fully adopt the "African warlord" mentality and push into the suburbs. And they will have an army, no small town police force or impromptu militia will hold them back. They will be drugged up, and willing to die for their warlord and more then willing to kill, rape and steal whatever they want, from whoever they want.

    This country will BURN. It will BLEED.

    It will cease to exist a month after the cities burn. There might be a few pockets of resistance, but those few survivors wont be the rule, only the exception.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. @Alden
    " black and white workers united to elect Obama who expelled millions of immigrant workers"


    If indeed he did that, good for Obama.

    I wish Petras would mention that most immigrant workers are supported by the welfare their women and children get. Were it not for the immigrant women and children welfare, most of the male immigrant low level workers wouldn't even have a car to sleep in, let alone a government paid for house or apartment.

    The basic expenses of the hispanic immigrants, housing, food, utility bills pre school and day care school breakfast and lunch and medical care are paid by the state. The minimum wage jobs pay for cars, bus fare, toys, clothes, furniture and massive remittances to their home country. What is it, 20 billion a year sent to Mexico by dishwashers and day laborers? If they had to spend their own money on housing and food, they would not have 20 billion a year to spend to Mexico.

    It's true that Clinton put a 5 year limit on TANF, the woman and child welfare benefit. But they are all on disability now. Instead of getting about $250 in food stamps and cash per kid every month, they get $600 to $900 depending on the state they are in disability every month.

    All those ads by disability attorneys aren't just for adults. There is a huge business in certifying children as disabled so the Moms can get that money. And of course the Asian, Persian,
    armenian, Russian, Israeli Drs create disability medical records by the thousands.

    Our friends whose kids attend government school (“public school”) in the LA area tell us that the taxpayers provide free breakfast and lunch to all the kids.

    No need to request it and verify income — let alone a need to verify that the parents are in the damn country legally in the first place. Is there a damn minute of the Mexicans’ life that we DON’T pay for?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    "Education" is just another form of welfare for blacks & browns, legal and otherwise.

    Free healthcare, free food, free clothing, free transportation, free baby sitting before & after school, & much more.

    Black & brown violence is rampant and goes largely unpunished.

    Intelligent white students are held back by the dumbing down of classes for low IQ blacks & browns.

    Black & brown adults are disproportionately hired for do-nothing, high paying, corrupt, union 'education' jobs.

    And this is what we get:
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/11/walter-e-williams/black-self-sabotage-2/
    "In 2016, in 13 of Baltimore’s 39 high schools, not a single student scored proficient on the state’s mathematics exam. In six other high schools, only 1 percent tested proficient in math. In raw numbers, 3,804 Baltimore students took the state’s math test, and 14 tested proficient (http://tinyurl.com/y7f56kg2). Citywide, only 15 percent of Baltimore students passed the state’s English test.
    Of the nation’s 100 largest school systems, Baltimore schools rank third in spending per pupil."
    and:
    "Baltimore’s black students receive diplomas that attest that they can function at a 12th-grade level when in fact they may not be able to do so at a seventh- or eighth-grade level. These students and their families have little reason to suspect that their diplomas are fraudulent. Thus, if they cannot land a good job, cannot pass a civil service exam, get poor grades in college and flunk out of college, they will attribute their plight to racism. After all, they have a high school diploma, just as a white person has a high school diploma. In their minds, the only explanation for being treated differently is racism."

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Realist says:
    @RadicalCenter
    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person's mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s---holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don't fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don't want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a "soft landing" for our economy and society, if at all possible. It's in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say "screw it, let it collapse, bring it on" -- especially if you have children. We do.

    “Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event?”

    Die

    “They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. ”

    The dumb bastards would be lost…while the locals know where they are and know how to hit a target. Being armed means nothing if you can’t shoot straight.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    “They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. ”

    I doubt they will be doing too much, I understand drug withdrawals are a bitch.
    , @Logan
    For an interesting projection of what might happen in total civilizational collapse, I recommend the Dies the Fire series of novels by SM Stirling.

    It has a science-fictiony setup in that all high-energy system (gunpowder, electricity, explosives, internal combustion, even high-energy steam engines) suddenly stop working. But I think it does a good job of extrapolating what would happen if suddenly the cities did not have food, water, power, etc.

    Spoiler alert: It ain't pretty. Those who dream of a world without guns have not really thought it through.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. Jim says:
    @RadicalCenter
    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person's mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s---holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don't fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don't want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a "soft landing" for our economy and society, if at all possible. It's in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say "screw it, let it collapse, bring it on" -- especially if you have children. We do.

    I don’t know about California but the scenario you talk about won’t happen in Texas. The mobs you talk about require purposeful leadership and organization which will not exist. Some years ago in Waco a motor-bike gang had a little run with the McLennan County Sheriff’s Department. The motor-bike gang lost. A battle between the McLennan County Sheriff’s Department and the mobs you talk about would be a massacre of the mob. And there’s nothing that special in Texas about McLennan County.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Sure, the State of Texas can bring enough LEOs to bear on ONE biker gang shoot out. Thirty at roughly the same might be a little different.

    You must be too young to remember the urban riots of the 1960s. There were relatively few firearms in the hands of the Simians, but they still managed to burn down, trash and loot an ass load of wealth.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. What’s with all the “quotes”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    The misuse of 'single' as opposed to "double" also sticks out. While we're at it, the italics seem needless, too.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Neuday says:
    @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    What part of “Gibsmedat” do you not understand?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @RadicalCenter
    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person's mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s---holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don't fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don't want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a "soft landing" for our economy and society, if at all possible. It's in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say "screw it, let it collapse, bring it on" -- especially if you have children. We do.

    I would love to see some of you transgenered pan- whatever snowakes get a dose of some real world problems.

    Trying any of that shit here without the fed to protect you will get you the 3s treatment.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. While I agree with Petras’s intent (notwithstanding several exaggerations and unnecessary conflations with, for example, racism), I don’t agree so much with the method he proposes. I don’t mind welfare and unions to a certain extent, but they are not going to save us unless there is full employment and large corporations that can afford to pay an all-union workforce. That happened during WW2, as only wartime demand and those pesky wage freezes solved the Depression, regardless of all the public works programs; while the postwar era benefited from the US becoming the world’s creditor, meaning that capital could expand while labor participation did as well. From then on, it is quite hard to achieve the same success after outsourcing and mechanization have happened all over the world. Both of these phenomena not only create displaced workers, but also displaced industries, meaning that it makes more sense to develop individual workfare (and even then, do it well, not the shoddy way it is done now) rather than giving away checks that probably will not be cashed for entrepreneurial purposes, and rather than giving away money to corrupt unions who depend on trusts to be able to pay for their benefits, while raising the cost of hiring that only encourages more outsourcing. The amount of welfare given is not necessarily the main problem, the problem is doing it right for the people who truly need it, and efficiently – that is, with the least amount of waste lost between the chain of distribution, which should reach intended targets and not moochers. Which inevitably means a sound tax system that targets unearned wealth and (to a lesser degree) foreign competition instead of national production, coupled with strict, yet devolved and simple government processes that benefit both business and individuals tired of bureaucracy, while keeping budgets balanced. Best of both worlds, and no military-industrial complex needed to drive up demand.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  16. Wally says: • Website

    “President Obama transferred 2 trillion dollars to the ten biggest bankers and swindlers on Wall Street … ”

    That’s twice the amount that Bush gave them.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  17. Wally says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Our friends whose kids attend government school ("public school") in the LA area tell us that the taxpayers provide free breakfast and lunch to all the kids.

    No need to request it and verify income -- let alone a need to verify that the parents are in the damn country legally in the first place. Is there a damn minute of the Mexicans' life that we DON'T pay for?

    “Education” is just another form of welfare for blacks & browns, legal and otherwise.

    Free healthcare, free food, free clothing, free transportation, free baby sitting before & after school, & much more.

    Black & brown violence is rampant and goes largely unpunished.

    Intelligent white students are held back by the dumbing down of classes for low IQ blacks & browns.

    Black & brown adults are disproportionately hired for do-nothing, high paying, corrupt, union ‘education’ jobs.

    And this is what we get:

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/11/walter-e-williams/black-self-sabotage-2/

    “In 2016, in 13 of Baltimore’s 39 high schools, not a single student scored proficient on the state’s mathematics exam. In six other high schools, only 1 percent tested proficient in math. In raw numbers, 3,804 Baltimore students took the state’s math test, and 14 tested proficient (http://tinyurl.com/y7f56kg2). Citywide, only 15 percent of Baltimore students passed the state’s English test.
    Of the nation’s 100 largest school systems, Baltimore schools rank third in spending per pupil.”
    and:
    “Baltimore’s black students receive diplomas that attest that they can function at a 12th-grade level when in fact they may not be able to do so at a seventh- or eighth-grade level. These students and their families have little reason to suspect that their diplomas are fraudulent. Thus, if they cannot land a good job, cannot pass a civil service exam, get poor grades in college and flunk out of college, they will attribute their plight to racism. After all, they have a high school diploma, just as a white person has a high school diploma. In their minds, the only explanation for being treated differently is racism.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. Wally says:
    @Realist
    "Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event?"

    Die

    "They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. "

    The dumb bastards would be lost...while the locals know where they are and know how to hit a target. Being armed means nothing if you can't shoot straight.

    “They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. ”

    I doubt they will be doing too much, I understand drug withdrawals are a bitch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Delinquent Snail
    Thing is, they wouldnt go thru withdrawals. The cities hold police evidence lockers, and pharmaceutical warehouses, plus you dont think the CIA or a mexican gang will see this opportunity to import even more drugs?

    It will be bad for every one. Not just city folk and the surrounding towns.

    We have an impressive freeway system in this country that goes nearly everywhere. Once a few powerful players took charge (or were given power by the cia or whatever clandestine power players that still make the marionettes dance), they would take huge swaths of land and there would be little to stop them. The US military would dissolve, and the few remaining loyalists would be set up on guard duty to protect rich people and a few military installations. The common people will be fucked.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Wally says: • Website
    @Issac
    If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse.

    “If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse.”

    before total economic collapse”?

    Lack of whites will cause economic collapse.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Wally says:
    @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    ““Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today.”

    Nailed it.

    Add to that:
    ‘when unwanted low IQ “immigrants” figure out they can simply get generous benefits by crossing the border’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @animalogic
    ““Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today.”
    Quite right: the 0.01% have worked it out & US democracy is a Theatre for the masses.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    “Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last. — whyanihere

    It’s perfectly natural and healthy for the people in any democracy — especially an electoral democracy — to vote themselves some portion of the wealth of the nation. Consider, what was the winning slogan of the Republican Party when it started out in 1856?

    “Free labor, free land, free men” — Republican Party Slogan 1856

    That did not mean “free labor” in the Soviet sense of “we pretended to work and they pretended to pay us.” No, it meant free labor as in “right to work”.

    How long could that last? Well, how long did the GOP’s hegemony last after 1856?

    As for our immigration problem, consider this idea from a comment by ‘Third world nationalist’, #29 at Derb’s Time to Stop Importing an Immigrant Overclass

    “I think America should follow China’s system, don’t give citizenship no matter what, not even marriage. But allow foreigners to have residency permits for doing business, work, marriage etc. “– Third world nationalist

    Of course, we would have to clear out the debris and eliminate birthright citizenship at the very first, but everyone knows that has to go. Thereafter, we would find ourselves with a nation once again.

    After that, it’s simple. Only resident citizens can vote. No dual citizenship — not even for Ireland. Oh sure, you could keep your Ireland passport, but you couldn’t vote for Sinn Fein or even for the Social Democratic and Labour Party … nor should you, unless you really want to be a full-time resident citizen of Ireland and not of USA.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    If the welfare state in America was abolished…

    If the corporate welfare state were abolished, Amerika wouldn’t exist. Hell, North America it’s possible would not have been colonized by Europeans!*

    *A bit of hyperbole for emphasis, :)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. The American welfare state was created in 1935 and continued to develop through 1973. Since then, over a prolonged period, the capitalist class has been steadily dismantling the entire welfare state.

    Wrong wrong wrong.

    Corporations are welfare recipients and the bigger they are, the more handouts they suck up, and welfare for them started before 1935. In fact, it started in America before there was a USA. I do not have time to elaborate, but what were the various companies such as the British East India Company and the Dutch West India Companies but state pampered, welfare based entities? ~200 years ago, Herbert Spencer, if memory serves, pointed out that the British East India Company couldn’t make a profit even with all the special, government granted favors showered upon it.

    Corporations not only continuously seek monopolies (with the aid and sanction of the state) but they steadily fine tune the welfare state for their benefit. In fact, in reality, welfare for prols and peasants wouldn’t exist if it didn’t act as a money conduit and ultimate profit center for the big money grubbers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  24. Well, the author kind of nails it.
    I remember from my childhood in the 50- 60 ties in Scandinavia that the US was the ultimate goal in welfare. The country where you could make a good living with your two hands, get you kids to UNI, have a house, a telly ECT. It was not consumerism, it was the American dream, a chicken in every pot; we chewed imported American gum and dreamed.
    In the 70-80 ties Scandinavia had a tremendous social and economic growth, EQUALLY distributed, an immense leap forward. In the middle of the 80 ties we were equal to the US in standards of living.
    Since we have not looked at the US, unless in pity, as we have seen the decline of the general income, social wealth fall way behind our own.
    The average US workers income has not increased since 90 figures adjusted for inflation. The Scandinavian workers income in the same period has almost quadrupled. And so has our societies.
    The article is dismal reading, and evidence of the failings of the “unregulated” society, where the anything goes as long as you are wealthy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pandos
    You don't have blacks. Easy peasy
    , @Ace
    The one thing Sweden forgot to regulate - prohibit, really - was Muslim and African invaders. You gave away your country - soul, really - and now you're toast. You persecute people who call for an end to immigration and a reversal.

    But, God bless you, you're socialist. Good job!

    How do you say "cucks" in Nordic?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @Ben Frank
    You get what you pay for. If you pay people who don't work, do crimes and develop addictions, then you will have more.

    Worse than that, we are importing millions of new clients for the welfare state.

    “When you subsidize something, you get more of it” – Ronald Reagan

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Like the Pentagon. Americans still don't readily call this welfare, but they will eventually. Defense profiteers are unions in a sense, you're either in their club Or you're in the service industry that surrounds it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Stephen Marle Ii
    What's with all the "quotes"?

    The misuse of ‘single’ as opposed to “double” also sticks out. While we’re at it, the italics seem needless, too.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. wayfarer says:

    Between the mid 1970’s to the present (2017) labor laws, welfare rights and benefits and the construction of and subsidies for affordable housing have been gutted. ‘Workfare’ (under President ‘Bill’ Clinton) ended welfare for the poor and displaced workers. Meanwhile the shift to regressive taxation and the steadily declining real wages have increased corporate profits to an astronomical degree.

    source: http://www.unz.com/jpetras/rise-and-decline-of-the-welfare-state/

    What does Hollywood “elite” JAP and wannabe hack-stand-up-comic Sarah Silverman think about the class struggle and problems facing destitute Americans?

    “Qu’ils mangent de la bagels!”,
    source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Let_them_eat_cake

    “Nationalism is innately terrifying for Jews – flags, marching, blind allegiance. Think about it, these things tend to ring a bell for Jews!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. BigAl says:

    The 1970’s was in many ways the watershed decade for the radical transformation of the American economy and society, even more than the 1960’s (I lived through both as a young man). I have yet to read the definitive social-critical analysis of these years to explain the changes that, looking back, seem to have taken the country of my childhood right out from under me, gone forever, increasingly difficult to remember through the fog of nostalgia that tends to distort as much as to reveal.

    Some of the things I do remember about this time include the PATCO (air traffic controllers) strike, very well. What is often not mentioned is that PATCO was attempting to do something that had not been permitted under federal civil service law, that is, bargain for wages as well as working conditions. Wage bargaining, PATCO correctly assessed, was the issue that made or broke unions and had enabled state and local public employees to finally begin to earn a decent, living wage beginning in the 1960’s (think the iconic Mike Quill and the NYC TWU). Reagan correctly (from his point of view) saw that to fail to break PATCO on this issue was to open the floodgates and turn the U.S. civil services into something akin to its European counterpart, with the possibility of general strikes and the rest. And of course to encourage private sector unions in their drive to organize and to change federal and state labor laws to strengthen the right to picket strike and organize.

    What I also remember well however, is how little support PATCO was able to garnish from other unionized workers (and in many cases from union leadership as well). It seemed to me at the time that some of the strongest hostility came from rank and file of trade and utilities unions. Of course Reagan, following the Nixon playbook, shrewdly played the patriot-nationalist card, painting PATCO as a threat to national security as well as composed of a bunch of ingrates who should have been happy to have jobs. But by then the segmentation of the American workforce, a tactic that played right into the hands of the corporate-capitalist class was in full swing. The American worker lucky enough to possess a decent paying skilled or semi-skilled union job was being taught to see their situation as morally “deserved” and to see newer aspirants to similar positions, whether recently arrived immigrants or members of racial-ethnic groups previously suppressed by law, custom and prejudice as threats/dangers/enemies of their own recently won status.

    I recall too that it was in the 1970’s that the threat of “relocation”, at that time mainly from the more heavily unionized north and northeastern states to the union-hostile south began to play a major role in the destruction of the power of labor. This was the beginning of the “globalization” factor and of the off-shoring of manufacturing jobs that has been commented on extensively and that took off a decade or so later. What is often not recalled is that unions and other pro-labor groups attempted to lobby Congress to amend the NLRA (National Labor Relations Act) and to appoint labor-friendly members to the NLRB to ensure that plant relocation would be a mandatory subject of bargaining and thus prevent unilateral (by capital ownership) relocation or the threat of relocation as a means to destroy the power of labor. They were, of course, not successful, and factories and business continued to move away from traditional centers of labor power and worker-protections, first to so-called “right-to-work” states and eventually to Asia.

    And I remember the beginning of the financialization of the American corporation that I experienced on a “micro” scale, a kid lucky enough to have a summer job while in university at a large resource-extraction corporation’s HQ in NYC. I recall white-collar conversations about compensation and about how salaries had steadily risen over the past decade (the company was said to be doing “really well”). And I remember how towards the end of my summer stints more and more conversation was about stock prices and Wall Street favor and about the new executive managerial style brought in by “those young MBA”s”, and about (for the first time) worries of a “take-over” by “outsiders” (the company, although public, had had family leadership for many years).

    And most of all I remember how gradually the material-economic components to the identity of the blue-collar and middle class worker were written out of existence. The great narrative, the myth that explains to us what it means to be “an American,” no longer included any hint of class solidarity, of the kind of work we did, the pay we earned, the common living conditions in the small towns and urban neighborhoods and “cookie-cutter” suburbs of America. Formerly the struggle of economic and material improvement was seen by most ordinary Americas as a struggle for certain necessary conditions to maintain, strengthen, and perpetuate a way-of-life in which the common core assumptions about the “good life” remained basically stable and unchallenged: family, stable job, residential security, public schools, public places — neighborhood bars, coffee shops, civic clubs, parks and playgrounds — where people could meet and interact as social equals.

    The financialization of the economy, indeed of social life itself to a great extent, meant the drive for the maximization of private profit and the pursuit of interests and ‘efficiencies” conceived entirely apart from any impact of the common good of society as a whole, and should have been seen as a grave threat to the very conditions of material and economic security, only recently achieved, that were the foundation of these other civic and social institutions. Instead, through a grand and diabolical deceit cynically promulgated by a mostly Republican capitalist class of privilege, but also aided and abetted by a “new Left” that increasingly postured itself as the enemy of this older and more traditional way of life, the enemy was reconceived as the new “elites”, the young, urban, hipster “Leftist” who despised the old ways and represented a singular assault on everything good about America. Meanwhile, steadily, relentlessly, the material conditions and hard-won economic improvements that had gradually made small town, urban-neighborhood, and inner-suburban life decent and livable were being destroyed by a class that paid lip-service to Capra’s Bedford Falls while at the same time endlessly working to transform it into Pottersville.

    Read More
    • Replies: @peterAUS
    Good post.

    But, still, no hint of a solution, unfortunately.
    , @Astuteobservor II
    the financial crisis in the 1970s got over 1000+ bankers into jail. that was like a warning bell for them. so they change the govt or bought them you might say. 2007/8 crisis = zero bankers were jailed.

    change complete. welcome to the brave new world.

    @article: UBI is going to be a thing, it will have to as automation will kill most jobs.

    if you have a kid in college, make sure s/he is studying a major that has to do with AI and automation. earns a butt load and probably the last ones to be automated.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. It sounds overwrought, except that it really isn’t.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Greg Fraser
    "When you subsidize something, you get more of it" - Ronald Reagan

    Like the Pentagon. Americans still don’t readily call this welfare, but they will eventually. Defense profiteers are unions in a sense, you’re either in their club Or you’re in the service industry that surrounds it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete


    “When you subsidize something, you get more of it” – Ronald Reagan
     
    Like the Pentagon.
     
    And big business. Especially the really big ones.

    Medicare, for instance, was really all about subsidizing the insurance industry.

    Same with the pharmaceutical industry. How many mom and pop pharmacies are left?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. TheOldOne says:

    Note to self–add Petras to list of those NOT worth reading.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    Note to self–add Petras to list of those NOT worth reading.
     
    He's certainly all over the place with this one.

    I about gagged with his virtual hagiography of "the" (there were many variations of it since none of their meddling seemed to work until war got instigated) New Deal, but he did rescue himself a few paragraphs later.

    Over the past forty years the working class and the rump of what was once referred to as the ‘labor movement’ has contributed to the dismantling of the social welfare state...
     
    What folks don't seem to realize is that any social welfare state that was increased during the Depression was not about helping Joe Six Pack but was part of the conspiracy to consolidate big business and to impose big government on us in a final blow. And it worked.

    Now that the unions have outlived their usefulness, they've been tossed under the bus, and the social welfare state's been dismantled...

    It's no wonder that FDR supported Stalin and his slave labor camps in his "worker's paradise." In both cases the ultimate goal was the same; only the methods differed.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    As other commenters have pointed out, it’s Petras curious choice of words that sometimes don’t make too much sense. We can probably blame the maleable English language for that, but here it’s too obvious. If you don’t define a union, people might assume you’re only talking about a bunch of meat cutters at Safeway.

    The welfare state is alive and well for corporate America. Unions are still here – but they are defined by access and secrecy, you’re either in the club or not.

    The war on unions was successful first by co-option but mostly by the media. But what kind of analysis leaves out the role of the media in the American transformation? The success is mind blowing.

    America has barely literate (white) middle aged males trained to spout incoherent Calvinistic weirdness: unabased hatred for the poor (or whoever they’re told to hate) and a glorification of hedge fund managers as they get laid off, fired and foreclosed on, with a side of opiates.

    There is hardly anything more tragic then seeing a web filled with progressives (management consultants) dedicated to disempowering, disabling and deligitimizing victims by claiming they are victims of biology, disease or a lack of an education rather than a system that issues violence while portending (with the best media money can buy) that they claim the higher ground.

    Read More
    • Replies: @HallParvey

    The welfare state is alive and well for corporate America. Unions are still here – but they are defined by access and secrecy, you’re either in the club or not.
     
    They are largely defined as Doctors, Lawyers, and University Professors who teach the first two. Of course they are not called unions. Access is via credentialing and licensing.

    Good Day

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. @Wally
    "“Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today."

    Nailed it.

    Add to that:
    'when unwanted low IQ "immigrants" figure out they can simply get generous benefits by crossing the border'.

    ““Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.” We are definitely in this situation today.”
    Quite right: the 0.01% have worked it out & US democracy is a Theatre for the masses.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. @Issac
    "The military-industrial complex has found new partners on Wall Street and among the globalized multi-national corporations."

    "The collaboration of liberals and unions in promoting endless wars opened the door to Trump’s mirage of a stateless, tax-less, ruling class."

    A mirage so real, it even has you convinced.

    Nice try jewboy
    the unions were sued by jews into destruction by affirmative action the few whites that remain are living on the reduced buying power the alliance between cult marx jews and tech globalist jews. You have played whites against each other using 70s era lib v con arguments but the conservatives are cucked neocon jew running dogs its falling apart as white pride is rising world wide, its unfortunate that many whites will fall for socialism but as long as its racial national socialism at least they will get it half right later we can purge the commies

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. They elected militarists and demagogues as their new presidents.

    Wilson and FDR were much more militarist and demagogic than those that followed.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  36. @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    I don’t know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, “Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury.”

    Some French aristocrat put it as, once the gates to the treasury have been breached, they can only be closed again with gunpowder.

    Anyone recognize the author?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Pandos says:
    @Den Lille Abe
    Well, the author kind of nails it.
    I remember from my childhood in the 50- 60 ties in Scandinavia that the US was the ultimate goal in welfare. The country where you could make a good living with your two hands, get you kids to UNI, have a house, a telly ECT. It was not consumerism, it was the American dream, a chicken in every pot; we chewed imported American gum and dreamed.
    In the 70-80 ties Scandinavia had a tremendous social and economic growth, EQUALLY distributed, an immense leap forward. In the middle of the 80 ties we were equal to the US in standards of living.
    Since we have not looked at the US, unless in pity, as we have seen the decline of the general income, social wealth fall way behind our own.
    The average US workers income has not increased since 90 figures adjusted for inflation. The Scandinavian workers income in the same period has almost quadrupled. And so has our societies.
    The article is dismal reading, and evidence of the failings of the "unregulated" society, where the anything goes as long as you are wealthy.

    You don’t have blacks. Easy peasy

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wally
    Well they have them now, and a lot of low IQ browns.

    Things are not going so well in the Scandinavian Socialist Paradise.

    And it's just the beginning.

    , @Logan
    1
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. This essay is a fantastic example of far-left agit-prop (agitation propaganda). This is the stuff Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren & Barack Obama would recite with a similar effect as throwing red meat at lions.

    What a load of Bull****!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Bernie Sanders, speaking on behalf of the MIC's welfare bird: "It is the airplane of the United States Air Force, Navy, and of NATO."

    Elizabeth Warren, referring to Mossad's Estes Rockets: "The Israeli military has the right to attack Palestinian hospitals and schools in self defense"

    Barack Obama, yukking it up with pop stars: "Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming."

    It's not the agitprop that confuses the sheep, it's whose blowhole it's coming out of (labled D or R for convenience) that gets them to bare their teeth and speak of poo.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. @Issac
    If South Africa or Zimbabwe are any indicator, the vast majority of the white American population will be displaced or dead before total economic collapse.

    In 100 years everybody alive today, with few exceptions, will be dead. Cease to exist. The future will belong to those who show up. These are absolutes.

    Good Day.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. phil says:

    The author doesn’t get it. What we have now IS the welfare state in an intensely diverse society. We have more transfer spending than ever before and Obamacare represents another huge entitlement.

    Intellectuals continue to fantasize about the US becoming a Big Sweden, but Sweden has only been successful insofar as it has been a modest nation-state populated by ethnic Swedes. Intense diversity in a huge country with only the remnants of federalism results in massive non-consensual decision-making, fragmentation, increased inequality, and corruption.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stripes Duncan
    It's fascinating watching sharp minds reduced to goo as they try to square the circle that is socialism. I'm a dope who does manual labor and I run circles around people with advanced degrees in these kinds of discussions, not because I'm smarter, but because my thought process isn't penned in by taboos.

    For most people these are matters of faith, not logic.
    , @Logan
    It has been pointed out repeatedly that Sweden does very well relative to the USA. It has also been noted that people of Swedish ancestry in the USA do pretty well also. In fact considerably better than Swedes in Sweden.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. @Anonymous
    As other commenters have pointed out, it's Petras curious choice of words that sometimes don't make too much sense. We can probably blame the maleable English language for that, but here it's too obvious. If you don't define a union, people might assume you're only talking about a bunch of meat cutters at Safeway.

    The welfare state is alive and well for corporate America. Unions are still here - but they are defined by access and secrecy, you're either in the club or not.

    The war on unions was successful first by co-option but mostly by the media. But what kind of analysis leaves out the role of the media in the American transformation? The success is mind blowing.

    America has barely literate (white) middle aged males trained to spout incoherent Calvinistic weirdness: unabased hatred for the poor (or whoever they're told to hate) and a glorification of hedge fund managers as they get laid off, fired and foreclosed on, with a side of opiates.

    There is hardly anything more tragic then seeing a web filled with progressives (management consultants) dedicated to disempowering, disabling and deligitimizing victims by claiming they are victims of biology, disease or a lack of an education rather than a system that issues violence while portending (with the best media money can buy) that they claim the higher ground.

    The welfare state is alive and well for corporate America. Unions are still here – but they are defined by access and secrecy, you’re either in the club or not.

    They are largely defined as Doctors, Lawyers, and University Professors who teach the first two. Of course they are not called unions. Access is via credentialing and licensing.

    Good Day

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What came first, the credentialing or the idea that it is a necessary part of education? It certainly isn't an accurate indication of what people know or their general intelligence - although that myth has flourished. Good afternoon.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  42. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Linda Green
    This essay is a fantastic example of far-left agit-prop (agitation propaganda). This is the stuff Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren & Barack Obama would recite with a similar effect as throwing red meat at lions.

    What a load of Bull****!

    Bernie Sanders, speaking on behalf of the MIC’s welfare bird: “It is the airplane of the United States Air Force, Navy, and of NATO.”

    Elizabeth Warren, referring to Mossad’s Estes Rockets: “The Israeli military has the right to attack Palestinian hospitals and schools in self defense”

    Barack Obama, yukking it up with pop stars: “Two words for you: predator drones. You will never see it coming.”

    It’s not the agitprop that confuses the sheep, it’s whose blowhole it’s coming out of (labled D or R for convenience) that gets them to bare their teeth and speak of poo.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Wally says:
    @Pandos
    You don't have blacks. Easy peasy

    Well they have them now, and a lot of low IQ browns.

    Things are not going so well in the Scandinavian Socialist Paradise.

    And it’s just the beginning.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @HallParvey

    The welfare state is alive and well for corporate America. Unions are still here – but they are defined by access and secrecy, you’re either in the club or not.
     
    They are largely defined as Doctors, Lawyers, and University Professors who teach the first two. Of course they are not called unions. Access is via credentialing and licensing.

    Good Day

    What came first, the credentialing or the idea that it is a necessary part of education? It certainly isn’t an accurate indication of what people know or their general intelligence – although that myth has flourished. Good afternoon.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. increasing the number of mind-numbing, poorly paid, and politically impotent jobs in the so-called ‘service sector’ – a rapidly growing section of unorganized and vulnerable workers – especially including women and minorities.

    Vulnerable workers-women and minorities. Right. Women and minorities run, rule, even terrorize the joint, Coast to Coast. Interesting bit of virtue signaling to “vulnerable women and minorities”. Petras must not spend much time around the American Popsicle stand. Or read a paper. Or Unz. Women and minorities along with their Jewish partners have rendered us poor Whites to lower-caste. Soon, they won’t have Dick Nixon to kick around anymore.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  46. The arguments of the most educated, credentialed, and eloquent socialist will always boil down to “not enough money/not been properly tried yet” because their ideology is a lake of bullshit a mile wide but only an inch deep. There’s just not really that much to it.

    There’s only so many ways you can say “gibsmuhdat.”

    All the New Deal and unions served to do was engineer a nation of spoiled lazy retards and the big worry seems to be how do we keep it going?

    This band-aid is coming off one way or another. I live in the PNW and lemme tell ya there was nothing so rich as watching the union crybabies at Boeing watch some of their 787 production go to South Carolina because they didn’t feel they were getting compensated enough to put the green screw in seat 25A. Unions killed themselves off because of greed.

    Read More
    • Agree: Buck
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  47. @phil
    The author doesn't get it. What we have now IS the welfare state in an intensely diverse society. We have more transfer spending than ever before and Obamacare represents another huge entitlement.

    Intellectuals continue to fantasize about the US becoming a Big Sweden, but Sweden has only been successful insofar as it has been a modest nation-state populated by ethnic Swedes. Intense diversity in a huge country with only the remnants of federalism results in massive non-consensual decision-making, fragmentation, increased inequality, and corruption.

    It’s fascinating watching sharp minds reduced to goo as they try to square the circle that is socialism. I’m a dope who does manual labor and I run circles around people with advanced degrees in these kinds of discussions, not because I’m smarter, but because my thought process isn’t penned in by taboos.

    For most people these are matters of faith, not logic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "isn't penned in by taboos" But is closed by ideology?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. Logan says:
    @Realist
    "Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event?"

    Die

    "They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. "

    The dumb bastards would be lost...while the locals know where they are and know how to hit a target. Being armed means nothing if you can't shoot straight.

    For an interesting projection of what might happen in total civilizational collapse, I recommend the Dies the Fire series of novels by SM Stirling.

    It has a science-fictiony setup in that all high-energy system (gunpowder, electricity, explosives, internal combustion, even high-energy steam engines) suddenly stop working. But I think it does a good job of extrapolating what would happen if suddenly the cities did not have food, water, power, etc.

    Spoiler alert: It ain’t pretty. Those who dream of a world without guns have not really thought it through.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Realist
    But the scenario was if welfare was ended the low lives in big cities would riot and head into the country. I contend that is where they would die.

    Very little essentials are produced in big cities they are net leaches. Rural areas and small and medium size cities would do just fine without big cities. The main product of large cities is 'financial products' which are based on fiat money to make the rich richer at the expense of the middle class.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. Logan says:
    @Pandos
    You don't have blacks. Easy peasy

    1

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. Logan says:
    @phil
    The author doesn't get it. What we have now IS the welfare state in an intensely diverse society. We have more transfer spending than ever before and Obamacare represents another huge entitlement.

    Intellectuals continue to fantasize about the US becoming a Big Sweden, but Sweden has only been successful insofar as it has been a modest nation-state populated by ethnic Swedes. Intense diversity in a huge country with only the remnants of federalism results in massive non-consensual decision-making, fragmentation, increased inequality, and corruption.

    It has been pointed out repeatedly that Sweden does very well relative to the USA. It has also been noted that people of Swedish ancestry in the USA do pretty well also. In fact considerably better than Swedes in Sweden.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. @Jim
    I don't know about California but the scenario you talk about won't happen in Texas. The mobs you talk about require purposeful leadership and organization which will not exist. Some years ago in Waco a motor-bike gang had a little run with the McLennan County Sheriff's Department. The motor-bike gang lost. A battle between the McLennan County Sheriff's Department and the mobs you talk about would be a massacre of the mob. And there's nothing that special in Texas about McLennan County.

    Sure, the State of Texas can bring enough LEOs to bear on ONE biker gang shoot out. Thirty at roughly the same might be a little different.

    You must be too young to remember the urban riots of the 1960s. There were relatively few firearms in the hands of the Simians, but they still managed to burn down, trash and loot an ass load of wealth.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Stripes Duncan
    It's fascinating watching sharp minds reduced to goo as they try to square the circle that is socialism. I'm a dope who does manual labor and I run circles around people with advanced degrees in these kinds of discussions, not because I'm smarter, but because my thought process isn't penned in by taboos.

    For most people these are matters of faith, not logic.

    “isn’t penned in by taboos” But is closed by ideology?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stripes Duncan
    It's not ideological to conclude that the leftists will never legislate away hard luck, consequences and biology. It's common sense.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. Realist says:
    @Logan
    For an interesting projection of what might happen in total civilizational collapse, I recommend the Dies the Fire series of novels by SM Stirling.

    It has a science-fictiony setup in that all high-energy system (gunpowder, electricity, explosives, internal combustion, even high-energy steam engines) suddenly stop working. But I think it does a good job of extrapolating what would happen if suddenly the cities did not have food, water, power, etc.

    Spoiler alert: It ain't pretty. Those who dream of a world without guns have not really thought it through.

    But the scenario was if welfare was ended the low lives in big cities would riot and head into the country. I contend that is where they would die.

    Very little essentials are produced in big cities they are net leaches. Rural areas and small and medium size cities would do just fine without big cities. The main product of large cities is ‘financial products’ which are based on fiat money to make the rich richer at the expense of the middle class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jacques sheete

    Rural areas and small and medium size cities would do just fine without big cities. The main product of large cities is ‘financial products’ which are based on fiat money to make the rich richer at the expense of the middle class.
     
    You've nailed a huge source of problems since at least the founding, the clash of the classes.

    Not 5 minutes ago I happened to be reviewing the source of this quote.

    [Burr’s} cohorts of “forgotten men,” the fellows who had won independence and were left to wonder what had become of it elected a State Assembly almost unanimous for the restoration of democracy and agrarian ascendency.

    -David Loth, Public Plunder, (1938), p94

     

    The problem has worsened over the decades and the centuries so that now we have the .0001% whose interests clash with those of the rest of us.

    I wish I had a solution.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. @RadicalCenter
    I see how such a sentiment can cross a normal person's mind. I live in LA, so believe me, I see how that sentiment could cross your mind.

    But millions of good, hardworking, patriotic Americans live in cities that you would, with some justification, describe as s---holes. Like my family here in Los Angeles.

    Secondly, what do you think the surviving savages among the urban populations will do in the wake of such an event? They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don't fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. I don't want to see it happen, but it is not hard to envision.

    We ought to try to engineer a "soft landing" for our economy and society, if at all possible. It's in all our interests. It is the height of folly to say "screw it, let it collapse, bring it on" -- especially if you have children. We do.

    This right here. Few people think about the week after the cities burn.
    There will be survivors, and they will fully adopt the “African warlord” mentality and push into the suburbs. And they will have an army, no small town police force or impromptu militia will hold them back. They will be drugged up, and willing to die for their warlord and more then willing to kill, rape and steal whatever they want, from whoever they want.

    This country will BURN. It will BLEED.

    It will cease to exist a month after the cities burn. There might be a few pockets of resistance, but those few survivors wont be the rule, only the exception.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. @Anonymous
    "isn't penned in by taboos" But is closed by ideology?

    It’s not ideological to conclude that the leftists will never legislate away hard luck, consequences and biology. It’s common sense.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. @Wally
    “They will head into the suburbs and the country as much as the highways allow them to. And don’t fantasize about using your guns to hold them off; there could be tens of thousands descending on your town at once, many of them armed as well. ”

    I doubt they will be doing too much, I understand drug withdrawals are a bitch.

    Thing is, they wouldnt go thru withdrawals. The cities hold police evidence lockers, and pharmaceutical warehouses, plus you dont think the CIA or a mexican gang will see this opportunity to import even more drugs?

    It will be bad for every one. Not just city folk and the surrounding towns.

    We have an impressive freeway system in this country that goes nearly everywhere. Once a few powerful players took charge (or were given power by the cia or whatever clandestine power players that still make the marionettes dance), they would take huge swaths of land and there would be little to stop them. The US military would dissolve, and the few remaining loyalists would be set up on guard duty to protect rich people and a few military installations. The common people will be fucked.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. @Anonymous
    Like the Pentagon. Americans still don't readily call this welfare, but they will eventually. Defense profiteers are unions in a sense, you're either in their club Or you're in the service industry that surrounds it.

    “When you subsidize something, you get more of it” – Ronald Reagan

    Like the Pentagon.

    And big business. Especially the really big ones.

    Medicare, for instance, was really all about subsidizing the insurance industry.

    Same with the pharmaceutical industry. How many mom and pop pharmacies are left?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. @TheOldOne
    Note to self--add Petras to list of those NOT worth reading.

    Note to self–add Petras to list of those NOT worth reading.

    He’s certainly all over the place with this one.

    I about gagged with his virtual hagiography of “the” (there were many variations of it since none of their meddling seemed to work until war got instigated) New Deal, but he did rescue himself a few paragraphs later.

    Over the past forty years the working class and the rump of what was once referred to as the ‘labor movement’ has contributed to the dismantling of the social welfare state…

    What folks don’t seem to realize is that any social welfare state that was increased during the Depression was not about helping Joe Six Pack but was part of the conspiracy to consolidate big business and to impose big government on us in a final blow. And it worked.

    Now that the unions have outlived their usefulness, they’ve been tossed under the bus, and the social welfare state’s been dismantled…

    It’s no wonder that FDR supported Stalin and his slave labor camps in his “worker’s paradise.” In both cases the ultimate goal was the same; only the methods differed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @pogohere
    Roosevelt’s National Industrial Recovery Act (enacted 6/33) (https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=66) was the deal organized by Wall Street to implement the plans that had been made by Bernard Baruch and Gerard Swope, the latter the head of General Electric, in the 1920s.

    The object was to waive all antitrust laws and permit trade associations of major corporations to set the federal regulatory trade rules while buying off labor by legalizing and protecting union organizing and requiring good faith bargaining under federal law (these rights were reinstated after the National Industrial Recovery Act was declared unconstitutional in May 1935 by the Supreme Court with the passage of the National Labor Relations Act, aka the Wagner Act, (enacted in 7/35) (https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=67) and Social Security etc. In other words, Wall Street got its way–it’s version of socialism–and the rest of us got what are now usually called “entitlements.” (See: http://rooseveltinstitute.org/chamber-and-ge-have-plan-restore-business-confidence-and-jobs-1931/ )

    Democrat Roosevelt was Wall Street’s candidate in 1932 after Hoover– who was the winning Republican candidate for president in 1928 against Al Smith–refused to implement the form of fascism (Hoover used the word fascism to describe this program in his autobiography) contemplated under The Swope Plan (https://www.garynorth.com/SwopePlan.pdf), consistent with Bernard Baruch–the national industrial czar under Wilson during World War1 –(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Industries_Board ) and his assistant Hugh Johnson’s (http://spartacus-educational.com/USARjohnson.htm)
    efforts and research in the 1920s. This research paved the way for the implementation of The Swope Plan by means of the NIRA in the 1930s.

    Roosevelt agreed to the plan when he ran in 1932 and Wall Street contributions flowed to Roosevelt, the Democrat. Yes, the New Deal was a Wall Street plan enacted under a Democratic Wall Street oligarch. And yes, that was after Wall Street financed both sides of the Russian Revolution and the fascists in Italy and Germany. But I digress.

    Baruch’s assistant Johnson became the head of the National Recovery Administration (NRA) under Roosevelt. Walter Teagle, the president of Standard Oil, Gerard Swope, the president of General Electric and Louis Kirstein, vice president of William Filene’s Sons of Boston (a big department store in Boston) became Johnson’s assistants administering the NRA–which in a coupla years was declared unconstitutional by The Supremes. Just a technicality.

    Today Wall Street is calling off the deal and the troglodyte neocons and “conservatives” get to accuse the rest of us —on what is now the side of the deal holding the burning bag of shit– of being just a bunch of losers and economic parasites.

    See: “Wall Street and F.D.R” (hard copy: “Wall Street and FDR: The True Story of How Franklin D. Roosevelt Colluded With Corporate America”
    Franklin Roosevelt as an agent of Wall Street financiers
    — by: Antony C. Sutton, 1975, source: Reformation.org

    http://modernhistoryproject.org/mhp?Article=WallStFDR
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. bluedog says:
    @Ben Frank
    You get what you pay for. If you pay people who don't work, do crimes and develop addictions, then you will have more.

    Worse than that, we are importing millions of new clients for the welfare state.

    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars,park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Miro23

    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars, park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.
     
    Very true, except that you have to hide what you are doing.

    Economics 101 has been very helpful in this regard:

    1) Everyone benefits from free trade. David Ricardo proved it in the 18th century.
    2) Outsourcing frees up American labour for higher value added work.
    3) We are an advanced post-industrial services economy. Lack of manufacturing is normal.
    4) The "World is Flat" - get used to it. Globalized and no borders.
    5) US workers are not "Cosmopolitan" enough. They have the wrong attitude.

    And if you still don't get it, keep singing John Lennon's "Imagine".
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. @Realist
    But the scenario was if welfare was ended the low lives in big cities would riot and head into the country. I contend that is where they would die.

    Very little essentials are produced in big cities they are net leaches. Rural areas and small and medium size cities would do just fine without big cities. The main product of large cities is 'financial products' which are based on fiat money to make the rich richer at the expense of the middle class.

    Rural areas and small and medium size cities would do just fine without big cities. The main product of large cities is ‘financial products’ which are based on fiat money to make the rich richer at the expense of the middle class.

    You’ve nailed a huge source of problems since at least the founding, the clash of the classes.

    Not 5 minutes ago I happened to be reviewing the source of this quote.

    [Burr’s} cohorts of “forgotten men,” the fellows who had won independence and were left to wonder what had become of it elected a State Assembly almost unanimous for the restoration of democracy and agrarian ascendency.

    -David Loth, Public Plunder, (1938), p94

    The problem has worsened over the decades and the centuries so that now we have the .0001% whose interests clash with those of the rest of us.

    I wish I had a solution.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. joe webb says:

    petrified Petras…soon to be installed mummified next to Lenin.

    American Renaissance has an article up right now on how much the US spends on welfare…. it is a trillion a year with almost all going to the useless races.

    Petras the Liar. Never mind a total sap. Joe Webb

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  62. Miro23 says:
    @bluedog
    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars,park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.

    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars, park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.

    Very true, except that you have to hide what you are doing.

    Economics 101 has been very helpful in this regard:

    1) Everyone benefits from free trade. David Ricardo proved it in the 18th century.
    2) Outsourcing frees up American labour for higher value added work.
    3) We are an advanced post-industrial services economy. Lack of manufacturing is normal.
    4) The “World is Flat” – get used to it. Globalized and no borders.
    5) US workers are not “Cosmopolitan” enough. They have the wrong attitude.

    And if you still don’t get it, keep singing John Lennon’s “Imagine”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tick Tock
    You must be God too.!! Either that or a fence post.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Bill Jones says: • Website

    Yup, I can not see the downside.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  64. pogohere says: • Website
    @jacques sheete

    Note to self–add Petras to list of those NOT worth reading.
     
    He's certainly all over the place with this one.

    I about gagged with his virtual hagiography of "the" (there were many variations of it since none of their meddling seemed to work until war got instigated) New Deal, but he did rescue himself a few paragraphs later.

    Over the past forty years the working class and the rump of what was once referred to as the ‘labor movement’ has contributed to the dismantling of the social welfare state...
     
    What folks don't seem to realize is that any social welfare state that was increased during the Depression was not about helping Joe Six Pack but was part of the conspiracy to consolidate big business and to impose big government on us in a final blow. And it worked.

    Now that the unions have outlived their usefulness, they've been tossed under the bus, and the social welfare state's been dismantled...

    It's no wonder that FDR supported Stalin and his slave labor camps in his "worker's paradise." In both cases the ultimate goal was the same; only the methods differed.

    Roosevelt’s National Industrial Recovery Act (enacted 6/33) (https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=66) was the deal organized by Wall Street to implement the plans that had been made by Bernard Baruch and Gerard Swope, the latter the head of General Electric, in the 1920s.

    The object was to waive all antitrust laws and permit trade associations of major corporations to set the federal regulatory trade rules while buying off labor by legalizing and protecting union organizing and requiring good faith bargaining under federal law (these rights were reinstated after the National Industrial Recovery Act was declared unconstitutional in May 1935 by the Supreme Court with the passage of the National Labor Relations Act, aka the Wagner Act, (enacted in 7/35) (https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=67) and Social Security etc. In other words, Wall Street got its way–it’s version of socialism–and the rest of us got what are now usually called “entitlements.” (See: http://rooseveltinstitute.org/chamber-and-ge-have-plan-restore-business-confidence-and-jobs-1931/ )

    Democrat Roosevelt was Wall Street’s candidate in 1932 after Hoover– who was the winning Republican candidate for president in 1928 against Al Smith–refused to implement the form of fascism (Hoover used the word fascism to describe this program in his autobiography) contemplated under The Swope Plan (https://www.garynorth.com/SwopePlan.pdf), consistent with Bernard Baruch–the national industrial czar under Wilson during World War1 –(https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Industries_Board ) and his assistant Hugh Johnson’s (http://spartacus-educational.com/USARjohnson.htm)
    efforts and research in the 1920s. This research paved the way for the implementation of The Swope Plan by means of the NIRA in the 1930s.

    Roosevelt agreed to the plan when he ran in 1932 and Wall Street contributions flowed to Roosevelt, the Democrat. Yes, the New Deal was a Wall Street plan enacted under a Democratic Wall Street oligarch. And yes, that was after Wall Street financed both sides of the Russian Revolution and the fascists in Italy and Germany. But I digress.

    Baruch’s assistant Johnson became the head of the National Recovery Administration (NRA) under Roosevelt. Walter Teagle, the president of Standard Oil, Gerard Swope, the president of General Electric and Louis Kirstein, vice president of William Filene’s Sons of Boston (a big department store in Boston) became Johnson’s assistants administering the NRA–which in a coupla years was declared unconstitutional by The Supremes. Just a technicality.

    Today Wall Street is calling off the deal and the troglodyte neocons and “conservatives” get to accuse the rest of us —on what is now the side of the deal holding the burning bag of shit– of being just a bunch of losers and economic parasites.

    See: “Wall Street and F.D.R” (hard copy: “Wall Street and FDR: The True Story of How Franklin D. Roosevelt Colluded With Corporate America”
    Franklin Roosevelt as an agent of Wall Street financiers
    — by: Antony C. Sutton, 1975, source: Reformation.org

    http://modernhistoryproject.org/mhp?Article=WallStFDR

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. Tick Tock says:
    @Miro23

    Hmm lets see I manufacture wing nuts and find I can ship the jobs to any third world country and get them made for pennies rather than dollars, park my profits in off-shore accounts and then whine because others have followed suit and now we have a sorry underclass (which use to be the middle class) on welfare.
     
    Very true, except that you have to hide what you are doing.

    Economics 101 has been very helpful in this regard:

    1) Everyone benefits from free trade. David Ricardo proved it in the 18th century.
    2) Outsourcing frees up American labour for higher value added work.
    3) We are an advanced post-industrial services economy. Lack of manufacturing is normal.
    4) The "World is Flat" - get used to it. Globalized and no borders.
    5) US workers are not "Cosmopolitan" enough. They have the wrong attitude.

    And if you still don't get it, keep singing John Lennon's "Imagine".

    You must be God too.!! Either that or a fence post.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. bluedog says:
    @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    Utter nonsense WHEN have the people been able to vote themselves anything,they run down and pull the lever for the candidate of the party they belong to and that is the end of lol people power,as they say money talks and bullshit walks ,and that my friend is the government we live under…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. denk says:

    The Warfare state….

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  68. bjondo says:

    get rid of welfare?
    blankfein and dimon and halliburton AND israel
    to the streets with clubs and cocktails and blackmailing pics

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  69. peterAUS says:
    @BigAl
    The 1970’s was in many ways the watershed decade for the radical transformation of the American economy and society, even more than the 1960’s (I lived through both as a young man). I have yet to read the definitive social-critical analysis of these years to explain the changes that, looking back, seem to have taken the country of my childhood right out from under me, gone forever, increasingly difficult to remember through the fog of nostalgia that tends to distort as much as to reveal.

    Some of the things I do remember about this time include the PATCO (air traffic controllers) strike, very well. What is often not mentioned is that PATCO was attempting to do something that had not been permitted under federal civil service law, that is, bargain for wages as well as working conditions. Wage bargaining, PATCO correctly assessed, was the issue that made or broke unions and had enabled state and local public employees to finally begin to earn a decent, living wage beginning in the 1960’s (think the iconic Mike Quill and the NYC TWU). Reagan correctly (from his point of view) saw that to fail to break PATCO on this issue was to open the floodgates and turn the U.S. civil services into something akin to its European counterpart, with the possibility of general strikes and the rest. And of course to encourage private sector unions in their drive to organize and to change federal and state labor laws to strengthen the right to picket strike and organize.

    What I also remember well however, is how little support PATCO was able to garnish from other unionized workers (and in many cases from union leadership as well). It seemed to me at the time that some of the strongest hostility came from rank and file of trade and utilities unions. Of course Reagan, following the Nixon playbook, shrewdly played the patriot-nationalist card, painting PATCO as a threat to national security as well as composed of a bunch of ingrates who should have been happy to have jobs. But by then the segmentation of the American workforce, a tactic that played right into the hands of the corporate-capitalist class was in full swing. The American worker lucky enough to possess a decent paying skilled or semi-skilled union job was being taught to see their situation as morally “deserved” and to see newer aspirants to similar positions, whether recently arrived immigrants or members of racial-ethnic groups previously suppressed by law, custom and prejudice as threats/dangers/enemies of their own recently won status.

    I recall too that it was in the 1970’s that the threat of “relocation”, at that time mainly from the more heavily unionized north and northeastern states to the union-hostile south began to play a major role in the destruction of the power of labor. This was the beginning of the “globalization” factor and of the off-shoring of manufacturing jobs that has been commented on extensively and that took off a decade or so later. What is often not recalled is that unions and other pro-labor groups attempted to lobby Congress to amend the NLRA (National Labor Relations Act) and to appoint labor-friendly members to the NLRB to ensure that plant relocation would be a mandatory subject of bargaining and thus prevent unilateral (by capital ownership) relocation or the threat of relocation as a means to destroy the power of labor. They were, of course, not successful, and factories and business continued to move away from traditional centers of labor power and worker-protections, first to so-called “right-to-work” states and eventually to Asia.

    And I remember the beginning of the financialization of the American corporation that I experienced on a “micro” scale, a kid lucky enough to have a summer job while in university at a large resource-extraction corporation’s HQ in NYC. I recall white-collar conversations about compensation and about how salaries had steadily risen over the past decade (the company was said to be doing “really well”). And I remember how towards the end of my summer stints more and more conversation was about stock prices and Wall Street favor and about the new executive managerial style brought in by “those young MBA”s”, and about (for the first time) worries of a “take-over” by “outsiders” (the company, although public, had had family leadership for many years).

    And most of all I remember how gradually the material-economic components to the identity of the blue-collar and middle class worker were written out of existence. The great narrative, the myth that explains to us what it means to be “an American,” no longer included any hint of class solidarity, of the kind of work we did, the pay we earned, the common living conditions in the small towns and urban neighborhoods and “cookie-cutter” suburbs of America. Formerly the struggle of economic and material improvement was seen by most ordinary Americas as a struggle for certain necessary conditions to maintain, strengthen, and perpetuate a way-of-life in which the common core assumptions about the “good life” remained basically stable and unchallenged: family, stable job, residential security, public schools, public places -- neighborhood bars, coffee shops, civic clubs, parks and playgrounds -- where people could meet and interact as social equals.

    The financialization of the economy, indeed of social life itself to a great extent, meant the drive for the maximization of private profit and the pursuit of interests and ‘efficiencies” conceived entirely apart from any impact of the common good of society as a whole, and should have been seen as a grave threat to the very conditions of material and economic security, only recently achieved, that were the foundation of these other civic and social institutions. Instead, through a grand and diabolical deceit cynically promulgated by a mostly Republican capitalist class of privilege, but also aided and abetted by a “new Left” that increasingly postured itself as the enemy of this older and more traditional way of life, the enemy was reconceived as the new “elites”, the young, urban, hipster “Leftist” who despised the old ways and represented a singular assault on everything good about America. Meanwhile, steadily, relentlessly, the material conditions and hard-won economic improvements that had gradually made small town, urban-neighborhood, and inner-suburban life decent and livable were being destroyed by a class that paid lip-service to Capra’s Bedford Falls while at the same time endlessly working to transform it into Pottersville.

    Good post.

    But, still, no hint of a solution, unfortunately.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. joe webb says:

    standard issue left wing propaganda, the above cartoon. The US military budget is about 5% of GDP.

    nevertheless, all these wars are for Israel and the news today is that Trump is looking for a new war in Syria and Iran and Palestine.

    Send the bill to the jews. Jewish Imperialism…some kind of weird sounding phrase…right?

    Joe Webb

    Read More
    • Replies: @bluedog
    Hmm our actual gdp they say is around $13 trillion the rest is made up of smoke and mirrors from the financial sector,and of course our so called defense budget is only the beginning of the actual defense cost, as many ongoing projects are financed outside of the defense budget..
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. bluedog says:
    @joe webb
    standard issue left wing propaganda, the above cartoon. The US military budget is about 5% of GDP.

    nevertheless, all these wars are for Israel and the news today is that Trump is looking for a new war in Syria and Iran and Palestine.

    Send the bill to the jews. Jewish Imperialism...some kind of weird sounding phrase...right?

    Joe Webb

    Hmm our actual gdp they say is around $13 trillion the rest is made up of smoke and mirrors from the financial sector,and of course our so called defense budget is only the beginning of the actual defense cost, as many ongoing projects are financed outside of the defense budget..

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. Ace says:
    @Den Lille Abe
    Well, the author kind of nails it.
    I remember from my childhood in the 50- 60 ties in Scandinavia that the US was the ultimate goal in welfare. The country where you could make a good living with your two hands, get you kids to UNI, have a house, a telly ECT. It was not consumerism, it was the American dream, a chicken in every pot; we chewed imported American gum and dreamed.
    In the 70-80 ties Scandinavia had a tremendous social and economic growth, EQUALLY distributed, an immense leap forward. In the middle of the 80 ties we were equal to the US in standards of living.
    Since we have not looked at the US, unless in pity, as we have seen the decline of the general income, social wealth fall way behind our own.
    The average US workers income has not increased since 90 figures adjusted for inflation. The Scandinavian workers income in the same period has almost quadrupled. And so has our societies.
    The article is dismal reading, and evidence of the failings of the "unregulated" society, where the anything goes as long as you are wealthy.

    The one thing Sweden forgot to regulate – prohibit, really – was Muslim and African invaders. You gave away your country – soul, really – and now you’re toast. You persecute people who call for an end to immigration and a reversal.

    But, God bless you, you’re socialist. Good job!

    How do you say “cucks” in Nordic?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. “It’s true that Clinton put a 5 year limit on TANF, the woman and child welfare benefit. ”

    That’s why they have a new baby every five years to reset the clock.
    Why do you think there are so many families with infants to twenty somethings in the ghetto and the barrio? Other advantage, built in babysitters once the older kids hit twelve or so.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  74. @BigAl
    The 1970’s was in many ways the watershed decade for the radical transformation of the American economy and society, even more than the 1960’s (I lived through both as a young man). I have yet to read the definitive social-critical analysis of these years to explain the changes that, looking back, seem to have taken the country of my childhood right out from under me, gone forever, increasingly difficult to remember through the fog of nostalgia that tends to distort as much as to reveal.

    Some of the things I do remember about this time include the PATCO (air traffic controllers) strike, very well. What is often not mentioned is that PATCO was attempting to do something that had not been permitted under federal civil service law, that is, bargain for wages as well as working conditions. Wage bargaining, PATCO correctly assessed, was the issue that made or broke unions and had enabled state and local public employees to finally begin to earn a decent, living wage beginning in the 1960’s (think the iconic Mike Quill and the NYC TWU). Reagan correctly (from his point of view) saw that to fail to break PATCO on this issue was to open the floodgates and turn the U.S. civil services into something akin to its European counterpart, with the possibility of general strikes and the rest. And of course to encourage private sector unions in their drive to organize and to change federal and state labor laws to strengthen the right to picket strike and organize.

    What I also remember well however, is how little support PATCO was able to garnish from other unionized workers (and in many cases from union leadership as well). It seemed to me at the time that some of the strongest hostility came from rank and file of trade and utilities unions. Of course Reagan, following the Nixon playbook, shrewdly played the patriot-nationalist card, painting PATCO as a threat to national security as well as composed of a bunch of ingrates who should have been happy to have jobs. But by then the segmentation of the American workforce, a tactic that played right into the hands of the corporate-capitalist class was in full swing. The American worker lucky enough to possess a decent paying skilled or semi-skilled union job was being taught to see their situation as morally “deserved” and to see newer aspirants to similar positions, whether recently arrived immigrants or members of racial-ethnic groups previously suppressed by law, custom and prejudice as threats/dangers/enemies of their own recently won status.

    I recall too that it was in the 1970’s that the threat of “relocation”, at that time mainly from the more heavily unionized north and northeastern states to the union-hostile south began to play a major role in the destruction of the power of labor. This was the beginning of the “globalization” factor and of the off-shoring of manufacturing jobs that has been commented on extensively and that took off a decade or so later. What is often not recalled is that unions and other pro-labor groups attempted to lobby Congress to amend the NLRA (National Labor Relations Act) and to appoint labor-friendly members to the NLRB to ensure that plant relocation would be a mandatory subject of bargaining and thus prevent unilateral (by capital ownership) relocation or the threat of relocation as a means to destroy the power of labor. They were, of course, not successful, and factories and business continued to move away from traditional centers of labor power and worker-protections, first to so-called “right-to-work” states and eventually to Asia.

    And I remember the beginning of the financialization of the American corporation that I experienced on a “micro” scale, a kid lucky enough to have a summer job while in university at a large resource-extraction corporation’s HQ in NYC. I recall white-collar conversations about compensation and about how salaries had steadily risen over the past decade (the company was said to be doing “really well”). And I remember how towards the end of my summer stints more and more conversation was about stock prices and Wall Street favor and about the new executive managerial style brought in by “those young MBA”s”, and about (for the first time) worries of a “take-over” by “outsiders” (the company, although public, had had family leadership for many years).

    And most of all I remember how gradually the material-economic components to the identity of the blue-collar and middle class worker were written out of existence. The great narrative, the myth that explains to us what it means to be “an American,” no longer included any hint of class solidarity, of the kind of work we did, the pay we earned, the common living conditions in the small towns and urban neighborhoods and “cookie-cutter” suburbs of America. Formerly the struggle of economic and material improvement was seen by most ordinary Americas as a struggle for certain necessary conditions to maintain, strengthen, and perpetuate a way-of-life in which the common core assumptions about the “good life” remained basically stable and unchallenged: family, stable job, residential security, public schools, public places -- neighborhood bars, coffee shops, civic clubs, parks and playgrounds -- where people could meet and interact as social equals.

    The financialization of the economy, indeed of social life itself to a great extent, meant the drive for the maximization of private profit and the pursuit of interests and ‘efficiencies” conceived entirely apart from any impact of the common good of society as a whole, and should have been seen as a grave threat to the very conditions of material and economic security, only recently achieved, that were the foundation of these other civic and social institutions. Instead, through a grand and diabolical deceit cynically promulgated by a mostly Republican capitalist class of privilege, but also aided and abetted by a “new Left” that increasingly postured itself as the enemy of this older and more traditional way of life, the enemy was reconceived as the new “elites”, the young, urban, hipster “Leftist” who despised the old ways and represented a singular assault on everything good about America. Meanwhile, steadily, relentlessly, the material conditions and hard-won economic improvements that had gradually made small town, urban-neighborhood, and inner-suburban life decent and livable were being destroyed by a class that paid lip-service to Capra’s Bedford Falls while at the same time endlessly working to transform it into Pottersville.

    the financial crisis in the 1970s got over 1000+ bankers into jail. that was like a warning bell for them. so they change the govt or bought them you might say. 2007/8 crisis = zero bankers were jailed.

    change complete. welcome to the brave new world.

    @article: UBI is going to be a thing, it will have to as automation will kill most jobs.

    if you have a kid in college, make sure s/he is studying a major that has to do with AI and automation. earns a butt load and probably the last ones to be automated.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    This essay is littered with the imprecise use of millions. Millions is more effective than writing ‘it was a whole lot’ but can still be mostly wrong. Petras is intentionally misleading and (shock!) this is a reveal for propaganda.

    Petras writes (and has written before) the following partial statement: “foreclosure of two million”. The time period is sometimes omitted but here he refers to the Obama administration.

    So, Obama was in office for 8 years, 2008-2016.

    * In 2009 there were nearly 4 million foreclosure filings
    * In 2010 there were 2 million foreclosure filings
    * In 2011 there were 2.7 million filings for foreclosure
    * In 2012 there were another 2 million filings
    * In 2013, 1.5 million

    Most of these homes were foreclosed, repossessed or auctioned, or short sold.

    Other common figures about the financial crisis:

    * 10 million homes
    * 7 million homes.
    * 20 million people who lived in the houses (using the 10 million figure x 2) would have been ‘foreclosed on’ or directly affected – sale of the asset in which they lived is forced.

    The method Petras is using in his essays isn’t any mystery – he repeats a figure that is more than inconsistently low. (It’s ok if you think he’s a good guy or he’s a leftie liar.)
    But he repeats a falsehood. More importantly he repeats this over time for more effective propaganda.

    It must be said the author has plenty of help in the media – Notice that the figures above are not precise either, but much higher for some of the years. Those were gleaned from real estate data provided and prepared for public consumption by RealtyTrac. In order to get greater accuracy, you could pay private parties or contact Federal Agencies with requests for data.

    The question for readers would be, why would it be difficult to determine an actual number ? The motivation to obscure the number of foreclosures to mislead people is so common on Unz and any number of politically oriented outlets. We should expect propaganda about the financial crsis, especially from those who appear to be more credible or you believe share your values and beliefs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  76. @whyamihere
    If the welfare state in America was abolished, major American cities would burn to the ground. Anarchy would ensue, it would be magnitudes bigger than anything that happened in Ferguson or Baltimore. It would likely be simultaneous.

    I think that's one of the only situations where preppers would actually live out what they've been prepping for (except for a natural disaster).

    I've been thinking about this a little over the past few years after seeing the race riots. What exactly is the line between our society being civilized and breaking out into chaos. It's probably a lot thinner than most people think.

    I don't know who said it but someone long ago said something along the lines of, "Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury." We are definitely in this situation today. I wonder how long it can last.

    Democracy can only work until the people figure out they can vote for themselves generous benefits from the public treasury

    This was never said by anyone famous, but is true nonetheless.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. JamesWWW says:

    The increase in wages will provoke more invaders go USA. The more attractive the salary is for illegals, more invaders will go. USA government is very stupid offering the same rights to illegals than to legal citizens. The illegals should be blocked to get jobs, if that is not possible because government is traitor or it loves illegals, then the solution is to increase the tax for aliens, in such a way that they dont feel comfortable in USA, for the high taxes they pay. If minimum wage is $11 the foreigners should pay 50% in taxes, so the net salary would ver $5.50. Since that is not very atractive for them, many of them would prefer to go back to their countries. If USA pays same salary to American than to foreigners and charges them same taxes, all the foreigners will take the jobs that should be for Americans, because for them those salaries are much more attractive, because in their homeland they get 5 or 8 times less. If you are an employer and you say to 2 candidates for a job: (one from Latin America and one from USA): “I can pay you 11 dollars per hour” – the American probably will want a little more, but the Latin will jump and say: “I take it, now”. But if he knows that he will have to pay half of his salary in taxes, he will not like it very much, so the American will have more chance to get the job.
    Other countries can not order USA to pay same salaries to all workers, navites and foreigners. Every country has the right to pay different salaries to natives and to foreigners. If USA tried to obligate other countries to pay same salaries to all workers, they would tell USA: “it is not of your business, we pay what we want, you like it or not, this is our country, not yours”.
    Then why doesnt USA do the same? –
    Think of that, do you think that if you go to an Arab country, or China, etc you will have the same rights than a local citizen? Of course not, the local citizens always have preference, advantages over the foreigners.
    USA gives the advantages to the foreigners, this is the cause for most jobs are given to foreigners, even illegals are first class citizens compared to American workers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
Current Commenter says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All James Petras Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?