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Derb’s January Diary: Collective Mass Insanity; Mary Tyler Moore As Sex Goddess; Etc.
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MTM and Dick Van Dyke as the Petries.
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Collective mass insanity. From a reader, edited for anonymity:

After witnessing the Left’s response to Trump’s “Muslim Ban” I can only refer to one of your early diaries in which you said that “we are passing through a temporary period of collective mass insanity.”

I still remember the pre-2001 America. Muslims were not any sort of presence in the U.S., outside of a few cities (Dearborn, MI, Paterson, NJ, Brooklyn, NY, Falls Church, VA, etc.) There was little cultural impact, outside of appearing in a few terrorist novels. I don’t recall seeing a Muslim in my daily life outside of NYC. Now, only 15 years later, they are supposedly a key element of American identity.

Case in point: The CEO of my company sent out an email to all of our employees following President Trump’s executive order on immigration from those seven unstable Muslim-majority countries. In the email he urged us to keep our workplace “a safe space” for all our co-workers. Our company, he said, values “diversity” and “inclusion.” Our differences, he said, make us stronger.

Our CEO is an ordinary American guy; not bad or crazy in any way, by no means a Social Justice Warrior, just a suburban dad who worked hard and eventually moved to the top of the organization. Yet he used the phrase “safe space” un-ironically in an email to the firm’s employees. This phrase was not in any sort of use outside of the looniest corners of college grievance culture three years ago.

I’m afraid that the West has morphed into some sort of suicide death cult. Most Americans, even ones who don’t read the news on a daily basis, are aware of what is going on in Europe. The majority of Americans, who do not want to see mass Muslim migration, are terrified of speaking out against it.

What is next for the West? I honestly don’t know.

Neither do I, friend. Watching the month-end mass hysteria over an unremarkable and minor change to our customs and immigration rules, it really does seem that some large subset of our population has slipped into collective insanity.

The Diversity Cult is nuts. A moment’s calm reflection shows its absurdity. If you have more than that moment to spare, I refer you to blogger M.G., who spells it all out in fine detail at Those Who Can See [The Diversity Tax , December 11, 2016]

And as my correspondent says, it’s not just that we have tens of thousands of shrieking lunatics with nothing to do all day long but make placards and demonstrate. That would be bad enough; but sane, normal people like that CEO believe they have to parrot the idiot phrases — “safe space,” “inclusion,” “who we are” — or pay a price.

It’s nuts. Just look at those demonstrators these past few days. An actual majority seem to be women.

The most passionate opponents of any restriction on Muslim immigration, in fact, are (a) women, and (b, to judge from newspaper Op-Eds and online commentary) Jewish liberals like Chuck Schumer.

They should form a pressure group together. They could call it WOMEN AND JEWS FOR ISLAM.

As the kids say: Hel-lo?

News-itive dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is the psychological phenomenon that results when contradictory beliefs collide in one’s head, or when some indisputable aspect of reality contradicts one’s cherished beliefs.

Something analogous happens now and then in the news: two different stories, both true, colliding with a noise of crumpling metal and breaking glass.

So it was at the end of January. On the 29th, following President Trump’s Executive Order on immigration, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz (right) announced that his company will hire 10,000 “refugees” to work in its coffee shops.

On the 30th we found ourselves reading about Cafe X, a different chain of coffee shops, introducing a robot barista in one of their San Francisco outlets.

At some date not very far in the future, Starbucks will have to choose between robots and “refugees.” To the best of my understanding, the two categories are mutually exclusive.

Sixty years on from Peak Happiness. For British people, it says here, the happiest year of the last century was 1957.

The analysis, published by the university [of Warwick] with the Social Market Foundation, is taken from eight million books used to track contentment from 1776 to 2009, based on positive words such as “peaceful,” “enjoyment,” and “happiness” compared to negative words such as “stress” and “unhappy.”

It shows a rise in joy after 1945, peaking in 1957, a fall through the nationwide strikes and inflation of 1978’s Winter of Discontent, and then a recovery, but never to the happiness levels of the 1950s.

Homes costing £2,000, a yo-yo for Christmas and no traffic jams: Why 1957 was Britain’s happiest year of the last century

By Victoria Allen, Daily Mail, January 23, 2017

That brought two things to mind. The first was a nostalgia piece I wrote ten years ago that proved one of my most popular. It was titled The Lost Eden of Robert A. Heinlein,” and contrasted the confident, homogenous, high-social-capital U.S.A. of the 1950s favorably with the bickering, diverse, bowling-alone nation of 2007.

The second thing was Daniel Eakins, the hero of David Gerrold’s 1973 classic sci-fi novel The Man Who Folded Himself. The young Eakins inherits a time-travel belt from his uncle. He then does all the things you might try doing if you could travel in time. And then some: He has affairs with himself, both homo- (by the logic of time travel, after a few excursions there are numerous copies of him around) and hetero- (via a trip to the future where full sex-change is routine). He gives birth to himself, and sees himself die. The mysterious uncle is of course himself.

(Yes, I know: Heinlein did some of this in his short story “All You Zombies.” Gerrold took it further, though, to novel length.)

In middle age — his body ages at the normal rate — after many adventures, Eakins settles down at last in 1950s California.

The fifties are a great time to live. They are close enough to the nation’s adventurous past to still bear the same strident idealism, yet they also bear the shape of the developing future and the promise of the technological wonders to come … The roads are still new … it is still too soon for them to be overburdened with traffic and ugliness … The hills around Los Angeles are still uncut and green …

I don’t know how rigorous this University of Warwick study was, and of course would want to see it replicated before I swallow it whole. It’s nice to think, though, that fifties nostalgia has some grounding in fact.

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If it’s true that 1957 was Peak Happiness in the West, I’d identify two causes. One is the well-known fact that personal well-being arises not so much from f (t) as from f ′(t): not on what you have at time t so much as the rate of change in what you have. In the 1950s the rather stern and gritty period immediately after WW2 was turning into the consumer society. f (1957) was of course miserable compared to f (2017) — polio, stick shift, black-and-white TV, halitosis, the draft — but f ′(1957) was through the roof.

The other cause was ethnic homogeneity. In 1957 neither Britain nor American was seriously afflicted with the horrible blight of diversity. In my own country town in the English midlands, wellnigh everyone was English. A Scot or a Welshman was exotic. Our society was as homogenous as 2017 Japan.

There were a few real foreigners: our family dentist was Polish, and the local ice-cream van’s proprietor was Italian (surname Gallone; we had to be taught to pronounce the “e”). Americans from a nearby USAF base were sometimes seen in the town.

Nobody minded this. Poles were gentlemen; Italians were mildly comical, but harmless; Americans were sort-of familiar from the movies.

Outside our provincial idyll, however, things were changing fast. London already had tens of thousands of Caribbean blacks; Britain’s first race riot occurred the following year. Mass immigration was well under way, bringing with it the destruction of social capital and the decline in happiness.

Nostalgia is of course annoyingly geezerish, and there’s a lot to like about 2017. Much that was good has been lost in these sixty years, though. Some of it might yet be reclaimed, with sensible policies.

The political challenges to late-20th-century Goodthink that we are seeing in both America and Europe are, I believe, driven in part by awareness of those losses, and hopes for some reclamation.

R.I.P.(1): Mary Tyler Moore. I was sorry to read about the death of Mary Tyler Moore on January 25th.

The Main Stream Media obituaries were all cast in the context of feminism, with emphasis on her career-woman role in the 1970s sitcom “Mary Tyler Moore Show.” Here was the New York Times, for example:

Ms. Moore’s portrayal … expressed both the exuberance and the melancholy of the single career woman who could plot her own course without reference to cultural archetypes …

The show, and her portrayal of Mary as a sisterly presence in the office, as well as a source of ingenuity and humor, was a balm to widespread anxieties about women in the work force.

It modeled a productive style of coed collegiality, with Ms. Moore teasing out the various ironies known to any smart woman trying to keep from cracking up in a world of scowling male bosses and preening male soloists.

The hell you say. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” had its moments, I’ll allow; but it was in the earlier “Dick Van Dyke Show” that Mary captured my cohort of mid-1960s late-teen males.

We were in love with her. She was a sex goddess: not of the glamorous sort, like Marilyn Monroe, nor precisely the girl-next-door of our own generation, like Hayley Mills. The expression MILF was not then current, but that was how we saw Mary: mature and sophisticated, yet very desirable. There was a general opinion among my coevals that Mary’s then-husband, Grant Tinker, should be kidnapped and imprisoned in some remote location, to give the rest of us a chance.

Were we objectifying a smart, talented lady by reducing her to a mere object of adolescent lust? You bet we were. Did she mind? I doubt it. R.I.P.

Bring on the NATINTERN. The January 21st summit of European nationalist leaders in Koblenz, Germany seems to have gone well. France’s Marine Le Pen, Germany’s Frauke Petry, Italy’s Matteo Salvini, and Holland’s Geert Wilders were all there, along with some lesser lights of European nationalism.

If the show went well, however, it didn’t go over well with the Main Stream Media. The Economist was of course particularly scathing. Their report was decorated with a picture photo-shopped to make Wilders, Le Pen, and Petry look as sinister and ghoulish as possible.

Said the text of the report:

Mr Wilders, fresh from a criminal conviction for inciting racial discrimination, delivered his usual absurdity-flecked attack on immigrants, declaring at one point that European blondes are growing afraid to show their hair for fear of being attacked by immigrants.

At a summit in Germany, nationalism goes international, January 24, 2017

The precise “crime” for which Mr Wilders was convicted was “inciting discrimination and group offense.” At a political rally Wilders had asked whether attendees wanted more or fewer Moroccans in Holland, then led the crowd chant of “Fewer! Fewer!” Even the judges at his trial seem to have been embarrassed at the silliness of this prosecution: they released Wilders without punishment.

An international conference of nationalists is not at all paradoxical. All over the West there are people who believe that the cults of diversity and mass immigration are totally out of control and need reining in. It’s natural for these people to get together and share ideas.

In fact I got a frisson of musical excitement when speed-reading that Economist piece. At one point it tells us that Ms Le Pen “thrilled the largely middle-aged crowd with her call for a ‘patriotic spring’.” (Note in passing that sneering observation about the age of the crowd. Apparently middle-aged people are not a Designated Victim Group.)

In my haste I misread that as Ms Le Pen calling for a patriotic song. Yes! I thought, we need a new “Internationale” — a nationalist “Internationale”! I invite musically-inclined readers to submit suggestions.

Then my imagination really took flight. Remember the COMINTERN — the Communist International, founded in 1919 to help spread a worldwide Leninist revolution? Well, how about we start up a NATINTERN? Nationalism is just as subversive of globalist Goodthink as communism was of industrial capitalism.

(Homosexuals in the 1930s favored a HOMINTERN, to propagate the joys and benefits of their own lifestyle; but the word was taken up almost at once by anti-homosexual conspiracy theorists, and dropped by the gay set. I don’t believe they ever got around to writing a song for the HOMINTERN. There are some numbers on YouTube they might have used.)

R.I.P.(2): Zhou Youguang. A moment of silence, please, for Zhou Youguang, who passed away on January 14th at the age of 111. (The picture at right was taken 90 years ago.)

Mr Zhou invented the pinyin system for writing Chinese words in the Latin alphabet. The ChiCom government adopted pinyin in 1958 as the official transcription of their language, and it has since become universal. Even Taiwan has taken it up.

What a thing, to live to be 111! Mr Zhou was actually born during the last years of Imperial China; his father was a scholar-gentleman of the traditional type, serving the court of the Manchu dynasty under the Dowager Empress whose honorific name is written in pinyin as Cixi.

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I didn’t know until reading the obituaries that Mr Zhou was a dissident, who regarded Mao Tse-tung, correctly, as a lawless despot, and who supported the 1989 student movement that was suppressed at last in the massacres at Tiananmen Square and elsewhere. This kept him in the obscurity of official disfavor during his later years, but he seems not to have come to any actual harm. As he told a BBC interviewer at age 106: “What are they going to do, come and take me away?”

As a way of rendering Chinese alphabetically, pinyin is not bad, and in any case we are all used to it now. At any rate, pinyin (the Empress is “Cíxǐ” with tone marks) is better than the old Wade-Giles system (“Tzŭ² Hsi³”), and way better than the Gwoyeu Romatzyh (“Tsyr Shii,” I think, the tones indicated by variant spelling of the vowels) that was floated by Chiang Kai-shek’s government in the 1930s.

None of these systems was as good for English speakers — I mean, got as close to representing English sounds — as the Yale system (“Tśz Sỹi”), now alas defunct. That’s not really a fair criticism, though, as pinyin was intended for international use, which has no consistency in the sound of Latin-alphabet letters. The letter “s” is pronounced “s” in English, “z” in German, and “sh” in Hungarian; the letter “c” is either a “s” sound or a “k” sound in English, but it’s a “ts” sound all over Central Europe; the letter “i” is either a short pure vowel (“bit”) or an “ah-ee” diphthong in English (“bite”), but it’s an “ee” sound most everywhere else; and so on. Whaddya gonna do?

Mr Zhou seems to have been a pretty companionable fellow. I’m sure he did his best, and the result was not bad. R.I.P.

Lecture course of the month. My workout companion this month has been Professor Robert LaFleur, lecturing on the Analects of Confucius.

LaFleur is very good, with an obvious enthusiasm for his subject and a way of humanizing the famously dry Analects. (Bertrand Russell, according to Ronald Clark, gave the Analects a try but bailed out. Confucius was, said Russell, “boring.” That’s from a guy who had read Hegel with keen attention!)

LaFleur is certainly a great improvement on Kenneth Harl, whose lectures on Barbarian Empires of the Steppes were my previous audio purchase from Great Courses. Steppe barbarians interest me, and the course is not without instructional content, but Prof Harl’s weird speech aberrations got to be too much at last, and I never got further than Genghis Khan.

I think Harl is actually dyslexic in some way not previously familiar to me, nor perhaps to neurodevelopmental science. Almost any word outside the normal run of conversational American English was liable to be mangled by Prof Harl. I had thought it was just the pronuniation of Chinese names he had trouble with, but as the course progressed it became clear that foreign-ness of any kind foxed him.

There was for example an Iranian dynasty called the Sassanids, which I have always heard pronounced “SASS-a-nids.” Prof Harl renders is as “Sa-SAN-a-nids,” with an extra syllable and a change of stress — not once, but consistently.

Even British English baffles him. He actually mentions the Wade-Giles transcription at one point, when discussing Chinese names; but he pronounces it “Wade-Jillies.” Ye gods!

I’m pretty sure dyslexics are a Designated Victim Group; so I had better not be too unkind, or I shall end up in Hate Court like Geert Wilders. I’ll just say that if Prof Harl would like some instruction in pronouncing words that fall outside outside the scope of everyday American English, I can make myself available at a modest hourly fee, plus travel expenses.

Presidential footwork. Now please don’t get me wrong. I love our new President; I voted for him; I support him; and I have great hopes for his administration.

However, watching the Inauguration festivities, I saw the President dancing with his beautiful (and, by all accounts, intelligent and charming) wife. It was painful to watch.

Mr President: Random small shufflings of the feet is not dancing.

And, Mr President: A lady as lovely, loyal, and accomplished as Mrs Trump is surely worth a few hours of your time with instructors at an Arthur Murray studio. At your net-worth level, in fact, you can skip the studio and just have instructors chauffered over to your gaff.

Not everybody can be good at everything, and I don’t necessarily want to see the First Couple leaping and twirling on Dancing With the Stars. Although … Never mind. Still, basic waltz, foxtrot, and rumba are not hard to master, and were considered basic social accomplishments when you and I were growing up. (I’m only 375 days older than the President.)

And please don’t tell me Barack Obama can’t dance, either. True; in defiance of all stereotypes, he can’t, but we expect nothing better from a shallow, self-absorbed Gen-X idler. Just by giving himself to us to gaze at in worshipful adoration, Obama feels he has fulfilled his social obligations.

From a National Conservative, we want something better. If you really want to work the national aspect, there are some fine traditional American dances you might try.

Get yourself a pair of dancing pumps, Mr President! Or else stay off the dance floor altogether, and leave it to people who can dance.

Math Corner. In December’s Math Corner I posed the traditional end-of-year question: what is interesting about the number 2017, other than its just being a prime number?

I’m going to retire that tradition. Websites like OEIS (of which I still possess the original book, 1995 edition) make it too easy.

This guy took it to the max. Blogsites being ephemeral things — as opposed to my website, which is for the ages — I’ve reproduced his listing here.

  • Rounded to the nearest integers, both 2017 π and 2017 e are primes.
  • Add up all the odd primes (i.e. not counting 2) to 2017 inclusive: 3+5+7+11+ … +2017. The answer is itself a prime number.
  • Consider all the gaps between prime numbers up to 2017. The first gap, 3−2, is 1. The next, 5−3, is 2. So is the next, 7−5 … The last gap is the one from 2011 to 2017, a gap of 6. The sum of the cubes of all these gaps is a prime number.
  • Add (2−0−1−7) to 2017; the answer is the previous prime. Now add (2+0+1+7) to 2017; that’s the next prime.
  • You can insert a 7 almost anywhere into 2017 and get another prime: 27017, 20717, 20177 are all primes. Alas, 72017 is not.
  • 2017 is the octal (i.e. base-8) representation of decimal 1039, which is a prime.
  • 2017 can be written as a sum of three cubes of primes, i.e. p³+q³+r³ for some primes p, q, r, not necessarily all different.
  • 2017 can be written as a sum of five cubes of integers (not necessarily primes) that are all different.
  • You can find positive integers x and y such that 2017 = x²+y²; and positive integers x and y (not necessarily the same x and y as the previous, of course) for which 2017 = x²+2 y²; and positive integers x and y for which 2017 = x²+3 y²; and similarly for x²+4 y², x²+6 y², x²+7 y², x²+8 y², and x²+9 y².
  • 20170123456789 is also a prime.
  • The 2017th prime number is 17539 and 201717539 is also a prime
  • (2017+1) / 2 and (2017+2) / 3 are both prime.
  • Take the cube root of 2017. The first ten decimal digits (you have to include both sides of the decimal point) are the ten digits 0, 1, 2, …, 9 (in, of course, a different order); and 2017 is the smallest integer with this property.
  • If you subtract the 11th prime number from the 11th power of 2, you get 2017.
(Republished from VDare.com by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Immigration, VDare Archives 
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  1. There is nothing sane or normal about this CEO. He has been bitten and now is one of them.

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  2. MarkinLA says:

    When your paycheck demands it you can make yourself believe anything. One year we went to our normal NCAA tournament Vegas vacation and took some low level manager that one of the guys worked for. He actually started vomiting out the “diversity is our strength” garbage even though he works in high tech and has nobody but whites and Asians under him.

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  3. Mr. Derbyshire, I like your diary articles on VDare a bunch. It was all good stuff, but since there are a bunch of subjects that I wanted to reply about, I’ll break replies up into individual comments.

    So point #A)
    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he’s not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don’t think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only – one word in fact – Lawyers.

    Due to worry about just one employee bringing up some type of discrimination, harassment, or whatever, kind of lawsuit, these big-wigs, or even medium-wigs, will go to great lengths to get the words out there – on website and in emails and probably posters in any kind of break-room they may have. It is worth it for this CEO, if it were to give contrary “evidence” against just one suit that could bankrupt the company, to do this sort of thing. That’s the way the Western world, and especially this country, is nowadays, and yes, it’s pretty sick.

    It’d be hard to prove my point though. If Derb’s correspondent were very good friends and even then only talked to him about this in private, with no way to be recorded (what, maybe a nude sauna … but, I digress ;-} he could get the honest truth. The higher up the chain of command though, the more lies you will hear.

    Next, time permitting:
    B) Mary Tyler Moore vs., say, Valerie Bertinelli
    C) Chinese Pinyin vs. other methods – and WTHell is a Dowager, anyway?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963

    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he’s not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don’t think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only – one word in fact – Lawyers
     
    Quite so.

    The fact the Left has been very, very successful in using the legal system to transform business and culture via lawsuits. They wrecked the Boy and Girl Scouts, ruined public education, terrified small businesses and even churches into submission to their agenda. It's even effected the military in terms of training and personnel policy. Academia is total disaster because of it. Higher education now resembles some sort of Marxist clown shop.

    Conservatives OTOH aren't into using the legal system nor pooling resources to form counterweights to the ACLU and ADL. Which makes it easy for the Left to steamroll whats left of conservative society with just a handful of lawyers and pliant judges.

    , @WorkingClass
    Your point is well taken. I should have said bitten by his lawyer.
    , @The Alarmist
    To your point B, you're going to leave it to MTM and Val? What about Ginger and Marianne? If we are going to keep it to MILFs, I still have a thing for Shirley Jones, but Florence Henderson wasn't unpleasant on the eyes. Discuss.
    , @The Alarmist
    Crap, forgot about Elizabeth Montgomery, my favourite MILF of the Twentieth Century.
  4. Dwright says:

    I always assumed my little shuffling on the dance floor was adequate. I do sway a bit also.

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.

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    • Replies: @Truth

    We were in love with her. She was a sex goddess: not of the glamorous sort, like Marilyn Monroe
     

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.
     
    Boy is the apocalypse (uncovering) going to be bad for you guys, it has destroyed me over the past two years, but hey, as the bible says, there is nothing new under the sun, and they've kept this deception in place since ancient Greece...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i12xoOzWcxQ
  5. Keith Vaz says:

    The most insane people are Budweiser. They are paying millions of dollars to destroy their company via the Superbowl Ad. Thinly veiled anti-Trump, pro-refugee propaganda.

    Most of their market are blue collar White men. I went over to youtube, sure enough, my suspicions were vindicated – more dislikes than likes, and loads of White men in the comments explaining how they will boycott the beer and haye how political it has become.

    Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?

    There’s only two explanations I can come up with for their idiocy:
    1) The top executives are alienated from their base & got hi on their own suply of sanctimonious PC diversity drivel.
    2) The (((ad agencies))) are mocking their gullible clients & don’t care about their defined job but about more visceral racial animosities.

    ??????

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    • Replies: @European-American
    Wow. I'm guessing it's 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck's, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee... Aren't we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    , @Hibernian
    "Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?"

    They can sell to the Saudi women who ditch their veils when the plane takes off from Riyadh to Paris.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Ad agencies are awash with young women and homosexuals.
  6. D. K. says:

    President Barack Hussein Obama II (b. 8/4/1961)– like his successor, Donald John Trump, Sr., and two predecessors, William Jefferson Clinton (ne Blyth III) and George Walker Bush, each of whom was born in mid-1946– is a member of my own Baby Boom Generation; to wit: 1946-1964 (although, the United States Bureau of the Census– perhaps uncomfortable with such an odd number of years, for such an artificial and arbitrary construct, or perhaps based upon the official signing of the Japanese Instrument of Surrender, aboard the U.S.S. Missouri, on September 2, 1945, and the time that it would have taken American military personnel to sail back home to America, en masse– has taken recently to shortening it to just 18 years– 7/1/46-6/30/64– which would exclude our current president, and thereby save the so-called Silent Generation– 1925-1945/1946– from the ignominy of never having produced an American president!?!).

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  7. @Keith Vaz
    The most insane people are Budweiser. They are paying millions of dollars to destroy their company via the Superbowl Ad. Thinly veiled anti-Trump, pro-refugee propaganda.

    Most of their market are blue collar White men. I went over to youtube, sure enough, my suspicions were vindicated - more dislikes than likes, and loads of White men in the comments explaining how they will boycott the beer and haye how political it has become.

    Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?

    There's only two explanations I can come up with for their idiocy:
    1) The top executives are alienated from their base & got hi on their own suply of sanctimonious PC diversity drivel.
    2) The (((ad agencies))) are mocking their gullible clients & don't care about their defined job but about more visceral racial animosities.

    ??????

    Wow. I’m guessing it’s 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck’s, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee… Aren’t we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WorkingClass
    It's not like the old Anheuser Bush headquartered in St. Louis. I like Corona for a commercial beer. I still think of it as Mexican. Stella is quite drinkable in its shapely green ten ounce bottle. Stella also bottles a passable hard cider spelled cidre. It's probably so good because it's "Made With Hand Picked Apples". Are there machine picked apples?
    , @MarkinLA
    Europeans won't buy American Budweiser so why screw with your major market?
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Hey EuroAmerican, I just did a cntrl-F on your comment, and found no "Miller High Life" in the results, hic, I'm good.
    , @El Dato

    AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company
     
    Totally exploitative of the local bar, too.

    Plus, practically all their beers are easily marketable, easily recognizable, easily undrinkable. Stay away.

    (Packs a few cans of Erdinger Weissbier before going into deplorable mode)

    Okay, time for my course on statistics. Enough Internet!
  8. Rod1963 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr. Derbyshire, I like your diary articles on VDare a bunch. It was all good stuff, but since there are a bunch of subjects that I wanted to reply about, I'll break replies up into individual comments.

    So point #A)
    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he's not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don't think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only - one word in fact - Lawyers.

    Due to worry about just one employee bringing up some type of discrimination, harassment, or whatever, kind of lawsuit, these big-wigs, or even medium-wigs, will go to great lengths to get the words out there - on website and in emails and probably posters in any kind of break-room they may have. It is worth it for this CEO, if it were to give contrary "evidence" against just one suit that could bankrupt the company, to do this sort of thing. That's the way the Western world, and especially this country, is nowadays, and yes, it's pretty sick.

    It'd be hard to prove my point though. If Derb's correspondent were very good friends and even then only talked to him about this in private, with no way to be recorded (what, maybe a nude sauna ... but, I digress ;-} he could get the honest truth. The higher up the chain of command though, the more lies you will hear.

    Next, time permitting:
    B) Mary Tyler Moore vs., say, Valerie Bertinelli
    C) Chinese Pinyin vs. other methods - and WTHell is a Dowager, anyway?

    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he’s not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don’t think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only – one word in fact – Lawyers

    Quite so.

    The fact the Left has been very, very successful in using the legal system to transform business and culture via lawsuits. They wrecked the Boy and Girl Scouts, ruined public education, terrified small businesses and even churches into submission to their agenda. It’s even effected the military in terms of training and personnel policy. Academia is total disaster because of it. Higher education now resembles some sort of Marxist clown shop.

    Conservatives OTOH aren’t into using the legal system nor pooling resources to form counterweights to the ACLU and ADL. Which makes it easy for the Left to steamroll whats left of conservative society with just a handful of lawyers and pliant judges.

    Read More
  9. The Socionomic Hypothesis rests on the notion that under conditions of uncertainty, humans make their decisions in the limbic system, not the neocortex.

    The former is the seat of emotion and sense of self. It includes the amygdala, which gets so much discussion at the anonymousconvervative blog with its emphasis on r/K evolutionary biology.

    The point is, decisions made in the limbic system are heavily influenced by the compulsion to “fit in.” This is why humans exhibit clear signs of herding behavior (fashions, fads, and Extraordinary Popular Delusions.) This is the genesis of bull and bear markets in stocks, real estate and all other financial markets.

    A key element of Socionomics is R.N. Elliott’s observation that stocks trace a patterned fractal.

    tl;dr version: we’ve been in a social mood mania since the bear market of the 1960′s.

    Read More
  10. @European-American
    Wow. I'm guessing it's 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck's, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee... Aren't we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    It’s not like the old Anheuser Bush headquartered in St. Louis. I like Corona for a commercial beer. I still think of it as Mexican. Stella is quite drinkable in its shapely green ten ounce bottle. Stella also bottles a passable hard cider spelled cidre. It’s probably so good because it’s “Made With Hand Picked Apples”. Are there machine picked apples?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    It’s probably so good because it’s “Made With Hand Picked Apples”. Are there machine picked apples?
     
    Common nonalcoholic cider is made with B grade apples. They might be windfall apples. They might have to have a wormy or mushy half cut off and discarded. Some A grade apples might be included. The Stella cider you like is made from A grade apples and picked at a better stage of ripeness. There are no apple picking machines.

    I can buy a gallon of common/no alcohol/ cider for three dollars. See what you are paying per gallon of Stella cider that is fermented a bit into an alcoholic drink. Now you know why Stella can afford to be using high class apples. I see Angry Orchard cider going for seven dollars for 72 ounces in a six pack. And you get charged alcohol taxes on top of this, but not for my three dollar per gallon cider.
  11. @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr. Derbyshire, I like your diary articles on VDare a bunch. It was all good stuff, but since there are a bunch of subjects that I wanted to reply about, I'll break replies up into individual comments.

    So point #A)
    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he's not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don't think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only - one word in fact - Lawyers.

    Due to worry about just one employee bringing up some type of discrimination, harassment, or whatever, kind of lawsuit, these big-wigs, or even medium-wigs, will go to great lengths to get the words out there - on website and in emails and probably posters in any kind of break-room they may have. It is worth it for this CEO, if it were to give contrary "evidence" against just one suit that could bankrupt the company, to do this sort of thing. That's the way the Western world, and especially this country, is nowadays, and yes, it's pretty sick.

    It'd be hard to prove my point though. If Derb's correspondent were very good friends and even then only talked to him about this in private, with no way to be recorded (what, maybe a nude sauna ... but, I digress ;-} he could get the honest truth. The higher up the chain of command though, the more lies you will hear.

    Next, time permitting:
    B) Mary Tyler Moore vs., say, Valerie Bertinelli
    C) Chinese Pinyin vs. other methods - and WTHell is a Dowager, anyway?

    Your point is well taken. I should have said bitten by his lawyer.

    Read More
  12. MarkinLA says:
    @European-American
    Wow. I'm guessing it's 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck's, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee... Aren't we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    Europeans won’t buy American Budweiser so why screw with your major market?

    Read More
  13. @European-American
    Wow. I'm guessing it's 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck's, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee... Aren't we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    Hey EuroAmerican, I just did a cntrl-F on your comment, and found no “Miller High Life” in the results, hic, I’m good.

    Read More
  14. Forbes says:

    Without reading the entirety of the NYT obit of MTM, the contradictions just leap out…

    the single career woman who could plot her own course without reference to cultural archetypes… her portrayal of Mary as a sisterly presence in the office…

    And without references to cultural archetypes, she apparently needed

    scowling male bosses and preening male soloists

    to play against…

    The retconning continues apace.

    Read More
  15. Zach says:

    To Mr. Derbyshire,

    I too have The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes audiobook. Perhaps you’d consider doing an MP3 audio file, correcting Harl’s pronunciation of key names, places, and concepts. You could put it up on your website. Thanks.

    Read More
  16. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Harl is a prof who requires that you pay attention and use your brain, but I’ve heard three of his lecture courses and liked them. He actually got me through the Peloponnesian War, and he’s the only one who’s been able to do it. Thucydides and Donald Kagan are both massive bores to read.

    Read More
  17. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    “The Diversity Cult is nuts.”

    It is time to call Immigration to the West ‘colonization’.

    Immigration means the arrivals of peoples in manageable numbers with the consent of the majority settled population. Implicit in the arrangement is the agreement that the immigrants will come with gratitude & appreciation and will respect the established system & culture and try to assimilate to the extent possible. The US used to be about immigrants. When too many arrived, the flow was stemmed. Also, newcomers were expected to assimilate, and the US favored the kinds of immigrants who would assimilate best. As for those who were not easily assimilate-able, they were allowed only in small numbers. And if they chose not to assimilate, they still acknowledged the primacy of the majority culture.

    But now, the US and EU have become about colonization. The US in current state is a Nation of Colonists. These massive flows of newcomers are coming to take over, displace white communities, dictate terms, demand special privileges & protections, pile abuse on white heritage, insult & even attack whites, and celebrate the demise of whites with taunting contempt.
    In anti-Trump rallies, non-whites are brazenly attacking whites with fists, sticks, and hammer.
    These are colonists, not immigrants. And they don’t request to be allowed in on the promise of gratitude and loyalty. They demand to let in on grounds that it is their RIGHT to enter America and do as they please. In their minds, the US must accommodate them.
    So, not only must America invite them but welcome them and serve them.

    How did this happen? To an extent, we can’t entirely blame these colonists. After all, some, or even many, do arrive with a sense of gratitude and respect. But they soon lose respect because America no longer has a center. When America was a white nation, assimilating to white norms was the template.
    But the US is now billed as nation of Diversity, which means there is no Core America. Much of American Culture is celebration of black thugs who sexually own white women on TV shows. White males are featured as pussy & weak if good and evil & hateful if strong. (Or whites can be tough against fellow whites. ‘Good’ whites whupping ‘bad racist’ whites. People don’t respect good weakness and evil power. Good whites must be weak or turn race-traitor. As for white power with racial agency, that is featured as the worst evil.) At any rate, there is no strong white archetype for white identity and interests. No John Wayne.
    Even white people don’t defend whiteness but remain at a moral disadvantage. A lot of white kids are decadent and trashy. Schools and media make evil seem like a white thing. So, colonists lose respect for White America fast. And their kids who attend schools are made to feel that the US belongs more to themselves than to whites since US is billed as ‘nation of immigrants’ and ‘nation of diversity’ whereas whites are reviled as ‘racist’ all throughout history. So, white ‘sin’ has disowned white claim on America that now properly belongs to Diversity according to PC. And plenty of whites also came under this indoctrination, and their main identity is virtue-signaling that they are as ‘good whites’ invitinmg their own displacement to atone for ‘white guilt’.

    Much of this transformation owes to Jews taking power as the new elites and fundamentally altering the Narrative of America. The Narrative has been turned upside down. America went from a nation where newcomers came with gratitude and sought acceptance by the majority to a nation where newcomers arrive as rightful royalty for whom the red carpet must be rolled out to them.
    With immigrant-rooted Jews as the New Elites of America, the new template is Jews-as-top-immigrant-Americans leading the future immigrant-Americans to overtake and displace white Americans.

    This is colonization pure and simple.

    Consider Israel. Jews first arrived as immigrants who tried to assimilate to the reality of Arab domination. But under British power that ruled Palestine, Jewish immigrants soon turned into Jewish colonizers. (Similarly, the colonization of America by the Third World is happening under the power of Jewish Globalist Imperialism, the supreme power over America. If not for British rule, Jewish immigrants couldn’t have entered into Palestine in big numbers. Without Jewish globalist rule, the US and EU wouldn’t have allowed so much invasion by the Third World.)
    At some point, Jewish immigration turned into Zionist colonization. Jews were no longer arriving to be a part of Palestine. They were coming to dictate the terms to the native population.

    White people need to know something fundamental about human nature which is a part of nature. Nature quickly senses weakness and seeks to exploit it for easy gain.

    [MORE]

    Consider a Big White Moose. It is big and powerful and nearly invulnerable. It feels so confident and fears no one. Its self-image is one of invincibility.
    One day, a weasel goes to the Big White Moose and says, “Mr Moose, I’m so hungry and thirsty. Can I just nibble on just a little piece of you for food & sustenance?”
    The moose figures, oh gee, why not? After all, it’s only a tiny weasel. So, the moose feels magnanimous and lets the weasel have a piece of it. The weasel bites off a tiny bit of the moose around the joint. Weasel eats a little flesh and drinks some blood. It wasn’t pleasant to the moose, but it was bearable. But there is infection on the wound, and it won’t heal. And the wound begins to fester. And since a part of the joint was gnawed, the moose begins to hobble a bit.
    Now, if the setting only had the moose and the weasel,it’d be no big deal.

    But the setting has lots of hungry animals, some desperately hungry.
    The weasel calls out to them and says he had a delicious meal of moose flesh and blood.
    So, others also come to the moose and ask to eat and drink some of him. The moose, still feeling big and strong, complies, but as time goes on, more and more of him has been torn off. Gradually, the pain becomes unbearable and the loss of blood has made him weaker. Also, all those bites led to infections and puss.
    At some point, the moose figures the feeding must stop… but by then, he no longer has the strength to say NO. All the other creatures see that he’s a vulnerable wounded beast to gorge on. And he is eaten alive while the weasel looks into his eye and giggles fiendishly.

    No matter how big and strong you are, you need to worry about vulnerabilities than bask in invulnerabilities since there is no such thing as an invulnerability. Every system, however powerful, has vulnerabilities. And a sign of weakness, though seemingly insignificant initially, will fester and grow into more serious weaknesses, which serves as a signal to all the predators and parasites that an easy feast is in the offing.

    When America allowed the first fatal bite with the 1965 Immigration Act, it doomed itself to be a beached whale to be feasted on by the world.

    But white Americans, satiated with too much fun and food, failed to see the dangers. They had so much that ‘not sharing’ seemed a bad sport.
    It’s like hungry animals in the wild all about the fight and survival.
    But well-fed animals in captivity don’t much care about their turf being taken over by other animals since their stomachs are full and have security & comfort provided by people.
    Little do they know that the arrival of more and more animals will eventually lead to their displacement while the human masters ready them for the glue factory.

    In our time, ‘white supremacism’ is a myth. The reality is White Submissivism.

    America and the feeding frenzy:

    Read More
  18. Art Deco says: • Website

    The retconning continues apace.

    Aye. Mary Tyler Moore generally played the straight man for Valerie Harper, Gavin MacLeod, Ed Asner, &c. The character Mary Richards was frequently flustered and, to a degree, socially awkward (the wretchedness of her cocktail parties was an occasional theme). She had only one friend outside the office (who decamped to New York in 1974), never earned a promotion which caused a substantive change in her duties at work, had no discrete professional accomplishments, was never recruited by any other employer, and was eventually fired by the end of the series by the new owners of the TV station where she’d worked for seven years (along with ‘Murray’ and “Lou Grant” – “Ted Baxter” was retained). She had no hobbies (other than recreational walking as depicted in the opening credits) and no personal library. In spite of being handsome (and charming in a clumsy sort of way), hardly any men took an interest in her. Much of her conversation with the fictional ‘Rhoda Morgenstern’ was marked by ‘Rhoda’s sardonic commentary on the dissatisfaction incorporated into everything she’d done and was doing, something which ‘Mary Richards’ shared to a degree. It was a story about a woman at the but end of young adulthood coping with the stagnation that tends to set in around that time. Remember the Peggy Lee song, “Is That All There Is”? Mary Tyler Moore and Ed Asner managed to make it light and amusing, to a degree. “Mary Richards” wasn’t a feminist icon except in the imagination of people who write inane newspaper commentary. She was an unmarried woman living by herself, making rent, and, in general, getting through life. That wasn’t a novelty in 1970. The spinster minority had been taking care of themselves in urban settings for several generations at that point.

    Read More
    • Replies: @middle aged vet..
    I wish I had written that insightful comment. For the record, nothing you said contradicted Derbyshire's remarks that she was attractive to him and his cohort in her earlier role as Dick Van Dyke's fertile wife. In real life, while being extremely limited intellectually, she did succeed in being the Gerard de Nerval of her day, which is something you cannot say about many people. "I have a liking for lobsters. They are peaceful, serious creatures."
  19. Hibernian says:
    @Keith Vaz
    The most insane people are Budweiser. They are paying millions of dollars to destroy their company via the Superbowl Ad. Thinly veiled anti-Trump, pro-refugee propaganda.

    Most of their market are blue collar White men. I went over to youtube, sure enough, my suspicions were vindicated - more dislikes than likes, and loads of White men in the comments explaining how they will boycott the beer and haye how political it has become.

    Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?

    There's only two explanations I can come up with for their idiocy:
    1) The top executives are alienated from their base & got hi on their own suply of sanctimonious PC diversity drivel.
    2) The (((ad agencies))) are mocking their gullible clients & don't care about their defined job but about more visceral racial animosities.

    ??????

    “Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?”

    They can sell to the Saudi women who ditch their veils when the plane takes off from Riyadh to Paris.

    Read More
  20. B) Yes, Mary Tyler Moore was cute. Still, how can you put her ahead of say, “That Girl”, Miss Marlo Thomas, from that same era? I gotta go with “That Girl” – gotta friend who was on a big “That Girl” kick a few months back – can ya blame him?

    If you get to the next decade, well, there was both Barbara Romano (aka, Valerie Bertinelli), and just a bit later, Mallory Keaton (aka, I don’t care what the actress’s real name is in my fantasies.) They weren’t MILFs in their shows because they weren’t married, so they were just “ILFs, I guess.

    To Mr. Forbes:

    … scowling male bosses and preening male soloists

    The former would have been Lou Grant, and the latter Ted Baxter, in the show, and the only good guys were the ones she dated. My Dad would exclaim about every other show something like “Why doesn’t she just get married, and quit listening to Rhoda”? How right he was!

    Read More
  21. C) About the pinyin, Mr. Derbyshire, I am familiar, and I agree it’s not the best. Many people who don’t know too much about China forget about the characters and think that it is THE Chinese language. It is, after all, not very easy to pronounce correctly (even forgetting the 4 tones – that’s a whole nother level of difficulty). I wondered for a long time why they, or Mr. Zhou – now that I learned about him – didn’t use better combinations of our letters to represent the sounds. He was trying to work with the entire Western world, I guess, not just the English speakers.

    I try to imagine what it would have been like for the missionaries (even when they were standing up) and the businessmen in the concession territories to learn the language before pinyin. Characters notwithstanding, how could one even make out the breaks between the words when the sounds are so damn strange until one already knows the way the syllables are put together. Imaging a guy pointing to a whole bunch of squiggles an saying “howdza” or “tsz syi”.

    Lastly, without pinyin or any of the other transcription types, how would they have gotten started with computers, not to mention typewriters (out of the question!)? You know how it works, of course, but I don’t know if even the tablet with touchscreen/pen operation would be that useful. It be damn slow, I can tell you that. They need to get rid of the characters sometime – 5,000 years is long enough to put up with that crap.

    My take on Confucius should be widely known by now.

    Read More
  22. @Art Deco
    The retconning continues apace.

    Aye. Mary Tyler Moore generally played the straight man for Valerie Harper, Gavin MacLeod, Ed Asner, &c. The character Mary Richards was frequently flustered and, to a degree, socially awkward (the wretchedness of her cocktail parties was an occasional theme). She had only one friend outside the office (who decamped to New York in 1974), never earned a promotion which caused a substantive change in her duties at work, had no discrete professional accomplishments, was never recruited by any other employer, and was eventually fired by the end of the series by the new owners of the TV station where she'd worked for seven years (along with 'Murray' and "Lou Grant" - "Ted Baxter" was retained). She had no hobbies (other than recreational walking as depicted in the opening credits) and no personal library. In spite of being handsome (and charming in a clumsy sort of way), hardly any men took an interest in her. Much of her conversation with the fictional 'Rhoda Morgenstern' was marked by 'Rhoda's sardonic commentary on the dissatisfaction incorporated into everything she'd done and was doing, something which 'Mary Richards' shared to a degree. It was a story about a woman at the but end of young adulthood coping with the stagnation that tends to set in around that time. Remember the Peggy Lee song, "Is That All There Is"? Mary Tyler Moore and Ed Asner managed to make it light and amusing, to a degree. "Mary Richards" wasn't a feminist icon except in the imagination of people who write inane newspaper commentary. She was an unmarried woman living by herself, making rent, and, in general, getting through life. That wasn't a novelty in 1970. The spinster minority had been taking care of themselves in urban settings for several generations at that point.

    I wish I had written that insightful comment. For the record, nothing you said contradicted Derbyshire’s remarks that she was attractive to him and his cohort in her earlier role as Dick Van Dyke’s fertile wife. In real life, while being extremely limited intellectually, she did succeed in being the Gerard de Nerval of her day, which is something you cannot say about many people. “I have a liking for lobsters. They are peaceful, serious creatures.”

    Read More
  23. @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr. Derbyshire, I like your diary articles on VDare a bunch. It was all good stuff, but since there are a bunch of subjects that I wanted to reply about, I'll break replies up into individual comments.

    So point #A)
    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he's not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don't think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only - one word in fact - Lawyers.

    Due to worry about just one employee bringing up some type of discrimination, harassment, or whatever, kind of lawsuit, these big-wigs, or even medium-wigs, will go to great lengths to get the words out there - on website and in emails and probably posters in any kind of break-room they may have. It is worth it for this CEO, if it were to give contrary "evidence" against just one suit that could bankrupt the company, to do this sort of thing. That's the way the Western world, and especially this country, is nowadays, and yes, it's pretty sick.

    It'd be hard to prove my point though. If Derb's correspondent were very good friends and even then only talked to him about this in private, with no way to be recorded (what, maybe a nude sauna ... but, I digress ;-} he could get the honest truth. The higher up the chain of command though, the more lies you will hear.

    Next, time permitting:
    B) Mary Tyler Moore vs., say, Valerie Bertinelli
    C) Chinese Pinyin vs. other methods - and WTHell is a Dowager, anyway?

    To your point B, you’re going to leave it to MTM and Val? What about Ginger and Marianne? If we are going to keep it to MILFs, I still have a thing for Shirley Jones, but Florence Henderson wasn’t unpleasant on the eyes. Discuss.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Dear Mr. Alarmist,

    This whole Ginger vs. Mary Ann thing has been debated ad infinitum, probably more than the issue of abolition a century before this issue. One hopes there won't be a war over this contentious issue too. As an independent, my answer to the Ginger/Mary Ann debate is ....


    wait for it ....



    Marlo Thomas!

    Yeah, Shirley Jones - I liked her. Florence Henderson was too skinny, but if she'd had long hair... For me, it was always "Marsha, Marsha, Marsha.....".
  24. @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr. Derbyshire, I like your diary articles on VDare a bunch. It was all good stuff, but since there are a bunch of subjects that I wanted to reply about, I'll break replies up into individual comments.

    So point #A)
    Regarding the CEO of your anonymous correspondent, to you, Mr. WorkingClass, and to your friend, I say this: This guy is not insane, he's not got cognitive dissonance (zerohedge reader, anyone?), and I also don't think he is stupid. Even higher-ups in small organizations, any place where it is not family and close friends only, the guy is writing these ridiculous PC garbage phrases for one reason only - one word in fact - Lawyers.

    Due to worry about just one employee bringing up some type of discrimination, harassment, or whatever, kind of lawsuit, these big-wigs, or even medium-wigs, will go to great lengths to get the words out there - on website and in emails and probably posters in any kind of break-room they may have. It is worth it for this CEO, if it were to give contrary "evidence" against just one suit that could bankrupt the company, to do this sort of thing. That's the way the Western world, and especially this country, is nowadays, and yes, it's pretty sick.

    It'd be hard to prove my point though. If Derb's correspondent were very good friends and even then only talked to him about this in private, with no way to be recorded (what, maybe a nude sauna ... but, I digress ;-} he could get the honest truth. The higher up the chain of command though, the more lies you will hear.

    Next, time permitting:
    B) Mary Tyler Moore vs., say, Valerie Bertinelli
    C) Chinese Pinyin vs. other methods - and WTHell is a Dowager, anyway?

    Crap, forgot about Elizabeth Montgomery, my favourite MILF of the Twentieth Century.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    The bewitched lady, yeah, nice, but speaking of sexy witches (I said, WITCHES, get your minds outta the gutter!), I would take the "I Dream of Jeannie" one first. Major Nelson should have quit the Air Force, made the 1st wish for independent wealth, the 2nd possibly to get ride of the in-laws (esp. Paul Lind), and the 3rd would be just a back-up wish to make Jeannie not age at all and make sure there are no ... (well witches don't menstruate, do they?, so maybe he could save that wish for something political).

    Just my take on the matter - probably not useful information at this late stage.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    In Bewitched she usually wore modest housedresses in maintaining her character. In one episode, however, she had to appear in front of some kind of witches' council and she did so in a costume with impressive decolletage and a slit skirt. "Bewitching," but I don't see a picture of it anywhere.
  25. Marcus says:

    The Uber CEO buckled after the left declared a boycott, makes sense b/c they probably do most of their business in heavily shitlib areas, but I will still hold it against them.

    Read More
  26. George says:

    “pre-2001 America. Muslims were not any sort of presence in the U.S.,”

    Ajit Pai, the most illustrious citizen of Parsons Kansas, is almost certainly not Muslim, but I point him out for a reason. He was raised in tiny Parsons, Kansas because the US could no longer provide medical professionals willing to work there so the US imported his parents. Large numbers of Muslims enter the US not as refugees, or immigration scammers, but as medical professionals the US cannot produce. Things are likely different in Derb World, but in much of the US medical delivery means foreigners. Even in very Jewish NY City, medical delivery is not very Jewish or European looking.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajit_Varadaraj_Pai

    “passionate opponents of any restriction … immigration, in fact, are (a) women, and (b, to judge from newspaper Op-Eds and online commentary) Jewish liberals like Chuck Schumer.”

    Schumer represents the following interests:
    Real Estate (renters)
    Capitalism (cheap Labor)
    Government Jobs (immigrants need an unusual amount of governing)
    Real Estate (on the list twice for emphasis)

    Women just love:
    Real Estate
    Capitalism (cheap Labor)
    Government Jobs (immigrants need an unusual amount of governing, and are for women the best paying jobs generally available)
    Real Estate (on the list twice for emphasis)

    The last time women turned against the above list was when Alma Bridwell White was organizing protestant church ladies in the Klu Klux Klan to resist the Papal threat. The KKK was also pretty bad for NYC real estate.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alma_Bridwell_White

    Read More
  27. Truth says:
    @Dwright
    I always assumed my little shuffling on the dance floor was adequate. I do sway a bit also.

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.

    We were in love with her. She was a sex goddess: not of the glamorous sort, like Marilyn Monroe

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.

    Boy is the apocalypse (uncovering) going to be bad for you guys, it has destroyed me over the past two years, but hey, as the bible says, there is nothing new under the sun, and they’ve kept this deception in place since ancient Greece…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfred1860
    The comments were disabled on that video for obvious reasons.
    , @Polymath
    The narrator of the video is clearly delusional.
  28. peterike says:

    Well “The Mary Tyler Moore” show, like so much 70s television, was really all about bringing Jews into the American living room.

    Sure, Mary was a classic Protestant girl. But Rhoda was the overtly Jewish neighbor. Mr. Grant the obviously Jewish boss/media controller. Murray the obviously Jewish nebish writer. Ted Grant was the bufoonish white male — already this meme had started. The Betty White character was the true “modern feminist” on the show: the worn out slut that slept around, proudly rode the carousel, and overtly went after the boss (the Alpha). The neighbor Phyllis, directly described as Swedish, was shown as neurotic, arrogant, domineering over her (never seen) husband, and a feminist with a resentful daughter. In other words, a Jewish stereotype put into the character of a Swede.

    Rhoda, Phyllis and Lou Grant all went on to have their own shows, because you can really never have enough Jewish characters on television.

    Read More
  29. @The Alarmist
    To your point B, you're going to leave it to MTM and Val? What about Ginger and Marianne? If we are going to keep it to MILFs, I still have a thing for Shirley Jones, but Florence Henderson wasn't unpleasant on the eyes. Discuss.

    Dear Mr. Alarmist,

    This whole Ginger vs. Mary Ann thing has been debated ad infinitum, probably more than the issue of abolition a century before this issue. One hopes there won’t be a war over this contentious issue too. As an independent, my answer to the Ginger/Mary Ann debate is ….

    wait for it ….

    Marlo Thomas!

    Yeah, Shirley Jones – I liked her. Florence Henderson was too skinny, but if she’d had long hair… For me, it was always “Marsha, Marsha, Marsha…..”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    That Girl was the only TV series I watched (or have ever watched) specifically to see the actress.
  30. @The Alarmist
    Crap, forgot about Elizabeth Montgomery, my favourite MILF of the Twentieth Century.

    The bewitched lady, yeah, nice, but speaking of sexy witches (I said, WITCHES, get your minds outta the gutter!), I would take the “I Dream of Jeannie” one first. Major Nelson should have quit the Air Force, made the 1st wish for independent wealth, the 2nd possibly to get ride of the in-laws (esp. Paul Lind), and the 3rd would be just a back-up wish to make Jeannie not age at all and make sure there are no … (well witches don’t menstruate, do they?, so maybe he could save that wish for something political).

    Just my take on the matter – probably not useful information at this late stage.

    Read More
  31. @Truth

    We were in love with her. She was a sex goddess: not of the glamorous sort, like Marilyn Monroe
     

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.
     
    Boy is the apocalypse (uncovering) going to be bad for you guys, it has destroyed me over the past two years, but hey, as the bible says, there is nothing new under the sun, and they've kept this deception in place since ancient Greece...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i12xoOzWcxQ

    The comments were disabled on that video for obvious reasons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    Keep believing what you believe, Sport. Understand though, "apocalypse" in ancient Greek simply means "uncovering", and we're here.

    The level of spiritual corruption in today's world is so incredibly deep it would take you a year to scratch the surface.
  32. @The Alarmist
    Crap, forgot about Elizabeth Montgomery, my favourite MILF of the Twentieth Century.

    In Bewitched she usually wore modest housedresses in maintaining her character. In one episode, however, she had to appear in front of some kind of witches’ council and she did so in a costume with impressive decolletage and a slit skirt. “Bewitching,” but I don’t see a picture of it anywhere.

    Read More
  33. @Achmed E. Newman
    Dear Mr. Alarmist,

    This whole Ginger vs. Mary Ann thing has been debated ad infinitum, probably more than the issue of abolition a century before this issue. One hopes there won't be a war over this contentious issue too. As an independent, my answer to the Ginger/Mary Ann debate is ....


    wait for it ....



    Marlo Thomas!

    Yeah, Shirley Jones - I liked her. Florence Henderson was too skinny, but if she'd had long hair... For me, it was always "Marsha, Marsha, Marsha.....".

    That Girl was the only TV series I watched (or have ever watched) specifically to see the actress.

    Read More
  34. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Cíxǐ” with tone marks) is better than the old Wade-Giles system (“Tzŭ² Hsi³”)

    Surely the Wade-Giles spelling must be Tz’ŭ² Hsi³ (with an extra apostrophe)? This of course underscores Derb’s basic point that Wade-Giles is even more unwieldy than pinyin. On the other hand, WG gives non-specialists a better idea of the pronunciation. (Cixi is a good example of this.)

    Zhou’s committee based its system principally on the Soviet “latinhua” system developed by Dragunov (sp?) and others. The Russian origin of pinyin is still reflected in Cyrillic-style phonetics in pinyin such as q (looks and sounds like a Cyrillic Ч) and x (originally used for pinyin “h,” then changed to current pinyin X sound). Of course, this non-autochthone history is anathema to modern Chinese.

    http://www.eastasianlib.org/ctp/RomTable/Chipinyintowade.pdf

    Read More
  35. El Dato says:

    Meanhile, otherwise excellent profs fancy themselves living in a “Berlin, City of Stones” (and regarding “unprecedented”, have apparently forgotten all about FDR):

    After the election it seemed to me that it would be a good idea to ignore what Trump tweeted or said, and wait to see what he and the people he surrounded himself with would actually do. We’ve been finding this out over the past few days, and today the nature of the problem we face is now clear. The actions ordered today that are now being carried out by US officials around the world are the product of a deranged and dangerous personality who has surrounded himself with similar others. This is a national emergency with no parallel in our history.

    While the US has never seen the likes of this situation, Europe has, with Trump following a playbook familiar from the history of the 1930s. At this point the US may be one terrorist attack away from full-blown Fascism, this time with nuclear weapons. This needs to be stopped, now.

    The Constitution does provide two ways to deal with something like this: either the impeachment process or removal under the Twenty-Fifth Amendment as “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” Many of Trump’s recent statements are clearly the product of delusional mind that is incapable of dealing with reality, and these delusions are now reflected in his actions.

    Removing Trump and those he has surrounded himself with will require the cooperation of a significant number of Republican legislators. Anyone who cares about US democracy should be trying to figure out how to get this to happen. Those of us in the US desperately need some good ideas about how to do this. Those in other countries should be pressing their governments and institutions to fight back against the US, as well as doing what they can to keep their own societies from following the US down this path.

    I’m moderating comments here and will only post one kind of comment: positive ideas about what to do about this emergency situation. At this point I think what’s needed are ideas way beyond suggestions of a “scientist’s march” to promote rationality. We need to figure out how to fight a new form of Fascism that has just come to power and is starting to rule by decree.

    The panic level is grotesque.

    Well, unless the posturing against Iran doesn’t stop soon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    "We need to figure out how to fight a new form of Fascism that has just come to power and is starting to rule by decree."

    So it was OK for his narcissistic predecessor to rule by decree, but not for this narcissist to do so?
  36. El Dato says:
    @European-American
    Wow. I'm guessing it's 1). AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company with global headquarters in Leuven, Belgium. Their brands include Budweiser, Corona, Stella Artois, Beck's, Hoegaarden, Bud Light, Skol, Brahma, Antarctica, Quilmes, Victoria, Modelo Especial, Michelob Ultra, Harbin, Sedrin, Klinskoye, Sibirskaya Korona, Chernigivske and Jupiler.

    Multinationals identify with transnational heroic figures like refugees. Who else could they identify with? They embody diversity, so it makes sense they would glorify it. A nation is just another narrow brand. But a refugee... Aren't we all refugees, in a way?

    And probably Super Bowl ads, like Hollywood movies, increasingly have a global audience.

    AB InBev is a multinational beverage and brewing company

    Totally exploitative of the local bar, too.

    Plus, practically all their beers are easily marketable, easily recognizable, easily undrinkable. Stay away.

    (Packs a few cans of Erdinger Weissbier before going into deplorable mode)

    Okay, time for my course on statistics. Enough Internet!

    Read More
  37. Polymath says:
    @Truth

    We were in love with her. She was a sex goddess: not of the glamorous sort, like Marilyn Monroe
     

    MTM was my favorite when I was 12 and older. Had a thing for Anne Francis and Barbara Eden also.
     
    Boy is the apocalypse (uncovering) going to be bad for you guys, it has destroyed me over the past two years, but hey, as the bible says, there is nothing new under the sun, and they've kept this deception in place since ancient Greece...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i12xoOzWcxQ

    The narrator of the video is clearly delusional.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    I sincerely and truly wish that that were the case. The sad and unfortunate truth though, is that you are.

    And the sadder truth is that your overlords are about to let you know it.

  38. dearieme says:
    @El Dato
    Meanhile, otherwise excellent profs fancy themselves living in a "Berlin, City of Stones" (and regarding "unprecedented", have apparently forgotten all about FDR):

    After the election it seemed to me that it would be a good idea to ignore what Trump tweeted or said, and wait to see what he and the people he surrounded himself with would actually do. We’ve been finding this out over the past few days, and today the nature of the problem we face is now clear. The actions ordered today that are now being carried out by US officials around the world are the product of a deranged and dangerous personality who has surrounded himself with similar others. This is a national emergency with no parallel in our history.

    While the US has never seen the likes of this situation, Europe has, with Trump following a playbook familiar from the history of the 1930s. At this point the US may be one terrorist attack away from full-blown Fascism, this time with nuclear weapons. This needs to be stopped, now.

    The Constitution does provide two ways to deal with something like this: either the impeachment process or removal under the Twenty-Fifth Amendment as “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.” Many of Trump’s recent statements are clearly the product of delusional mind that is incapable of dealing with reality, and these delusions are now reflected in his actions.

    Removing Trump and those he has surrounded himself with will require the cooperation of a significant number of Republican legislators. Anyone who cares about US democracy should be trying to figure out how to get this to happen. Those of us in the US desperately need some good ideas about how to do this. Those in other countries should be pressing their governments and institutions to fight back against the US, as well as doing what they can to keep their own societies from following the US down this path.

    I’m moderating comments here and will only post one kind of comment: positive ideas about what to do about this emergency situation. At this point I think what’s needed are ideas way beyond suggestions of a “scientist’s march” to promote rationality. We need to figure out how to fight a new form of Fascism that has just come to power and is starting to rule by decree.
     
    The panic level is grotesque.

    Well, unless the posturing against Iran doesn't stop soon.

    “We need to figure out how to fight a new form of Fascism that has just come to power and is starting to rule by decree.”

    So it was OK for his narcissistic predecessor to rule by decree, but not for this narcissist to do so?

    Read More
  39. Clyde says:
    @WorkingClass
    It's not like the old Anheuser Bush headquartered in St. Louis. I like Corona for a commercial beer. I still think of it as Mexican. Stella is quite drinkable in its shapely green ten ounce bottle. Stella also bottles a passable hard cider spelled cidre. It's probably so good because it's "Made With Hand Picked Apples". Are there machine picked apples?

    It’s probably so good because it’s “Made With Hand Picked Apples”. Are there machine picked apples?

    Common nonalcoholic cider is made with B grade apples. They might be windfall apples. They might have to have a wormy or mushy half cut off and discarded. Some A grade apples might be included. The Stella cider you like is made from A grade apples and picked at a better stage of ripeness. There are no apple picking machines.

    I can buy a gallon of common/no alcohol/ cider for three dollars. See what you are paying per gallon of Stella cider that is fermented a bit into an alcoholic drink. Now you know why Stella can afford to be using high class apples. I see Angry Orchard cider going for seven dollars for 72 ounces in a six pack. And you get charged alcohol taxes on top of this, but not for my three dollar per gallon cider.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    "And you get charged alcohol taxes on top of this, but not for my three dollar per gallon cider.
     
    Your three-dollar cider is a simple fermentation away from a no-tax hard version of the stuff.
  40. Whoever says:

    If it’s true that 1957 was Peak Happiness in the West.

    No. Not “the West.” For Britain.

    In the 1950s the rather stern and gritty period immediately after WW2

    In Britain maybe, but not in America. It was party time in my country, if not yours. Everybody was flush with cash and had all kinds of cool things to spend it on. My grandfather bought a ’49 Ford for himself and a 1950 Studebaker convertible for grandmother. Then he bought a Hudson Hornet. Then motorcycles, speed boats, a Ryan Navion, all kinds of cool consumer goods, some of which the family still has and some of which still work.

    f (1957) was of course miserable compared to f (2017) — polio, stick shift, black-and-white TV, halitosis, the draft —

    Polio vaccine had been available for a while in 1957 and polio was not the threat it once had been. Both my boomer parents got vaccinated before they started grade school.
    My grandmother had a 1957 Dodge Royal Lancer convertible that stayed in the family and my dad fully restored about 20 years ago. I’ve driven it lots of times. It’s got an automatic, push-button transmission, 300-horsepower V-8, power roof and all kinds of other rad goodies and is totally bitchin’.
    My grandparents had color TV in 1957 and my dad remembered watching Superman and some other shows in color.
    Halitosis wasn’t a problem for we Americans because we had dentists and patronized them.
    The draft was not a big deal in late ’50s America from everything I know about it. It was a way for guys to get away from home and see the world after high school, have crazy high-jinks, bring back German binoculars for kid brother and a kimono doll for kid sister. It was MSgt Ernest G. Bilko’s army–and BM1c Fatso Gioninni’s navy. Full Metal Jacket and Flight of the Intruder were far in the unknowable future.

    In 1957 neither Britain nor American was seriously afflicted with the horrible blight of diversity…. Britain’s first race riot occurred the following year.

    You can’t just conflate Britain and America. Little Rock is in Arkansas, which is not in Britain but is in America. Have you not heard of the events there in 1957?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    As a white boy coming of age in the US midwest in the early Seventies, I would have thought I had come of age at the peak of Western civilization. We had just landed on the moon, and we hadn't yet felt the full effects of the inflation of the war on poverty being simultaneously waged with the war in Vietnam and other (not so) secret corners of SE Asia. Within a couple years, however, the older boy next door, with whom I used to play catch, came home in a flag-draped casket, and our President had been chased out of the White House by a rabble of rabid leftists, so it wasn't very hard to discern that we were on our way into a decline, even if we had no idea how long or how deep it would go.

    I just heard on Channel 4 (Jamie and Jimmie's Friday Night) yesterday that more Britons than ever are having hard times and rely on local food banks to get by. Maybe that is true; if so, why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?
  41. Truth says:
    @Alfred1860
    The comments were disabled on that video for obvious reasons.

    Keep believing what you believe, Sport. Understand though, “apocalypse” in ancient Greek simply means “uncovering”, and we’re here.

    The level of spiritual corruption in today’s world is so incredibly deep it would take you a year to scratch the surface.

    Read More
  42. Truth says:
    @Polymath
    The narrator of the video is clearly delusional.

    I sincerely and truly wish that that were the case. The sad and unfortunate truth though, is that you are.

    And the sadder truth is that your overlords are about to let you know it.

    Read More
  43. macilrae says:

    The 2017th prime number is 17539 and 201717539 is also a prime

    There is a tendency to devalue and even ridicule arithmomaniacs (I had to look that up) but today their obsession for primes and the like has given us the basis for almost all modern cryptography and, next time a kid asks you “What’s the use of algebra?”, just remind them of what happens every time they take a jpeg photo!

    “Our next prime year will be 2027 but then 2029 … oh, sorry!”

    Read More
  44. @MarkinLA
    Europeans won't buy American Budweiser so why screw with your major market?

    Budweiser, water polluted swill, every drop.

    Read More
  45. @Whoever

    If it’s true that 1957 was Peak Happiness in the West.
     
    No. Not "the West." For Britain.

    In the 1950s the rather stern and gritty period immediately after WW2
     
    In Britain maybe, but not in America. It was party time in my country, if not yours. Everybody was flush with cash and had all kinds of cool things to spend it on. My grandfather bought a '49 Ford for himself and a 1950 Studebaker convertible for grandmother. Then he bought a Hudson Hornet. Then motorcycles, speed boats, a Ryan Navion, all kinds of cool consumer goods, some of which the family still has and some of which still work.

    f (1957) was of course miserable compared to f (2017) — polio, stick shift, black-and-white TV, halitosis, the draft —
     
    Polio vaccine had been available for a while in 1957 and polio was not the threat it once had been. Both my boomer parents got vaccinated before they started grade school.
    My grandmother had a 1957 Dodge Royal Lancer convertible that stayed in the family and my dad fully restored about 20 years ago. I've driven it lots of times. It's got an automatic, push-button transmission, 300-horsepower V-8, power roof and all kinds of other rad goodies and is totally bitchin'.
    My grandparents had color TV in 1957 and my dad remembered watching Superman and some other shows in color.
    Halitosis wasn't a problem for we Americans because we had dentists and patronized them.
    The draft was not a big deal in late '50s America from everything I know about it. It was a way for guys to get away from home and see the world after high school, have crazy high-jinks, bring back German binoculars for kid brother and a kimono doll for kid sister. It was MSgt Ernest G. Bilko's army--and BM1c Fatso Gioninni's navy. Full Metal Jacket and Flight of the Intruder were far in the unknowable future.

    In 1957 neither Britain nor American was seriously afflicted with the horrible blight of diversity.... Britain’s first race riot occurred the following year.
     
    You can't just conflate Britain and America. Little Rock is in Arkansas, which is not in Britain but is in America. Have you not heard of the events there in 1957?

    As a white boy coming of age in the US midwest in the early Seventies, I would have thought I had come of age at the peak of Western civilization. We had just landed on the moon, and we hadn’t yet felt the full effects of the inflation of the war on poverty being simultaneously waged with the war in Vietnam and other (not so) secret corners of SE Asia. Within a couple years, however, the older boy next door, with whom I used to play catch, came home in a flag-draped casket, and our President had been chased out of the White House by a rabble of rabid leftists, so it wasn’t very hard to discern that we were on our way into a decline, even if we had no idea how long or how deep it would go.

    I just heard on Channel 4 (Jamie and Jimmie’s Friday Night) yesterday that more Britons than ever are having hard times and rely on local food banks to get by. Maybe that is true; if so, why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?
     
    Two Nations, as a Prime Minister once remarked. The ones with the megaphone, doing the virtue-signalling, are wealthy "Socialist" bourgeois non-jobbers and time-expired luvvies and celebs who literally never come into contact with the consequences of their benevolence (with Other People's Money, naturally) ; the ones nobody is permitted to hear, who are doing all the moaning and bellyaching among themselves about all the colonists and chancers "flocking here", are stuck away on council estates in the provinces, voting UKIP. How very dare they!
    , @Whoever

    Why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?
     
    Then there is also the problem of UK industries moving manufacturing to low-cost EU countries. I have a friend who works for UTC and he tells me the company is moving the actuation side of the business to Poland, where costs of production are lower. Lots of good jobs went from Wolverhampton to Wroclaw, the move financed by the EU from what he tells me, with many highly skilled British people losing their jobs as a result, and now Wolverhampton as a center of aerospace manufacturing is practically dead.
    And even worse than the loss of aerospace manufacturing jobs is the fact that Cadbury's has been moving chocolate production from Bournville to Poland!
    It's as if the English-speaking part of West has some sort of auto-immune disease that is causing it to destroy itself.
  46. @Clyde

    It’s probably so good because it’s “Made With Hand Picked Apples”. Are there machine picked apples?
     
    Common nonalcoholic cider is made with B grade apples. They might be windfall apples. They might have to have a wormy or mushy half cut off and discarded. Some A grade apples might be included. The Stella cider you like is made from A grade apples and picked at a better stage of ripeness. There are no apple picking machines.

    I can buy a gallon of common/no alcohol/ cider for three dollars. See what you are paying per gallon of Stella cider that is fermented a bit into an alcoholic drink. Now you know why Stella can afford to be using high class apples. I see Angry Orchard cider going for seven dollars for 72 ounces in a six pack. And you get charged alcohol taxes on top of this, but not for my three dollar per gallon cider.

    “And you get charged alcohol taxes on top of this, but not for my three dollar per gallon cider.

    Your three-dollar cider is a simple fermentation away from a no-tax hard version of the stuff.

    Read More
  47. Clyde says:

    Your three-dollar cider is a simple fermentation away from a no-tax hard version of the stuff.

    Today it is a yes and no. There was an e coli scare and now all or most seasonally made (Sept- January) cider in plastic one gallon jugs is pasteurized. Used to be non pasteurized and would easily ferment w alcohol produced if you left it out of refrigerator or would even ferment in the refrigerator if given time. I can only get the pasteurized kind where I live. But I am going to do more research and see if dropping some bakers yeast into the jug will get it fermenting. Probably so.
    _______

    The Real Deal: Have You Ever Tried Unpasteurized Cider …
    http://www.thekitchn.com/the-real-deal-have-you-ever-tr-155908
    Cider started being pasteurized in the 90′s following a very sad incident of a child dying from unpasteurized cider contaminated with e. coli … Have you ever tried …

    __________
    Karl S. May 16, 2005 09:02 AM
    Immense. The unpasteurized is alive (and, if you don’t open it for 2-3 weeks, it will start to ferment very pleasantly), the pasteurized is dead and is basically cloudy apple juice.

    Apple cider lovers generally hate pasteurized cider, unless they (or their loved ones) have immuno-suppression issues where the risk of drinking unpasteurized cider is more salient.

    Due to overaggressive regulation by the USDA, unpateurized cider can only be purchased directly from the orchards.
    ___________________

    How to Make Hard Cider With Baking Yeast

    http://www.ehow.com/how_12312210_make-hard-cider-baking-yeast.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    O aarr, you'm be wantin' a drop o' Turbocider then, boi?
    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090

    I did it with champagne yeast once, and dumped a couple of Granny Smith peels, a load of honey, and some stewed Typhoo in. Cor by 'eck was it heady, somewhere north of 10% I reckon. But tart enough to take the enamel off your teeth. Probably best done with a real cider yeast, or an ale yeast that won't ferment out every last drop of sweetness. Maybe bread yeast would actually do the trick once you'd got it "trained" through a couple of iterations/batches. Or you could just hoy in some sugar ..
    Like this fine "Park Bench Reserve"
    http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html
    It's a lot less fussy and nerve-racking than brewing beer. Absolutely bomb-proof, practically cooks itself.
  48. El Dato says:

    That photo of the European right-wing club looks like Petry is planning to invade while the others are having good selfie times.

    “Soon”.

    Read More
  49. Every time I hear about the wonders of diversity, I recall the millennia long hegemony of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Imagine an army with eleven languages or was it thirteen. Just think, if they could have managed to raise the number of languages to to 15 or 17, they might still be ruling the world. Yea diversity.

    Read More
  50. @Clyde

    Your three-dollar cider is a simple fermentation away from a no-tax hard version of the stuff.
     
    Today it is a yes and no. There was an e coli scare and now all or most seasonally made (Sept- January) cider in plastic one gallon jugs is pasteurized. Used to be non pasteurized and would easily ferment w alcohol produced if you left it out of refrigerator or would even ferment in the refrigerator if given time. I can only get the pasteurized kind where I live. But I am going to do more research and see if dropping some bakers yeast into the jug will get it fermenting. Probably so.
    _______

    The Real Deal: Have You Ever Tried Unpasteurized Cider ...
    www.thekitchn.com/the-real-deal-have-you-ever-tr-155908
    Cider started being pasteurized in the 90's following a very sad incident of a child dying from unpasteurized cider contaminated with e. coli ... Have you ever tried ...

    __________
    Karl S. May 16, 2005 09:02 AM
    Immense. The unpasteurized is alive (and, if you don't open it for 2-3 weeks, it will start to ferment very pleasantly), the pasteurized is dead and is basically cloudy apple juice.

    Apple cider lovers generally hate pasteurized cider, unless they (or their loved ones) have immuno-suppression issues where the risk of drinking unpasteurized cider is more salient.

    Due to overaggressive regulation by the USDA, unpateurized cider can only be purchased directly from the orchards.
    ___________________

    How to Make Hard Cider With Baking Yeast
    http://www.ehow.com/how_12312210_make-hard-cider-baking-yeast.html

    O aarr, you’m be wantin’ a drop o’ Turbocider then, boi?

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090

    I did it with champagne yeast once, and dumped a couple of Granny Smith peels, a load of honey, and some stewed Typhoo in. Cor by ‘eck was it heady, somewhere north of 10% I reckon. But tart enough to take the enamel off your teeth. Probably best done with a real cider yeast, or an ale yeast that won’t ferment out every last drop of sweetness. Maybe bread yeast would actually do the trick once you’d got it “trained” through a couple of iterations/batches. Or you could just hoy in some sugar ..
    Like this fine “Park Bench Reserve

    http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html

    It’s a lot less fussy and nerve-racking than brewing beer. Absolutely bomb-proof, practically cooks itself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    Thanks and I will try this soon with a surprisingly cloudy with sediments (a good thing) apple cider I saw at Walmart in the regular/non refrigerated juice isle in one gallon size plastic jug for $4. At least in my local W-Mart. This kind >>>>
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Musselman-s-100-Spiced-Apple-Cider-128-fl-oz-Jug/156763648
    Very useful because now I know a teaspoon yeast will do the trick

    ____________________

    also try>>>>> http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html

    Easy do it yourself alcoholic apple cider

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090
    Well this is as easy as it gets!
    (called turbo as its so quick and easy)
    Ingredients:
    4.5L of pure apple juice
    1tsp yeast

    Method:
    1. Place 3L of apple juice into a demijon (assumeing everything is sterile)
    2. PLace 1tsp of yeast into the demijon
    3. shake
    4. leave for 36-48hrs to ferment then top with with the remaining of the juice (cant fill it right up at the start as it will foam quite a bit)
    5. leave to ferment out
    6. Rack off and drink (or if you like cider fizzy then prime as usual)

    i thought i would try this out and i was very impressed with the results.

    , @Clyde
    btw....... I have an airlock but must look for it
    But really for a plastic apple cider jug you dump your yeast into it.....
    then tighten the cap.....
    then back it off a little bit......
    to allow fermentation gasses to escape.

    Realistically speaking, no outside bacteria will be able to get in. Too difficult.
    But still allows fermentation gasses to exit the cider jug.
  51. @The Alarmist
    As a white boy coming of age in the US midwest in the early Seventies, I would have thought I had come of age at the peak of Western civilization. We had just landed on the moon, and we hadn't yet felt the full effects of the inflation of the war on poverty being simultaneously waged with the war in Vietnam and other (not so) secret corners of SE Asia. Within a couple years, however, the older boy next door, with whom I used to play catch, came home in a flag-draped casket, and our President had been chased out of the White House by a rabble of rabid leftists, so it wasn't very hard to discern that we were on our way into a decline, even if we had no idea how long or how deep it would go.

    I just heard on Channel 4 (Jamie and Jimmie's Friday Night) yesterday that more Britons than ever are having hard times and rely on local food banks to get by. Maybe that is true; if so, why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?

    why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?

    Two Nations, as a Prime Minister once remarked. The ones with the megaphone, doing the virtue-signalling, are wealthy “Socialist” bourgeois non-jobbers and time-expired luvvies and celebs who literally never come into contact with the consequences of their benevolence (with Other People’s Money, naturally) ; the ones nobody is permitted to hear, who are doing all the moaning and bellyaching among themselves about all the colonists and chancers “flocking here”, are stuck away on council estates in the provinces, voting UKIP. How very dare they!

    Read More
  52. @Keith Vaz
    The most insane people are Budweiser. They are paying millions of dollars to destroy their company via the Superbowl Ad. Thinly veiled anti-Trump, pro-refugee propaganda.

    Most of their market are blue collar White men. I went over to youtube, sure enough, my suspicions were vindicated - more dislikes than likes, and loads of White men in the comments explaining how they will boycott the beer and haye how political it has become.

    Who do they think will buy their products? Teetotal muzzies?

    There's only two explanations I can come up with for their idiocy:
    1) The top executives are alienated from their base & got hi on their own suply of sanctimonious PC diversity drivel.
    2) The (((ad agencies))) are mocking their gullible clients & don't care about their defined job but about more visceral racial animosities.

    ??????

    Ad agencies are awash with young women and homosexuals.

    Read More
  53. Whoever says:
    @The Alarmist
    As a white boy coming of age in the US midwest in the early Seventies, I would have thought I had come of age at the peak of Western civilization. We had just landed on the moon, and we hadn't yet felt the full effects of the inflation of the war on poverty being simultaneously waged with the war in Vietnam and other (not so) secret corners of SE Asia. Within a couple years, however, the older boy next door, with whom I used to play catch, came home in a flag-draped casket, and our President had been chased out of the White House by a rabble of rabid leftists, so it wasn't very hard to discern that we were on our way into a decline, even if we had no idea how long or how deep it would go.

    I just heard on Channel 4 (Jamie and Jimmie's Friday Night) yesterday that more Britons than ever are having hard times and rely on local food banks to get by. Maybe that is true; if so, why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?

    Why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?

    Then there is also the problem of UK industries moving manufacturing to low-cost EU countries. I have a friend who works for UTC and he tells me the company is moving the actuation side of the business to Poland, where costs of production are lower. Lots of good jobs went from Wolverhampton to Wroclaw, the move financed by the EU from what he tells me, with many highly skilled British people losing their jobs as a result, and now Wolverhampton as a center of aerospace manufacturing is practically dead.
    And even worse than the loss of aerospace manufacturing jobs is the fact that Cadbury’s has been moving chocolate production from Bournville to Poland!
    It’s as if the English-speaking part of West has some sort of auto-immune disease that is causing it to destroy itself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    It's been on the cards since Kraft bought them out

    Kraft boss Irene Rosenfeld promised to save Cadbury’s Somerdale factory near Bristol, but after completing the deal provoked fury by announcing production would move to Poland, with the loss of 400 jobs.

     

    As you say, some sort of auto-immune disease.
    Not everyone is amused.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2140717/Sweet-revenge-Cadbury-heiress-angered-Kraft-takeover-sells-30m-house-launch-rival-American-plastic-cheese-company.html
  54. Clyde says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    O aarr, you'm be wantin' a drop o' Turbocider then, boi?
    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090

    I did it with champagne yeast once, and dumped a couple of Granny Smith peels, a load of honey, and some stewed Typhoo in. Cor by 'eck was it heady, somewhere north of 10% I reckon. But tart enough to take the enamel off your teeth. Probably best done with a real cider yeast, or an ale yeast that won't ferment out every last drop of sweetness. Maybe bread yeast would actually do the trick once you'd got it "trained" through a couple of iterations/batches. Or you could just hoy in some sugar ..
    Like this fine "Park Bench Reserve"
    http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html
    It's a lot less fussy and nerve-racking than brewing beer. Absolutely bomb-proof, practically cooks itself.

    Thanks and I will try this soon with a surprisingly cloudy with sediments (a good thing) apple cider I saw at Walmart in the regular/non refrigerated juice isle in one gallon size plastic jug for $4. At least in my local W-Mart. This kind >>>>

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Musselman-s-100-Spiced-Apple-Cider-128-fl-oz-Jug/156763648

    Very useful because now I know a teaspoon yeast will do the trick

    ____________________

    also try>>>>> http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html

    Easy do it yourself alcoholic apple cider

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090

    Well this is as easy as it gets!
    (called turbo as its so quick and easy)
    Ingredients:
    4.5L of pure apple juice
    1tsp yeast

    Method:
    1. Place 3L of apple juice into a demijon (assumeing everything is sterile)
    2. PLace 1tsp of yeast into the demijon
    3. shake
    4. leave for 36-48hrs to ferment then top with with the remaining of the juice (cant fill it right up at the start as it will foam quite a bit)
    5. leave to ferment out
    6. Rack off and drink (or if you like cider fizzy then prime as usual)

    i thought i would try this out and i was very impressed with the results.

    Read More
  55. Clyde says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    O aarr, you'm be wantin' a drop o' Turbocider then, boi?
    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=3090

    I did it with champagne yeast once, and dumped a couple of Granny Smith peels, a load of honey, and some stewed Typhoo in. Cor by 'eck was it heady, somewhere north of 10% I reckon. But tart enough to take the enamel off your teeth. Probably best done with a real cider yeast, or an ale yeast that won't ferment out every last drop of sweetness. Maybe bread yeast would actually do the trick once you'd got it "trained" through a couple of iterations/batches. Or you could just hoy in some sugar ..
    Like this fine "Park Bench Reserve"
    http://brewingshed.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/joy-of-turbo-cider.html
    It's a lot less fussy and nerve-racking than brewing beer. Absolutely bomb-proof, practically cooks itself.

    btw……. I have an airlock but must look for it
    But really for a plastic apple cider jug you dump your yeast into it…..
    then tighten the cap…..
    then back it off a little bit……
    to allow fermentation gasses to escape.

    Realistically speaking, no outside bacteria will be able to get in. Too difficult.
    But still allows fermentation gasses to exit the cider jug.

    Read More
  56. @Whoever

    Why are there so many Britons misty-eyed about efforts to stop more immigrants coming to the UK to further depress wages and lower standards of living?
     
    Then there is also the problem of UK industries moving manufacturing to low-cost EU countries. I have a friend who works for UTC and he tells me the company is moving the actuation side of the business to Poland, where costs of production are lower. Lots of good jobs went from Wolverhampton to Wroclaw, the move financed by the EU from what he tells me, with many highly skilled British people losing their jobs as a result, and now Wolverhampton as a center of aerospace manufacturing is practically dead.
    And even worse than the loss of aerospace manufacturing jobs is the fact that Cadbury's has been moving chocolate production from Bournville to Poland!
    It's as if the English-speaking part of West has some sort of auto-immune disease that is causing it to destroy itself.

    It’s been on the cards since Kraft bought them out

    Kraft boss Irene Rosenfeld promised to save Cadbury’s Somerdale factory near Bristol, but after completing the deal provoked fury by announcing production would move to Poland, with the loss of 400 jobs.

    As you say, some sort of auto-immune disease.
    Not everyone is amused.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2140717/Sweet-revenge-Cadbury-heiress-angered-Kraft-takeover-sells-30m-house-launch-rival-American-plastic-cheese-company.html

    Read More
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