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Making America Great Through Exploitation, Servitude and Abuse
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The public denunciation by thousands of women and a few men that they had been victims of sexual abuse by their economic bosses raises fundamental issues about the social relations of American capitalism.

The moral offenses are in essence economic and social crimes. Sexual abuse is only one aspect of the social dynamics facilitating the increase in inequality and concentration of wealth, which define the practices and values of the American political and economic system.

Billionaires and mega-millionaires are themselves the products of intense exploitation of tens of millions of isolated and unorganized wage and salaried workers. Capitalist exploitation is based on a rigid hierarchy with its private prerogatives, which enables the oligarchs to demand their feudal privileges, their seigniorial sexual predations.

US capitalism thrives on and requires unlimited power and the capacity to have the public treasury pay for its untrammeled pillage of land, labor, transport systems and technological development. Capitalist power, in the United States, has no counterpart; there are few if any countervailing forces to provide any balance.

Today, 93% of US private sector workers have no organized representation. Moreover, many of the 7% who are in unions are controlled and exploited by their corrupt union officials – in league with the bosses.

This concentration of power produces the ever deepening inequalities between the world of the billionaires and the millions of low-wage workers.

The much-celebrated technological innovations have been subsidized by the state and its educational and research institutions. Although these are financed by the taxpayers, the citizen-workers are marginalized by the technological changes, like robotics, that they originally funded. High tech innovations flourish because they concentrate power, profits and private privilege.

The hierarchical matrix of power and exploitation has led to the polarization of mortality rates and moral codes. For the working poor, the absence of competent health care has led to the massive use and abuse of prescription opioids and other addictive drugs. For the upper class, it has led to the flagrant physical and psychological abuse of vulnerable employees, especially, but not exclusively young working women. The prestigious bourgeois media blur the class polarization by constant reference to what they term ‘our shared traditional democratic values.’

The pervasive and growing vulnerability of workers of both sexes coincides with the incorporation of the latest technological innovations in production, distribution and promotion. This includes electronic and digital advances, artificial intelligence, robotics and extensive surveillance on workers, which incorporate high profits for the investors and long hours of demeaning monotonous work for those who manufacture and transport the ‘products’.

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The proliferation of new technology has grown in direct relation with the abject debasement of labor and the marginalization and trivialization of workers. Amazon and Walmart approach trillions of dollars in revenue from mass consumption, even as the Chaplinesque speed-up of robotized humans race to fill the overnight delivery orders. The entertainment industry amuses the population across class lines with increasingly vulgar and violent offerings, while the moguls of film entertain themselves with their young workers – who are depersonalized and even raped.

The more egregious immorality exposes itself one time too often and is condemned, while the victims are temporality lionized for their courage to protest. The worst predators apologize, resign to their yachts and mansions and are replaced by new avatars with the same power and structures in place which had facilitated the abuse. Politicians rush to embrace the victims in a kind of political and media ‘Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy’ when one considers their own role as enablers of this dehumanization.

The problem is not merely corrupt and perverted individual miscreants: It is the hierarchy of inequality which produces and reproduces an endless supply of vulnerable workers to exploit and abuse.

The most advanced forms of entertainment thrive in an environment of absolute impunity in which the occasional exposé of abuse or corruption is hidden behind a monetary settlement. The courage of an individual victim able to secure public attention is a step forward, but will have greater significance if it is organized and linked to a massive challenging of the power of the bourgeois entertainment industry and the system of high tech exploitation. Sexual abuse of an individual in the workplace is just part of a chain that begins with exploitation of workers in general and can only be stopped through collective worker organization.

Can anyone say with a straight face that the US remains a nation of free and autonomous citizens? Servitude and moral degradation are the outcome of an atomized, impotent laboring class who may change one boss for another or one vulgar president for a moralizing hypocrite. We hope that the exposés will start something but without class conscious organizations we don’t know what will arise.

 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Capitalism, Inequality, Working Class 
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  1. The entertainment industry amuses the population across class lines with increasingly vulgar and violent offerings, while the moguls of film entertain themselves with their young workers – who are depersonalized and even raped.

    These “young workers” are simply whores, as actresses across all ages always have been. And isn’t it very interesting that every #MeToo Hollywood harlot is past the wall?

    Can anyone say with a straight face that the US remains a nation of free and autonomous citizens?

    Most people freely enslave themselves. That doesn’t mean we should make their chains weigh more heavily on them (or worse, outright try to replace the working class with foreign helots), but let’s not kid ourselves–”workers” are workers for a reason.

  2. OK some good points, but many would be disputed by various libertarians and conservatives who think current capitalist arrangements are just fine. For example you say:

    “This concentration of power produces the ever deepening inequalities between the world of the billionaires and the millions of low-wage workers.”

    Some libertarian and conservative types would see this as the natural and proper state of affairs. Those ow-wage workers are probably where they are because of their own inadequacies and lack of effort. The billionaires should be celebrated as innovators and “can do” persons, who DO , rather than complain and look for “government handouts,” or so some of the standard narrative goes.

    What would be some of your solutions to these issues? And how would you meet similar objections above?

  3. First, could the author try a more expository style of writing, rather than simple blunt declarative sentences? Please?

    Second, the saying is “they rent you, they do not own you”. Every single hopeful young job seeker is empowered with the ability to tell Harvey Wienstein, or whomever the creep of the day may be, to go fuck him (or HER) self, and walk out of that office.

    Every job interview is a two way street; it’s as much about them as it is about you, the job seeker.

    An abusive job interview is an early clue that you probably really don’t want to waste your precious time working for a bunch of creeps.

    And yes, lawsuits do tend to focus the mind. I am strongly in favor of evening the score via the use of lawsuits, lawyers.

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