The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 BlogviewJohn Derbyshire Archive
Weird American Alpha Male Meets Weird American Fertility Goddess (And NATIONAL REVIEW’s Squirmishing Girly Boys)
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

One thing that came to mind watching Sarah Palin’s speech endorsing Donald Trump: how very American it was. It’s hard to see your country and its customs objectively if you’re born and raised here; you just take them for granted. To immigrants like myself, America’s national culture is as distinctive, as unique, as fascinating as Japan‘s. Mrs. Palin fits right in there.

Before globalization took hold, the U.S.A. was even more distinctive—what Bob Dylan’ s biographer called “the old, weird America.” It’s gone now, but I’m old enough to have caught the tail end of it.

So there I was, aged about fourteen, sitting in a provincial English drawing-room belonging to the family of my schoolfriend, when his father, who had eccentric tastes in music, put a disk on the gramophone. It was a record he’d just gotten by mail order from some American supplier.

I listened in amazement. Weird? It was the weirdest thing I’d ever heard—extraterrestrial weird.

Here it is, and it still sounds radically weird: The Fendermen with Mule Skinner Blues.”

Talking of weird, how about this:

The United States is arguably the most secure great power in history. With weak and pliant neighbors to its north and south, vast oceans to its east and west and a superior nuclear deterrent, it is remarkably insulated from external threats.

I took that from an essay by John Glaser in The National Interest magazine. [The Ugly Truth About Avoiding War With China, December 28, 2015] Glaser is making an argument, which I find compelling, for the U.S.A. to draw down its troops and commitments in the Pacific theater.

After all that, you can imagine that I squirm a little when candidates on the campaign trail talk about “making America great again.”

The Donald Trump campaign is particularly big on “making America great again.” But does the Donald mean the same thing by that phrase that I mean? Yo, Mr. Trump: We have 50,000 soldiers, sailors, and airmen stationed in Japan; 38,000 in Germany; 28,000 in South Korea; 12,000 in Italy for crying out loud. You OK with those numbers, Mr. Trump? Hello? I wish someone would ask him.

But someone even keener on making America great again is: Sarah Palin. Mrs. Palin’s endorsement speech took just short of twenty minutes and the phrase “make America great again” occurred seven times. That’s an average of once every two minutes fifty seconds.

Don’t get me wrong here. I’m not trying to be a wet blanket. I like Trump and I like Palin. I’m just seeking some clarity on this making-America-great idea, which is obviously a major theme in the Trump campaign. Who’s he going to make America great for? Great for Americans? Hey, no problem with that. Great for South Koreans, Taiwanese, Italians, Saudis? Not so much.

I’d just like to know.

The New York Times had some sport with Mrs. Palin’s endorsement speech. Some NYT hack named Michael Barbaro published a column titled The Most Mystifying Lines of Sarah Palin’s Endorsement Speech. He quoted this sentence, for example.

Clip: And you quit footin’ the bill for these nations who are oil-rich, we’re paying for some of their squirmishes that have been going on for centuries..

Look at that, snickered Mr. Barbaro. Mrs. Palin coined a new word, “Squirmish.” Quote from him: “a cross between squirm (which means to wriggle the body from side to side) and skirmish (which means a brief fight or encounter between small groups). Twitter embraced the new term instantly.”

So what? People coin words all the time. Shakespeare coined words. I coin words, or try to. Come on: Did you ever see the word “Andro-American” before I coined it last week?

And, I must say, I rather like “squirmish.” If your unit and my unit engage in a small firefight, that’s a skirmish. If we wriggle and writhe while so engaged, pretending we’re doing something else, that would be a squirmish. Kind of like what the GOP Establishment is doing with the Trump campaign.

All right, Mrs. Palin’s tongue tends to trip over itself. You try talking for twenty minutes unscripted without saying something daft. I didn’t see anything much wrong with her speech. It made up in vigor and enthusiasm what it sometimes lacked in coherence.

And at several points in her speech, Mrs. Palin got to the heart of the matter—the matter, I mean, of why Trump is doing so well, and so many of us are cheering him on. Concerning the charges that Trump and his followers are not realconservatives, for instance:

Clip: What the heck would the establishment know about conservatism? Tell me, is this conservative? GOP majorities handing over a blank check to fund Obamacare and Planned Parenthood and illegal immigration that competes for your jobs, and turning safety nets into hammocks, and all these new Democrat voters that are going to be coming on over the border as we keep the borders open, and bequeathing our children millions in new debt, and refusing to fight back for our solvency, and our sovereignty, even though that’s why we elected them and sent them as a majority to DC.

That’s spot on. Voters elect a GOP Congress; nothing much changes; voters get mad. It’s really not hard to understand—unless you’re as stupid as the GOP Establishment. Which is way more stupid than the New York Times is trying to paint Mrs. Palin.

And watching the video of that endorsement, Mrs. Palin working the crowd while Trump stands at the side with a poop-eating grin on his face, I have to admit to feeling the Golden Bough factor at work, too. Fertility goddess meets alpha male; beauty pageant winner meets beauty pageant proprietor; cut it any way you like, there’s some primal stuff going on here.

Now that, thanks to Mrs. Palin, we’ve got the word, let’s use it.

OK, squirmish of the week: National Review against Donald Trump. The venerable conservative magazine has published a special issue urging conservatives to not support Trump, on the grounds that he’s not a conservative.

My former colleagues (memorably described by my heroine Ann Coulter as “girly-boys”) have a point. But at the same time they’re missing a more important point.

ORDER IT NOW

The point they have is that Trump has (almost) no track record as a movement conservative. Trump shows no acquaintance with the ideas that have shaped the post-WW2 conservative movement. I’m just flipping through George Nash’s book The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945. Eric Voegelin,Whittaker Chambers, Ludwig von Mises, Russell Kirk, Willmoore Kendall, … Do any of these names mean anything to Trump? I doubt it.

The point they’re missing is that, first—all right, I’m going to make two points out of it—first, there is such a thing as gut conservatism, as distinct from head conservatism. A great many Americans—tens of millions—are conservatives without ever having heard of Willmoore Kendall.

And second, even among the lesser number of us who do know the difference between Straussians and Fusionists, the conviction has settled in that intellectual “conservatism” is a political dead end, with no consequences in the present age.

That wasn’t true in the previous age, the age of the Cold War. Conservative ideas were important and had consequences: most notably, the election of Ronald Reagan. That was terrifically impressive to those of us who grew up during the Cold War, and it made the conservative intellectual enterprise seem worthwhile.

It seems worthwhile no longer. It has no consequences, none that seem good to a conservative temperament, to a conservative gut. The Tea Party election of 2010 has had no good consequences. Nothing happened for us, nothing changed. The George W. Bush Presidency had none, less than none. The 1994 Gingrich Revolution had none. Even the Reagan Presidency had rather few in the domestic sphere, arguably none. I refer you to Chapter 3 of David Frum’s 1994 book Dead Right, chapter title: “The Failure of the Reagan Gambit.”

Gut conservatives are left clutching at straws. They—we—are ready to rally to anyone who shows, in how unsatisfactory-soever a way, some glimmer of understanding about what concerns us.

We don’t want millions of unassimilable foreigners pouring into our country. We don’t want our young people sent off to fight half-hearted wars our leaders have no real desire to win. We don’t much care if Russia or China throw their weight around in their own spheres of influence. We don’t want to see our nation’s leaders apologize to anyone, for anything.

We have no confidence in the Republican Party as a vehicle for our concerns.

Who then are we to vote for? In 2012 a great many of us didn’t bother to vote at all. That’s how Barack Obama got his second term. We didn’t think Romney would have made much difference.

We think Donald Trump will make a difference. That’s the difference.

If you still don’t get it, go read the comment thread on the National Reviewwebsite. Random sample, quote:

Been lied to too many times. If the nominee isn’t Trump or Cruz I’ll vote for the Democrat. Trump might screw us over but the establishment candidate will for sure. I’ve come to realize that the establishment Republicans are a greater enemy to me than any communist democrat. I’ll cut off my arm before I ever vote for you c***-*****rs again.

If you still don’t get it, I can’t help. I’ve done my best here.

Oh, just one short note here to my ex-colleagues at National Review:

Don’t you see how weird it looks for Bill Buckley’s magazine to snipe at Donald Trump for being the beneficiary of inherited wealth?

John Derbyshire [email him] writes an incredible amount on all sorts of subjectsfor all kinds of outlets. (This no longer includes National Review, whose editors had some kind of tantrum and fired him. ) He is the author of We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism and several other books. He’s had two books published by VDARE.com: FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT (also available in Kindle) and From the Dissident Right II: Essays 2013. His writings are archived atJohnDerbyshire.com.

(Republished from VDare by permission of author or representative)
 
Hide 48 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Blobby5 says:

    Have had this darn song going through my head all weekend!

  2. WGG [AKA "World\'s Greatest Grandson"] says:

    I know the song muleskinner blues well, but I have never heard that particular rockabilly version. I posit that the Fenderman were being intentionally subversive with their cover of a classic American country yodeling classic. The singer didn’t really yodel, but he did more of a creepy guffaw. The original Jimmie Rodgers version isn’t “weird,” it is American folkways come to life. The vocals of the 1970’s Dolly Parton iteration are the best.

    It works both ways, though. In your example, a cheeky rock band covered a classic country/bluegrass song. Conversely, the Manfred Mann song “Fox on the Run” became an instant bluegrass classic after being recorded by American Bill Emerson and associated acts. It has been covered by probably every bluegrass band since then. Bluegrass music is simply English/Scottish/Irish balladry combined with harmonizing vocals.

    Americans and British are extremely similar as far as I can tell, except that it seems the English and Scottish are under some kind of P.C. hypnosis. When political correctness starts to ruin their neighborhood, Americans wake up, but UK residents just dig in deeper. That’s the biggest difference I see.

  3. Trump is not okay with those overseas troop deployments. It would help if Derbyshire listened to Trump’s speeches, as I do–admittedly a bit obsessively. Trump has said time and again that the U.S. should be paid for defending other countries, and has further said that the current state of affairs not only means we’re being suckered, but disrespected at the same time. As for Palin, I think it was a blunder for Trump to bring her on. Her voice is shrill and awful, and that twang…god. But I welcome being proved wrong here.

    • Replies: @Connecticut Famer
  4. Truth says:

    Hey Guys, on that note, take heart; even with all of the political correctness, wanton immigration, women’s lib, negrophilia, and homo-love going on in the lower-50 today, there are still strong, alpha, righteous, rural white MEN who are ready to stand up to the dark hordes and protect your way…OUR way…of life!

    • Replies: @jtgw
    , @Hibernian
    , @Bliss
    , @AndrewR
  5. jtgw says: • Website

    So what I take from this is that immigration and foreign policy are the primary concerns of “gut conservatives”, and these are indeed the policies on which I think Trump is strongest (relative to his other policy proposals, that is). Because of his charisma, you have confidence he will actually achieve his goals in those areas, and then you think his reign will usher in an era of prosperity.

    On foreign policy I can see the attraction. I’m not convinced Trump is significantly better on this than other America Firsters like Paul or Cruz, however; witness his bellicose threats against ISIS here: http://www.ronpaulinstitute.org/archives/featured-articles/2015/august/10/isis-winning-will-trumps-plan-work/. I’m afraid a good portion of the GOP base, including Trump supporters, are easily led by the media to seek intervention against foreign monsters. This forces even “isolationists” to pander.

    On immigration, Trump has certainly staked out the strictest position. The question is how many liberties are American citizens expected to surrender in order to achieve the restrictionists’ wet dream of expelling all illegal immigrants and enforcing a moratorium on future immigration? For example, in order to expel anyone without proper documentation, everyone, citizen or not, will be required to carry their documents around with them and police will be authorized to stop everybody and demand to see papers. Do you really think the authorities will be happy to use this power only to expel unauthorized immigrants and will not use this power to abuse citizens in other ways?

    The immigration issue in particular is to me analogous to the issue of national security and civil liberties. For sure, terrorists exploited the openness of American society to carry out their attacks. But the conservative reaction was almost unanimous in supporting the suspension of those liberties, rather than in questioning the foolish foreign policies that provoked the attacks in the first place. Likewise, the welfare state has subsidized a good deal of low-skilled immigration and contributed to our economic and financial distress, but instead of questioning the welfare state, Trump supporters follow right-wing socialists like Sam Francis in wanting to keep their welfare and just get rid of the immigrants, as if that will solve all their long-term problems.

    • Replies: @Discard
    , @AnotherDad
  6. jtgw says: • Website
    @Truth

    What the hell was that about?

    • Replies: @Truth
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
  7. Truth says:
    @jtgw

    Hell, a proud WhiteMan, a taxpayer and a citizen of the great nation, wants a beer in his own good ole’ You -Ess of Aye and some dothead furrner who stowed away on a curry barge is telling him he can’t have it…and threatening him with a prison shiv?!?!?!

    • Replies: @jtgw
    , @Hibernian
  8. @jtgw

    Trolling. You took the bait.

    • Replies: @jtgw
  9. Spot on. Mr. Derbyshire! Thank you once again for articulating so many issues so much better than I can. The bottom line is that a vote for Trump is the only effective way, modest though it may be, that most of us have for showing our contempt of the venal, corrupt and incompetent elites who have brought us to the sad state we are in today.

  10. jtgw says: • Website
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Yeah I got that already thanks.

  11. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The Fendermen were on the same label, soma, as The Trashmen
    of Surfin Bird fame. Can’t get any more eccentric than those two.
    Early Minneapolis groups that eventually produced Prince, The
    Replacements and others. Of course the granddaddy of Minnesota
    music, Bob Dylan, started there also even though the UM crowd
    shunned him and he left for NYC. Spelled backwards soma is named
    after Amos Schleicter(sp?) local recording legend who gave many a
    chance to record their own or covers. Anyone remember “Liar Liar
    by the Chancellors? Made it to Dick Clarks’ Bandstand and almost if
    not number one nationally.

  12. Discard says:
    @jtgw

    The alternative to mass expulsion is inundation. You won’t have your civil liberties anyway if you allow the 3rd World to occupy your country. You may have a chance of recovering them if you return the country to its rightful owners.

    • Replies: @jtgw
  13. Svigor says:

    Wonderful piece, Derb. You even managed to coin a new word for me without having to actually coin it yourself.

    I wouldn’t mind a heated squirmish with Mrs. Palin.

    I’ve never seen or heard anything from Palin to top Hussein’s “Marine Corpse.” Or from Dan Quayle, for that matter.

    What the heck would the establishment know about conservatism? Tell me, is this conservative? GOP majorities handing over a blank check to fund Obamacare and Planned Parenthood and illegal immigration that competes for your jobs, and turning safety nets into hammocks, and all these new Democrat voters that are going to be coming on over the border as we keep the borders open, and bequeathing our children millions in new debt, and refusing to fight back for our solvency, and our sovereignty, even though that’s why we elected them and sent them as a majority to DC.

    You could give the negro-in-chief a million teleprompters, and he’d never say anything that sensible. For him to do it extemporaneously would be about as likely as a monkey banging out Shakespeare on a Selectric.

    The point they have is that Trump has (almost) no track record as a movement conservative. Trump shows no acquaintance with the ideas that have shaped the post-WW2 conservative movement.

    This is what’s so amazing about modern American politics: Trump, with (almost) no track record as a conservative, is far more of the sort of “conservative” that America needs than any other Republican candidate. To put it another way, Trump after a few speeches has genuinely displayed more right-of-center American patriotism than all but a vanishing few GOPers have displayed in their entire careers.

    Hey, GOP: don’t blame Trump for your profound weakness and treachery. It’s not his fault it takes almost no effort to show more genuine patriotism than we’ve seen from you vermin in the last twenty years and more.

    Don’t you see how weird it looks for Bill Buckley’s magazine to snipe at Donald Trump for being the beneficiary of inherited wealth?

    It’s not weird. It’s perfectly normal; “establishment” political hackery is about as genuine as a psychotic menstruating yenta with her wig half off. It’s all just whatever kitchen-sink bullshit she can throw at you. She throws whatever’s to hand. If you take any of her bullshit seriously, you’re doing it wrong.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    , @Olorin
  14. Svigor says:

    What the hell was that about?

    Boon gonna boon.

    • Replies: @Truth
  15. anon • Disclaimer says:

    and turning safety nets into hammocks

    I’ve used “safety nets into sofas” before for the alliteration but “hammocks” works better imo.

    Golden Bough – fave book as a kid.

    What the NRO girly-boys need to understand is that after the Cold War ended a pack of Wall St. sociopaths screwed up the US (and global) economy out of short-sighted greed and the girly-boys have been turned into the minions of those guys (in some cases probably literally).

  16. Mark Green says: • Website

    John Derbyshire: “We don’t want to see our nation’s leaders apologize to anyone, for anything.”

    Nothing?

    What if an American political leader(s) makes a monumental blunder and innocent people pay for it with their lives?

    Not even an apology?

    How about the Iraq war, Derb?

    As many as one million dead. Trillions of dollars squandered.

    Should Americans be proud of this venture or have ‘second thoughts’?

    Should those responsible for this catastrophe be held accountable in any way?

    The US invasion of Iraq was a preemptive war, based entirely on falsehoods.

    Not even an apology?

    What about the destruction of Libya, Derb?

    A rising and (relatively) civilized N. African country bombed by NATO and turned into a failed state. Massive chaos. Death. Suffering. And countless, impoverished refugees pouring into Europe.

    Good thing?

    Thank you for sharing your deep thoughts with us.

    • Replies: @jtgw
  17. jtgw says:
    @Discard

    I’ve heard similar scaremongering with respect to civil liberties and how we must do without them to preserve our freedom. Try to be more original.

    • Replies: @AnalogMan
  18. Priss Factor [AKA "Dominique Francon Society"] says:

    Well… if so many white Americans weren’t as dumb and ignorant as Palin, they would not be in this mess.

    Obama is a shi*, but Palin blaming Obama for her son’s problems is a true low.

    I mean her daughter didn’t turn out so great either.

    With parents like these…

  19. jtgw says:
    @Mark Green

    This is what you get when you base your worldview on your gut alone.

  20. Corvinus says:
    @Svigor

    “To put it another way, Trump after a few speeches has genuinely displayed more right-of-center American patriotism than all but a vanishing few GOPers have displayed in their entire careers.”

    Trump is a showman. Of course he displays right-of-center American patriotism. But he is not some bonafide conservative policy wise. He is an eastern bred, wealthy elitist who says a couple of buzzwords to get the crowd going. Once he is in office, you and other “true conservatives” will turn on him when his policies cater to “crony capitalists” and “banksters”. Barnum was right, a sucker is born every minute.

    • Replies: @bob k. mando
  21. AnalogMan says:

    Oh, man, I loved that song! First record I ever bought.

  22. AnalogMan says:
    @jtgw

    You asked a question, he gave you a perfectly civil and coherent reply. He has no way of knowing if you’ve heard it before. That doesn’t invalidate his reply, in any event. Try to be more gracious.

    • Replies: @jtgw
  23. jtgw says:
    @AnalogMan

    My question was rhetorical. Apologies for any misunderstanding.

    • Replies: @Jim Christian
  24. Truth says:
    @Svigor

    Why would you refer to a fine Caucasoid gentleman, holding a perfectly civil argument, as a “boon?”

  25. @jtgw

    Civility! I like it! Kudos, gentlemen.

  26. Hibernian says:
    @Truth

    When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

  27. Hibernian says:
    @Truth

    I think the “redneck” might be a little Zimmermanish.

  28. @Bragadocious

    Agree on Palin’s shrill voice. Like the proverbial nails on the blackboard. Alas, because the voice gets in the way of the words. Like Trumpy, she is speaking for millions and millions who have become strangers in their own country. But the RepubliCrats don’t care of course. Money talks, and they just follow the money.

  29. Welcome to the bizarre world of John Derbyshire, who obsessively calculates that Sarah Palin says the phrase “make America great again” an average of once every two minutes and fifty seconds, and who speaks of alpha males and fertility goddesses in an explicitly metaphorical sense while trying to convey the impression that they are no mere metaphors.

    Derb has never shaken off (and evidently will never shake off) his underlying Cartesian, Darwinist, historicist, and quite typically British metaphysical errors, not realizing that these are the very sources of the problems he decries. He attempts to plant himself firmly on the alt-right, but he brings with him the whole intellectual seedbed of liberal ideology.

    Traditional conservatism means nothing if not at least a correct view of metaphysical reality. This is furnished by classic Catholic Scholasticism, i.e. Aristotelian-Thomism in the natural and speculative sciences and perennialism in the political-social sphere. It is something light-years apart from—and opposed to—the Darwinite-quant ululations of twits like Sailer and Derb.

  30. Priss Factor [AKA "Dominique Francon Society"] says:

    A new term to describe naive whites innocently blind to what is coming at them. DITH or deer-in-the-headlights.

    So many diths in Germany.

    http://www.infowars.com/cologne-women-apologize-for-xenophobia-by-giving-migrants-roses-following-mass-molestation/

  31. Olorin says:
    @Svigor

    So basically she’s saying we shouldn’t import IMMIGRANT third world undertow multitudes.

    We should defund PP and let its major clientele breed our own coz abortion bad.

    Yeah, OK. All hail the all-American fertility goddess.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  32. @Corvinus

    Once he is in office, you and other “true conservatives” will turn on him when his policies cater to “crony capitalists” and “banksters”. Barnum was right, a sucker is born every minute.

    which makes him, worst case, exactly the same as ¡Jeb! Bush, John Boehner or Paul Ryan?

    you’ve convinced me, Trump it is.

    i mean, jesus, at least Trump is not campaigning on the idea of rewarding flagrant lawbreakers by giving them votes.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  33. Rehmat says:

    Yes Mr. Derbyshire, Sarah Palin, a cocaine addict may present your concept of morality but not mine.

    Joe McGinniss’ “The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin,” claims that Palin had a one night stand with former NBA star Glen Rice nine months before her marriage to Todd. The book also details how Palin allegedly had a six-month affair with Todd’s friend and business partner Brad Hansan……

    http://rehmat1.com/2011/09/16/pat-robertson-%e2%80%98divorce-your-terminal-sick-wife%e2%80%99/

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  34. Corvinus says:
    @bob k. mando

    “which makes him, worst case, exactly the same as ¡Jeb! Bush, John Boehner or Paul Ryan?”

    No, Trump is observably not like any of those you listed.

    “you’ve convinced me, Trump it is.”

    Go ahead, just bastardize your principles for a two-issue president.

    “i mean, jesus, at least Trump is not campaigning on the idea of rewarding flagrant lawbreakers by giving them votes.”

    No, he is campaigning using the Seinfeld line “This show is ultimately about nothing.”

    • Replies: @anowow
  35. @Olorin

    We should defund PP and let its major clientele breed our own coz abortion bad.

    On just about every social barometer, white folks (and not just in America) were better off back when abortion was illegal and vilified. That’s how people with a healthy racial identity handle it.

    Now, if you want to make a case for legal abortion only for minorities, please go ahead and do so. Germans once did.

    I don’t want it legal for my race because I want my race to have a future.

  36. @Rehmat

    Yes Mr. Derbyshire, Sarah Palin, a cocaine addict may present your concept of morality but not mine.

    I’ll take Mrs Palin’s addiction over Frau Merkel’s. The former won’t damage me.

  37. anowow says:
    @Corvinus

    Even if Trump is a fraud and people are made to look like fools he has shifted the Overton Window. It will not shift back. We are seeing the end of the marriage of convenience between Reagan Republicans and Wall Street. Who will then herd the feral white underclass?

    The GOP is doomed, at least as a presidential party and maybe as a senatorial party, if Trump is a sham because working class and middle class whites will then be disillusioned and whatever rump GOP survives, made up of some professional whites and hardcore hawks, will consistently lose to the Democrats. They will survive in local elections and in the House, but consistently attacking their largest voting bloc brings diminishing returns, even if that bloc has shown itself to be naive and susceptible to maudlin, blood-thirsty b.s. It’s 2016 and now the rubes realize the Bush clan doesn’t have their interest at heart? Maybe in 30 years they might start rethinking the Pentagon as a force for good and cultural stability.

    It will be interesting to see what happens to Evangelicals as a political force. I think Trump might bring about the end of that decades-long role of the Midwestern and Sunbelt Evangelical voting bloc, a force for voting and idiotic foreign policy, if pathetically ineffectual in trying to stem decadence. And Falwell’s boy speaking for Trump is some delicious irony. Almost makes one willing to forgive the Falwell family for their poisonous role in American History- almost.

    There appears to be a split between the Midwestern and Southern Evangelicals, the Germano-Scandinavian and Mid-Atlantic cultural background of the former makes them somewhat less supportive of Trump. It would be interesting to see how support for Trump breaks down in Iowa. Not surprisingly, Trump does poorly in upper middle class burbs, but I’m willing to bet he does better in southern Iowa, which has stronger Upland South ties, than in more Scandinavian areas. But who knows?

    Noam Chomsky once said, I believe, that America only needs a leader who can’t be bought in order to go fascist. I’m not advocating fascism, but I’m not sure it’s worse than an oligarchic, predatory elite lording it over a depraved, desperate, Balkanized population, dominated by a horde of angry, career harpies advocating Universalist Messianic militarism.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  38. @jtgw

    The question is how many liberties are American citizens expected to surrender in order to achieve the restrictionists’ wet dream of expelling all illegal immigrants and enforcing a moratorium on future immigration? For example, in order to expel anyone without proper documentation, everyone, citizen or not, will be required to carry their documents around with them and police will be authorized to stop everybody and demand to see papers. Do you really think the authorities will be happy to use this power only to expel unauthorized immigrants and will not use this power to abuse citizens in other ways?

    Nice apologia for anarcho-tyranny.

    We no longer have any civil liberty to be without “papers”. To get my job–like a lot of salaried professional jobs–i had to show legality to work (in my case my passport). To fly anywhere i have to produce a federally approved document (my state’s driver’s license won’t even cut it pretty soon unless they come into compliance with federal requirements). To drive on the highway i must have my “papers”. My car must have and is identifiable by a license plate linking it to me, and the government takes pictures of it everywhere–knows it’s mine and bills me for driving on some roads. Whatever i purchase, wherever i go my bank cards leave a paper trail that the government is free to access if they want to mess with me be in criminal or a tax matter. And i certainly can’t decide “hey i don’t feel like paying my taxes to this bloated super state”, they know *exactly* where i live, what income i’m making, where my assets are–and they demand their cut or else they’ll make trouble and start seizing stuff. Heck, i even had to purchase Obama approved health insurance–which was about $500 more a month than what i was paying–or they’d slap an extra tax penalty on me.

    For normal middle class Americans … the state has your number. Carrying your “papers” and complying with state edicts is routine and required, if you want to continue your middle class lifestyle.

    What the super-state simply *refuses* to do is enforce immigration law. It schools illegal’s kids–gratis. It provides emergency medical care and other welfare services–gratis, courtesy of the well policed American middle classes. It doesn’t bother to enforce employment eligibility across whole sectors of the low wage economy. It doesn’t bother to deport folks who simply don’t show up for immigration hearings. Heck, it doesn’t even bother to deport illegal alien criminals!

    The state doesn’t need to send the cops down the street checking people’s papers. All it has to do is enforce the law on aliens like it does on the much more “visible” legal Americans. Mandatory E-verify for all jobs, with some special attention aimed at hospitality, meatpacking, construction and agriculture industries. (The reason Obama blocked this is because it would work.) You’d probably need some intensive auditing of contractors in the more informal construction and ag industries. Check that their subs EINs were valid, then check the subs’ employees. But once you have established the expectation of enforcement so that there was a level playing field–contractors not having to compete against alien cheap labor outfits–the market will sort out quite well. With no jobs for illegals you pull the plug and the cesspool of alien cheap labor drains. Self-deportation.

    This is coupled with quick deportation of any illegals the government comes into contact with–school, welfare office, traffic stop, courthouse, jail. The end of any illegal alien welfare. (There shouldn’t be any immigrant welfare either–make it or go home–but that’s another step up.) Illegal aliens criminals sent home.

    This is all utterly straightforward. The government simply applying the same bureaucratic “show me your papers” drill, it routinely demands of regular citizens to get a job, attend school, drive or fly. The reason we have a huge illegal alien population is because the government(s)–national and local–have made an at least semi-conscious decision as a result of leftist–“racist!”–agitation and cheap labor lobby sympathy to *not* enforce the law and carve out a “whatever” zone of bureaucratic looking-the-other-way non-enforcement that certainly doesn’t apply to Americans. Stop that and 95% of the issue is resolved without doing much of anything regarding your fantasy of “paperless” whatever. (What can you do without your papers? Maybe walk through your neighborhood?)

    ~~~

    The 2nd and even more critical point is the one Discard made, which you cavilierly dismissed:

    Whatever you may *feel* or *believe*–no matter how deeply you feel and believe it– your standard plate of Anglo-Saxonish liberties, does not just descend upon you by the good grace of God, nor words printed in some constitution. It depends on being part of an Anglo-Saxonish *people* who general believe and respect it. (You’ve already lost a good bit of your natural rights–freedom of association–under the guise of “civil rights”, just because we are now are controlled by an elite who don’t like it and have a populace that in the net won’t stand up and demand it.)

    When your nation is replaced by Latin Americans, a sprinkling of Asians and–coming if immigration isn’t stopped–a deluge of Africans, then yeah, the government may be more *incompetent* in tracking you, but it won’t have any qualms about oppressing you if it sees fit. A bunch of musty words by some dead white males 200+ years ago won’t mean shit.

    The most important thing determining the character of a nation is the *people* that make up the nation–their genes, their culture, their civilization. That’s what must be protected first and foremost or you have … nothing.

    • Agree: Travis, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @jtgw
    , @ATX Hipster
  39. jtgw says: • Website
    @AnotherDad

    Nice apologia for tyranny.

    Why aren’t you outraged by your lack of civil liberties? Instead of seeking to remove all these tyrannical impediments to your freedom of association and contract, you want to keep all these chains and then add more just to get at that small number of contracts that the government has somehow failed to bring under its control yet. The existence of illegal labor should be a signal to you that the government interferes too much in the market, making legal labor too costly for employers, but you derive the completely wrong lesson from it.

    As for your arguments that liberty depends on culture, I actually agree, but you seem not to have noticed that your liberty has already been taken away from you, that your much-vaunted Anglo-Saxon culture is already a failure at preserving your freedom. You’re focusing on immigration as if we are currently living in a libertarian paradise and we just need to keep out the statist enemies. But we are living in a statist hellhole, not a libertarian paradise, so your focus should be on relentlessly tearing down the state and rolling back taxes and regulations, not on trying to extend state power into all the places that have somehow managed to save themselves from it.

  40. jtgw says: • Website

    I think there’s a good analogy with healthcare policy and the left-wing push for complete socialization. Government interference in the healthcare market has driven up prices and made insurance unaffordable for many. Further interference from Obamacare to make it more affordable for some just makes it less affordable for others, which stimulates the campaign for full nationalization of the market under a single-payer system. Both Sanders and Trump have adopted this approach. The final result, of course, will be severe shortages and government-rationing of care, as we find in countries with fully socialized medicine, but few are willing to hear this because they’re more concerned with fairness, even if everyone is equally miserable, than liberty.

  41. Bliss says:
    @Truth

    That should serve as a reality check for south asians: to white racists they too are ni****s.

  42. Corvinus says:
    @anowow

    “Even if Trump is a fraud and people are made to look like fools he has shifted the Overton Window. It will not shift back.”

    Only until there are similar candidates like Trump, with the same observable results as he is achieving by pounding at the same narrative openly, will there be this shift. It is too early to tell whether Trump is merely a blip on the radar or a trailblazer with sustainability.

    “We are seeing the end of the marriage of convenience between Reagan Republicans and Wall Street. Who will then herd the feral white underclass?”

    
Trump is part of Wall Street. There is no divorce taking place.

    “The GOP is doomed, at least as a presidential party and maybe as a senatorial party, if Trump is a sham because working class and middle class whites will then be disillusioned and whatever rump GOP survives, made up of some professional whites and hardcore hawks, will consistently lose to the Democrats.”


    Again, only until there are several election cycles within a certain time frame by which the GOP loses clout and influence at the national level will one be able to clearly state that the GOP is going the way of the Federalist Party. Furthermore, working and middle class whites know exactly what is Trump—an eastern bred educated billionaire elitist who is a showman focusing on a couple of issues. There ought not to be any disillusionment considering the record of Trump’s activities and proclivities.

    
“They will survive in local elections and in the House, but consistently attacking their largest voting bloc brings diminishing returns, even if that bloc has shown itself to be naive and susceptible to maudlin, blood-thirsty b.s.”

    Wait, are you disrespecting whites? I thought they were high IQ types who clearly understood the machinations of politics.

    “It’s 2016 and now the rubes realize the Bush clan doesn’t have their interest at heart?”

    
Really, whites are rubes? That’s anti-white.

    “It will be interesting to see what happens to Evangelicals as a political force. I think Trump might bring about the end of that decades-long role of the Midwestern and Sunbelt Evangelical voting bloc, a force for voting and idiotic foreign policy, if pathetically ineffectual in trying to stem decadence.”

    You’re going to have to be more specific, considering that Falwell was and is at the forefront of the cultural war on the right.

    “Almost makes one willing to forgive the Falwell family for their poisonous role in American History- almost.”



    What poisonous role?

    “There appears to be a split between the Midwestern and Southern Evangelicals, the Germano-Scandinavian and Mid-Atlantic cultural background of the former makes them somewhat less supportive of Trump.”

    And what gives you this impression?

    “It would be interesting to see how support for Trump breaks down in Iowa. Not surprisingly, Trump does poorly in upper middle class burbs, but I’m willing to bet he does better in southern Iowa, which has stronger Upland South ties, than in more Scandinavian areas. But who knows?”

    Exactly, who knows until the smoke clears in Iowa.

    “Noam Chomsky once said, I believe, that America only needs a leader who can’t be bought in order to go fascist. I’m not advocating fascism, but I’m not sure it’s worse than an **oligarchic, predatory elite lording it over a depraved, desperate, Balkanized population, dominated by a horde of angry, career harpies advocating Universalist Messianic militarism**.”



    You ought to refrain from such grandiose comparisons, considering that your overall assumption about our current society** is, well, based on assumptions.

    Praytell, who is this “oligarchic, predatory elite”? Would not Trump fit in with your characterization here?

  43. @AnotherDad

    100% agree with every word. Great post.

  44. I think he means return to being a creditor nation. A productive, innovative and prosperous nation. Put another way – a great place to live and work again. Or that’s what I hope he means.

  45. While five children is certainly a high number by modern standards, I think it is still too low to anoint someone as a fertility goddess. Nancy Pelosi has five children. Barbara Bush has five children – six if we count the one who died.

  46. Jeff77450 says:

    Mr. Derbyshire, good article, as always. For the record, I do *not* think that Donald Trump is qualified to be President. The office of the Presidency should *not* be considered to be an entry-level position. There are two executive positions that provide experience in governing, Vice President and governor of a state. (I’m not saying that *anyone* who has served in either position would be guaranteed to be a good president). In addition, Dwight D. Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy demonstrated that a solid military or legislative background coupled with actual *competence* can produce good results.

    Donald Trump has not served as Vice President, governed a state, commanded all allied forces on D-Day, served in congress or even delivered the mail.

    It blew my mind that he didn’t know what the word “triad” meant as it relates to national defense. I’m just a retired master sergeant but even I knew, without having to look it up, that triad refers to the three strategic components of our nuclear offensive capabilities, i.e. ICBMs, SLBMs and bombers.

    To all you Trump-supporters out there I just want to say that “I get it.” We’re all profoundly weary of being lied to and the daily obfuscation and Trump just comes out and says whatever is on his mind. It’s refreshing and entertaining in its way. That said, I’m flabbergasted at all the undeniably *stupid* things that he’s said. Saying that he was going to make Mexico pay for a wall on the border. Saying, in effect, that most illegal aliens are violent criminals. (Without a doubt some are but not most). Putting down U.S. servicemen who have been prisoners-of-war. Commenting on how unattractive Carly Fiorina’s face is (according to D.T). Saying that Hillary Clinton got “shlonged” by Barack Obama. Stupid Stupid Stupid.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments on articles more than two weeks old will be judged much more strictly on quality and tone


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All John Derbyshire Comments via RSS