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April Diary: Amren Report, Charles Murray's Space Program Book, Foreign Meddling, Etc. (13 Items!)
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From showery to flowery

As a child I learnt the old rhyme characterizing the months:

Snowy, Flowy, Blowy,
Showery, Flowery, Bowery,
Hoppy, Croppy, Droppy,
Breezy, Sneezy, Freezy.

2018-04-30alSo there went Showery, and now we’re into Flowery. The back yard is a riot of daffodils (or a host, if you want to be punctilious about it).

Then comes Bowery; which, taking the word to mean “leafy” means up to the treehouse for some spring cleaning and repairs. Fourteen years old now, the structure’s bearing up remarkably well; but that tree’s still growing, and as it grows it tries to pull my treehouse apart. Mother Nature will win at last, I guess, but I’ll fight her to the end.

Tennessee does what Virginia didn’t

April was actually Speak-Truth-To-Powery, or it would have been if anyone in power listened to the proceedings of American Renaissance conferences.

They really should. There is more good sense and realistic prognostication about our country spoken at an AmRen conference than you’ll hear in an entire twelve-month congressional session.

I live-tweeted from this year’s conference and don’t have much more to add. Video of the proceedings will go up at the AmRen website, and some other attendees have tweeted or blogged about it — the indefatigable Z-man, for example, here, here, and here.

As Z says, the Antifa protest of this year’s conference was a floperoo, mainly due to a huge security operation b y Tennessee state law enforcement.

Put it another way, the authorities of Tennessee did, very professionally and courteously, what the state authorities of Virginia and the city authorities of Charlottesville so disgracefully failed to do last summer: They protected the right of citizens peacably to assemble, and they nipped mob violence and rampaging anarchy in the bud. Thanks, Tennessee!

As with the April 21st demonstration in Georgia, law enforcement at the AmRen conference even pushed back against the anarchists’ going masked.

When one young protester briefly wore a bandana around the lower half of his face, police charged at him, grabbed him by the arms and walked him out of the protest pen.

Yee-hah! However:

In an act of solidarity, a group of his fellow protesters then donned masks of their own and stared down police for an hour. This time the police did nothing.

I’d have preferred it if they’d waded in to the anarchists with billy clubs and cattle prods at that point … but no doubt the cops know best how to do their job.

It was a great conference: civilized, instructive, and high-spirited. Thanks to all who helped make it possible; and of course, most of all to the great, the indispensable Jared Taylor. Excelsior!

Book of the Month

51V8XkkjTtL._SX340_BO1,204,203,200_Did you know that Charles Murray and his wife Catherine co-wrote a book about the Apollo Program? It was published in 1989, between Losing Ground and The Bell Curve.

I did not know this until a few weeks ago. Intrigued, I bought a copy of the book and read it.

It’s very good, a first-class piece of book-length journalism. You get as much technical stuff as you could possibly want, interleaved with personality profiles of all the people who made the moon landings possible — engineers, administrators, and astronauts — along with blow-by-blow accounts of their disagreements and conflicts.

Believing as I do in the broad general principle that men are more interested in things, women in people, I found myself quietly wondering whether the technical stuff was mostly done by Charles, the personalities by Catherine. I actually met Charles at a function this month, shortly after finishing the book; I should have asked him, but it slipped my mind.

Co-written as it was by a hatefully hate-filled hater like Charles, and furthermore published back in the Dark Ages of thirty years ago when it was legal — in fact compulsory — for white people to shove black people off the sidewalk and women were chained to their kitchen sinks, I had better warn sensitive souls that Apollo: The Race to the Moon is really not suitable for placing on the bookshelves in your Safe Space.

There is no mention at all of the black women who did all the heavy-duty math that made the space program possible; and the authors give Werner von Braun a good press. Eeeek!

As a hateful hater myself, I didn’t mind any of that. As a Long Islander, though, I did wish the Murrays had given us more about the design and building of the Lunar Excursion Module, much of which was done by Grumman Corp. here on the Island. The oldest generation of locals still speak of the LEM with pride.

To be perfectly fair, the authors do have references in their endnotes to Pellegrino and Stoff’s book Chariots for Apollo: The Making of the Lunar Module, now on my reading list.

Most stunning picture in this book is one showing the crawler, the tracked vehicle that transported a Saturn V rocket from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. If you look carefully at the picture, down at bottom left you can just make out an accompanying vehicle — actually a large fire truck, but almost lost against the vast size of the crawler.

What colossal engineering achievements went into Apollo! Who believes we could do such things today?

But hey: We have Facebook and Twitter!

Open the pod bay doors, Hal

On the same general theme: April 3rd marked the fiftieth anniversary of the nationwide release of Stanley Kubrick’s movie 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Did I like 2001? Yes, I liked it a lot. Do I have anything to say about it that hasn’t already been said? No, I don’t

So why have I mentioned it? Because the plot of 2001 was inspired by one of Arthur C. Clarke’s short stories and I want to show off my favorite fan letter once again.

acclarke

explorationI was reading Clarke decades before he was reading me. My Uncle Fred, a sci-fi buff from way back, had a copy of Clarke’s book The Exploration of Space. I read it in his house circa 1956.

Now Clarke has a mountain range named after him. It’s three and a half billion miles away, but he wouldn’t have minded that.

It’s OK to be John!

Steve Sailer had some fun with a New York Times story about guys named John.

The number of chief executives named John — a group that is overwhelmingly white — is very similar to the number of female executives. There are even more Jameses. [The Top Jobs Where Women Are Outnumbered by Men Named John by Claire Cain Miller, Kevin Quealy and Margot Sanger-Katz NY Times, April 24, 2018.]

I’m heartened to see this evidence of John supremacy. It’s OK to be John! (“It’s OK to be a John!” doesn’t quite work …)

George Orwell said it took him thirty years to recover from having been named Eric (his real forename). The name had been popularized for late-Victorian and Edwardian parents by a sternly moralistic book of the 1850s, just the kind of book Orwell hated.

I can’t say I’ve ever minded having the name John. Cumbered as I am with a ten-letter surname, I appreciate the brevity.

I know how I came by the name. My father was John Robert; my mother’s father was John Henry; she had a brother also named John Henry.

When I was born my mother wanted me named Peter, I don’t know why. My father overruled her thus: “Your father’s John, your brother’s John, and you married John. It’s a good serviceable name.” Toxic masculinity won the day. I’ve been John ever since.

The paradox is that no-one ever called my father John. He was known to everyone as Bob. Similarly, my Grandad John and my Uncle John were hardly ever anything but Jack. The only exception was when Grandma was annoyed with Grandad: then he got the full “John Henry!

To my forebears, proles from the gritty industrial West Midlands of England, “John” had a whiff of the Squirearchy about it, something hifalutin. It looked as though it needed a “Sir” in front of it. “Jack” was more down home.

(And yes, I know the old quip about the importance of capital letters in writing, as illustrated by the sentence: “I helped my Uncle Jack off a horse.”)

Institutional memory

My stock answer when asked whether I consider myself Alt Right is: “No, I’m too old.”

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All right, it’s flippant. I do, though, feel at a distance from the younger, wilder spirits fighting back against the creeping totalitarianism of the modern West. All strength to them! but … I’m old. With age comes reflection and caution. Did any 72-year-old ever run whooping and hollering towards an enemy machine-gun nest? I doubt it.

I heard another side of this when speaking with two young Dissident Right friends — one still a college student — shortly before the AmRen conference. No, I said when asked, I didn’t have a full speaking slot at the conference, and I was fine with just being an attendee. There comes a point (I added) when we graybeards need to step back and let Youth take its turn.

They chided me for that. It’s my generation (they said) that stands witness to what society was like before diversity, multiculturalism, and collective guilt came up. We are the institutional memory, the ballast of the Dissident Right — a precious resource.

I don’t think this was meant as idle flattery. I took it to heart in any case, and am now ashamed of my former negativity.

Foreign meddling

Say what you like about our meddling in other nations’ internal conflicts, our government is at least up front about it.

SF-poster-it-says-more-about-youA friend passed on some military pamphlets he picket up at a recruiting booth. Here’s one for the Special Forces:

The U.S. Army Special Forces, also known as Green Berets, is a strategic multipurpose force that is trained and equipped to respond to various contingencies around the world. These missions include direct action, special reconnaissance and unconventional warfare where you conduct activities to enable a resistance movement or insurgency to coerce, disrupt or overthrow a government or occupying power by operating through or with an underground, auxiliary and guerilla force in a denied area.

For a 20-year-old guy full of pee-pee and vinegar, it sounds like terrific fun, and certainly there are bad people in remote places who need killing by us.

Still, “to coerce, disrupt or overthrow a government …” How often is that any proper business of ours? Who gets to decide?

I’m of the Steve Sailer school. If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much, or waste our substance in godforsaken sinkholes like Niger.

And if disrupting and overthrowing unfriendly governments is truly a thing we ought to be doing, why not start with Mexico?

Skipping the begats

The puzzle? Finished. And yes, the sacred ceremony of Placing the Last Piece has been carried out with appropriate reverence.

Discussing the Tower of Babel story with a friend, he mentioned that he had embarked on a project to read the entire Bible, King James version, supplemented by listening to Alexander Scourby’s readings at SoundCloud. Scourby, who has a fine resonant voice, has recorded the entire KJV Bible twice.

That — reading the whole book — is something I’d like to attempt, if I could summon the resolution. I actually did attempt it many years ago, before I got married, but lost my attention in one of those endless chains of begats in the Pentateuch and bailed out.

Were I to essay another attempt now, older and more patient, I’d take the OT out of sequence.

  • First, the history books. They have good narratives, memorable personalities, and not too many begats. Plus, I like history.
  • Then, the prophets, who key handily to some of that history.
  • Then the wisdom books, which I’ve always had a liking for and find I know quite well.
  • Only then, finally, would I make another assault on the Pentateuch, perhaps just skipping the begats.

The odd thing here is that I am irreligious, and so is my friend. Not anti-religious in the style of Hitchens or Dawkins, only non-observant.

The Bible is one of Western Civ’s foundation stones, though, as my jigsaw puzzle (and last year’s, too) illustrates. Besides, there is a quiet pleasure in filling out the stories you half-remember from your childhood.

Read the whole thing? I bet I could. I shall, but … not just yet.

Rhetorical question

Until this month the only book I possessed whose subject matter is rhetoric was Figures of Speech, Arthur Quinn’s nifty little handbook, very useful when you’ve forgotten the difference between an ellipsis and an aposiopesis.

I now have another one. Early in April, in fact, I met an actual Professor of Rhetoric. I didn’t know such positions existed, but they do.

This was Philippe-Joseph Salazar, Distinguished Professor of Rhetoric in the Faculty of Law at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. Prof. Salazar was kind enough to give me a copy of his book Words Are Weapons: Inside ISIS’s Rhetoric of Terror.

Not much on ellipsis and aposiopesis here, but some fine gloomy passages about the Fate of the West.

It is possible too, we hope, that the lesson of November 13 might have been to make us, at last, realize that nothing can replace the culture of letters, the civilization of elevated writing and oratory that is specific to Western civilization. The power of the caliphal library is that it is gradually gaining a foothold, book after book, battle after battle, and that it is settling in our territories devastated by the decline in intelligence, in populations that were once cultured, which sink a little further into comfortable and insolent ignorance every day, only to emerge after a carnage to express their rage and tears, bearing lighted candles. Pathos can never take the place of culture. Cemeteries are mute.

Prof. Salazar lives up to his own high standards of cultural literacy: That last sentence was, he tells me, inspired by Rodrigo in Verdi’s Don Carlo. All right; but does it rise to the level of being a catachresis?

Heard around the house

Writing about my forebears back there brought to mind a conversation with Sam Dickson at the AmRen conference. Sam’s of my generation, more or less, and we traded some of the folk sayings and axioms we heard around the house as kids.

Ever since I’ve been wistfully recalling more of those things, common usages by my elders in the middle 20th century, rarely heard since.

  • Someone walked over my grave. [Said when the speaker had experienced a shudder of foreboding about something.]
  • Well, this won’t buy the baby a bonnet. [The speaker should be busy at some task, not necessarily remunerated, but has been idling for a while.]
  • You have to hold a candle to the Devil. [I.e. go along with something you don't think altogether right, for the sake of some greater good, or just of a quiet life.]
  • Where there’s muck there’s brass. [Muck = dirt; brass = money.]
  • That’s what the cobbler threw at his wife. [I.e. the last, said on finishing up some task.]
  • Don’t teach your Granny how to suck eggs. [Don't think you know more than someone older. Did people really suck eggs? And is it really something you need to study to get right? No idea.]

There must be a hundred others down there in the silt at the bottom of my memory.

Math Corner

There is a worked solution to last month’s brainteaser here.

This month I just want to pay tribute to Mathematical Intelligencer, whose current issue (Spring 2018) celebrates the quarterly magazine’s fortieth birthday.

The Intelligencer carries plenty of good meaty articles about, of course, mathematics; but it has the great virtue of not taking itself, or its subject matter, too seriously.1 (1)

In this issue, for example, in among articles titled “On Models and Visualizations of Some Special Quartic Surfaces” (art meets differential geometry) and “Using Kempe Exchanges to Disentangle Kempe Chains” (graph theory), there is one on “The Mathematics of Taffy Pullers” (quite challenging, with nods to matrix algebra and Information Theory).

Mary Leng gets 2700 words out of “Does 2 + 3 = 5? In Defence of a Near Absurdity,” which, speaking just a a writer, I find pretty darn impressive.

There is mathematical verse, a genre I have ventured into myself from time to time. This one is a parody on Robert Frost:

Whose proofs these are, I think I know —
He assigned the work a week ago …

Least serious of all is a spoof letter by Colin Adams “To the Fields Medal Committee,” recommending himself for that award, the math equivalent of a Nobel Prize, notwithstanding that:

I am fully aware that I am an unusual choice for the medal, given my extremely limited research credentials.

He makes the best case he can, though:

Another advantage to choosing me is that I am not a candidate who is likely to turn the medal down, once offered. That can be quite embarrassing, as you know all too well …

(That’s a reference to Grigory Perelman’s turning down of the Fields Medal in 2006.)

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Colin Adams is about as qualified for a Fields as I am. Like me, in fact, he’s too old for the award: It is limited to mathematicians under forty, and he’s forty-five. That just gives him the opportunity to make a veiled threat of legal action, though:

What better way to say, “We are sorry for our blatant discrimination on the basis of age. Our shameful behavior deserves contempt …”

Altogether a fun commemorative issue, marred only by a twelve-page article on “Women’s Representation in Mathematics Subfields.” There is no escaping this Grievance Studies flapdoodle nowadays, though, and twelve pages out of ninety-six is tolerably restrained as things currently go in STEM journals.

So congratulations to the Intelligencer on forty years of instruction and amusement, and best wishes for forty more!

 

2010-12-24dl[1] John Derbyshire [email him] writes an incredible amount on all sorts of subjects for all kinds of outlets. (This no longer includes National Review, whose editors had some kind of tantrum and fired him. ) He is the author ofWe Are Doomed: Reclaiming Conservative Pessimism and several other books. He has had two books published by VDARE.com com:FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT (also available in Kindle) and FROM THE DISSIDENT RIGHT II: ESSAYS 2013.

(Republished from VDare by permission of author or representative)
 
• Category: Ideology • Tags: Political Correctness, Technology 
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  1. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    Peterson vs Peter Pan? LOL

    https://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a19834137/jordan-peterson-interview/

    In some ways Peterson has it easy in our crazy current order where Bruce Jenner can claim to be ‘Caitlyn’ and be showered with honors for his ‘courage’. It’s very easy to be sane and balanced against such obvious lunacy.

    And yet, because the Powers-that-be have officially institutionalized Homomania or Queertianity as the official faith of the West, Peterson isn’t just fighting a fad or cult but the System and its neo-religion.

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  2. …didn’t Arthur C. Clarke turn out to be a diddler?

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  3. astrolabe says:

    Not in the same category as your phrases, but my mother mentioned last week that people used often to say ‘before the war…’, but at some point they stopped. I think I might remember my grandparents saying it.

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    • Replies: @dearieme
    Yep. Another favourite was "don't leave your food: think of all the poor people in China". China was also the star of "I wouldn't do that for all the tea in China."
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  4. utu says:

    If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much, or waste our substance in godforsaken sinkholes like Niger.

    I think you and Sailer got the causality arrow wrong with one exception. Invading comes first. Armenian Americans or Irish American or German Americans did not cause America invade anything. Now the exception: If Jews were not invited we would do much less invading.

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    • Replies: @dearieme
    "Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything." Well, except Canada.

    The German Americans probably tried too.
    , @Chris Mallory
    The Irish and Germans did damage in other ways. They worked at destroying the nation and freedoms the Founding Fathers left to their posterity. No such thing as an "Armenian American". If you are Armenian, you are not American, no matter where you are born.
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  5. And yet, because the Powers-that-be have officially institutionalized Homomania or Queertianity as the official faith of the West, Peterson isn’t just fighting a fad or cult but the System and its neo-religion.

    And not only that – this neo-religion is not only about the quasi-sacredness of – – – natural predispositions, as I might call them – – – : – – – In doing so, this neo-religion also sanctifies the very self (and it’s (natural, ironically) selfishness and it’s self-centeredness, and it’s utter narcissism by that – which means: The ultimate puberterian mindset of (mostly) priviledeg kids from the middle-class on upwards – – – in perfect harmony with the (by these very standards) very much deteriorated mass media.

    Peterson cuts through this present days Gordian Knot – and therefor I praise him!

    (Thanks, the Esquire article by Wesley Yang is very interesting and very well written.)

    (The most iportant thing in my opinion about Peterson, that Yang does not mention is this: Peterson manages to bring very important thinkers together – thus making them even more important: Jonathan Haidt, David Perkins, Sam Harris, Camille Paglia, Charles Murray/Richard Herrnstein***….).

    ***
    I couldn’t resist: I’ve smuggled in one name, Peterson – as far as I know, has not mentioned explicitly. Sigh.

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  6. Brabantian says: • Website

    In the above article, John Derbyshire discusses both the work of film director Stanley Kubrick, and some books on the ‘moon landings’

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA ‘walk on the moon’ videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

    Am amazed at the absurd persistence of this tale that 50 years ago this December, the USA somehow began the first of nine ‘voyages to the moon’ in 1968-72, with six alleged ‘moon landings’ … and no one going back ever since … HA

    3 days before his death on 7 March 1999, Stanley Kubrick confessed to fellow film-maker T Patrick Murray, that he had faked the films of the USA claimed 6 ‘moon landings’ of 1969-1972, an era when the CIA had its own film studios at Laurel Canyon, California

    “Kubrick made it clear that he had agreed to the interview for a very specific purpose. He knew that he was close to death & he wanted to get something monumental off his chest before he died. Almost immediately after sitting down, he proceeded to tell the stunned interviewer that the moon landings were fake & he himself had been the director in charge of the filming proceedings.

    T (T. Patrick Murray): That we didn’t land on the moon, you’re saying?

    K (Stanley Kubrick): No, we didn’t. It was not real.

    T: The moon landings were fake?

    K: A, a, a … fictional moon landing. A fantasy. It was not real.

    T: The moon landing in ’69 …

    K: Is total fiction. I perpetrated a huge fraud on the American public, involving the United States government & NASA, that the moon landings were faked, that the moon landings ALL were faked, & I was the person who filmed it.

    T: Why did they have to fake it? Why would they have to do that?

    K: Because it is impossible to get there.

    Here’s the Onion audio re-make of Kubrick’s ‘men landing on the moon’ official hoax films Kubrick made for NASA, with the ‘re-discovered original audio transmissions’ full of four-letter words & other irreverent language, 3 minutes of hilarity ‘Houston, we’re on the f-cking moon, over’

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    • Replies: @Truth

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA ‘walk on the moon’ videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

     

    Naah, we were there, we just lost the technology to go back..,.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GFfbsOaZc0
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    I have to agree with my friend Truth: the moon landings were real, at least the first two missions. And by the mid 1960s Kubrick stayed put in England. By the way, those Laurel Canyon studios you speak of were real. All sorts of interesting conspiracies swirl around that place.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    https://youtu.be/BfciFooWD1Y
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  7. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    The “Foreign Meddling” passage is Mr. Derbyshire’s latest swoon over the Establishment’s military. That’s a common trait, especially among men, but it seems even more juvenile coming from a public commentator who takes pride in being bravely contrarian.

    The hyperlink in this sentence

    “For a 20-year-old guy full of pee-pee and vinegar, it sounds like terrific fun, and certainly there are bad people in remote places who need killing by us.”

    is to Osama Bin Laden, a person so bad that his killing by “us” couldn’t even be documented.

    Too bad.

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    • Replies: @Mishra

    Osama Bin Laden, a person so bad that his killing by “us” couldn’t even be documented.
     
    It's like "Robert Maxwell" about whom: "He died. He have heart attack and fell out of window onto exploding bomb, and was killed in a shooting accident."

    And the corpse was spirited off to Israel for "autopsy". You can look it up!

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  8. David says:

    When I was a kid in Southern Ohio, people always used to say, “It’s a free Country.” They don’t say that anymore.

    A very minor correction. The word “excursion” was eliminated from the LEM before it ever flew because it seemed frivolous. Could say it lacked gravitas. The LEM became the LM, as used in the book title cited.

    Murray’s wife really hit that 80′s look with her glossy lipstick and big frizzy hair.

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  9. “There must be a hundred others down there in the silt at the bottom of my memory.”

    How about: “Don’t piss on my boots and tell me it’s raining.”

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  10. Rich says:

    Mr Derbyshire’s conversation with the two younger Amren conference attendees about how different things used to be is something that’s been on my mind for a long time. I’m about twenty years younger than Mr Derbyshire, but I remember when TV shows had all-White casts, every commercial didn’t show an interracial couple and Whites actually had pride in themselves. My father grew up in a NYC that was over 90% White and where a smart kid could go to college on the cheap, or take a test and land a good job at a good company. Now these poor White kids have to sacrifice their futures to the god “Diversity”, and many of them are so brainwashed, they believe it’s a good thing.

    A friend of my son’s, German surname, maybe 24 years old, from a working class family on Long Island, often goes on rants about his “White privilege” and the poor minorities. This is a kid whose father worked in a blue collar job, whose grandfather and great grandfather did, too. A kid whose family never owned a slave and was probably never in a position to discriminate against anyone, anyway. It’s not going to be easy to break these kids away from their deranged “religion”.

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  11. dearieme says:
    @astrolabe
    Not in the same category as your phrases, but my mother mentioned last week that people used often to say 'before the war...', but at some point they stopped. I think I might remember my grandparents saying it.

    Yep. Another favourite was “don’t leave your food: think of all the poor people in China”. China was also the star of “I wouldn’t do that for all the tea in China.”

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  12. dearieme says:
    @utu

    If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much, or waste our substance in godforsaken sinkholes like Niger.
     
    I think you and Sailer got the causality arrow wrong with one exception. Invading comes first. Armenian Americans or Irish American or German Americans did not cause America invade anything. Now the exception: If Jews were not invited we would do much less invading.

    “Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything.” Well, except Canada.

    The German Americans probably tried too.

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    • Replies: @utu
    What Canada?
    , @syonredux

    “Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything.” Well, except Canada.
     
    Yes, the Fenian Raids:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenian_raids

    Fortunately, the 19th century Irish didn't have the kind of power that the Jews wield nowadays....
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  13. If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much

    When talking about the United States, you don’t get to say “we”. You are an immigrant, a guest. Your nation is across the sea. The guest has no say in the affairs of the host.

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    • Replies: @Forbes

    The guest has no say in the affairs of the host.
     
    I guess you been hiding under a rock somewhere. The immigrants are here, and they've got lots of say.

    What "is" and what "ought" are two entirely different things.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    I don't mean to argue, but your comment is directed at a Citizen of the United States, not a guest.

    Furthermore, he represents the kind of naturalized Citizens we want, in his case racially and culturally as close to our founding stock as you can get.

    If you are going to defend us from invasion -- and I agree you should -- try aiming better instead of using the rhetorical equivalent of a shotgun.
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  14. @utu

    If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much, or waste our substance in godforsaken sinkholes like Niger.
     
    I think you and Sailer got the causality arrow wrong with one exception. Invading comes first. Armenian Americans or Irish American or German Americans did not cause America invade anything. Now the exception: If Jews were not invited we would do much less invading.

    The Irish and Germans did damage in other ways. They worked at destroying the nation and freedoms the Founding Fathers left to their posterity. No such thing as an “Armenian American”. If you are Armenian, you are not American, no matter where you are born.

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  15. “No-one owes you a living”.

    “Whoever said that life is fair?”

    “Keep it up. You’ll wind up a ditch digger when you grow up.”

    Three of my Mother’s favorites.

    And then one day it struck me as I was clearing a ditch of debris while surveying a road during a Civil Engineering road-widening project, that my Mother’s admonition had been prophetic! I had wound up a ditch digger (well, clearing a culvert anyway). I had to pause and laugh.

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  16. utu says:

    You being a moron is your most American quality.

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  17. utu says:
    @dearieme
    "Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything." Well, except Canada.

    The German Americans probably tried too.

    What Canada?

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  18. Tiny Duck says:

    Today is a great day for progress

    Starbucks has given the victims 1 million dollars each

    the Boy Scouts have changed their name to Scouts to be gender inclusive

    The Basque seperatists have dissolved themselves

    The NFL players are supporting Kapepernik

    The white racist from Charloettesville has been found guilty of murder

    Sorry, you guys lose!

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  19. Truth says:
    @Brabantian
    In the above article, John Derbyshire discusses both the work of film director Stanley Kubrick, and some books on the 'moon landings'

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA 'walk on the moon' videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

    Am amazed at the absurd persistence of this tale that 50 years ago this December, the USA somehow began the first of nine 'voyages to the moon' in 1968-72, with six alleged 'moon landings' ... and no one going back ever since ... HA

    3 days before his death on 7 March 1999, Stanley Kubrick confessed to fellow film-maker T Patrick Murray, that he had faked the films of the USA claimed 6 'moon landings' of 1969-1972, an era when the CIA had its own film studios at Laurel Canyon, California

    "Kubrick made it clear that he had agreed to the interview for a very specific purpose. He knew that he was close to death & he wanted to get something monumental off his chest before he died. Almost immediately after sitting down, he proceeded to tell the stunned interviewer that the moon landings were fake & he himself had been the director in charge of the filming proceedings.

    T (T. Patrick Murray): That we didn't land on the moon, you're saying?

    K (Stanley Kubrick): No, we didn't. It was not real.

    T: The moon landings were fake?

    K: A, a, a ... fictional moon landing. A fantasy. It was not real.

    T: The moon landing in '69 ...

    K: Is total fiction. I perpetrated a huge fraud on the American public, involving the United States government & NASA, that the moon landings were faked, that the moon landings ALL were faked, & I was the person who filmed it.

    T: Why did they have to fake it? Why would they have to do that?

    K: Because it is impossible to get there.
     
    Here's the Onion audio re-make of Kubrick's 'men landing on the moon' official hoax films Kubrick made for NASA, with the 're-discovered original audio transmissions' full of four-letter words & other irreverent language, 3 minutes of hilarity 'Houston, we're on the f-cking moon, over'
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIkHLO93lCA

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA ‘walk on the moon’ videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

    Naah, we were there, we just lost the technology to go back..,.

    Read More
    • Replies: @pyrrhus
    Kubrick didn't say that we never landed on the moon, but he did shoot the video in advance, as is easily shown by the seams in the background....The Pentagon was worried about things going wrong...
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  20. The non-coffee drinking neer-do-wells who were loitering in Starbucks got $1 each, not 1 million–and that from the city of Philadelphia, fool.

    The white guy who gave that black guy a beat down in a fair fight was sentenced to 10 years, not life. Probably be out in 2. Just shows that black men don’t fare well when they’re not ganging up on girls and teenagers.

    The NFL players didn’t say they supported Kaepernick; the gay ones said they would like to hold his balls.

    The Boy Scouts welcome girls into their ranks. Especially at summer camp. That’s a victory!

    And just what has the Basque movement to do with the dissolute behavior of persons of color in America?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Tiny Dick doesn’t really believe that stuff, he is just doing ham-fisted parodies of stupid Leftist talking points. Note that he uses a self-insulting moniker to give everyone a hint to what he’s doing.Unfortunately he isn’t too bright himself so they have the subtlety of a sledgehammer. For example, in this one he should have just posted the line about the Starbucks scammers getting one million dollars instead of one dollar, and dropped the rest. Punchy and effective.
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  21. Hooray for the mention of Grumman’s Lunar Module. Over here on the other side of the Sound, I know the son of the man who owned and operated the small metal fabrication company that provided the aluminum main struts for the LM landing legs. The son still has some of the leftover tubes in his shop here in Connecticut, still as ready to go as they were when Apollo was sadly cut short.

    Kudos also for mentioning 2001: A Space Odyssey. On another personal note, I also happen to know the actor who played Dave Bowman. He has aged better than he did in the movie. He says he liked working for Kubric, and that the hardest thing was sitting through hours of makeup for the aging scenes.

    Kubric deliberately had him play his part flat, not only to be like a cool-headed astronaut, but also to accentuate the sense of man now being part of his technological creation, part of the machine. It is no accident that HAL comes across as having more of a personality.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Red-faced apologies for leaving the "k" off the end of "Kubrick."
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  22. @Buzz Mohawk
    Hooray for the mention of Grumman's Lunar Module. Over here on the other side of the Sound, I know the son of the man who owned and operated the small metal fabrication company that provided the aluminum main struts for the LM landing legs. The son still has some of the leftover tubes in his shop here in Connecticut, still as ready to go as they were when Apollo was sadly cut short.

    Kudos also for mentioning 2001: A Space Odyssey. On another personal note, I also happen to know the actor who played Dave Bowman. He has aged better than he did in the movie. He says he liked working for Kubric, and that the hardest thing was sitting through hours of makeup for the aging scenes.

    Kubric deliberately had him play his part flat, not only to be like a cool-headed astronaut, but also to accentuate the sense of man now being part of his technological creation, part of the machine. It is no accident that HAL comes across as having more of a personality.

    Red-faced apologies for leaving the “k” off the end of “Kubrick.”

    Read More
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  23. pyrrhus says:

    A couple of comments on an otherwise fine post…

    Arthur C. Clarke, gay pedophile who moved to Sri Lanka to more fully enjoy his hobby…..

    “Certainly there are bad people in remote places who need killing by us.” Why? And who determines who the bad people are? Oh, the Deep State…some of the worst people on the planet.

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  24. pyrrhus says:
    @Truth

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA ‘walk on the moon’ videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

     

    Naah, we were there, we just lost the technology to go back..,.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GFfbsOaZc0

    Kubrick didn’t say that we never landed on the moon, but he did shoot the video in advance, as is easily shown by the seams in the background….The Pentagon was worried about things going wrong…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    I was being facetious. We've never been to the moon, which is much closer than they tell us; and may never go to the moon.
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  25. More about 2001 that might be of interest to a mathematician like Derbyshire:

    Kubrick made the monolith represent the movie screen. Original showings began with music and a black screen, a horizontal version of the monolith right there in front of the audience. The same thing happened during intermission.

    The epic story of man plays out in the two dimensions of the screen/monolith. There are other allusions to this as well. The space station is a film reel, as is the hamster wheel inside the spaceship Discovery.

    Finally Bowman moves in the light show that appears to be aligned perpendicular to the black plane.

    Man leaves Flatland.

    That is the story of our species moving outward to another dimension off the Earth and evolving into another form.

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  26. Alfa158 says:
    @ThreeCranes
    The non-coffee drinking neer-do-wells who were loitering in Starbucks got $1 each, not 1 million--and that from the city of Philadelphia, fool.

    The white guy who gave that black guy a beat down in a fair fight was sentenced to 10 years, not life. Probably be out in 2. Just shows that black men don't fare well when they're not ganging up on girls and teenagers.

    The NFL players didn't say they supported Kaepernick; the gay ones said they would like to hold his balls.

    The Boy Scouts welcome girls into their ranks. Especially at summer camp. That's a victory!

    And just what has the Basque movement to do with the dissolute behavior of persons of color in America?

    Tiny Dick doesn’t really believe that stuff, he is just doing ham-fisted parodies of stupid Leftist talking points. Note that he uses a self-insulting moniker to give everyone a hint to what he’s doing.Unfortunately he isn’t too bright himself so they have the subtlety of a sledgehammer. For example, in this one he should have just posted the line about the Starbucks scammers getting one million dollars instead of one dollar, and dropped the rest. Punchy and effective.

    Read More
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  27. ‘I’m of the Steve Sailer school. If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much,’

    Your old country Britain invaded much of the world without having invited first.

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  28. Forbes says:
    @Chris Mallory

    If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much
     
    When talking about the United States, you don't get to say "we". You are an immigrant, a guest. Your nation is across the sea. The guest has no say in the affairs of the host.

    The guest has no say in the affairs of the host.

    I guess you been hiding under a rock somewhere. The immigrants are here, and they’ve got lots of say.

    What “is” and what “ought” are two entirely different things.

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  29. @Chris Mallory

    If we didn’t invite so much of the world, we wouldn’t need to invade so much
     
    When talking about the United States, you don't get to say "we". You are an immigrant, a guest. Your nation is across the sea. The guest has no say in the affairs of the host.

    I don’t mean to argue, but your comment is directed at a Citizen of the United States, not a guest.

    Furthermore, he represents the kind of naturalized Citizens we want, in his case racially and culturally as close to our founding stock as you can get.

    If you are going to defend us from invasion — and I agree you should — try aiming better instead of using the rhetorical equivalent of a shotgun.

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    • Agree: RadicalCenter, Mishra
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  30. Alfa158 says:

    NASA thought that was all going to happen. Around 1964 when Kubrick started collecting material for the movie with them, NASA was already looking past Apollo. They issued a request for proposals for a super heavy lift booster which would put up the massive amounts of materials needed for giant wheel space stations, lunar colonies and manned interplanetary exploration. That payload would have been the same mass as all four Space Shuttle orbiters and their payloads; one million pounds. Flights were expected to begin in 1976 for the bicentennial. NASA was also testing nuclear propulsion for solar system exploration.
    Sadly, they never figured on the budgetary effects of the end of the space race, and two wars, Vietnam and the War on Poverty. Instead of 2001 we ended up with Obama setting the goal of NASA helping Muslims to feel better about their lack of modern achievements.

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  31. @Brabantian
    In the above article, John Derbyshire discusses both the work of film director Stanley Kubrick, and some books on the 'moon landings'

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA 'walk on the moon' videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

    Am amazed at the absurd persistence of this tale that 50 years ago this December, the USA somehow began the first of nine 'voyages to the moon' in 1968-72, with six alleged 'moon landings' ... and no one going back ever since ... HA

    3 days before his death on 7 March 1999, Stanley Kubrick confessed to fellow film-maker T Patrick Murray, that he had faked the films of the USA claimed 6 'moon landings' of 1969-1972, an era when the CIA had its own film studios at Laurel Canyon, California

    "Kubrick made it clear that he had agreed to the interview for a very specific purpose. He knew that he was close to death & he wanted to get something monumental off his chest before he died. Almost immediately after sitting down, he proceeded to tell the stunned interviewer that the moon landings were fake & he himself had been the director in charge of the filming proceedings.

    T (T. Patrick Murray): That we didn't land on the moon, you're saying?

    K (Stanley Kubrick): No, we didn't. It was not real.

    T: The moon landings were fake?

    K: A, a, a ... fictional moon landing. A fantasy. It was not real.

    T: The moon landing in '69 ...

    K: Is total fiction. I perpetrated a huge fraud on the American public, involving the United States government & NASA, that the moon landings were faked, that the moon landings ALL were faked, & I was the person who filmed it.

    T: Why did they have to fake it? Why would they have to do that?

    K: Because it is impossible to get there.
     
    Here's the Onion audio re-make of Kubrick's 'men landing on the moon' official hoax films Kubrick made for NASA, with the 're-discovered original audio transmissions' full of four-letter words & other irreverent language, 3 minutes of hilarity 'Houston, we're on the f-cking moon, over'
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIkHLO93lCA

    I have to agree with my friend Truth: the moon landings were real, at least the first two missions. And by the mid 1960s Kubrick stayed put in England. By the way, those Laurel Canyon studios you speak of were real. All sorts of interesting conspiracies swirl around that place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Truth
    You picked a bad time to agree with me. Ol' Buddy.

    I would seriously doubt there is any postwar technology we "lost" and are unable to recreate. That sounds absurd at face value. But Mr. Pettit is the Senior ranking astro-naut at NASA.

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  32. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    The damned elites.

    Some people showboat. The elites knowboat.

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  33. KenH says:

    …..in fact compulsory — for white people to shove black people off the sidewalk and women were chained to their kitchen sinks

    Not only that but we used to burn crosses on their front lawns just for joy!

    And if disrupting and overthrowing unfriendly governments is truly a thing we ought to be doing, why not start with Mexico?

    Fred Reed is fuming reading those words and it will probably be the focus of his next column, but I’m 100% for regime change in Mexico. They are not our friend and ally. I’d start with taxing remittances at 50%.

    There is no mention at all of the black women who did all the heavy-duty math that made the space program possible; and the authors give Werner von Braun a good press. Eeeek!

    Not only did negra women do the all the hard math, but blacks in general have authored all of Western civilizations accomplishments as well as built our institutions, but racist historians have kept this explosive information from the public. Somehow these institutions turned against the blacks who created them and kept them in bondage until 1965 and some say even until decades later. So blacky created it all but it’s all still dripping with institutional racism and white supremacy and must be abolished.

    It’s my generation (they said) that stands witness to what society was like before diversity, multiculturalism, and collective guilt came up

    I’m a lot younger than Derb and still remember a much whiter and saner time where whiteopias were the rule rather than becoming the exception like they are now. Those were better days and they are worth striving for again.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Taxing remittances to foreign countries was one of the few very specific Trump ideas, and it was a good one.

    Politically, imagine the Democrats' dilemma if Trump proposed a huge new tax on outbound foreign remittances, and proposed using the revenue to cut the income tax by an equal amount for middle-income Americans -- meaning US citizens.
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  34. What colossal engineering achievements went into Apollo! Who believes we could do such things today?

    @Derb

    There are currently 3 rockets being worked on in the US that are larger then the Saturn V

    The BFR being built by SpaceX

    New Armstrong being Built by Blue Origin

    Block 2 SLS

    With a bit of luck the SLS will get cancelled before they ever get to launch block 2 but it looks like Bezos and SpaceX have the money to finish their work and set us on our way, also since the Blue and SpaceX rockets will be reusable they will have far lower launch costs than the Saturn V or the Shuttle, which is the reason NASA never made it back to the Moon

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  35. jamie b. says:

    Arthur C. Clarke was gay, but not a pedophile. Charges brought against Clarke (as part of an effort to discredit Prince Charles, who was about to knight Clarke at the time) were dismissed as groundless after reviewing the alleged confession on tape. Clarke’s last 30 years of life were entirely celibate, as he was completely non-functional due to his polio.

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  36. Truth says:
    @pyrrhus
    Kubrick didn't say that we never landed on the moon, but he did shoot the video in advance, as is easily shown by the seams in the background....The Pentagon was worried about things going wrong...

    I was being facetious. We’ve never been to the moon, which is much closer than they tell us; and may never go to the moon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    https://i.pinimg.com/originals/79/a9/86/79a98686339ca5dbf6c072fd175a66f7.jpg
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  37. Truth says:
    @SunBakedSuburb
    I have to agree with my friend Truth: the moon landings were real, at least the first two missions. And by the mid 1960s Kubrick stayed put in England. By the way, those Laurel Canyon studios you speak of were real. All sorts of interesting conspiracies swirl around that place.

    You picked a bad time to agree with me. Ol’ Buddy.

    I would seriously doubt there is any postwar technology we “lost” and are unable to recreate. That sounds absurd at face value. But Mr. Pettit is the Senior ranking astro-naut at NASA.

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  38. willem1 says:

    “And if disrupting and overthrowing unfriendly governments is truly a thing we ought to be doing, why not start with Mexico?”

    Because then we’d be like the dog who caught the car.

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  39. syonredux says:
    @dearieme
    "Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything." Well, except Canada.

    The German Americans probably tried too.

    “Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything.” Well, except Canada.

    Yes, the Fenian Raids:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenian_raids

    Fortunately, the 19th century Irish didn’t have the kind of power that the Jews wield nowadays….

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    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    Tiocfaidh ár lá :-)
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  40. ‘…waste our substance in godforsaken sinkholes like Niger.”

    My spellchecker changes it to sinkhole, too. Damn thing is worthless as tits on a boar hog.

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  41. @KenH

    .....in fact compulsory — for white people to shove black people off the sidewalk and women were chained to their kitchen sinks
     
    Not only that but we used to burn crosses on their front lawns just for joy!

    And if disrupting and overthrowing unfriendly governments is truly a thing we ought to be doing, why not start with Mexico?
     
    Fred Reed is fuming reading those words and it will probably be the focus of his next column, but I'm 100% for regime change in Mexico. They are not our friend and ally. I'd start with taxing remittances at 50%.

    There is no mention at all of the black women who did all the heavy-duty math that made the space program possible; and the authors give Werner von Braun a good press. Eeeek!
     
    Not only did negra women do the all the hard math, but blacks in general have authored all of Western civilizations accomplishments as well as built our institutions, but racist historians have kept this explosive information from the public. Somehow these institutions turned against the blacks who created them and kept them in bondage until 1965 and some say even until decades later. So blacky created it all but it's all still dripping with institutional racism and white supremacy and must be abolished.

    It’s my generation (they said) that stands witness to what society was like before diversity, multiculturalism, and collective guilt came up
     
    I'm a lot younger than Derb and still remember a much whiter and saner time where whiteopias were the rule rather than becoming the exception like they are now. Those were better days and they are worth striving for again.

    Taxing remittances to foreign countries was one of the few very specific Trump ideas, and it was a good one.

    Politically, imagine the Democrats’ dilemma if Trump proposed a huge new tax on outbound foreign remittances, and proposed using the revenue to cut the income tax by an equal amount for middle-income Americans — meaning US citizens.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mishra

    Politically, imagine the Democrats’ dilemma if Trump proposed a huge new tax on outbound foreign remittances, and proposed using the revenue to cut the income tax by an equal amount for middle-income Americans — meaning US citizens.
     
    Isn't there anyone with brains left on Trump's team? Stephen Miller is still there, isn't he? But, ah. The person with brains would still have to convince Trump.
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  42. @syonredux

    “Irish Americans did not cause America to invade anything.” Well, except Canada.
     
    Yes, the Fenian Raids:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenian_raids

    Fortunately, the 19th century Irish didn't have the kind of power that the Jews wield nowadays....

    Tiocfaidh ár lá :-)

    Read More
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  43. @Brabantian
    In the above article, John Derbyshire discusses both the work of film director Stanley Kubrick, and some books on the 'moon landings'

    But Derb neglects to report that before he died, Stanley Kubrick admitted he personally directed the official NASA 'walk on the moon' videos, and that the entire Apollo thing was a hoax

    Am amazed at the absurd persistence of this tale that 50 years ago this December, the USA somehow began the first of nine 'voyages to the moon' in 1968-72, with six alleged 'moon landings' ... and no one going back ever since ... HA

    3 days before his death on 7 March 1999, Stanley Kubrick confessed to fellow film-maker T Patrick Murray, that he had faked the films of the USA claimed 6 'moon landings' of 1969-1972, an era when the CIA had its own film studios at Laurel Canyon, California

    "Kubrick made it clear that he had agreed to the interview for a very specific purpose. He knew that he was close to death & he wanted to get something monumental off his chest before he died. Almost immediately after sitting down, he proceeded to tell the stunned interviewer that the moon landings were fake & he himself had been the director in charge of the filming proceedings.

    T (T. Patrick Murray): That we didn't land on the moon, you're saying?

    K (Stanley Kubrick): No, we didn't. It was not real.

    T: The moon landings were fake?

    K: A, a, a ... fictional moon landing. A fantasy. It was not real.

    T: The moon landing in '69 ...

    K: Is total fiction. I perpetrated a huge fraud on the American public, involving the United States government & NASA, that the moon landings were faked, that the moon landings ALL were faked, & I was the person who filmed it.

    T: Why did they have to fake it? Why would they have to do that?

    K: Because it is impossible to get there.
     
    Here's the Onion audio re-make of Kubrick's 'men landing on the moon' official hoax films Kubrick made for NASA, with the 're-discovered original audio transmissions' full of four-letter words & other irreverent language, 3 minutes of hilarity 'Houston, we're on the f-cking moon, over'
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIkHLO93lCA

    Read More
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  44. @Truth
    I was being facetious. We've never been to the moon, which is much closer than they tell us; and may never go to the moon.

    Read More
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  45. Mishra says:
    @anonymous
    The "Foreign Meddling" passage is Mr. Derbyshire's latest swoon over the Establishment's military. That's a common trait, especially among men, but it seems even more juvenile coming from a public commentator who takes pride in being bravely contrarian.

    The hyperlink in this sentence

    "For a 20-year-old guy full of pee-pee and vinegar, it sounds like terrific fun, and certainly there are bad people in remote places who need killing by us."

    is to Osama Bin Laden, a person so bad that his killing by "us" couldn't even be documented.

    Too bad.

    Osama Bin Laden, a person so bad that his killing by “us” couldn’t even be documented.

    It’s like “Robert Maxwell” about whom: “He died. He have heart attack and fell out of window onto exploding bomb, and was killed in a shooting accident.”

    And the corpse was spirited off to Israel for “autopsy”. You can look it up!

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  46. Mishra says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Taxing remittances to foreign countries was one of the few very specific Trump ideas, and it was a good one.

    Politically, imagine the Democrats' dilemma if Trump proposed a huge new tax on outbound foreign remittances, and proposed using the revenue to cut the income tax by an equal amount for middle-income Americans -- meaning US citizens.

    Politically, imagine the Democrats’ dilemma if Trump proposed a huge new tax on outbound foreign remittances, and proposed using the revenue to cut the income tax by an equal amount for middle-income Americans — meaning US citizens.

    Isn’t there anyone with brains left on Trump’s team? Stephen Miller is still there, isn’t he? But, ah. The person with brains would still have to convince Trump.

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