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Do #WhiteTrashLivesMatter to Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon Party Bad Boy Kevin Williamson?

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National Review’s Kevin Williamson

My old National Review colleague Kevin Williamson [Email him] has been frightening the horses with a piece he posted at the National Review website the other day. It’s a subscription website; you have to pay a quarter to read the article. I gritted my teeth and paid.

Kevin’s theme is white trash. They’re complaining, he says. They think their jobs were stolen by immigrants or shipped abroad by rapacious capitalists. They think they should be able to go on living in the place where they grew up, even after the jobs have left. They nurse “poorly informed and sentimental ideas about what those old Rust Belt factory jobs actually paid.” They cherish “the concept of the nation as an extended family”–and that’s a European concept, not an American one, according to Kevin.

And look at what’s happening to their lives, says Kevin, wandering over into Charles Murray territory. Their families have disintegrated. Divorce, drug addiction, suicide … Here we get to the politics:

It is easy to imagine a generation of young men being raised without fathers and looking out the window like a kid in an after-school special, waiting for Daddy to come home … Some of them end up grown men still staring out that window, waiting for the father-führer figure they have spent their lives imagining, the protector and vindicator who will protect them, provide for them, and set things in order.

Shall I pause for a nanosecond while you figure out who Kevin has in mind as the father-führer figure?

R-i-ight. These are Trump voters!

It’s all just victimology, says Kevin. Quote: “Nobody did this to them. They failed themselves.” Another longish quote:

The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets … The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul.

This article of Kevin’s generated a lot of outraged criticism, some of it fair, some not.

Among the fair criticism: people saying that Kevin would never write so scathingly about poor blacks; and, if he did, National Review would not publish it. Both things are true. [Right: A 2010 NR cover story by Williamson called Keeping Blacks Poor which blames liberal policy initiatives for black poverty, and a book called What Doomed Detroit, answer: more liberal policy initiatives. ]

It is further true that, as dysfunctional as the white underclass may be, they are nothing like as antisocial, certainly nothing like as homicidal, as the black underclass. Nor are they anything like as big a proportion of the white population as underclass blacks are of the black population.

See, Kevin? I can say these things on VDARE.com, but you can’t. Eat your heart out, pal.

I know Kevin fairly well. My rather strong impression is that he’s a race realist, in an intuitive sort of way. I mean, he has no math or science, and understands nothing about the quantitative study of human nature; but at some level, he knows the score.

He is, though, young and ambitious. He can’t take the kind of risks that a geezer like me, at the other end of life, can cheerfully take. He knows what happened to Jason Richwine, and he’s not going to let it happen to him.

ORDER IT NOW

Further, he wants to cut a figure. Last week, you’ll remember, I said there are really four political parties in the U.S.A. today:

  • The White Gentry Liberal Party;
  • The Labor Unions and Non-Asian Minorities [NAMs] Party;
  • The Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon Party;
  • The White Prole Party.

Each party has its own dedicated commentariat. Well, Kevin wants to position himself as the Bad Boy of the Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon commentariat, the one who says out loud what others merely think.

That does not, or course, mean saying unkind things about blacks: Donorist-Neocon types are just as prissy and hypocritical about race as liberals are, if not more so. Saying unkind things about white trash, however, works fine in those precincts.

I said there were some unfair reactions to Kevin’s article. Mostly people picked on him for saying that economically derelict white trash communities deserve to die. This, said the critics, is sheer Tim-Wise-ery. Die, white trash!

Come on, guys, let’s have a little respect for the meaning of words. Kevin said the communities should die. What he wishes for the people is that they should rent U-Hauls and get out of there.

My biggest problem with Kevin’s piece is his glib conflating of Trump voters with the white underclass. Meth-addled white underclass types with chaotic lives don’t vote, Kevin. Even if they did, there’s nothing like enough of them to give Trump the numbers he’s been getting. Trump voters, as I said up above, are mainly working- and middle-class suburban types—like me, and my next-door neighbors here on Long Island.

Just on those grounds, I’m going to call nonsense on Kevin’s piece.

The white underclass are the aborigines of the post-industrial age. It’s absurd for Kevin Williamson to tell them to get a U-Haul and move out of their dying communities. They’ll just be underclass whites somewhere else, with lives just as empty. There is no solution for them, any more than there is for Eskimos or aborigines, other than the one they’ve found in drink, drugs, and despair. The smart, capable, and energetic ones will escape and get lives, as always happens; the rest will sink into squalor.

Charles Murray, who wrote about the problems of the white underclass in his 2012 book Coming Apart, is more honest about this than is Kevin Williamson. Last July, I reviewed three social science books in a column for VDARE: one of them was Murray’s Coming Apart, another was Robert Putnam’s Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. I linked to a televised debate between Murray and Putnam, where Murray says this (click here to go to 43:24):

Bob has already referred to my take-away from all this with the ways in which we really need a civic Great Awakening. However, I’ve got to say that the fact is, civic Great Awakenings have about as much chance of transforming what’s going on as a full implementation of Bob’s “purple” programs does.

The parsimonious way to extrapolate the trends that Bob describes so beautifully in the book is to predict an America permanently segregated into social classes that no longer share the common bonds that once made this country so exceptional; and the destruction of the national civic culture that Bob and I both cherish. I hope for a better outcome: I do not expect it.

The American dream in crisis? A discussion with Robert Putnam and Charles Murray,Streamed live on Jun 22, 2015

And if you think that’s the bad news, talk to an AI alarmist—one of those people, I mean, and the category includes some very smart people indeed, like Elon Musk and Steven Hawking—one of those people who think that Artificial Intelligence will advance to a point where all of us, our entire species, is the aborigines, our culture superseded by one much more advanced, Homo sapiens shuffled off into reservations to drink ourselves to death.

ORDER IT NOW

Yesterday, the Eskimos and Apaches; today, the white underclass; tomorrow perhaps you and me. Who knows?

Like Charles Murray, I hope for a better outcome, but I do not expect it.

VDARE.com Editor Peter Brimelow writes: I’m reluctant to interfere with Derb in his full We Are Doomed mode, but the official VDARE.com position is that tightening the labor market through an immigration moratorium must improve wages and job prospects for all American workers–including, on the margin, the underclass.

John Derbyshire [email him] writes an incredible amount on all sorts of subjectsfor all kinds of outlets. (This no longer includes National Review, whose editors had some kind of tantrum and fired him. ) He is the author of We Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism and several other books. He’s had two books published by VDARE.com: FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT (also available in Kindle) and From the Dissident Right II: Essays 2013. His writings are archived atJohnDerbyshire.com.

(Reprinted from VDare.com by permission of author or representative)
 

175 Comments to "Do #WhiteTrashLivesMatter to Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon Party Bad Boy Kevin Williamson?"

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  1. Kevin looks like Satan from a B-rated ’60s movie.

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  2. Where I find Williamson especially wrong is in his attempt to explain away the trade deficit with China, which he claims is mostly the result of the Chinese being poor and unable to afford American products. We do not, in fact, have free trade with China, and have not had it since Nixon reopened commercial relations with that country. China, though not to the extent it was under Mao, is still a command economy. One aspect where this is evident is in that the Chinese currency does not float in the world market, but is pegged to the dollar, in such a way that China has an advantage in U.S. markets. China has consistently operated in a mercantilist fashion.

    Another way in which Williamson underestimates or dismisses the effects of policy on domestic industry and employment is by failing to consider the incentives that U.S. corporate income taxation and regulation give multinational companies to move their production overseas. By offshoring operations to countries where corporate income is taxed at 15% or 10% rather than 35%, they save the incremental cost, and as long as they don’t bring the earnings back into the U.S., never pay tax on them here. Not only jobs, but capital, end up being exported. There is also the strategy of ‘inversion,’ whereby a U.S.-based company acquires a foreign one in a lower-tax jurisdiction, and the new entity created by the merger is domiciled in the foreign country. Despite recent IRS rulings designed to curtail such tax arbitrage measures, they are still attractive, and continue to be used.

    To the extent that the factors mentioned have brought about plant closures in the United States, the unemployment that has come about thereby is the result of policy decisions, and the remedy is not just for the affected people to “get a U-Haul,” but for policy decisions to be made that would help them. If not tariffs, there is legitimate reason to apply anti-dumping penalties to Chinese imports, and to pressure China to abandon the most egregious aspects of its mercantilist policies.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
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  3. Isn’t the “rent U-Hauls and leave” solution a form of ethnic cleansing? And, as John points out, where do they go? Do we owe people on the left-hand side of the bell curve, who are becoming increasingly economically irrelevant, the chance to work and earn a living, even if it’s doing something that could be done cheaper by a machine or in another country?

    I can’t believe that I’m advocating this, but it seems to me we need a managed economy, with certain sectors protected by tariffs or subsidies, or both, from foreign cheap labor and automation. That’s where the low IQ will work. So no more free trade. This needs to be coupled with a 40-60 year moratorium on any mass immigration.

    The cognitive elite, including Kevin Williamson, need to read Michael Young’s The Rise of the Meritocracy; it ends in a rebellion of the low IQ that kills large numbers of those that have previously dominated the meritocracy, including the book’s fictional narrator. The whites whose communities Kevin Williamson thinks ought to die might have different plans.

    • Agree: Bill
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  4. “frightening the horses”

    http://www.breitbart.com/2016-presidential-race/2016/03/20/anti-trump-protester-april-foster-charged-with-hitting-police-horse-in-kansas-city/

    The anti-Trump coalition represents evil in all its manifestations.

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  5. “Well, Kevin wants to position himself as the Bad Boy of the Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon commentariat, the one who says out loud what others merely think.”

    Agree. Williamson’s not totally wrong, but he overreaches. I live in a busted-up Rust Belt community. A great many people have left, some have boomeranged back when their big-city jobs disappeared, the cost of living here is very low, some don’t have the folding money or credit for the U-Haul to take them to Seattle, etc. The land-locked steel mills here were undone mostly by domestic competition, not China. Group health insurance is not compensation for work, although most people mistakenly believe it is. Yep, there’s heroin, crystal meth, and so on, but a lot of folks hold themselves together despite bleak prospects for advancement.

    I don’t know Williamson, haven’t read “NR” in decades, but, yeah, when I scanned his article a few days ago, I thought this was a young guy who’s making a bid for attention from lobbyists and think tanks who might hire him.

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  6. I like that this American election is laying bare just how much they hate us all:

    Who are these idiot Donald Trump supporters? Trump loves the poorly educated — and they love him right back
    Urban poor are parasites who need personal responsibility. Trump fans are victims of economic forces. Yeah, sure

    http://www.salon.com/2016/03/20/who_are_these_idiot_donald_trump_supporters_trump_loves_the_poorly_educated_and_they_love_him_right_back/

    Salon is progressive and NRO is conservative. Totally different word-views, I assure you.

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  7. Kevin Williamson is my enemy. I say that as a white prole. He and his murderous ilk get my people killed. Dead. I have much more in common with the brown proles that Williamson likes to kill in large numbers than I do with Williamson. I would advise him to be cognizant of the fact that he is making millions of very real enemies. If he’s ok with that so am I.

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  8. “I don’t know Williamson, haven’t read “NR” in decades, but, yeah, when I scanned his article a few days ago, I thought this was a young guy who’s making a bid for attention from lobbyists and think tanks who might hire him.”

    This is the most adequate explanation of the NR Trumpsteria. At first, I thought that the magazine’s antipathy toward a Trump nomination reflected the fear that he would lose to Hillary Clinton. Yet Cruz, belatedly endorsed by NR, seems less electable – this is a man who cannot even get along with his own Senate caucus. NR now seems to fear that Trump might win the general election. I have never seen NR publish such invective against a Democrat as they have against Trump.

    And why? If elected, Trump would fill his administration with those Republicans that had given him support. NR has nailed its colors to the mast – no chance that any of its staff could get a patronage appointment or work effectively as a lobbyist. Trump will draw on the “Buchanan boys” that Williamson and his ilk detest. Wouldn’t it be a kick in the head if President Trump drew his “brains trust” from the staff of Chronicles rather than that of NR?

    I am sorry to say that I cannot contemplate Kevin Williamson without being reminded of the “Terrible Williamsons,” or, alternatively, the eponymous character of Henry St. Clair Whitehead’s short story, “Williamson.”

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  9. Priss Factor [AKA "Dominique Francon Society"]
    says:
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    That stupid bald-headed BREAKING-BAD-lookalike punkass fool needs to be rejected by all serious patriots.

    He cooks up ideological meth for cuckservatives.

  10. says:
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    Kevin Williamson is my enemy. I say that as a white prole. He and his murderous ilk get my people killed. Dead. I have much more in common with the brown proles that Williamson likes to kill in large numbers than I do with Williamson. I would advise him to be cognizant of the fact that he is making millions of very real enemies. If he’s ok with that so am I.

    I think this election, specifically Trump, has changed things permanently. It has opened the eyes of many to the real enemy. The GOP has sustained a fatal wound and cannot recover. The globalists now have millions of new Americans who are on to them and view them as traitors to this country. Little men like Williamson and Charles Murray are two sissy men who haven’t done anything in their lives (except waste ink and electrons producing bullshit). And they are both rabidly anti-Trump non-stop. There is something about Trump that sends the BS-ing beta males into hysterical hissy fits.

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  11. 1/ Let’s see if I get this right.

    When Blacks go on welfare, use heroin, dress badly, have kids out of wedlock, get morbidly obese (the ones not on heroin), won’t move to better their lives, etc its genetic.

    HBD.

    When Whites go on welfare, use heroin, dress badly, have kids out of wedlock, get morbidly obese (the ones not on heroin), won’t move to better their lives, etc its a result of environmental factors (trade treaties, competition from immigrants, the Chinese allegedly lowering their currency, the culture)

    Aytchbeedee? What’s that?

    2/ For those who actually want to rent a U-Haul and maybe improve their lives: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_unemployment_rate

    As I’ve mentioned before when people complained about problems in SoCal: ND

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  12. Why, your failure to see the dramatic and fundamental difference between these two organs of entirely opposed ideologies is only a reflection of your limited, peasant mindset, and why you should rely upon us, your humble but much more intelligent betters, to decide these things for you.

    Ta.

  13. Sir, you had me at “NR has nailed its colors to the mast.”

  14. Priss Factor [AKA "Dominique Francon Society"]
    says:
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    Looking at Williamson’s dumbass bald head makes me sick. He looks like some hick devil who thinks he’s a cosmo-cuck intellectual.

    Looking at his unsightly head calls for soul-cleansing.

    You gotta listen to some uplifting music like this.

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  15. Kevin Williamsons advice for poorer off whites to U-Haul is similar to something Margaret Thatcher said about unemployed British workers, something along the lines of ‘on your bike’ I believe was the phrase used. But where are they supposed to go? The whole country is a rancid burger of wrath. I’d like to see what Kevin would do if he was to lose his fortune & was left without a source of income in a neo-Hooverville rustbelt town – I think his own advice would have a pretty hollow ring to it. Anony-mouse too. It’s always good advice until THEY have to do it.

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  16. Thanks.

    “NR has nailed its colors to the mast – no chance that any of its staff could get a patronage appointment or work effectively as a lobbyist.”

    Yeah, I agree. The visceral, ad hominem-heavy anti-Trumpism I’ve heard does seem to be explained by the possibility he’ll upset the gravy train Washington folks are used to. Trump spoke here before the Ohio primary. All I heard was a rich guy with the popular touch promising to make things better. He drew a lot of cross-over voters in my area. How in hell that can be “divisive” or “disastrous” for Republicans is beyond me. Unless, of course, “Republicans” means only a label of convenience used by a bloc of Washington elites and their big-money backers.

    • Agree: Travis
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  17. Aspirational snobbery at its worst, Williamson himself is from Amarillo!

  18. Looking at Williamson’s dumbass bald head makes me sick. He looks like some hick devil who thinks he’s a cosmo-cuck intellectual.

    Looking at his unsightly head calls for soul-cleansing

    Hilarious, my thoughts exactly. Don’t you love the earring and the red handkerchief in the breast pocket of the charcoal blazer with black turtle neck look? Dude’s trying too hard to capture that Anton LeVay look, which these creepy-cuck types think is mysteriously masculine. But we should be glad this pseudo intellectual redneck doesn’t have a real job– e.g., producing stuff like the people he denigrates– where he could endanger other people.

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  19. A tangent, to be sure, but this aspect of the issue reminds me of it:

    What is behind this notion that people should never be expected to leave the place where they grew up, even when the jobs go?

    I admit I’m a city boy and of upper-working/lower middle class origins [parents high school only education]. I grew up in an inner suburb of a biggish city [Toronto- It's Big for Us (tm)], moved away at perhaps the rather late age of 24 and returned briefly at 26 before leaving again. Couldn’t care less about visiting it even though I live only a few hundred miles away. Visit only for my parents, and even then they mostly come here. When they go, I may never visit Toronto again unless work requires it.

    So I concede I have always struggled with the emphasis on locality and “place” that means so much to so many, whether from small towns or very particular neighbourhoods in American cities. I get their importance intellectually. I don’t feel them at all. It’s weird- I do feel that sense of particularity at the nationalist level, and maybe the province-regional level if pushed. Not city or town, much. Or rather, more for my adopted city than native one, and still not that much.

    All of that is preface.

    We have ancient debates in Canada about the relative poverty of some provinces and the practical necessity that some have found, in every generation, to leave their home province for work elsewhere. Typically, though not exclusively, from the Atlantic provinces to Ontario and Alberta.

    I on several occasions have been struck by the resentment of Atlantic Canadians of my acquaintance, people with whom I otherwise agree on much, that anyone should say this is reasonable. Not that they are impractical- I know these people because they have all done it and moved. But they feel on some deep level that they are owed the ability to prosper at home.

    I suppose we all do on some level. But if there is no work, there is no work. All these places were founded by people coming from somewhere else in search of it. The oil wells, fishing grounds, whatever, lured them there when those were good bases for prosperity. Few of these communities in North America are more than a few centuries old, and not all residents go back to the beginning. If ancestors came in search of the pot of gold, and it is now exhausted, what is so immoral about expecting descendants to do the same and go elsewhere?

    As we speak, vast regions of entire continents are doing just that, to our own long-term collective detriment. If North Americans lack the resources to move within their own countries to prosper, what does that say of us?

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  20. That struck me too.

    Williamson says things about poor whites he wouldn’t dare say about poor blacks, and demands agency and action from the former on pain of collective death but insists the latter are merely victims of others.

    And this site calls him out for his raging hypocrisy, as it should. I could hardly read his article without being overwhelmed by it.

    And yet…

    In these parts, the reverse hypocrisy prevails. At least a bit. Some will acknowledge that the economic dislocations that have crushed underclass whites are not unrelated to those that have done the same to blacks, and see some of the same social dysfunctions in both. Derb is probably right that it’s not as bad among whites, though I can’t say myself.

    But in the crunch, it ends up being “blacks are genetically inferior according to this and that metric [it may be so] and that explains their fate entirely [less sure it's the whole picture] whereas underclass whites just need federal assistance to be all jim dandy again”.

    There are more commonalities between these communities already evident than that. And there are similar commonalities between every mulatto American who made good and left and every white American from Appalachia, rural Texas, or some such places and left behind community and even family. The sequences of events are comparable. And probably so are the personal and family guilts and losses.

    And there is probably as little hope for either, except at the margins.

    America of 1955 got super rich and relatively egalitarian in its richness because it could afford to- the manufacturing capacity of the entire world outside North America was either worn out or totally destroyed and had to be rebuilt. That world was already fading in the mid 60s when German and Japanese manufacturing started to hit their stride again, and much of it was already gone in the 1970s when the oil shocks added to the pressure and foreign manufactures started to compete on both price and quality with American ones. [I dimly remember the jokes about Japanese products in the 1970s. Yet already superior.]

    That postwar world is not coming back. It was a miracle contingent on specific historic events and America was lucky it lasted a whole generation, more or less. [This all applies in some ways to Canada, too. We were a comparatively bit player, but we'd essentially industrialized overnight during the war and have never really let go of some dreams from the 1950s ourselves.]

    The question is where do we all go now.

    A more nationalist policy strikes me as good sense for both our countries, though I obviously would prefer America not go whole hog. I don’t want my country impoverished or annexed. Some economic management is probably good on the domestic sphere for both of us. Globalization has reached the point of diminishing returns, to probably misuse the term.

    But either way, there probably isn’t a yellow brick road awaiting the denizens of poor, isolated white working class people, any more than for those living in the ghetto.

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  21. I’m an expat myself, living a continent away from where I grew up and visiting only to stay in touch with family, so I’m not well-qualified to comment on people’s sense of identity with a particular place. The willingness to move on when opportunities are better elsewhere is, on the whole, a desirable thing. Some people (you and me) are more willing, others less so. I know people who have lived all of their life in pretty much one place who are totally comfortable with their decision.

    The distinction that the Williams piece brings out is why there is a need to move on. If the gold field is played out, if the coal mine’s exhausted, if the climate has dried up and crops will no longer grow, then staying place makes no sense. But these industrial towns in the Northeast have died economically largely to public policy decisions to promote free trade and force these communities to compete with foreigners who work for much less and are used to much lower standards of living. Add to that immigrants (legal and otherwise) who will also live at much lower standards of living (packing 8-12 people in an apartment designed for 4. Add to that the increasing presence of women in the workplace and automation: perfect economic storm!

    Finally, I get back to my question, where are these people supposed to go once they’ve loaded the U-Haul? Where’s Kevin Williamson’s bright shiny El Dorado that these drug-addicted loser homebodies are missing? Most of the reading I’ve done on the subject is that the industrial economy isn’t all that good anywhere else in the U.S. What’s the point of leaving a place you’re comfortable with in Corning, New York, to take a service job in Houston?

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  22. I’ll admit, KDW is one of my favorite journalists on the right. In fact, he’s about the only one worth reading at NR, in spite of his Trump criticism. With that said, I think he is partly right and partly wrong. I am from a working-class town. I have seen the depravity, the lack of accountability, and the moral rot and drug abuse that pervades these communities. They are morally indefensible. When I visit relatives in Eastern KY, it is revolting how many local residents live. Illegitimate children, rampant prescription drug abuse, welfare, and social stagnation. There is no excuse for it. It’s not the fault of the manufacturers that these people are, essentially, killing themselves with their life choices of drugs, alcohol, big gulps and cheeseburgers. I disagree with him that they should “die.” Rather, don’t sit around waiting for things to come around. Sometimes it’s “just the way it is.”

    One thing I don’t like about Trump’s campaign promises is that he promises to “bring the jobs back.” I hate to break it to you, but they are never coming back. Attempts to revive it only prolong the inevitability of automation.

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  23. All this brings to mind: Steinbecks “Grapes of Wrath,” chapter 21, last few paragraphs which remark that “money that could have been spent on wages, was spent on guns, spies and drilling.”
    Next, Joe Bageants book, “Deer Hunting With Jesus,” Dispatches from Americas class war.
    Then, Wendell Berrys essays which discuss how the Non-Marxist Supreme Soviet destroys regional economies, environments, communities and marriage itself, all over the world.

  24. says:
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    One thing I don’t like about Trump’s campaign promises is that he promises to “bring the jobs back.” I hate to break it to you, but they are never coming back. Attempts to revive it only prolong the inevitability of automation.

    The economy is for the people, not people for the economy.

  25. “Isn’t the “rent U-Hauls and leave” solution a form of ethnic cleansing?”

    No. Don’t be ridiculous.

    “Do we owe people on the left-hand side of the bell curve, who are becoming increasingly economically irrelevant, the chance to work and earn a living, even if it’s doing something that could be done cheaper by a machine or in another country?”

    Wait. that wreaks of liberalism. I thought people should take it upon themselves to figure out their own problems rather than be a burden upon society by demanding “free stuff”.

    “I can’t believe that I’m advocating this, but it seems to me we need a managed economy, with certain sectors protected by tariffs or subsidies, or both, from foreign cheap labor and automation. That’s where the low IQ will work.”

    How low are we talking about? Are these jobs for everyone regardless of racial or ethnic composition? Who makes these decisions? How? What are their wages? Who will set them? How do you create this managed economy in light of current company and labor laws and Supreme Court decisions? How does your proposal align with free market principles?

    “So no more free trade.”

    Do companies have the liberty to do what they want with their own property? Can they not chose for themselves where to locate their business and hire whomever they want at wages they set, with prospective employees deciding for themselves whether they will accept those wages? Cannot a corporation openly seek to protect their own financial interests, like groups of people, through Congressional recourse?

    “The whites whose communities Kevin Williamson thinks ought to die might have different plans.”

    Will you be front and center of this rebellion, or on your couch eating Cheetos and watching “American Gladiator” reruns?

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  26. The anti-Trump coalition represents evil in all its manifestations.

    Her jailhouse photo has a bit of that wild-eyed look of insanity that seems to be the calling card of many of these protesters.

    https://twitter.com/fox4meg/status/711289118588686336/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

  27. With an average IQ of 100 and a standard deviation of 15, one out of six Whites are no smarter than the average Black, true. In every homogeneous society, whatever the average IQ and whatever the standard deviation, there is a dumbest 1/6 of the population, and every society has dealt with them, either more or less humanely. We once did that. But, in addition to our own White “Slow Sixth” the U.S. is burdened with a “Slow Half” of Blacks and a further bunch of slow Mexicans. The slow Whites can be incorporated into the larger society because of cultural compatibility. They were generally assimilated to White middle class norms, most successfully in the 1950s and ’60s. OTOH, the culturally alien Blacks and Mexicans are generally not compatible.

    The White Slow Sixth may be salvageable or may not, but surely not as long as we put them in competition with a vast pool of slow Blacks and Mexicans. Remove the stumbling blocks and hurdles and some will still fail, but many will succeed. They won’t be rocket scientists, or even schoolteachers for the most part, but they can fix roofs and drive cement trucks and paint houses.

    The country can afford to help out its own weaker members, but not a couple extra nations’ worth of dumb minorities too. A slow sixth is manageable, especially if they look and act like us. A slow third, alien and resentful is not manageable.

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  28. Not all of the jobs, but surely a good number of them can be brought back. Does the inability to restore all the jobs mean we should not try to restore some of them?

    And don’t let illegals have them.

  29. But in the crunch, it ends up being “blacks are genetically inferior according to this and that metric [it may be so] and that explains their fate entirely [less sure it's the whole picture] whereas underclass whites just need federal assistance to be all jim dandy again”.

    The difference is that given a certain level of opportunity — relatively low-skilled labor that pays decently, i.e. manufacturing work, construction, plus an absence of immigration — most whites will take it and make due, and their social pathologies will recede rapidly. Blacks, on the other hand, are far less able to take advantage.

    Granted, a sensible trade and economic policy that re-shored manufacturing and ended immigration would help many blacks as well as whites. Only the black community has significant numbers that are unable even to put widgets together down at the Acme factory, who won’t show up on time or at all, etc.

    At the other end, in the total absence of reasonable opportunity (leaving your small city to go find work at an advertising agency or NGO in the Big City is NOT a reasonable option, nor one that anyone other than a zealot would even consider possible) whites at the lower end of the curve will indeed fall into pathological behavior. Given a chance they will recover.

  30. I agree that the degradation of White working class America is widespread, but I don’t fault the working class so readily. You and I are smarter then most of them, and we have options they don’t. We are more capable of making our own way, and those less able than us require leaders. These people have no leaders, or worse, wicked leaders.

    Young men need to be brave and capable. Young women need to be attractive and admired. A successful culture has ways to direct these needs into positive behaviors, through honest work and marriage. The culture we live in despises these people, even if they are productive, honest, and raising their own children. They are damned as racist, sexist, homophobes and xenophobes. Their religion is ceaselessly mocked, their language and dress and music ridiculed, the very states they live in have become synonyms for backwardness. Unless you make guitars by hand or boutique ice cream, working with your hands is a mark of a loser. These people have simply learned the lessons they’ve been taught.

    Give them options. Let them know what those options are, and the consequences of their choices. They need honest leadership. Damning them because they are not as smart as we are is just like whipping an old horse because it won’t gallop.

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  31. Congratulations Corvinus. I see you’re expanding your repertoire, as you’ve gone from being merely stupid and purblind to being vile and contemptible. Well played.

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  32. “Do companies have the right to do what they want with their own property?”

    No. There are limits. If you live within a society, you contribute to that society, not prey on it. If not, you forfeit your place. Being more clever than others no more justifies exploiting them than being bigger does. At some point, a group of weaker or less intelligent people take you down. When the rule of law does not benefit the society, the society creates new laws. Pointing to Adam Smith or the U.S. constitution will mean as much as the divine right of kings.

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  33. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Exactly.

    For a good paleo economics books I’d recommend: Ethics and the National Economy by Heinrich Pesch, S.J. (originally in German in 1917 and transl./ed. Dr. Rupert Ederer, 2003). It’s endorsed by Paul Gottfried and Sam Francis. The late Dr. Francis said about it, “Dr. Pesch’s book is a much needed corrective to the delusions of a society hypnotized by the Myth of Economic Man.”

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  34. The U-Haul solution might have been realistic 10-20 years ago. There was a time when an American construction worker/handiman/landscaper/busboy/ cabdriver, finding himself unemployed (or doomed to compete for sub-minimum wage pay) in California, could find better prospects elsewhere. But today, Mexicans have colonized every part of the country; you’ll be competing with the same people whether you’re in Anaheim or Atlanta.

    Likewise IT people/programmers. Indians are everywhere from coast to coast.

  35. This is a perfect analysis, in my most humble opinion, of why the members of what Derbyshire calls “Conservtatism, Inc.” are as anti-Trump as they are.

    It was Oscar Wilde (I think) who said something to the effect that the only thing worse than not getting what you want in life is getting it. Here, it seems that the GoP leadership is not afraid that Trump will lose. Rather, they are afraid that he is going to win, and win without them, their consultants, their pundits, and their backing.

    THAT will expose the party for what it has become while talking about how patriotic they are.

    I personally am not a fan of Donald Trump’s, and I think his ‘ideas’ are bordering on incoherent. I think he is going to lose in November.

    But his chances I think are far better than Cruz’s or Kasich’s. And that, frankly, scares people like NR.

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  36. Your foray in rhetoric demonstrates a new low in intellectual ineptitude. Do you have anything of actual substance to challenge my assertions? You can even phone a friend to help craft a somewhat coherent counter-argument.

  37. VA-con, I could agree up to a point.

    But what responsibility does a society have for not promoting the pathologies that you mention? Do you think that all those people in rural, eastern Kentucky brought the meth into their communities? Did they promote a popular culture where illetimacy and fatherless-homes were considered “cool?”

    These people signed up for the army or navy to protect ‘free’ trade, and corporations benefit from the US government (paid for by taxes of its citizens) enforce patent rules, make it safe to ship their goods across the seas, and in some cases, pacified the locals.

    The people sure as hell did not vote to have 20 million illegal immigrants brought into the country to undermine the already shaky wage structures of those on the left end of the bell curve.

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  38. My own mother and father started off in Atlantic Canada; it’s funny to read your post (which is not wrong, by the way).

    The point is this – if you read, eg., Murray’s book, part of the reason why one cannot just “pack up the U-Haul” is that a community is not just a place where you work and sleep. There is social capital for people in a place like, well, Halifax, NS.

    If one takes the view that one’s community is just a location, then how is it, intrinsically, different to from people who want to come to the US as sojourners, and have no interest in blending into the culture?

    The community you live in is of course, your job. But it’s your family, and your friends. And the idea that (in no small part because of the predictable consequences of conscious policy choices of our government) one should just become a sort of migrant in the country following the work really is corrosive to the idea of a nation itself.

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  39. Well said. I have been hanging out from time to time in Wheeling WV since college and I have seen it go downhill. A lot of the people with get up and go got up and left. Many of those who remain do so because all the people they know live there too. And, let’s face it, some of them who stay are too stupid or scared to say “the hell with this. I’m moving to Houston!”.

    Drugs, alcohol, illegitimacy, etc., are real problems, but no one in our culture says anymore “You shouldn’t do that” because that would be judgemental, the worst of all sins. Single motherhood is next to sainthood; it’s affordable for the upper class and a disaster for the lowers.

    They’ve seen the factories that used to provide good jobs shut down, and they’ve been derided for years as knuckle dragging homophobic racist retards who are itching to put on their KKK robes and lynch the next available darkie. After a while they say screw this, let’s get on SSDI and kick back. As another commenter said, they’ve learned the lesson they’ve been taught.

  40. Its amazing how many social institutions and traditions, developed over the centuries, actually served a beneficial purpose. Marriage, discouraging premarital sex and promiscuity even segregation all worked wonders if your goal was a cohesive, prosperous nation.

    Today integration has worked exactly as its critics claimed it would. Rather than elevate the black community to white standards it has allowed the bottom of white society to descend to the level of the negro. Worse still, it has done the same to the aspirational black ‘middle class’. The bottom of black society has been promoted and allowed to infect the working class and is making inroads into the middle class. Only the affluent and insular immigrant populations can escape the infection

  41. It is further true that, as dysfunctional as the white underclass may be, they are nothing like as antisocial, certainly nothing like as homicidal, as the black underclass. Nor are they anything like as big a proportion of the white population as underclass blacks are of the black population.

    See, Kevin? I can say these things on VDARE.com, but you can’t. Eat your heart out, pal.

    To be fair to Williamson, I recall a piece he wrote some time ago about Appalachia in which he described the appalling poverty worse than that found in urban (read “black) ghettoes but with only half the national murder rate (crime was mostly welfare fraud or those petty ones with “the usual suspects” easily identified by the local police). The obvious implication was that poor whites didn’t commit violent crimes as blacks did.

    I understand Mr. Derbyshire might be sore about being fired by the National Review and, furthermore, may use continually the said incident to burnish his “alt-right” credentials, but much of the ad hominem nature of attacks on his erstwhile colleagues strikes me as needlessly petty and vindictive in tone (and tiresome). I am pretty sure that a writer as humorous and gifted as Mr. Derbyshire can shred the arguments of his old pals without resorts to such a tone.

    I also sense a bit of hypocrisy in that Mr. Derbyshire was apparently a bit more cautious about truth-telling, as such, too prior to the separation from the National Review if Jared Taylor’s passing recollection of his conversation with Mr. Derbyshire regarding the financial arrangement he had with the National Review is to be believed.

  42. I have a longstanding policy not to trust guys with shaved lightbulb heads and goatees. I call them “devil men”.

  43. ”White trash lives” could adapt themselves cleverly without the necessity to scape but… they are so dependent from good will of the system as happen with most-of-whites, most of humans.

  44. “No. There are limits.”

    As prescribed by the laws made by representatives of the people. So corporations have the liberty to do what they want with their property under current laws, and if that means taking advantage of the available loopholes, then seek to close them.

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  45. I disagree with him that they should “die.” Rather, don’t sit around waiting for things to come around.

    As Derbyshire correctly points out, Williamson does not want the people to die, he wants the ruined communities to die and for the people to move elsewhere. Eastern Kentucky could then revert to an Adirondack-style wilderness whose tiny remaining population basically just services the tourists from Belmont.

  46. But his chances I think are far better than Cruz’s or Kasich’s.

    Kasich leads Hillary by 6 points, Trump is 12 points behind her (and 20 points behind Bernie).

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  47. You might also appreciate Red Toryism:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Tory

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  48. I swear the sob has a ring in his left ear in that picture; and he’s working for NR.

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  49. While there may indeed be a strong element of this, there are probably also strong class-based resentments in the anti-Trump movement. How dare the low IQ “white trash” electorate assert its needs and make its champion the Republican candidate? Never mind that the Republican elite shamefully neglected the needs of its party’s “lowest” members by promoting policies that helped to destroy and weaken those communities economically, while not fighting to preserve those communities spiritually by tolerating the leftist assault on traditional family values that provide stability, and denigration of European heritage that promotes pride and self-respect.

    Trump would probably be a disaster, and the people on the lower end of the achievement spectrum generally don’t make the best political (or any) decisions. But if the Republican establishment would have dutifully looked out for these people rather than for their own bank accounts they would not have been so easily mobilized by a Trump, who saw the opening and cleverly took it.

    I imagine if the Democrat party were hijacked by its version of the Trump electorate* and got a Marion Barry-like figure as its presidential candidate there would be similar feelings by educated Democratic writers and policy think-tank denizens, though their resentments towards Marion Barry voters wouldn’t be openly expressed because the target would have the wrong skin color.

    *Like, three flavors of Bernie Sanders-type progressives up against one Marion Barry, who wins by plurality by riling up his voters against patronizing Establishment Whitey to become the nominee.

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  50. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Anybody else remember this relevant Sam Kinison bit? Want to help the starving? Send ‘em U-Hauls!

  51. so where are the white trash supposed to move to once they pack the U-hauls: Bangladesh? We have created a trade policy that does not take into account the needs of the average person, only the needs of the international capitalist elite.

    What current events should show people is that no matter whether you are waiting in line at an American Airlines desk in Belgium or living in a Rust Belt town, they do not matter to the elite. The proles are expendable.

    That is what is fueling much of the anger. But the forces in charge do not have to worry about that anger. They are insulated from it for at least now. We shall see for the long term.

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  52. “Representatives of the people” doesn’t really mean much. We’re not living in a civics textbook.

  53. Just curious, but what region/country did your parents then end up in, and is it where you still live? No need for details- just curious in general. The Atlantic/Newf/Maritime diaspora is a VERY widespread one, I have found. [I have also found the region itself to be the part of Canada in which the ideal of 'place' is most deeply rooted, except maybe backwoods Quebec. I met some very rooted and cohesive extended families when I went to St. John's for a wedding some years ago. I felt like I'd found Canada's "South".]

    I largely appreciate your comments- I was a bit clumsy but those contradictions are definitely inherent in my original post and I know it. When I talk to people I have worked with who are more globally minded- looking to move to and work in Germany, for example, and not for a spell but to make new lives, or have done so, I recognize that my own attachment and instinct for a more Canadian way of life and identity [they are still Canadians, but they have a more global sensibility and comfort level] might be considered a serious weakness. I even recognize it is odd to have a sense of place that operates on a national level, when a nation is to some degree an abstraction in its own right.

    So it goes. I doubt I’ll reconcile those contradictions anytime soon. Then again, and within limits, I seem to have more mental room for both more American and more British ways of looking at the world than some other Canadians I have known, so perhaps I fall in the middle somewhere.

    You’ll just never get me to live in a small town surrounded by extended family and neighbours who know all my business. I’d go mad. And I might not go alone.

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  54. A thousand times God Help Us, No!

    The problem with Red Toryism, a term and philosophy largely confined to Canada, is that by the time it could qualify as Red in even the mildest, most metaphorical sense, it was scarcely Tory. Something snapped in them in the 1950s. [I have a lot of time for the shade of John Diefenbaker, but he was in many ways a western prairie radical populist with some progressive instincts whose chief Tory virtues were his adoration of the monarchy and parliamentary system, hardcore anticommunism, and hatred of the US (for the right, Tory reasons, not wuss leftist reasons- he hated Kennedy, and Kennedy hated him right back); the real Red Tories who came after him had their personal and moral virtues as men and women, but I'm glad most of them never saw power].

    Some of them were ‘conservative’ in very soft ways- there was a bit of attachment to the country and culture as being its own thing, at least early on, a bit of economic nationalism that lasted longer, a tiny sliver of cultural traditionalism albeit especially at the literary end of the spectrum. But it wasn’t much. And it usually shaded toward the leftward end of the spectrum pretty quickly.

    They seemed mainly to be about finding ways to accommodate French Canada even more than the Liberals, and about turning us into a multicultural mosaic even more and faster than the Liberals. And about turning us into a good little province of the UN even faster than the Liberals. Even on increased welfare and social spending, proto-PC, and just generally holier-than-thou unctuousness they competed with the social-democratic NDP to outdo the Liberals. I doubt they’d even have been reliable on the monarchy, a national cultural policy, or anything to do with distinctively Canadian traditions within the big happy mosaic.

    When I was growing up — born 1970, so 70s and 80s and university by 1988 — I wanted rid of them so badly I could taste it. It’s not even a matter of taking whatever conservatism I can get. The only thing conservative about the Progressive Conservative party under the Red Tories was the name, and only half the name at that. [Mulroney's PC party was barely any better, and in its turn got too wrapped up in free trade and placating the French, but he talked a better game, and at least it was only trade with the US.]

    Good riddance to them all. And I don’t want them back, not at any price.

    For those Americans looking for an analogy, imagine President Adlai Stevenson and VP Thomas Dewey, except both nicer personally and more irritatingly smug, with a cabinet of third-tier New Dealers all members of the most arrogantly liberal sects of mainline Protestantism.

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  55. I must admit I was struck by the comparative cluelessness/viciousness of this Williamson piece.

    His past mid-length journalism on the problems of Appalachia and the overlapping opiate problem of white American society [including one a couple of issues of NR ago] have struck me as interesting [illustrative, if not investigative reporting], serious and compassionate. The sort of material that could easily be fodder for a policy approach that used economic policy and government intervention to try to save these Americans, or at least help/not kill them.

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  56. “the sob has a ring in his left ear in that picture; and he’s working for NR.”

    And he’s for gay “marriage”:

    Such are our arbiters of respectable conservatism these days.

  57. As a non-Canadian who lived in Canada for a few years, after the Red Tory demise, I appreciate this perspective!

    The principles appeared worthy, “on paper” (or internet).

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  58. Trump does indeed have his greatest support in areas where the “White underclass” are most concentrated (poor Scots-Irish Greater Appalachian areas). See:

    The Donald Trump Phenomenon: Part 1: The American Nations

  59. “My biggest problem with Kevin’s piece is his glib conflating of Trump voters with the white underclass. Meth-addled white underclass types with chaotic lives don’t vote, Kevin. Even if they did, there’s nothing like enough of them to give Trump the numbers he’s been getting. Trump voters, as I said up above, are mainly working- and middle-class suburban types—like me, and my next-door neighbors here on Long Island.”

    Even if they did vote, the White meth addict underclass would most likely vote for Libertarian Gary Johnson over Donald Trump. Gary wants to legalize all drugs.

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  60. His past mid-length journalism on the problems of Appalachia and the overlapping opiate problem of white American society [including one a couple of issues of NR ago] have struck me as interesting [illustrative, if not investigative reporting], serious and compassionate.

    I agree. I read his past pieces on Appalachia and found them very thoughtful.

    I am not a fan of Trump (I don’t trust him even though I like many of his stated policy views, including immigration restriction) and supported Cruz instead, but I scratch my head when I see all these extremely bent-out-shape, apoplectic attacks on Trump from not just the usual suspects on the left and the “mainstream,” but from ostensibly conservative critics… to the point that I am almost regretting supporting Cruz over him (“almost,” because I still find him very vulgar and incoherent).

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  61. But these industrial towns in the Northeast have died economically largely to public policy decisions to promote free trade…

    Policies like the US Constitution and the Civil War. Many jobs left the Northeast for the South before they went abroad.

  62. On the other hand, one of their rare successes was Duff’s Ditch. Winnipeg escaped the fate of Grand Forks.

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  63. KEVIN WILLIAMSON was most likely was one of these anti Trump protesters at AIPAC

    “Most people I spoke with energetically condemned racist statements attributed to Trump. However, when I revealed the statements had actually been made by Israeli leaders, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, respondents immediately excused, justified or supported the rhetoric they had just condemned”

    https://electronicintifada.net/blogs/rania-khalek/video-aipac-attendees-slam-netanyahus-racism-when-they-think-its-trumps

  64. Isn’t the “rent U-Hauls and leave” solution a form of ethnic cleansing? And, as John points out, where do they go?

    The problem with going where the jobs are is that you find Mexicans have taken them before you arrive.

  65. White IQ at 100, black at 85, mexican mestizo at 90….averages. Send 40 plus mexican invaders home and presto, there are jobs for white workers. And better paying jobs since labor rates will be bid up thru scarcity.

    Blacks there is no solution, but no particular problem with regard to putting white workers into good jobs.

    On top of that, a nationalist economy would provide subsidies or welfare , call it what you will, for low wage Whites, and Negroes until we find some way to deal with them, as long as they are working. Right now mexicans here …half of them are on welfare even when working.

    If you go up to Canada, or BC which I visit from time to time, there are almost no mexicans, and in cafes the wait staff and cooks are white. I guess some mexers are getting into the fields, but I dunno. None in the cities.

    There is a lot of wasted breath on this theme. Get some decent jobs/income for workers, and most of the problem will disappear.

    Another problem that Murray as I recall addressed is this: 50 years or so ago, working classes retained lots of smart people who were unrecruited by Capital for mobility upward. Maybe half or so of smart workers just stayed in their neighborhoods and enlivened things. Now only about 10% of smarties are left in the working classes. This is bad news. (approximate numbers here from my aging memory banks.)

    A similar thing with old black communities, which have lost their talented tenth, and the result is the inner city of very stupid blacks.

    National socialism, without getting into the AH 88 rut, is the only solution. That means Capital is directed for national goals, and workers are well paid. Get out of Globalization, etc and come back to Norman Rockwell’s America. It could happen with mexers shipped home, and blacks subordinated once again. We could be autarchic, and cooperate with other White countries, and to hell with everybody else. The rest of he world is despotic, oriental and African varieties.

    We don’t need them. They are largely worthless to us. But let them live apart, and that is Normal, as in tens of thousands of years of history and evolution, and of course, genetic differences.

    Joe Webb

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  66. I can believe you’re advocating a managed economy because it makes good sense if done right and there should also be consequences for traitorous conduct. The national interest should not be sacrificed on the altar of private profit.

    A mixed economy actually works best. One that manages the strategic infrastructure and industry and then leaves the other stuff to the marketplace. The USA was once like that, before the coup.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1993/12/how-the-world-works/305854/

  67. Williamson is not a member of any “cognitive elite.” He’s just a guy from Lubbock with an average education who happens to have hooked up with the National Review crew.
    David Gordon, senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, has written of him, “Williamson lacks the ability to report facts accurately and his work contains preposterous errors.”
    If you want to read the article that quote came from, put “Williamson’s Howlers” into your search engine to find the Mises Wire review of the Politically Incorrect Guide to Socialism.

  68. But what responsibility does a society have for not promoting the pathologies that you mention? Do you think that all those people in rural, eastern Kentucky brought the meth into their communities? Did they promote a popular culture where illetimacy and fatherless-homes were considered “cool?”

    A lot when the government has tacitly endorsed every destructive behaviors across the board. The GOP long ago ceded the culture wars to the Democrats. I think the last effort was when Reagan was in office.

    The Hollywood elite promoted a just about every self-destructive and toxic behavior imaginable over the last 30 years. Homosexuality, trannies, nihilism, hatred of lower class whites, vilifying Christians, putting down people who work with their hands, out of wedlock births, fatherless homes, demonization of straight white guys, putting white males in subservient positions that are lorded over by wise blacks, etc.

    Then came the trade agreements that shut down factories, textile mills and just about everything else across the country. For every factory worker who lost a job it effected two people in the service industry as well.

    Drugs weren’t a issue in these regions until they got run down. We do that by impoverishing a region by stripping it’s jobs base. This demoralizes the men and breaks up families and makes them easy prey after they lose their self-respect. Then dumb down the education system so it only produces serfs with no knowledge of the past, their heritage or much of anything else. Remove any sense of community pride. IOW don’t allow whites to take pride in their town’s history and their faith. And while that is happening hammer them with endless toxic shit on TV that sells every vice imaginable while attacking society’s traditional values and family structure. Make sure that the entertainment industry really goes out of it’s way to promote drug dealing, pimping, gangsterism as valid life style choices.

  69. “Come on, guys, let’s have a little respect for the meaning of words. Kevin said the communities should die. What he wishes for the people is that they should rent U-Hauls and get out of there.”

    Kevin Williamson has also said that …

    “blue collar white trash who love their unions and the welfare state are about the only supporters Trump has. Thankfully, they are a dying race of inferiors that are living in increasing poverty as their jobs are done more efficiently and cheaply by foreign workers. Hopefully soon we can eradicate them once-and-for-all.”

    Set aside for the moment that their jobs are “done more efficiently and cheaply by foreign workers” solely due to the crooked trade deals arranged by Williamson’s wealthy patrons. His language is deliberately eugenicist at the least, and “exterminationist” would be a fair description of it.

  70. Why whine and get all hot and bothered about the “political” situation here in the USA?
    I have always sought economic freedom, and that led me off of over-taxed Long Island, to a better deal -as far as real estate goes- in Philly.
    And guess what? I don’t need this over- educated de-balled excuse of a man, to know when its time to get the uhaul…Again!
    and I have bad news for you march- madness pro football worshiping turds…any where in Asia
    is more advanced then this politically correct, sclerotic continent of violence.
    Just returned from Chongqing, China, Phuket Thailand. Looking into Cambodia. Much better
    class of people. No comparison. Enough of Big Brother…you’ve even driven the small merchant away with your catering to perverts and parasites, not to mention the unquenchable Byzantine Tax Labyrinth.

  71. Oh Williamson doesn’t care. He knows there is no where to go.

    The fact is he’s just the latest asshat in a long line of globalist asshat apologists to say things like this. I remember for decades the globalists would trot out their mouthpieces who would say “get retrained”, “go back to school”, etc. After a while anyone with a brain knew that wasn’t a answer since jobs were becoming scare and there sure weren’t any for 40+ year old machinists or assembly line workers except as a greeter at Wal-Mart which is as demeaning as it comes.

    The bright side is the that Williamson and his globalist ilk have once and for all showed what they really think of whites and has earned the hatred of millions of them in the process. If things go pear shaped they better watch out.

  72. As soon as the Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon Party finds a few cheap writers in China, Kevin Williamson can start developing a nice heroin habit.

  73. Trump would probably be a disaster, and the people on the lower end of the achievement spectrum generally don’t make the best political (or any) decisions.

    Trump’s policy prescriptions are pure Reagan, and he was hardly a “disaster”.

    As for intelligence, it’s true that support for Trump increases as you go down the educational ladder, and that the opposition to Trump is greatest among those with masters degrees or beyond.

    But it hardly follows from this that the “highly educated” are behaving intelligently or that the less educated are behaving foolishly. In reality both can be seen as intelligently pursuing their class interests. (Morally speaking the highly educated are the ones behaving contemptibly, but let that slide for now)

    Highly educated people have constructed guild systems to protect their own jobs from competition. Tenured professors for instance, or the bar for lawyers. From the safety of their positions they enthusiastically lobby for other Americans to face competition from the workers of the world. They smugly tell themselves that their great wealth is a function of their “intelligence” when in reality it is a function of their political power.

  74. I personally am not a fan of Donald Trump’s, and I think his ‘ideas’ are bordering on incoherent.

    Can you elaborate on what you imagine his “ideas” to be and why you consider them “incoherent”? Because they seem a good deal more well developed than anything Obama or Bush brought with them into office.

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  75. One thing I don’t like about Trump’s campaign promises is that he promises to “bring the jobs back.” I hate to break it to you, but they are never coming back. Attempts to revive it only prolong the inevitability of automation.

    The jobs went away due to decisions made by people. Due to government crafted trade polices (NOT ‘free trade”) There’s no reason why different decisions and policies cannot reverse what was done. The other side of this equation is immigration – at the same time as we’ve shipped millions of jobs overseas, we’ve imported scores of millions of new workers to compete with the laid-off Americans. All of this has been done and is being done quite deliberately and quite consciously, by people. It’s not some natural force like gravity at work, though the globalists would like you to think otherwise.

  76. edNels [AKA "geoshmoe"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Thank you Dom Franc for something beneficial and edifying… I certainly loved it!

  77. And how do you measure up against Charles Murray’s achievements? Have you published books on important subjects based on a lot of research? Have you set agenda by your writing for nationwide discussion amongst the literate and educated?

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  78. So?

  79. There’s a case taking a purist Adam Smith + David Ricardo competitive free enterprise and free trade model solution as one’s starting point before, with great care and hard precise thinking, beginning to deviate. It is this: the rule of the honest competitive market is like the Rule of Law (properly understood). It gives you a rule based result which does not depend on the prejudices or self-interest of bureaucrats or pluralities whose entitlements naturally add to well over 100 per cent.

  80. Thanks. I was just about to look up the betting odds on a Hilary Clinton victory and make a big bet. Now I shall wait to see if Kasich is, miraculously, the GOP candidate.

  81. Peculiar race realists at NR. The first precept of this realism is to accept Jewish superiority and dominance. This explains Charles Murray presence and role.

  82. National socialism, without getting into the AH 88 rut

    What exactly will prevent the slide and evolution into the rut?

    Do you have any modern examples where “national socialism” existed that did not get into the rut?

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  83. https://www.lewrockwell.com/2016/03/patrick-j-buchanan/rule-ruin-republicans/

    “Apparently, William Kristol circulated a memo detailing how to rob Trump of the nomination, even if he finishes first in states, votes, and delegates. Should Trump win on the first ballot, Kristol’s fallback position is to create a third party and recruit a conservative to run as its nominee.
    Purpose: Have this rump party siphon off enough conservative votes to sink Trump and give the presidency to Hillary Rodham Clinton, whose policies are more congenial to the neocons and Kristol’s Weekly Standard.”

  84. We’re not all like that.

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  85. “America of 1955 got super rich and relatively egalitarian” – There are macroeconomic solutions.
    Great Compression

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Compression

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  86. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    And how do you measure up against Charles Murray’s achievements? Have you published books on important subjects based on a lot of research? Have you set agenda by your writing for nationwide discussion amongst the literate and educated?

    I feel very good, in fact, much superior to Murray in my accomplishments. And I work in the real world, doing real things, not writing pretentious bullshit for a small audience of pseudo-intellectual beta males.

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  87. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    I am not a fan of Trump

    I’m surprised. I had pegged you as a paleo Catholic in the tradition of Belloc and Chesterton and Chronicles, not the establishment (neo-conservative) Catholics who wrote the calumnious NR letter against Trump.

    I became a big fan of Trump when I met him a decade ago in D.C. and I saw how nicely he treated some average guys who came up to talk with him. And it wasn’t for show. No one was around and I’m sure Trump thought I was just a security guard, yet he was super respectful and classy. I don’t think it’s accidental that Trump chose a guy to head his campaign who is a former cop (NH state police). Corey Lewandowski grew up in working class Lowell, MA, and went through Catholic schools and on to less-prestigious University of Lowell (now UMass-Lowell). He’s worked hard for everything he’s gotten, he’s a stand-up guy, and is part of the reason you will never see the Trump campaign stoop to the level we see other campaigns do (most notably Cruz).

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  88. Of course white trash lives matter. Where else can you get you get goofs literate enough to read military field manuals and ignorant enough to provide trainable werewolves to fight infantry wars for the investor class? A bargain for a mere $10,000 of life insurance.

  89. Research into the demographics of Trump voters has shown that the biggest metrics are under 50k per year and over 200k….

  90. Who does finance NR? How all the neocon think tanks are financed? We know that the top neocons that had direct connections to government and Israel like Richard Perl, Douglas Feith have stakes in armaments and security companies but the neocon of the second sort, i.e., the talking head and the thinking heads of the think tanks who are responsible for the control of the discourse are earning their living? Is it the voluntary money from Sabans, Kochs, Adelsons, Murdochs or is it a racket: you pay or else (like in the case of Bill Gates)?

    Did somebody do a chart and accounting of the neocon financial support network (NFSN)?

    We need another Mark Lombardi!

  91. I’m sure, you are the “friendliest people” that country singer ever saw after all

  92. Kevin’s practical advice to get out of dysfunctional communities seems to me the best that can be given, however difficult it may be to do. And in regard to his criticisms, good for him for disabusing them (those that might actually read & consider his piece) of the basis for the indulgence of victimhood that engenders more destructive indulgences – drugs, alcoholism, antisocial behavior. The old adage comes to mind: Sometimes a few blunt words are the most humane.

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  93. “pretentious bullshit for a small audience of pseudo-intellectual beta males” – the IQ points counters

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  94. Kevin’s practical advice to get out of dysfunctional communities seems to me the best that can be given, however difficult it may be to do.

    What if there are too many dysfunctional communities? What if there are not enough “new” functional communities to move to or to build? What if the “dysfunctional” part can’t get by without the “functional” part that has moved on or insulated itself? What if some of the dysfunction is willfully caused? Some of us don’t have blind faith and can “see” the invisible hand.

  95. I’m very happy for you simply as a private person that you are so pleased with yourself and your accomplishments, but since this is a forum for contested and contestable ideas would you care to elaborate so that those whom you have delivered your opinions to can have a chance to weigh them fairly.

    To start with Charles Murray, which of his writings have you read thoroughly or at all? Have you been one of the thousands, from Nobel Prize winners down who have reviewed his books or debated their subject matter? What problems do you have with the ideas or evidence in his books? Or are you saying that the subjects he deals with are unimportant and not worth spending time on? If the latter, compared to what other subjects?

    As to yourself have you written any books which had comparable sales and comparable publications commenting on them to those of Charles Murray? The Bell Curve for example had sales of over 400,000 within the first few months of publication.

    So please share with us some reason for thinking you to be a person of such accomplishments (to use your word) that we could at least understand where your dyslogistic opinion of Charles Murray comes from even if we disagree with it and find the jargon you use to express it glib and distasteful.

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  96. “Small audience”. Low grade sneers against people of achievement are revealing only of the sneerer when he advertises his ignorance. Not only have you not read Charles Murray’s work – not even The Bell Curve which does relate significantly to questions about IQ – but you haven’t even bothered to acquire minimal knowledge by Googling and reading Wikipedia where you would have learned of the 400,000 copies of his most famous work sold within the first few months and of the thousands of responses to it.

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  97. About four years ago, I was unemployed for the first time in my life at age 41. Lost my job with our first baby on the way and still paying off wedding expenses and other medical bills. The fear, anxiety, and humiliation were greater than I’d ever experienced or expected.

    Looking at the job market outside my white-collar field, I was shocked to see how little most people have as their realistic options — including people who don’t have graduate / professional degrees, and especially those who don’t have college degrees. It was a real eye-opener and led me to reconsider my Insufficiently sympathetic view and comments towards people who are failing economically on a sustained basis.

    Williamson is much nastier, more unkind, more sarcastic, more out of touch than I ever was.

    The man needs some problems, starting with unemployment but not ending there.

  98. November 21st, 2015 Fascists Running America Endorse Nazism by Stephen Lendman

    America didn’t eliminate the scourge of fascism in WW II. It shifted its headquarters from Berlin and Tokyo to Washington.

    http://www.thepeoplesvoice.org/TPV3/Voices.php/2015/11/21/fascists-running-america-endorse-nazism#more40892

  99. By, “the inevitability of automation,” you must mean the easy availability of near-slave labor by billions of Asians.

    For almost a century now, people like you have been telling Americans that “automation” will be doing all their jobs in the near future, just around the corner. It never happened.

    What happened is a bunch of business leaders found out how easy it is to get stuff done overseas by poor people with no rights. Government opened the doors to this, starting in a big way when it made friends with Communist China under Richard Nixon and then gave it Most Favored Nation status under Bill Clinton.

    Think about this the next time you play some idiotic video game on your precious iPhone — you know, the one made by all those human robots in China.

  100. There ‘s a degree to which the entire Canadian political spectrum is to the left of the US.

    We can make too much of this- America is the world leader in producing oppressive PC ideology, hysterical student leftism, and totalitarian ideas about race and “racism”. And in importing these into political debate and public policy. ‘Sexism’ too, come to think.

    But there is truth in it.

    Even my gun-owning friends who think our laws are stupid [The RCMP is essentially arbitrary in what it classifies as prohibited, and why] and who actually do believe in the ancient common law rights to arms and self defence don’t mind if safety courses and licenses are required- it’s a regulation of the right comparable to some of the more traditional regulations behind free speech [libel, slander, incitement; not 'hate speech' crapola], at least for them.

    Religion plays a smaller role on the Canadian right, and its disappearance from the everyday life of most non-evangelicals [me, to be sure] has passed largely without comment. [When I was a kid, church was still fairly common activity. Not as much now.] I am comfortable with that. On an earlier column on Unz I referred to the internet anecdote about some woman who turned up in a bar in backwater Texas wearing a t-shirt with a cartoon devil on it that had something to do with the software subculture rather than being an actual marker of devil worship. She was [allegedly] harassed by two Texans who took her for a Satanist and stressed that people in those parts didn’t care for Satan. Now, I would not mind a bit more Christianity in public in Canada again, and I harbour deep reserves of contempt for popular atheism as expressed in letters to the editor around here, but I could never live in those especially conservative and religious parts of the US. The guys in that anecdote, if it happened as described, struck me as menacing lunatics.

    And there are other markers of difference- single-payer health care conceived as a public utility, for one. I see its problems as a provider of health services but I can’t actually see what Mark Steyn is talking about when he calls it a threat to our liberty or what Krauthammer means when he complains that Obamacare nationalized “one sixth of the [American] economy” because I don’t see how one sixth of an allegedly productive economy can comprise health insurance rake-offs.

    So while I would not agree that even Harper’s conservatives were to the left of the whole Democratic party, there’s something in that way of looking at things.

    With all that in mind, I actually appreciate what Stephen Harper accomplished. He made it possible again to speak of limited government, of federalism, of fiscal probity, of a national-interest foreign policy, and of a [weak tea but still] national idea of national identity. If he had a terrible tone and manner, and by that probably also retarded the future efforts of the party he [after all] created in the first place, well no one is perfect. If he didn’t accomplish as much on the fiscal side and spent too much of his time pounding on his own employees instead of cutting out corporate and regional welfare, well so it goes. And if his national interest foreign policy still had too much reference to “values”, “religious freedom” overseas, and Israel [I'm a national interest guy, so I don't care about any of those things], at least it wasn’t Liberal values, progressive shibboleths [although there were a few] and the Palestinians. Harper was a hero by that standard, and he gave us what we wanted when I was a young man- a Conservative Party that actually, vaguely, looked and sounded conservative. And in a way that adopted some of the Reaganism and Thatcherism and even social conservatism we had then admired, didn’t push too far on the domestic norms we all considered normal, and didn’t act abroad as though the end of the USSR had been a disaster and we all needed to resume support for a one-world UN government the next day.

    Former PM Mulroney earned some credit with me by largely being an ally to all that [there were a few non-policy breaches between him and Harper, to do with old scandals]. Former PM Clark, the remaining archetypal Red Tory, and a superbly decent man when you run into him on the street, adopted a more Jimmy Carterish attitude to all this. He wearies me. Any suggestion that his legacy will be the one adopted by the next Tory leader would fill me with fear and loathing.

    I guess we shall see. So long as it isn’t Tony Clement, pork-barrel king.

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  101. #97 So, you too are a beta male who gets some solace from counting IQ points, right?

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  102. Don’t get me wrong- the Red Tories when in power tended to have belief systems I could do without and were soft on trends I would consider to have been danger signs, but when Canada still had some broad consensus it wasn’t always much of a problem, and in power [mostly provincial level] their governments produced some of the most capable politicians understood as managers, stewards of the state, or even builders.

    The classic is my own province Ontario. 43 years of PC government 1942-85. Starting in an era when conservatism was largely habitual and very low ideology, but in which the consensus of society as a whole was fairly conservative. Back then the Liberals were more of a free-marketers party. Marginally. The whole society would seem reactionary on every issue by modern standards.

    The Ontario Tory premiers were arguably all Red Tory, but the early ones were blue enough, again not least because society was. They would not have dreamed of a multicultural mosaic, a post-Christian atheist society, republicanism, or socialism. But they didn’t have to be aggressively against these things because none were on the horizon. They understood their role as province-building, and that meant “Progress” in the old industrial, technological, economic growth, health and well-being of society kind of way. Ontario in the late 1940s and 1950s, like America and other parts of Canada, benefited from the destruction of competition abroad and the industrialization brought by the war, and the Tory governments engaged in a vast effort of expanding education, infrastructure [all our big multilane highways and a good deal of public transit, among other things] and, yes, public health. They did this by capitalizing on the profits of capitalism, and they saw their efforts as building the basis for that to continue. A very soft-Trumpian approach, but common in those years. And not all that much into deficits at first.

    They got softer and softer, and by the Bill Davis government of the 1970s seemed hell-bent on progressivizing [ie. screwing up] education, had a minority government propped up by socialists [a bad sign when the NDP endorses your tory government] and started to overspend big time.

    But they could still run things better than the Liberals did [see "David Peterson", a not implausible elder statesman now but his government was an EPIC clusterf**k] or the NDP ["Bob Rae", ditto; Also, Ontarian public culture at least in cities is now pretty leftist, but his government probably destroyed the NDP's chance of ever again governing Ontario] and the Red Tories even under Davis didn’t seem interested in destroying the basically Anglo values of Ontario society the way our provincial NDP has been trying to do for 40 years [think of government organized as an episode of Sesame Street if the puppets had guns and batons and beat tar out of anyone who resisted the diversity of the street.]

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  103. All true, all accurate. None of this history of our country is ever discussed on the CBC though, where “Canada lives”. It has nothing to do with the SJW agenda, or rings any bells with New Canadians, so it’s just relegated to private conversation.

    … all members of the most arrogantly liberal sects of mainline Protestantism.

    Isn’t it strange how Orange and Tory Canada went so soft and worked so hard to forget itself? Sad stuff. I think the cherry on the top of that cake was the moment a Tory mayor out in Fredericton made a big show of putting up a rainbow flag to stick it to Putin during the Sochi Winter Games. He made the announcement with a picture of the Queen behind him. Apparently he’d made himself known for some resistance to some gay rights initiative back in the ’80s but now he’d seen the light. When I saw that I thought “yeah, it’s over”. We abolished ourselves.

  104. True enough, and worth trying to replicate through policy to the extent possible in current conditions. I was mainly thinking of some other postwar considerations:

    - USA producing over 50% of world GDP for a time and an outsized share for even longer
    - that market dominance ensuring the global reach of US mfg output with limited competition
    - consequently little threat at first of anything like offshoring or wage competition
    - cheap energy
    - near total currency dominance

    And secondary implications like the persistent power of unions, ability of a cartelized model to work well in major industries, undoubted government support for both of those things, huge amounts of money spent on post-secondary education for men who would not have had access to it prewar, both because of the GI Bill itself and the consequent expansion of the university-college system in both size and to some extent number of institutions, and an economy big enough and still expanding to provide jobs both meaningful and of appropriate salary to men with that kind of education and aspirations, as well as the ability of the manufacturing sector to pay wages enough for a man working on the line to have a house, car, wife at home, and 2-3 kids.

    That demanded a lot of money to be available in the system, including some from federal spending, and that the US have a truly huge position in the world economy relative to anyone else.

    I don’t disagree that there are things to be done that could be done to change the current situation of America. It’s just not going to get that miraculous set of conditions again.

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  105. The legalization of lotteries and casinos were a very un-Tory thing too. A lot of people ruin their lives with that stuff but the libertarian-libertine consensus is fine with it.

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  106. Wait. that wreaks of liberalism. I thought people should take it upon themselves to figure out their own problems rather than be a burden upon society by demanding “free stuff”.

    Uh, lots of paleocons hang out at unz. Other than the Austrian retards, paleos don’t tend to rave on about free stuff. How have you failed to notice this?

  107. good point. First, Germany from the git-go with NS was in an emergency situation. Second, the Fuhrer Principle, lifted from ancient Roman history, is contrary to White history…all the way back to Greco-Roman-Germania and even Homeric aristocratic/egalitarian warrior societies wherein elected chiefs and magistrates was the norm. It is in our DNA.

    “It” is not much involved in Ethical Thinking. It is rooted in “let me speak or I will kill you.” This is the ancient liberty’s psychological basis. Of course, it refined itself into Rule of Law, and so on, and became an ethical matter as well.

    The Principate, The Leader, was a corruption of A Leader, which was the Republican Roman principle of collective leadership. Empire destroyed Republican Rome.

    The Ancient Liberties of the White Race, as opposed to the oriental and african despotisms, should be the anchor of our thinking about everything. This is genetic, and not cultural. The evidence is overwhelming…thousands of years of history and biology.
    ———
    Now, Whites also like to fight and pursue their own personal ambition/prestige. You can see this on this list. Greece was destroyed by this white characteristic.

    Nevertheless, its run was several hundred years. And Rome managed to control itself for a long time, but was eroded by the same psychodynamic, plus enormous wealth due to imperialism, a large increase in slavery, and huge personal fortunes amidst general immiseration of its average citizens, and loss not only of virtue but even the abandonment of its own original ethnic base.

    Other Italians were heavily burdened by war service but were not given citizenship and Rome “could look with contempt on men of the same race and blood as if they were outsiders and foreigners…” From P. A. Brunt, an historian.. This was an effect of greed and empire.

    Add to that the ultimately granting of citizenship to non Latins, etc. etc and the use of allies, not Roman or Latin troops…the whole Empire dynamic led to the adoption of the The Leader, the Principate , as Augustus consolidated his rule, etc, etc.
    —–
    So, our history does not support the Fuhrer Prinzip. However, emergency situation is another matter. Still it must be provided for in law, not personal power. Even communism adopted a legalistic principle of collective leadership, not one man rule, not much observed of course, but the principle was recognized. Etc.

    Since we are not in Emergency, and will remain in electoral politics for some time, the Principate simply does not apply to us. However, The Future Lies Ahead and we might need some kind of emergency governance, and emergency powers would be logical, but always lawful.
    .
    Another principle of Roman political life was the idea of Advise and Consent, wherein political office carried a tradition of advice by counselors to any high office. This was a democratic or republican principle.

    Our liberal constitutionalism should carry us a long way, assuming we are not outvoted by darkies and white race traitors. If we are, the Maximum Leader or Leaders will arise, and hopefully Whites can keep their relative peace with ourselves, while making war on the Others.

    Joe Webb

  108. Exactly, be loyal to our own. I’ll be explicit: be loyal to other Whites.

  109. “Kevin’s practical advice to get out of dysfunctional communities seems to me the best that can be given, however difficult it may be to do. And in regard to his criticisms, good for him for disabusing them (those that might actually read & consider his piece) of the basis for the indulgence of victimhood that engenders more destructive indulgences – drugs, alcoholism, antisocial behavior. The old adage comes to mind: Sometimes a few blunt words are the most humane.”

    The problem with Kevin is that he is assuming the White guys with heroin marks on their arms and the White guys who are getting arrested on the TV show Cops are the ones who are mostly voting for Donald Trump. The vast majority of Donald Trump supporters are not White versions of Dindu Nuffins.

    Hussein Obama has way more thug underclass supporters than Donald Trump. The World Star Hip Hop demographic loves Hussein Obama.

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  110. I think you are underestimating the radicalism of his critique. He is rejecting the status hierarchy that you are demanding he use to justify himself.

    Charles Murray’s two most famous works are _Losing Ground_ and _The Bell Curve_. The former basically argues that, contrary to the left’s claims, welfare is bad for the recipients. The latter basically argues that intelligence is important, intelligence is mostly genetic, and blacks are stupid.

    These are important books. They marshal statistical and other evidence and are reasonably well-argued. They disagree with widespread conventional wisdoms. I have little doubt their conclusions are true.

    The thing is, you have to be living in bizarro world for these books to be necessary. Why do we need a book like _The Bell Curve_? Why do we need a book like _Losing Ground_? What kind of an utter moron would entertain the converse of the positions those books take?

    On my reading, Anonymous is saying that the system which produces that bizarro world is worthy of in toto rejection. Since Murray is a cog in that system, he goes with it. Asking Anonymous whether he is as good a cog as Murray misses the point.

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  111. The legalization of lotteries and casinos were a very un-Tory thing too. A lot of people ruin their lives with that stuff but the libertarian-libertine consensus is fine with it.

    Lotteries run by the state are not libertarian. They’re a case of the state furthering corruption in the populace. “You never know…”

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  112. You’re lying.

    Read comment 3 above which is entirely typical of reactions to Williamson’s article. Here’s a fragment: “Do we owe people on the left-hand side of the bell curve” See that phrase “bell curve?” It invokes the HBD explanation you’re desperate to pretend the nasty racists are being hypocritical about.

    The whole “blacks fail because HBD” thing you hear so often hereabouts is purely defensive. It’s trotted out because the regnant, utterly moronic, explanation is “blacks fail because racism.”

    Blacks got hit worse and earlier by free trade and immigration exactly because they are stupider. Because HBD.

    Also, moving to ND is really bad advice. Well, unless you want a job care-taking empty apartments or something.

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  113. All of this, even the political battle, is a battle between different castes of whites.
    When minorities are introduced, they are used as wedge or a tool to silence opposition.

  114. edNels [AKA "geoshmoe"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Say What???

    For almost a century now, people like you have been telling Americans that “automation” will be doing all their jobs in the near future, just around the corner. It never happened.

    I heard the stories about automation, and I tried to Deny… that it could happen. I guess I had some kind of … Luddite type thing, and hoped that the theories about how automation would take our work away, must be wrong. WRONG!!, and just loook at the shipping business and the Containers.

    And… you know what, most of those mfr’g containters are either completely empty at anytime, or under utilized, like with one little crate inside, or a car, or anything, that used to be part of a pallet load.

    All those MT containers need to be moved around incessantly, and stored on expensive real estate, and forget the cost of the units/maintanence/useful life of… that was heavily supported to do what it did… put the longshoremen/lumpers/truckers/warehousemen, out of a pay day!!

    Heavily supported/ and underwritten, and etc, and it really is a bust in a lot of ways.

    Bring back the old days, bring back… some semblance of a human scale to things.

    Bring back simple good manners for people!

    Give them a job to do, hoe some weeds, do something, the message being promulgated, is really, when you boil it down, it is: get rid of the people. The message is when you look it over: To make unnecessary the labor that is the purpose of people. which means, ultimately to get rid of the people, and there are those who, fell as gods or something that they will somehow be alive… to see this, somehow they will be immortal? That that guy that is CEO of GE, does he think he will be on Earth to see this? I picked him, because of his unusual voice/demeanor, but there are better examples,
    For one, I don’t think much of Larry Elison, an orphan rags to riches story, but to what end?

    Him and his billion dollar yahchit that killed normal sailboat racing, (of course that was already well under way, technology etc. )
    and was a horrendous example of throwing money around. And got the City to pay for alot of it too.

    I mean that guy is all EGO, see that is what he is even with billions@billions, bring back C Sagan! The poor ‘nebish’.

  115. Given the plausible alternatives, I hope that Trump wins the GOP nomination and then the general election.

    But Trump’s worship of police is NOT a selling point for me. Nor am I impressed that he picked a cop as his campaign manager. My family and I have all met more cops who were bullies or fools than competent and respectful of their employers — the taxpayers. Cops have talked to us like we were garbage, on more than one occasion, in a number of different States, over a long period of years, not isolated incidents.

    As police power grows ever more unconstitutional and excessive, the type of people attracted to police “work” seems to have changed for the worse accordingly.

    We can reject the Left’s siding with African thugs over police in confrontations caused or exacerbated by the thugs, without glorifying the police as Trump does. I know he’s trying to win votes and that there are indeed some good police left, but it’s too much.

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  116. Agree wholeheartedly, Jefferson, and thank you for making clear that most of us Trump supporters are productive, intelligent, civilized people, not heroin or meth or coke addicts and not illiterate losers.

    As for the demographic groups that voted for Obama, a large proportion of African men in the USA are convicted felons and therefore ineligible to vote in federal elections. While some presumably still manage to vote illegally, most apparently do not.

    It is African WOMEN who vote in droves, and as a monolithic mindless bloc, for Obama, Hillary, and every other Democrat presidential candidate.

    But your point remains that the Dems probably have a lot more voters on their side who are semi-literate or illiterate, uneducated, and for that matter not all that bright either (apart from formal education).

  117. I’m the author of comment 3. I certainly intended it to apply to all races whose members happen to fall on the left-hand side of the bell curve. Yes, I’m also an HBD, race-realist–there’ll be proportionately a lot more blacks there, but there’ll be plenty of whites too–the duty is to all of them. I don’t think, however, that we have any duty to people outside of our own country, whereever they might be on the bell curve.

    The duty is only to give people in ourt own country the opportunity to contribute as best they are able, given their ability. If they refuse to do so, then I fall back on the statement of St. Paul: “If a man will not work, neither let him eat.” Being an HBDer, I have the sinking feelingn that blacks will be disproportionately unable to take advantage of the opportunities offered, because of behavioral characteristics other than simple cognitive ability that impede their economic usefulness.

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  118. Can I please retain you when I need to get bail from a judge inclined to give credit for counsel relieving his boredom with eloquent ingenuity.

    But in Anonymous’s case I think you will be wise not to put him up as a witness in his own case open to cross-examination. Your notes will tell you how he handles accusations of cavalier inaccuracies such as his “small audience” jibe and you should know how his “accomplishments” will look when asked what they are and whether, considering he takes the trouble to argue a case in a public forum he has measurable achievements to match Charles Murray’s in making people understand what he sees as reality that, even if obvious, clearly needs to be argued for if people are to accept that it is obvious or anyway the actual truth. Then there his rash jibe about “beta males”. Are we going to find the brilliantly paradoxical Perry Mason wheeling out pop-psych to explain that “beta male” is just the wee man’s projection? I trust you be able to satisfy yourself that your client is the one and only real Anonymous however unstable bis personality. His identity will after all need tk be established before bail is granted :-)

  119. I wouldn’t buy a lottery ticket even if drunk but I am happy to see lotteries used as methods of voluntary taxation of those who probably contribute little in the way of ordinary taxes. I would argue that they do not create or prey on addiction in the way gaming machines seem to do and that they also give something n return – a regular dose of hope.

  120. Very good comments by you.

    I look at a hypothetical simple fishing society. Some have what it takes to be great fishermen, some have great ability to make great nets or fishing vessels, others, maybe all they can do is repair nets or repair boats or gather the raw materials to make the nets or boats. Maybe the least competent can only gather wood and smoke the fish. The point is that everyone has a place and a way to make it in the society. It is criminal for the right side of a society to structure the society in such a way that the left side has no place, no way to move forward.

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  121. Unless, of course, “Republicans” means only a label of convenience used by a bloc of Washington elites and their big-money backers.

    Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

    (I saw this used before and really liked it, and I have waited patiently for a place to use it.)

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  122. pseudo intellectual redneck

    I am not sure if I am offended or just confused by this term.

  123. A common theme when cucks or part negroid cucks like Williamson and anti-white lefties write about poor whites and/or underclass whites is that they are solely to blame for their plight and are utterly contemptible people who deserve neither assistance nor compassion. By contrast, blacks and Latinos are never, ever responsible for the blight and carnage they bring to both their own and white communities and nations. Oh no, that’s all the fault of librulism (sic) and librul (sic) policies and blacks and Latinos are always poor, helpless and innocent victims.

    If Rush Limbaugh was mayor of Detroit, why, he’d show those dang libruls and black Detroit would turn into a glittering heaven of peace and prosperity.

  124. “It is criminal for the right side of a society to structure the society in such a way that the left side has no place, no way to move forward.” – Exactly!

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  125. People have such a strong sense of place when they can afford to. Bucketfuls of public money have kept entire communities afloat for decades, when there is no longer any economic reason for their existence.

    Having left Newfoundland in 1992, and having left Alberta (yes, with a U-Haul!) in 2002 for Ontario, I can say that the experience, though rather trying at times, has made me a better person than some of those who held on by their fingernails hoping for the next make work project or government hand out. Every trip home ( for it will ever be) lets me see how things might have been had I stayed. Mere months after I left, the entire fishery was shut down due to the utter collapse of the stocks due to rapacious overfishing; 40,000 people unemployed overnight in a province of just over half a million people. I was unhappily employed 4000 miles away at a Toyota dealership, experiencing the cold hell of a prairie winter for the first time and ruing my lack of education. Despite the poverty and rather grim lifestyle, it was better than living in a place where even the job I had would have been hard to come by, and where the local colleges and training schools were filled to capacity for a good part of a decade with disinterested fishermen being “re-trained” on the public dime for jobs that did not exist. Well, they did exist, somewhere, but few people over a certain age had any intention of moving, considering they had mortgage free homes they had built themselves or had passed down to them waiting for when they graduated. Sadly, after all this, the moratorium was still in effect, and even the government gravy train pulls into the station eventually, so many had to leave anyway. There were deals to be had if you were looking to retire to a quiet seaside village. Some split level home were going for $5000. I don’t know if those reluctant emigres ever returned. Once you’ve been away, things can look awfully small when you go back. The current horror-show in Alberta has convinced some that poverty amongst kinfolk who won’t see you starve is preferable to staying in Alberta and hoping the Saudis change their minds. Most Canadians have no idea how bleak things are there at the moment.

  126. Hear! Hear!

  127. iffen, buddy, if it were only a matter of identifying the problem, then spending a few spare weekends rolling up our collective sleeves to solve it–we’d be out of our jobs commenting here:) Effective dissent is really hard.

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  128. Only half of eligible voters vote. Turnout for your side is everything. Identifying who is on your side is more difficult. BHO won in 2012 in part because he had Google on his side.

  129. speaking of structure, Plato’s classes in The Republic, which were described by simile…metals, from precious to coarse, is an interesting idea.

    Arguably, the middle class revolutions of the 18th century and even earlier in England, were probably mostly caused by lack of opportunity for smart commoners to get ahead. If you read about the French Revolution, particularly for example de Tocqueville’s Ancien Regime, it is clear that the IQ Bell Curve was not being served in France. Talented people were bottled up.

    Careers open to talent has been the middle class revolution’s demand, besides political rights.

    It is unlikely that Evolution perfectly parses out classes with regard to IQ to best serve a particular technological time…just so many workers, just so many merchants, etc. per Plato.

    It would be interesting to discover a list of jobs and professions and the requisite IQs needed for each type job. Then one could compare that to, in our case, the White Bell Curve, in our own country, or any country.

    I assume that there is less need these days for lower IQ people because of technology , etc.
    We have swollen the working class
    with mexicans and blacks. There are not enough jobs that fit tthese low IQ people. That is probably the main reason that working class labor price has been driven down. Globalization is probably about as important, but nevertheless, if there is a labor shortage, wages go up and if there is a surplus as in mexican workers, then the price of labor falls.

    Expelling40 million mexicans would drive up the price of labor. Also, mexicans are a net loss to the economy given their welfare and education costs. A study of LA school district a few years ago found that it was spending about 30 k a year on mexers and blacks, garbage in and garbage out and money down the drain.

    Also one could add the welfare costs of poor whites to the same tab because the mexicans have partly caused it. I posted a day or so ago a Harvard economist’s study that concluded that workers in the US transfer a half-billion each year to Capital because of globalization. Another factor.

    The man factor in our stagnant economy is low consumer demand. Expelling mexican cheap labor and mexicans would be win-win, that is a win on economics, and a win socially, racially.
    Only a nationalist economy directed by nationalist economists will solve the economic problem.

    Robert Putnam’s study on Diversity and Community in the 21st century describes diversity as dramatically lowering public trust. A social good, like trust, is necessary for good economics, as well as a comfortable social life.

    We are entering the great cliche of a perfect storm, racially, politically, economically.

    Strong measures are needed, but the girlie men running the follies don’t see it. Trump may get a start however. Joe Webb

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  130. Umm……….link?

  131. …[A]nd the destruction of the national civic culture that Bob and I both cherish.

    “Bob” and “Murray” cherish the destruction of the national civic culture?

  132. “diversity as dramatically lowering public trust” – this is the most important issue. Much more important that IQ. Trust, empathy, social solidarity are necessary for the well functioning society. Only then society can pay sufficient attention to the needs of the left hans side of the bell curve. Sweden was once a well functioning society but it was killed with immigration.

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  133. Priss Factor [AKA "Dominique Francon Society"]
    says:
    • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment

    When white SJWs freak out about ‘triggering’, what they really mean is they are afraid of blacks being triggered cuz blacks can act really crazy.

    So, SJW’s oppose triggering cuz they are afraid of blacks.

    Look at colleges with BLM running rampant. Triggered blacks act nuts.

    So, white Libs fear negro being triggered and going on rampages.

  134. You sound like a silly little man so I wondered what such a person might mean by the expression “beta male”. I did a bit of online searching. I can see it might be a subject of obsession by someone who has always worried that he wasn’t blessed by nature in body and mind and without a beautiful clever mother of his children. As far as I can see males in my family tree for 180 years haven’t done beta. Not all bothering to display full crude alpha to hoi polloi of course. More of a problem to avoid the appearance of condescension when brought up to the idea, adapted to Antipodean preference for egalitarianism, of noblesse oblige.
    Unfortunately not all my high IQ relations avoid foolishness, self-pity and general inadequacy. Typically it is females who have everything but sex appeal to match their IQs.

    So… to your wishful thinking: a resounding No.

  135. In his heart of hearts Kevin Williams is a bleeding heart rightist. Those types are somewhat rare, but I met a couple in college.

  136. I’m surprised. I had pegged you as a paleo Catholic in the tradition of Belloc and Chesterton and Chronicles, not the establishment (neo-conservative) Catholics who wrote the calumnious NR letter against Trump.

    Do you think that Belloc would have approved of Trump?

    I am most certainly NOT an “establishment Catholic.” The simplest way of describing me would be a traditionalist Catholic.

    I suppose I am in an odd spot here – I find Trump repulsive in many ways, but also find the antics and the hysterics of the Left and the Republican establishment even more loathsome. I suppose I am a man without a candidate this season. I wish that were not the case, but if it had to be Trump as the Republican candidate, so be it.

  137. agree. yet, intelligence tends to keep more rationality around, which is a good thing.
    Rationality and friendliness. I notice that lots of superficially friendly people, like Blacks, and other darker races, like arabs can become inflamed emotionally way too easy. Also, principle as opposed to putative friendship as a basis for politics is very important. Too little principle and too much ‘friendship’ leads to corruption. Think mexico. Or just about all the non-white world, including smart Asians.. corruption is the game, always.

    Joe Webb

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  138. Wow! Cool epithets.

  139. Ah, the BSD UNIX. I had heard about it causing troubles. Very funny story indeed. http://rmitz.org/freebsd.daemon.html

    APPLE products are based on BSD. i.e. IPhone, Ipad, MacBook etc. are all “daemonic”

  140. The word “union[s]” appears only three times above. Is that not very surprising?

    For starters didn’t unions play a big part in screwing the once great motor industry (and before that steel???)?

    No doubt there was a division of spoils with employers at the expense of the average American while America was the only seriously rich country in the world but it is a sure thing that a little gang of oligarchs with higher than average IQs looked after themselves first.

    Now there are the public sector unions screwing the average American through their control of, and irresponsible use of power in, legislatures and municipalities.

    As an outsider, albeit from another Anglophone country, I wonder whether unions haven’t got a place in the rogues gallery if only on the facing wall from Wall Street and think tank neo cons.

  141. Corruption is not as clear a concept as you seem to imply. You seem to treat it as necessarily involving anarchic dishonesty and therefore absence of the trust which aids the efficiency of economies and government. But my guess would be that there are implicit rules nearly everywhere that a straitlaced foreigner might deplore corruption. Without elaborating in great detail I can recall an impeccably honest relation of mine running a gold producers’ cartel many years ago which was entirely legal but meant he couldn’t travel to the US while he was involved. And I imagine there is genuine indignation in countries like Indonesia or India when police or petty bureaucrats get greedy and demand more than the going rate in small bribes.

  142. It can be done. Trump has even talked about it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FTHXgmzURM

  143. Thanks :-)

  144. “Much more important than IQ”. You remind me of a logical problem I saw many years ago while getting an MBA degree after having practised the law for some years. What is the critical/key factor in/for a company’s success? Well sometimes you could say that the CEO hero had made the business take off when he allowed the brilliant young boffins immediate access to top management or when marketing realised it was women who made the buying decisions and reshaped the company’s marketing accordingly. But always it was on the assumption that certain vital activities or capacities were at least OK. Cp. What is key to your living a happy life? “Well, I have to have enough air to breathe and water to keep me hydrated….” Extrapolate the weighing of incommensurables, and the ignoring of all that is tacitly assumed, to taste.

    Are you assuming a society with a high enough average IQ and enough high IQ people before the other “more important” factors can count? If so it would be hard not to rate IQ very high.

    Actually I have a bit of a problem with your list of the more important. Mostly they are small scale Affects which apply between individuals, albeit including ones who are unknown to the Good Samaritan until special circumstances arise. Of course you are right to suggest that a nation which is one big family of likeminded co-ethnics (or to give the old US a chance, has enough people subscribing to the common national myths) is more likely to have strangers behaving towards each other as though they were each presumptively trustworthy and empathy would help them to imagine reciprocally, whether rightly or wrongly, that they were family for whom solidarity was the default position.

    But gypsies perhaps show remarkable social solidarity amongst themselves and possible conclusions are that either their homogeneous clannishness is excessive or that what they need is more IQ points! Food for thought I hope.

  145. says:
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    The globalist’s economic arguments are crumbling so their media shills are looking for other things to say but the cupboard is bare – blaming the victims is all they can do.

  146. The “low IQ” people who need protection aren’t really so low. Well, some of them are, but a lot of them are whites in the 95-105 band (i.e., average) who are being replaced for the financial benefit of the 115-130 people.

    You are quite correct that we need a managed economy, protected from foreign competition.

    That’s called national socialism.

  147. Thanks for the thoughtful response. My cousins from Toronto were PC voters but not politically-minded and rarely discussed politics. They live in Rob Ford’s neighborhood but prefer John Tory.

    With respect to American-Canadian differences, American frontier traditions differ from European ones and thus American conservatism would naturally look different from the Canadian, which is more European in nature (Canada of course started largely as a Loyalist project of traditionalists who rejected the American Revolution).

  148. Effective dissent is really hard.

    Borderline impossible these days. I expect that the “establishment” will re-assert its control whether Trump wins or loses. There is no organized opposition of which I am aware. The “other side” wins everything mostly by default.

  149. Well said.

    I can’t say that most of the cops that I’ve known are bullies or incompetent. After serving in the army for three years from ’76-’79 I then served in the army-reserve for twenty-one years. Cops tended to be well-represented in the several units that I served in and I got to see a side to them that most people don’t get to see. My impression was that ~95% were “normal” guys trying to do their best in a job that required that they deal with people who ranged from merely obnoxious & disrespectful to the absolute scum-of-the-Earth. A typical day was more likely to include a drunk vomiting of their shoes or dealing with domestic-violence than it was kicking in the doors of drug dealers or stopping a serial-killer just in the nick of time.

    The other ~5% were high school bullies who had never grown up (or had *wanted* to be high school bullies but were at the bottom of the pecking-order and were now making up for lost time). My $0.02.

  150. IMHO most bad behavior, as most people would define it, is due to some combination or other of a defective brain and a bad upbringing. By defective brain I mean low I.Q., learning-disabilities, anger-management & impulse-control issues and the like, bipolar-disorder and of course schizophrenia.

    I read about one “family” that sent their four-year-old daughter door-to-door selling pot. I read about another “family” that had their nine-year-old child selling drugs at school. Bad upbringings. Some people–of all races/ethnicities–are *not* competent to be parents. They should do themselves & society a favor and get tubals & vasectomies. And “If you can’t feed’em, don’t breed’em.”

    Other types of bad behavior can result from simple misunderstandings. I’ve committed my share of driving faux pas but in most cases it was because the other driver was in my blind-spot or I misjudge time or distance or I was “zoning,” etc. I’ve said more than my fair-share of offensive things in large part due to “engaging the mouth before engaging in the brain.” I didn’t intend to offend anyone (but I did).

    In parts of the Middle East and Africa if you sit with your legs crossed and you present the sole of your foot/shoe to another person that is consider to be an insult. Most Westerners probably don’t know that. Again, unintentional bad behavior.

  151. I’m going to say something very un-PC: A *lot* of people, the world over, need to stop reproducing. They either aren’t competent to be parents or they can’t afford children, to include those who live in the middle of some large economic wasteland. I’ve known a number of people, nominally on the right-hand side of the bell-curve, who were probably minimally competent to be parents and could at least minimally afford one or two children but who simply were not willing to do the *hard* *work* that successful child-rearing requires. There’s a *lot* more to it than just changing diapers and throwing Pop-Tarts at them three times a day.

    In case you’re wondering I have two sons, ages 26 & 28, both of whom live in Houston, Texas, who have turned out reasonably well. They both have no vices other than the occasional drink. They have had no run-in with the law more serious than a traffic-ticket. They both contributed to paying for their education by working and both got good jobs right out of college. (It didn’t hurt that the Houston-metroplex is a jobs-creating-dynamo-on-steroids, even with the current oil-glut; Appalachians with skills, a work-ethic and a U-Haul take note).

  152. #138 High IQ is not everything. MENSA is full of high IQ people who cannot be utilized by any sensible society.

  153. Because HBD is nothing more than an excuse for a bunch of white losers to rationalize their failures and has about as much scientific validity as Scientology. Which it resembles.

    IQ’s nice to have but there are other factors that are more important.

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  154. Losers like Nobel Laureates James Watson and William Shockley?

    IQ isn’t everything, but without it, you’re just stupid.

  155. Well said.

  156. How do black and Hispanic losers rationalize their failure?

  157. Brilliant post sir, truly airtight logic

  158. Hussein Obama has way more thug underclass supporters than Donald Trump. The World Star Hip Hop demographic loves Hussein Obama.

    Are you sure about that one, Sport?

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/hip-hops-25-year-obsession-with-donald-trump_us_55d61727e4b055a6dab3524a

  159. “IQ’s nice to have but there are other factors that are more important.”

    For certain fields of human endeavor, high IQ is a necessary condition. It is not, however, a sufficient condition.

    Consider two people, one having an IQ or 90 and another having an IQ of 130. Both have the necessary intellectual capacity to be agricultural laborers or domestic servants; but only the one with the IQ of 130 has the necessary intellectual capacity to graduate from medical school. However, that is not by itself sufficient for him to do so. He must still make the effort.

    You might argue that self-discipline, persistence, and application are “more important” than IQ for a would-be medical student; but if he lacks the necessary IQ, he’s not going to succeed no matter how sterling his other characteristics may be.

  160. Hare, I’m an HBD-skeptic, at least to the extent that I doubt the ideas presented here are ripe enough to inform policy decisions. My technical knowledge is popular science-level. I enjoy these pages because they present a serious if not quite totally persuasive challenge to the present muddle we’re living in with respect to race. How many times does anyone have to listen to the notion that race is unimportant except when race is regarded by current government policy as important? How many times does anyone have to listen to the idea that it’s wrong to make broad judgments about peoples who are clearly definable as sharing common characteristics, when making broad judgments about peoples is what governments and corporations do as everyday business?

    We have a sort of an aggressively politicized “contra-HBD” at work today, a “contra-HBD” that refuses to articulate its biases and even malice, and that takes full advantage of how healthy nationalism and good ethnic and racial solidarity have been debased, so I’m okay with reading Steve and the other folks here. We all need an antidote to toxic politics. I’m not yet persuaded by HBD, but I’m willing to listen.

    FWIW-High IQ is a sine qua non for some occupations. Physical strength, manual dexterity, good character, regularity of habits, and much more—well, they mean something, too, in many occupations. So, I agree with you.

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  161. Skeptic about HBD? I am skeptical about IQ. IQ is very insufficient (simplistic) metrics to study HBD. What is lacking in studying HBD is psychology. Diversity of psychological traits across HBD. I think various psychological traits that have different distribution across HBD can explain much more than just IQ. Unfortunately people working in psychology departments deny HBD, so no help form there. They refuse to study psychological differences among races as their science is based on the axiom that races do not differ (no races!).

  162. […] Do #WhiteTrashLivesMatter to Donorist-Capitalist-Neocon Party Bad Boy Kevin Williamson? by John Derbyshire. Establishment writer Kevin Williamson infamously dissed underclass whites, blaming their poor economic and social status on the victims: […]

  163. says:
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    IQ’s nice to have but there are other factors that are more important.

    Necessary condition – not a sufficient condition.

  164. I think you people have this Kevin Williamson all wrong. In reality he was paid off by the U-Haul people and the rest of his column was just a way to work them in the story.

  165. Wizard of Oz says,”…For starters didn’t unions play a big part in screwing the once great motor industry (and before that steel???)?…”

    The managers never had to give to the Unions. GM gave into the Unions so they could stuff their pockets with shareholders cash and bonuses. They didn’t want the gravy to stop coming in. Never mind the long term consequences for the company. After all who ran the companies? Who was paid to run the companies? Of course now it’s the Unions fault.

  166. I can reliably trace most of my ancestors back to the 18th Century, my paternal ancestors to 1612 and my grandmother’s ancestors to 950. We are all from the same part of Wales. I do resent that after many centuries I and my brother had no choice but to leave. My Great Grandfather and his four brothers left in the 19th Century, made a lot of money in Chicago and came home to retire at 40, in my GG’s case. I have also managed a similar return, although not quite to home base. 70 miles out. But it is extremely difficult to do. It requires a business that is not location dependent. Most fail. It’s impossible for an employee.

    South Wales or the Maritimes or the Ohio valley need not have fallen as far as they have. Infrastructure does make a difference. Spending all the government’s money in the capital makes a difference. Pension funds that suck money out of the provinces and invest it in the big cities (No investments outside the M25) make a difference, perhaps even the biggest. They control more mobile money than the government. These are unnecessary inequities that can be addressed. Newfies and Hillybillies and Woolybacks have feelings too.

  167. […] loses. Derbyshire on Williamson. The delicate generation (relevant). The left eats itself (part […]

  168. Once automation has the planet “all watched over by machines of loving grace,” everything outside of Monaco and West Palm Beach will be nuked with neutron bombs and the only proles left will be obsequious holograms.

  169. Random -

    our family landed in Toronto, which I suspect, aside from Boston or (now), Vancouver, that’s a common path.

    Toronto was a way-station as it were, as we eventually came to live in Southern California. Interestingly, my extended family is a mix – some still live in Nova Scotia, but others have spread to the States or Vancouver.

    Your observations are not entirely contradictory. Personally, my own choices reflect a bit of a different reality. What an economist might call “revealed preference.” When I left home, settled in San Francisco, spent a few years living in France, and now back to California. I would, like you, probably go stir crazy in a small town where everyone knows everyone elses’s dirty laundry.

  170. Sure.

    His reaction to the TPP – which whilst not a good agreement, is completely ignorant of the fact that China is not actually a part of the TPP. That’s just one. His proclamations of essentially stepping over libel laws. His discussion of pouring more money into the military (for what?) Promises to bring manufacturing jobs back.

    In my view, he has a far exaggerated view of how much power the president actually has.

    I agree that he’s better than Bush and Obama in many regards, and I will 100% vote for him before Hillary Clinton, but extending the imperial presidency? Getting involved in idiotic cat fights with Megan Kelly? His truly bizarre infomercial following his win in Michigan?

    Do you think these reflect coherence?

  171. I didn’t realize Kevin Williamson looked like a comic book supra-villain (“And now, all shall be compelled to bow down before me!“). That just makes this story even better.

  172. says:
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    Trump is a symptom of a crumbling infrastructure of the Republican Party. Lack of maintainence of their main voting block has resulted in a total loss of confidence in the existing power structure and an uncontrollable desire to kick over the table and demand a new deal. The existing power elite have been recognized as a leech on the body politic so an emerging “Kingfish” populist is the last stop before absolute insurrection. Here is the real reason behind the liberal push to gut the Second Amendment; the terrifying thought of thousands of armed rednecks in the street!

  173. My old National Review colleague Kevin Williamson [Email him] has been frightening the horses with jobs were stolen by immigrants or shipped abroad by rapacious capitalists. They think they should be able to go on living in the place where they grew up, even after the jobs have left. They nurse “poorly informed and sentimental ideas about what those old Rust Belt factory jobs actually paid.” They cherish “the concept of the nation as an extended family”–and that’s a European concept, not an American one, according to Kevin.

    Your old NR colleague sounds like a real shitbird.

    No point bandying words with his ilk. Take his sizes for a custom pine box and move on.

    It is easy to imagine a generation of young men being raised without fathers and looking out the window like a kid in an after-school special, waiting for Daddy to come home … Some of them end up grown men still staring out that window, waiting for the father-führer figure they have spent their lives imagining, the protector and vindicator who will protect them, provide for them, and set things in order.

    I support Trump, and I grew up in a two-parent household. Like I said, a shitbird.

    The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die.

    Interesting choice of words. That’s how I feel about people who abuse the power granted to them by the megaphone. ‘Course nowadays the job’s mostly paid lying, so, lots of work for the box-makers.

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