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I finally went to see two popular animated movies at the $3 theater: Disney’s big budget / big hit Zootopia and the medium budget / medium hit Angry Birds based on the Finnish smartphone game. Like a lot of mainstream movies these days, both are allegories about classic iSteve topics like biodiversity.

Zootopia is a cop movie set in a utopian city of talking animals where lions lie down with lambs, where predator and prey normally get along with perfect amity. It’s about a tiny girl bunny who comes to the big city to follow her dreams and be a policeman, even though everybody tells her only large animals can be cops. To solve a big case and convince the police chief, a hard-headed Cape buffalo voiced by Idris Elba, that she belongs on the force, she has to enlist the help of a handsome fox conman (Jason Bateman).

Zootopia likely started out as a satire on diversity and political correctness, but then self-emasculated itself when early research reports came back that audiences want political correctness about diversity and feel-good pap: Anybody can be anything they dream of, as long as they work out enough.

The movie is still quite decent, although it’s painful to think about how good it could have been if that much talent had been given free rein to follow their instincts without PC being given a chokehold on their creativity.

From Slate today comes an article worrying that Disney almost didn’t gut their own movie:

This Deleted Scene From Zootopia Would Have Made the Racial Allegory a Lot More Disturbing

By Aisha Harris

After months and months of vague promos, Zootopia’s arrival in theaters came as a surprise to viewers—not only was the film fun and entertaining, but it was also totally a message movie about the perils of racial profiling. And if you thought about it too hard, the racial allegory quickly began to fall apart: What’s with the discriminated-against predators also being in positions of institutional power? And why, in a movie about shutting down stereotypes, is the fox actually sneaky and the weasel really a cheater?

And why, in the scene that get the biggest laughs, are all the clerks at the Van Nuys Department of Motor Vehicles (pretty much the Van Nuys DMV I go to and where Homer Simpson’s sister-in-laws Patty and Selma work) sloths? And not stereotype-shattering sloths, but sloths who fulfill every stereotype you ever guiltily entertained about sloths and DMV clerks?

And there’s this scene that stereotypes wolves as liking to howl:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOACBsy3Yaw

Moreover, if you watch closely, the filmmakers disclose what a Malthusian nightmare a predator-free ecosystem would be. For example, here is the rabbit heroine saying goodbye to her mother, father, and 275 siblings as she heads off to Zootopia. Watch Bunnyburrow’s population counter at 0:45:

https://youtu.be/XgaKL9m-0s4?t=29s

Still, after decades of questionable and/or downright racist on-screen depictions of people of color, Disney’s attempt to address such heavy subject matter in an animated kids’ movie can be considered a valiant effort and a sign of progress.

Which is why it’s probably a good thing that a deleted scene from Zootopia that is now online didn’t make it into the final cut of the film.

This deleted scene explains the key question of why the 10% of the population who are predators don’t follow their instincts:

For starters, the tone of the scene is considerably darker than that of the lighthearted romp the movie eventually became. It depicts a ceremony, soon revealed to be a “taming party,” in which a young bear cub named Morris prepares to become a “big bear.” His father presents his eager, ecstatic son with a collar in front of a room full of equally eager and ecstatic bear cubs: “With this collar, Zootopia accepts me,” the papa bear announces, wistfully, as Morris repeats after him. There’s a tinge of sadness and hesitation as he goes to put it around Morris’ neck, and understandably so—Morris is soon given an electric shock after becoming too excited. The room gasps, and a startled Morris hugs his father tight.

The idea of animals in a kids’ movie suffering a form of ritualized corporeal punishment in order to gain acceptance by others is already pretty heavy—but it’s made even more disturbing when you consider it within the context of the film’s blatant racial allegory. The suggestion that the only way for the predators to coexist in the world of Zootopia is to “tame” them in adolescence would have brought in some icky, very colonial notions about race that such a film probably wouldn’t be able to engage with properly, to say the least. So let’s all be grateful that the top dogs at Disney made a wise decision to let this scene go.

And here’s another deleted scene, showing Jason Bateman’s male lead, a fox, having his taming collar temporarily removed by a doctor:

In other words, the predators were forced to stop preying on the prey pretty much the same way Alex is tamed in A Clockwork Orange. The idea of a huge budget talking animal knock off of the themes of A Clockwork Orange is pretty awesome.

But that explanation for why the world works the way it does was cut out of the movie because it wasn’t lame and PC enough. So in the final version of the movie, all the animals have just “evolved” to not prey on each other. Why? Just because. No cost is paid to evolve, there are no tradeoffs, no choices, nothing of interest.

To me, this lowers the stakes in the movie and makes the film quickly forgettable. Which is too bad because it has a lot going for it otherwise.

Here’s a documentary about how the creators were told by Disney suits and marketing researchers to drop the shock collars and make the movie about the evils of stereotypes:

Because audiences like Goodthink.

Angry Birds is set on a paradisiacal island where birds, lacking predators, have evolved to be flightless, much like the now extinct dodo bird of Mauritius and other birds on predator-free islands that have since been plagued, sometimes into extinction, by the arrival of human sailors, along with their pigs, dogs, and rats. Feral egg-eating pigs remain a major threat to rare birds on Hawaii.

The birds on their isolated island live in pleasant harmony with each other, caring for their eggs, taking yoga classes, and, sure enough, there’s the bird version of the Free Hugs guy from Times Square. (I told you that guy was famous.) Almost everybody is happy except for grumpy Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis), who is an Angry Red Bird. He gets sentenced to anger management therapy.

Then a boatload of pigs arrive from an unknown island.

The naive birds, having never met pigs before, don’t listen to Red’s warning that something seems fishy about these friendly pigs.

SPOILER ALERT: The pigs steal all the birds’ eggs and take them back to their island for a feast. Red leads the now angry birds in an attack on Piggy Island, which requires the flightless birds to shoot themselves at the pig city using sling shots. The birds heroically retrieve their eggs and go back to their own island, and don’t live happily ever after with the pigs at all.

The movie is based on old fashioned 1990s Edward O. Wilson / Jared Diamond-style concern for biodiversity (here’s Diamond’s chapter in The Third Chimpanzee on the sad fate of the giant flightless birds of New Zealand after the Maori and their pigs arrived). But it seems topical today because of the Camp of the Saints floating hijrah in the Mediterranean.

It’s not bad, although it will appeal most to very small children.

 
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  1. rvg says:

    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    These talking animals are stand-ins for people. CS Lewis's talking lion was a stand-in for Jesus, IIRC.
    , @jon

    So you think Aslan not eating people ... means that ... CS Lewis [is a] mushy liberal[]
     
    Aslan was Jesus. The whole point was that he could easily eat all the people who opposed him, but instead, he sacrificed his own life to save Edmund. That's a frickin children's book. I read that in elementary school and I got it, how did you not?
    , @anon
    Aslan killed lots of evil creatures in the battle at the end of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

    And the bears were going to eat Goldilocks until she escaped.
    , @Abe

    or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner
     
    Ok, ok, I see what's going on here. 20+ comments in and no one has yet hit this softball out of the yard. Guess it falls on me to play the nerd for this thread:

    "The Lord of the Eagles would not take them anywhere near where men lived. “They would shoot at us with their great bows of yew,” he said, “for they would think we were after their sheep. And at other times they would be right."
    , @melendwyr
    The Eagles DO act in a predatory manner, commenting that the humans whose homes they pass over shoot arrows in fear for their flocks - and that on another day, they'd be correct to do so!
  2. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “A German Woman Called LBC In Tears Over The Abuse She Says She’s Received Since The Brexit Vote

    “I’m so scared. I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said.”

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/victoriasanusi/a-german-woman-called-lbc-in-tears-over-the-abuse-she-says-s

    A German woman called James O’Brien’s LBC radio show in tears on Tuesday as she recalled the xenophobic abuse she said she has received since it was announced the UK had voted to leave the EU.

    The caller, who said her name was Karen, told O’Brien she moved to the UK in 1973 alongside her late husband, who was a GP.

    Through sobs, Karen told O’Brien that dog excrement had been thrown at her window and that people she knows have said they don’t want to be friends with her any more.

    “I haven’t been out the house in three days because I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I live in a middle-class area and the people who are doing it [making her feel unwelcome] are middle-class pensioners. I don’t understand what is going on.”

    Karen said that since the Brexit vote, people have made her feel like she needs to “go back to Germany”, but added that she no longer had friends there. “I’m so scared,” she added. “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    The woman said she had contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, who she claims told her that she should “understand people are frustrated”.

    She also told the radio host about another incident she had heard of: “My friend Rosemary has a grandson who was beaten up because he has a foreign grandma.”

    • Replies: @The Albino Sasquatch
    These stories from Karen & her friend Rosemary, sound like absolute garbage. I don't believe a word of it. This is the second story I've heard in as many days of such things, and it's just hysteria mongering from the people who wanted the UK to stay in the EU. If it's that bad, they should all move to Scotland.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    This story smells strongly of hoax or psychosis.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, I guess the answer for Rosemary's beaten grandson is to have him flee to Honduras and from there to Mexico and then into the States. Obama will have his back as a refugee.
    , @Anonymous
    Granny better be careful out there. British chavs, emboldened by Brexit, are hunting down Jerries to pogrom.
  3. I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    The fox at the doctor's office is even better, IMO, because it's subtler. But both are good.
    , @Matthew Kelly

    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.
     
    Well, almost. 99.9999% of the population will never see that clip. Those who will are already aware.

    I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema. Such a huge, untapped market.
    , @MC
    Without having seen the movie, the predator/prey dichotomy seems to be more about sex than race. Civilization to some extent depends on the suppression of certain male instincts. And modern civilization seems more and more hostile to any expression of maleness in all its gory reality.
    , @TomSchmidt
    I never knew bears believed in circumcision.

    Agreed that this would make for a major movie about what is gained and lost by suppressing aspects of unfettered masculinity. The dam holding back the flood of red pill knowledge has to let some through the floodgates every once in a while, or it cracks and dissolves.
  4. Given that: most of the movie and TV revenues now come from overseas and in particular, CHINA, and given that leaving money on the table with PC can have serious consequences for studios that are totally hit-driven (Frozen created $1 billion in merchandise revenue two years after showing in theaters) …

    How long can PC reign supreme when Chinese audiences and critically, the government, demand un-PC content?

    The globalists forgot that globalism is defacto, the Chinese government sets the media content rules. Just ask Lady Gaga, banned from China for meeting the Dalai Lama.

    • Replies: @Lurker

    Just ask Lady Gaga, banned from China for meeting the Dalai Lama.
     
    Lucky China then.
    , @Formerly CARealist
    wait a sec. These kids' movies generate merchandise revenue for years because that's often the only stuff that Target sells. when I go to buy shorts or a swimsuit for my little one and there's the bright, happy Disney colors (the movie behind it doesn't matter), guess what? That's what he or she wants. Let's see, a Star Wars towel, or a plain one?

    Merchandising, feh.
  5. @rvg
    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    These talking animals are stand-ins for people. CS Lewis’s talking lion was a stand-in for Jesus, IIRC.

  6. jon says:

    The birds heroically retrieve their eggs and go back to their own island, and don’t live happily ever after with the pigs at all.

    I had a hilariously iSteve moment the other day while reading the comments on a very left-wing blog. Someone raised exactly the point that Steve did, which is that Angry Birds doesn’t seem at all pro-immigration, and that was, of course, quite upsetting. But then it was pointed out that the story might actually be read as anti-colonialism, which is, of course, entirely different than anti-immigration. It was agreed by all that the movie was, thus, obviously first rate.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    I had a hilariously iSteve moment the other day while reading the comments on a very left-wing blog. Someone raised exactly the point that Steve did, which is that Angry Birds doesn’t seem at all pro-immigration, and that was, of course, quite upsetting. But then it was pointed out that the story might actually be read as anti-colonialism, which is, of course, entirely different than anti-immigration. It was agreed by all that the movie was, thus, obviously first rate.

     

    That is indeed both funny and fascinating -- I guess if you've got a double standard, you've always got a 'good answer' right at hand!
    , @MEH 0910
    (punching) immigrating up versus (punching) immigrating down.
  7. @AKAHorace
    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    The fox at the doctor’s office is even better, IMO, because it’s subtler. But both are good.

  8. jon says:
    @rvg
    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    So you think Aslan not eating people … means that … CS Lewis [is a] mushy liberal[]

    Aslan was Jesus. The whole point was that he could easily eat all the people who opposed him, but instead, he sacrificed his own life to save Edmund. That’s a frickin children’s book. I read that in elementary school and I got it, how did you not?

    • Replies: @luagha
    He's not a tame lion.
  9. I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.

    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game.

    • Replies: @whorefinder

    I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.
     
    Although rarely super-successful, movies based on video games have been made for about twenty-five years (Super Mario Bros). Hollywood will steal, ahem, be inspired by a popular idea from anywhere, and since video games haven't lost popularity over all, Hollywood will continue to try to make films out of them.

    (Even long-dead franchises will get the Hollywood movie/TV show; The Lone Ranger, anyone? Studios take their ownership rights very seriously and are constantly trying to use it to their advantage or hang on for dear life until they can find someone to do something with it. Remember that it took nearly eighty years for Universal to sell the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit back to Disney, despite doing nothing with the character since owning it.)

    Like with comic book movies, studios will need to develop a template for making them profitable. It took until X-Men (2000) and Spiderman (2002) for the template to be set for superhero films; yes, they'd had hits before (like Christopher Reeve's Superman, Tim Burton's Batman, and the TV version of The Incredible Hulk) but none of those set a formula for making money, as the many failed movies and TV shows along the way showed.


    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game
     
    Eh, a movie can feed kids into a previous comic book/show/video game. If Angry Birds's designers were smart, they'dve had some new tie in games to the film, making the animation seem like the films. The Robert Downey Iron Man sent a lot of people back into looking at the character's history in the comics and made the previous-dusty old character more popular.
    , @TheJester
    My grandson had mastered the iPhone and iPad interface at 18 months and was a world-class Angry Birds player at four years of age. I don't usually play video games (perhaps no more than 10 in my 68 years). So, my four-year old grandson had to show me how to play one Angry Birds episode in particular. "Grandpa, you don't go through the rock ... you go under the water (to reach the piggies)".

    BTW: My grandson is now five and really enjoyed the Angry Birds movie. I really enjoyed its non-PC message about the dangers of immigration by alien peoples and cultures. The movie would have been a good lead-in for BREXIT.

  10. Coincidentally, on the fervent recommendation of my two young nephews, we Calvinists watched the Angry Birds movie last Friday, just after the Brexit results came out.

    We were about halfway through when my daughter and I made almost simultaneous comments; I said ‘They should have called this the Brexit Birds Movie’, and my daughter said ‘I can’t believe how un-PC this movie is!’.

    I was quite surprised, actually: the premise of the movie is that if one’s home is suddenly beset by seemingly-friendly aliens whom your neighbors insist on treating as honored guests, it’s best to be suspicious because they’re likely to be invaders.

  11. @ 1974

    “I am a man who looks after the pigs
    Usually I get along okay.
    I am man who reveals all he digs,
    Should be more careful what I say.

    I’m getting put down,
    I’m getting pushed round,
    I’m being beaten every day.
    My life’s fading,
    But things are changing,
    I’m not gonna sit and weep again.”

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Best. Album. Ever.
  12. Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at it’s monkey-fishing excuse for journalistic “thought.”

    Those folks are so deeply-programmed it’s a wonder they don’t occasionally have a glitch in their programming and start spouting out “Hope and Change! Yes We can!” or “Impeach Nixon!” on occasion when caught without anything to say, necessitating a reboot by Master Soros.

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps

    Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at...
     
    That's all you needed to say right there...brilliant.
    , @SFG
    Nixon is long since forgotten by your average liberal, unless ze were around in the 70s. I remember quite a few Bush jokes though.
    , @boogerbently
    "Ze".

    Misspelling or new gender neutral term?
    If so, what is the singular of ze ?
  13. @AKAHorace
    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    Well, almost. 99.9999% of the population will never see that clip. Those who will are already aware.

    I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema. Such a huge, untapped market.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    All attempts suffer from the same thing. Can't get funding (for a combination of ideological reasons and anticipated failure), can't get quality actors, and even if you can solve the first two problems it'll be savaged by the critics.
    , @Stan Adams
    There is a vicious cycle at work: As lamestream pop culture becomes more and more worthless, more and more folks tune out from it. In the end, only the true believers and the droolers (aren't they one and the same?) are able to stomach the dreck being churned out by the Hollywood nightmare machine. So the "creative masterminds" dumb down the product even more. It's a race to the bottom of the cesspool.

    I haven't been to the movies in years. So many of the films being crapped out these days are so full of PC tripe that I simply can't bring myself to watch them, let alone to pay $15 for the "privilege" of doing so. The urge to run gagging from the theater is too strong.

    As I've said before, I'm glad that I was born when I was. Think of the bullshit that a kid entering kindergarten this fall might absorb over the next 12 years. It boggles the mind.

    Have we reached peak bullshit? Will President Trump drag us back to sanity? Maybe. But it's a long shot - even if he does win, and keep his word, he'll still have to fight the bastards every step of the way. And, while the grown-ups slug it out in the marketplace of ideas, the kiddies are always a captive audience for the leftist propagandists.

    Most of my public schooling was in the '90s, so I was forced to swallow more than my fair share of steaming turds as part of my cultural indoctrination. But I had it good compared to those who came after me.
    , @Ed
    "I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema."

    Its not a great analogy because Fox was producing movies before they started a broadcast network.
  14. Here’s a documentary about how the creators were told by Disney suits and marketing researchers to drop the shock collars and make the movie about the evils of stereotypes:

    I don’t watch Disney movies. I don’t buy Disney crap. And this is why: Disney is spewing bullshit to warp young minds. The suits won’t let even a sliver of truth shine through, if they can help it.

    If you buy a ticket to a Disney movie – or any Hollywood movie, for that matter – then you are putting money in the pockets of the Thought Police. You’re aiding and abetting the Cultural Revolution.

    When the Big One hits L.A., I hope the whole rotten industry slides into the frickin’ ocean.

    (But not you, Steve. :D)

    I haven’t set foot in a movie theater since 2013. The last time before that was in 2011. The last time before that was in 2008. The last time before that was in 2005. The last time before that was in 2002.

    I never feel like I’m missing out.

  15. @jon

    The birds heroically retrieve their eggs and go back to their own island, and don’t live happily ever after with the pigs at all.
     
    I had a hilariously iSteve moment the other day while reading the comments on a very left-wing blog. Someone raised exactly the point that Steve did, which is that Angry Birds doesn't seem at all pro-immigration, and that was, of course, quite upsetting. But then it was pointed out that the story might actually be read as anti-colonialism, which is, of course, entirely different than anti-immigration. It was agreed by all that the movie was, thus, obviously first rate.

    I had a hilariously iSteve moment the other day while reading the comments on a very left-wing blog. Someone raised exactly the point that Steve did, which is that Angry Birds doesn’t seem at all pro-immigration, and that was, of course, quite upsetting. But then it was pointed out that the story might actually be read as anti-colonialism, which is, of course, entirely different than anti-immigration. It was agreed by all that the movie was, thus, obviously first rate.

    That is indeed both funny and fascinating — I guess if you’ve got a double standard, you’ve always got a ‘good answer’ right at hand!

  16. @Dave Pinsen
    I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.

    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game.

    I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.

    Although rarely super-successful, movies based on video games have been made for about twenty-five years (Super Mario Bros). Hollywood will steal, ahem, be inspired by a popular idea from anywhere, and since video games haven’t lost popularity over all, Hollywood will continue to try to make films out of them.

    (Even long-dead franchises will get the Hollywood movie/TV show; The Lone Ranger, anyone? Studios take their ownership rights very seriously and are constantly trying to use it to their advantage or hang on for dear life until they can find someone to do something with it. Remember that it took nearly eighty years for Universal to sell the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit back to Disney, despite doing nothing with the character since owning it.)

    Like with comic book movies, studios will need to develop a template for making them profitable. It took until X-Men (2000) and Spiderman (2002) for the template to be set for superhero films; yes, they’d had hits before (like Christopher Reeve’s Superman, Tim Burton’s Batman, and the TV version of The Incredible Hulk) but none of those set a formula for making money, as the many failed movies and TV shows along the way showed.

    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game

    Eh, a movie can feed kids into a previous comic book/show/video game. If Angry Birds‘s designers were smart, they’dve had some new tie in games to the film, making the animation seem like the films. The Robert Downey Iron Man sent a lot of people back into looking at the character’s history in the comics and made the previous-dusty old character more popular.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    And Universal only gave up Oswald so they could get Al Michaels from Disney.
  17. @Anonymous
    "A German Woman Called LBC In Tears Over The Abuse She Says She’s Received Since The Brexit Vote

    “I’m so scared. I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said."

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/victoriasanusi/a-german-woman-called-lbc-in-tears-over-the-abuse-she-says-s

    A German woman called James O’Brien’s LBC radio show in tears on Tuesday as she recalled the xenophobic abuse she said she has received since it was announced the UK had voted to leave the EU.

    The caller, who said her name was Karen, told O’Brien she moved to the UK in 1973 alongside her late husband, who was a GP.

    Through sobs, Karen told O’Brien that dog excrement had been thrown at her window and that people she knows have said they don’t want to be friends with her any more.

    “I haven’t been out the house in three days because I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I live in a middle-class area and the people who are doing it [making her feel unwelcome] are middle-class pensioners. I don’t understand what is going on.”

    Karen said that since the Brexit vote, people have made her feel like she needs to “go back to Germany”, but added that she no longer had friends there. “I’m so scared,” she added. “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    The woman said she had contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, who she claims told her that she should “understand people are frustrated”.

    She also told the radio host about another incident she had heard of: “My friend Rosemary has a grandson who was beaten up because he has a foreign grandma.”
     

    These stories from Karen & her friend Rosemary, sound like absolute garbage. I don’t believe a word of it. This is the second story I’ve heard in as many days of such things, and it’s just hysteria mongering from the people who wanted the UK to stay in the EU. If it’s that bad, they should all move to Scotland.

  18. @Matthew Kelly

    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.
     
    Well, almost. 99.9999% of the population will never see that clip. Those who will are already aware.

    I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema. Such a huge, untapped market.

    All attempts suffer from the same thing. Can’t get funding (for a combination of ideological reasons and anticipated failure), can’t get quality actors, and even if you can solve the first two problems it’ll be savaged by the critics.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    The Passion of the Christ.
    , @Esso
    http://www.hs.fi/kulttuuri/a1462362924166

    Hed was looking for a major Hollywood deal as early as 2010. However, as he puts it, “the commercial terms didn’t match”. According to Hed, Hollywood wanted too much control, so Rovio decided to make the film themselves.
     

    Rovio made the film in an exceptional manner: the company funded the entire production. For this reason, its success is crucial to the company. The film is by far the largest project in the history of the company.

    Its production cost USD 73 million, or around EUR 65 million, exclusive of the cost of production and distribution, which Rovio estimates at more than EUR 100 million. Making films, particularly animated ones, is labour-intensive. Most of the budget for the film consisted of fees.

    “We funded the film on our own, without taking out any loans,” says Hed.
     
  19. @AKAHorace
    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    Without having seen the movie, the predator/prey dichotomy seems to be more about sex than race. Civilization to some extent depends on the suppression of certain male instincts. And modern civilization seems more and more hostile to any expression of maleness in all its gory reality.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    in a hbd way civilization rather depends on the suppression of some female instincts. "Choose the male who is expected to have children who would most likely survive in a Hunger Games with only MMA-style fights allowed scenario and totally ignore IQ and the ability to create wealth and civilization". And because this suppression has been taken away in recent decades I have the impression that masculinity now plays a bigger role than before.
  20. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Very Nietzschean, Steve.

    The only reason “predator” humans can become moral and humane is through subjection to pain and becoming “tamed”, which is a terrible loss, because predators are “superior”.

    The alternative, non psycopathic version has it that predators become civilized and humane through subjection to a higher, more spiritual civilization, like Christianity, which makes them into superior men who are no longer just animals.

    Glad to see you’re a Nietzschean, steve.

    “How the world really works” – huh? in the real world West, predators are not tamed but allowed to run wild and dictate the entire system.

  21. Have you reviewed Angry Birds before and I missed it? If not then I’m surprised you had so little to say about it. It was by far the most Alt Right, shitlordy movie I’ve ever seen. The fact that it had to get made independently and could only get it’s winks and nods across in a kids movie speaks volumes about how hard it is to slip genuinely counter narrative messages into the mainstream.
    Why was there a truck with ‘hamesty international’ on it on the pig island? Somebody is aware. For gods sake it had Muslims/green pigs with beards flying planes! It even had the Europeans waking up that america aka the great eagle had grown fat and lazy and they would have to save themselves – and we’ve just had the brexit vote before america has had a chance to make it’s own anti-immigration voice heard.. There were seriously dozens of shout outs in this movie.

    • Agree: Pseudonymic Handle
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Is the Angry Red(-feathered) Bird by any chance a real estate developer?
    , @CJ

    There were seriously dozens of shout outs in this movie.
     
    I just saw The Angry Birds Movie at my local second-run theatre and I agree with you. Some more of the shout outs are a Coexist bumper sticker in Green Pig City, a Go Green! sign held by a pig in the audience when the Pig King speaks to his subjects, lines at critical moments like "It takes a long time to build up something like this" and "Something like this doesn't just happen by accident", and "Did you notice nobody minded when you moved out of the village" (spoken by the judge to Mr. Red, who had indeed moved out of the hip city center and into the sticks). And then of course there was the eagle - clearly a bald eagle, not one of the many other species found around the world - fat, lazy, narcissistic, and grooving to American disco music.

    Sometimes people on this site see politically incorrect messages that may not really be there, but not this time. That was a sociopolitical commentary thinly disguised as a children's animation movie.
  22. The Who – Helpless Dancer

  23. Slightly off topic but Game of Thrones has morphed into the most pc tv show I’ve ever seen.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    You must not watch much TV if a the most PC show you've ever seen is the one that's all about romanticizing feudalism and ultraviolence, with a cast that's whiter than a Swiss veganism convention. Even the (not really that numerous, by today's standards) warrior woman characters are explained as being physical freaks of nature, having magical powers, or relying on ranged weapons or subterfuge.

    I do admit suppressing a groan when Dany said "the people will choose their own rulers" or whatever.
    , @Yak-15
    Please elaborate.
    , @correctionsofficer
    By todays standards the show is pretty darn not P.C.

    However, I have noticed they buckled to the criticisms of being "too White," by stuffing P.O.C. in later and later seasons.

    For instance, their treatment of Dorne is pretty blackwashing. Dorne in the book is supposed to be similar to medieval Greece but it has lots of black characters thrown in and given a very Arab flair for the show.

    Same thing for the world outside of Westeros that Daenarys story takes place. It seems like the entire point of that location is having an excuse to hire enough people to make their P.O.C. quotas.

    I've noticed a large growth in fiction shows that place in historical or semi-historical settings, and I think it is an excuse in order to keep the actors 90% White. Just throw some "moor" who's the moral paragon into a historical fiction show about medieval England and your're good to go.
  24. @Matthew Kelly

    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.
     
    Well, almost. 99.9999% of the population will never see that clip. Those who will are already aware.

    I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema. Such a huge, untapped market.

    There is a vicious cycle at work: As lamestream pop culture becomes more and more worthless, more and more folks tune out from it. In the end, only the true believers and the droolers (aren’t they one and the same?) are able to stomach the dreck being churned out by the Hollywood nightmare machine. So the “creative masterminds” dumb down the product even more. It’s a race to the bottom of the cesspool.

    I haven’t been to the movies in years. So many of the films being crapped out these days are so full of PC tripe that I simply can’t bring myself to watch them, let alone to pay $15 for the “privilege” of doing so. The urge to run gagging from the theater is too strong.

    As I’ve said before, I’m glad that I was born when I was. Think of the bullshit that a kid entering kindergarten this fall might absorb over the next 12 years. It boggles the mind.

    Have we reached peak bullshit? Will President Trump drag us back to sanity? Maybe. But it’s a long shot – even if he does win, and keep his word, he’ll still have to fight the bastards every step of the way. And, while the grown-ups slug it out in the marketplace of ideas, the kiddies are always a captive audience for the leftist propagandists.

    Most of my public schooling was in the ’90s, so I was forced to swallow more than my fair share of steaming turds as part of my cultural indoctrination. But I had it good compared to those who came after me.

  25. @rvg
    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    Aslan killed lots of evil creatures in the battle at the end of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

    And the bears were going to eat Goldilocks until she escaped.

  26. I liked Brer Fox in Song Of The South. He was so frenzied and crazy, it’s a shame that movie isn’t seen by more people.

  27. @Yep
    Slightly off topic but Game of Thrones has morphed into the most pc tv show I've ever seen.

    You must not watch much TV if a the most PC show you’ve ever seen is the one that’s all about romanticizing feudalism and ultraviolence, with a cast that’s whiter than a Swiss veganism convention. Even the (not really that numerous, by today’s standards) warrior woman characters are explained as being physical freaks of nature, having magical powers, or relying on ranged weapons or subterfuge.

    I do admit suppressing a groan when Dany said “the people will choose their own rulers” or whatever.

  28. @MC
    Without having seen the movie, the predator/prey dichotomy seems to be more about sex than race. Civilization to some extent depends on the suppression of certain male instincts. And modern civilization seems more and more hostile to any expression of maleness in all its gory reality.

    in a hbd way civilization rather depends on the suppression of some female instincts. “Choose the male who is expected to have children who would most likely survive in a Hunger Games with only MMA-style fights allowed scenario and totally ignore IQ and the ability to create wealth and civilization”. And because this suppression has been taken away in recent decades I have the impression that masculinity now plays a bigger role than before.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Fess up, now--you've been reading Chateau Heartiste and/or Return of Kings, haven't you? Female sexuality also has its darker side.
    , @K.
    MMA is a product of wealth and civilization. Even chimpanzees have the good sense to improvise weapons.
  29. @snorlax
    All attempts suffer from the same thing. Can't get funding (for a combination of ideological reasons and anticipated failure), can't get quality actors, and even if you can solve the first two problems it'll be savaged by the critics.

    The Passion of the Christ.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    If the unusually high Hispanic support for Dubya had any truth to it, I strongly suspect it had a lot more to do with Mel Gibson than Karl Rove's immigration policy. Most Hispanics I knew saw it multiple times.

    Anyway, he ain't making any more movies.
  30. Abe says: • Website
    @rvg
    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner

    Ok, ok, I see what’s going on here. 20+ comments in and no one has yet hit this softball out of the yard. Guess it falls on me to play the nerd for this thread:

    “The Lord of the Eagles would not take them anywhere near where men lived. “They would shoot at us with their great bows of yew,” he said, “for they would think we were after their sheep. And at other times they would be right.”

    • Replies: @K.
    While your playing nerd, would you also please come up with a good estimate of the size of a prepubescent hobbit and then speculate as to what percentage of childhood mortality in the Shire would be accounted for by foxes, weasels, predatory birds, and really big rats?
  31. @newrouter
    @ 1974

    "I am a man who looks after the pigs
    Usually I get along okay.
    I am man who reveals all he digs,
    Should be more careful what I say.

    I'm getting put down,
    I'm getting pushed round,
    I'm being beaten every day.
    My life's fading,
    But things are changing,
    I'm not gonna sit and weep again."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oP4yP3-I8Tk

    Best. Album. Ever.

    • Agree: gruff, Travis
    • Replies: @gruff
    And Daltrey was pro Brexit.
  32. Abe says: • Website

    Lagertha, where you at girl! Anyone else find it amazing that after creating Nokia, then watching it be slowly crushed to death by the tech giants Samsung and Apple, the tough nerds of Finland blithely went on to create Angry Birds, which when all the merchandising and rights are thrown in, brings more money into Finland than the combined non-oil GDP of sub-Saharan Africa?

  33. @Anonym
    The Passion of the Christ.

    If the unusually high Hispanic support for Dubya had any truth to it, I strongly suspect it had a lot more to do with Mel Gibson than Karl Rove’s immigration policy. Most Hispanics I knew saw it multiple times.

    Anyway, he ain’t making any more movies.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I saw a preview awhile ago for an upcoming Mel Gibson movie in the "Taken" genre about a father fighting a motorcycle gang to get his daughter back. The preview looked okay.
  34. Still, after decades of questionable and/or downright racist on-screen depictions of people of color

    Of course, decades! Why only last year there was . . .er. . .OK. Well in 2014 there was. . .um. . . then back in . . er, um . . . anyhow, decades I tell ya, decades!

    • Replies: @Brohemius
    I guess those "decades" of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born. The first TV show I remember which had a prominent black character was called "Julia". I can't remember the details, but she was a flawless princess. All that racism must have happened just before I was born. Can anyone give me an example of a racist TV show? Just curious. I guess Eisenhower must have put an end to all those "racist depictions." What a great guy he must have been.
  35. @snorlax
    If the unusually high Hispanic support for Dubya had any truth to it, I strongly suspect it had a lot more to do with Mel Gibson than Karl Rove's immigration policy. Most Hispanics I knew saw it multiple times.

    Anyway, he ain't making any more movies.

    I saw a preview awhile ago for an upcoming Mel Gibson movie in the “Taken” genre about a father fighting a motorcycle gang to get his daughter back. The preview looked okay.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I wonder if Mel was offered the first Taken script and turned it down.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Isn't there an Easter sequel to Passion of the Christ in the works?
    , @HA
    He's also a producer/art-director on The Bombing and the director of Hacksaw Ridge, both of which come out just this year. Seems like a pretty full docket.
  36. @Whiskey
    Given that: most of the movie and TV revenues now come from overseas and in particular, CHINA, and given that leaving money on the table with PC can have serious consequences for studios that are totally hit-driven (Frozen created $1 billion in merchandise revenue two years after showing in theaters) ...

    How long can PC reign supreme when Chinese audiences and critically, the government, demand un-PC content?

    The globalists forgot that globalism is defacto, the Chinese government sets the media content rules. Just ask Lady Gaga, banned from China for meeting the Dalai Lama.

    Just ask Lady Gaga, banned from China for meeting the Dalai Lama.

    Lucky China then.

  37. @Steve Sailer
    I saw a preview awhile ago for an upcoming Mel Gibson movie in the "Taken" genre about a father fighting a motorcycle gang to get his daughter back. The preview looked okay.

    I wonder if Mel was offered the first Taken script and turned it down.

  38. @Anonymous
    "A German Woman Called LBC In Tears Over The Abuse She Says She’s Received Since The Brexit Vote

    “I’m so scared. I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said."

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/victoriasanusi/a-german-woman-called-lbc-in-tears-over-the-abuse-she-says-s

    A German woman called James O’Brien’s LBC radio show in tears on Tuesday as she recalled the xenophobic abuse she said she has received since it was announced the UK had voted to leave the EU.

    The caller, who said her name was Karen, told O’Brien she moved to the UK in 1973 alongside her late husband, who was a GP.

    Through sobs, Karen told O’Brien that dog excrement had been thrown at her window and that people she knows have said they don’t want to be friends with her any more.

    “I haven’t been out the house in three days because I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I live in a middle-class area and the people who are doing it [making her feel unwelcome] are middle-class pensioners. I don’t understand what is going on.”

    Karen said that since the Brexit vote, people have made her feel like she needs to “go back to Germany”, but added that she no longer had friends there. “I’m so scared,” she added. “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    The woman said she had contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, who she claims told her that she should “understand people are frustrated”.

    She also told the radio host about another incident she had heard of: “My friend Rosemary has a grandson who was beaten up because he has a foreign grandma.”
     

    This story smells strongly of hoax or psychosis.

  39. That three-humped camel joke shouldn’t be in a movie marketed towards children. I’m so sick and tired of Twenty-First century animated films made for and by jerk-off adults with no consideration for what’s appropriate.

  40. @Erik Sieven
    in a hbd way civilization rather depends on the suppression of some female instincts. "Choose the male who is expected to have children who would most likely survive in a Hunger Games with only MMA-style fights allowed scenario and totally ignore IQ and the ability to create wealth and civilization". And because this suppression has been taken away in recent decades I have the impression that masculinity now plays a bigger role than before.

    Fess up, now–you’ve been reading Chateau Heartiste and/or Return of Kings, haven’t you? Female sexuality also has its darker side.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    by now this is pretty much the the standard point of view among hbd-people, isn´t it?
  41. @snorlax
    All attempts suffer from the same thing. Can't get funding (for a combination of ideological reasons and anticipated failure), can't get quality actors, and even if you can solve the first two problems it'll be savaged by the critics.

    http://www.hs.fi/kulttuuri/a1462362924166

    Hed was looking for a major Hollywood deal as early as 2010. However, as he puts it, “the commercial terms didn’t match”. According to Hed, Hollywood wanted too much control, so Rovio decided to make the film themselves.

    Rovio made the film in an exceptional manner: the company funded the entire production. For this reason, its success is crucial to the company. The film is by far the largest project in the history of the company.

    Its production cost USD 73 million, or around EUR 65 million, exclusive of the cost of production and distribution, which Rovio estimates at more than EUR 100 million. Making films, particularly animated ones, is labour-intensive. Most of the budget for the film consisted of fees.

    “We funded the film on our own, without taking out any loans,” says Hed.

  42. Another recent movie that skirted the bounds of PC at times was The Jungle Book. The tiger, Shere Khan, although the villain, is in many ways a sympathetic character. He has a genuine reason to hate men and in his own way, he tries to tell the other animals that admitting someone as different as Mowgli into the jungle is a really bad idea. There was a moment after Mowgli inadvertantly starts a forest fire, that I thought Shere Khan might actually turn the other animals against him–a well-done scene where Shere Khan says, “No, I think they’re worried about something else,” indicating the forest fire. Shere Khan dies and PC is preserved, but I wonder if some screenplay author didn’t have a secret “Outcome B.”

    • Replies: @SFG
    It was based on a story by Rudyard Kipling, who was anything but PC (by modern standards).
    , @Keypusher
    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.
  43. @jon

    The birds heroically retrieve their eggs and go back to their own island, and don’t live happily ever after with the pigs at all.
     
    I had a hilariously iSteve moment the other day while reading the comments on a very left-wing blog. Someone raised exactly the point that Steve did, which is that Angry Birds doesn't seem at all pro-immigration, and that was, of course, quite upsetting. But then it was pointed out that the story might actually be read as anti-colonialism, which is, of course, entirely different than anti-immigration. It was agreed by all that the movie was, thus, obviously first rate.

    (punching) immigrating up versus (punching) immigrating down.

  44. @whorefinder
    Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at it's monkey-fishing excuse for journalistic "thought."

    Those folks are so deeply-programmed it's a wonder they don't occasionally have a glitch in their programming and start spouting out "Hope and Change! Yes We can!" or "Impeach Nixon!" on occasion when caught without anything to say, necessitating a reboot by Master Soros.

    Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at…

    That’s all you needed to say right there…brilliant.

  45. @Dave Pinsen
    I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.

    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game.

    My grandson had mastered the iPhone and iPad interface at 18 months and was a world-class Angry Birds player at four years of age. I don’t usually play video games (perhaps no more than 10 in my 68 years). So, my four-year old grandson had to show me how to play one Angry Birds episode in particular. “Grandpa, you don’t go through the rock … you go under the water (to reach the piggies)”.

    BTW: My grandson is now five and really enjoyed the Angry Birds movie. I really enjoyed its non-PC message about the dangers of immigration by alien peoples and cultures. The movie would have been a good lead-in for BREXIT.

  46. Disney has neutered Pixar.

    Pixar used to slip realtalk, anti-PC themes into its wildly successful films. My favorite is 2004’s “The Incredibles.” The whole film rails against equalism and PC. “Wall-E” railed against fat and sedentary people.

    Would either film be made under Disney’s control today? I doubt it.

    I fear there are darker forces at work within Disney…

    • Replies: @Keypusher
    I think Pixar has neutered Pixar. Literally. They used to run a list of all the babies born in the course of making one of their movies; they called them production babies. They've gotten rid of that. Instead in Finding Dory they had a note thanking their families. And of course the message of Finding Dory is that your family consists of whoever you think is your family.
    , @Ivy
    There are little signs in various movies to show that someone is slipping in images. For example, the Train Sequence clip has a sign reference to Fishtown, likely from Charles Murray's Belmont and Fishtown book Coming Apart. Might as well speed by that working class decay.

    In movies, people seem to want to go somewhere, and come from somewhere, on a train, whether in Harry Potter or The Hunger Games. Perhaps that is indicative of the desire or fantasy to move, anywhere, rather than get one's life derailed.

  47. @whorefinder
    Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at it's monkey-fishing excuse for journalistic "thought."

    Those folks are so deeply-programmed it's a wonder they don't occasionally have a glitch in their programming and start spouting out "Hope and Change! Yes We can!" or "Impeach Nixon!" on occasion when caught without anything to say, necessitating a reboot by Master Soros.

    Nixon is long since forgotten by your average liberal, unless ze were around in the 70s. I remember quite a few Bush jokes though.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    To the Left, it's always 1968.

    That said, plenty of the old guard boomer Left uses Nixon as a boogeyman when Hitler won't do.

    Yeah, "Bush is stupidHitler" is another thing I expect their mouths to sputter out.
  48. @Diversity Heretic
    Another recent movie that skirted the bounds of PC at times was The Jungle Book. The tiger, Shere Khan, although the villain, is in many ways a sympathetic character. He has a genuine reason to hate men and in his own way, he tries to tell the other animals that admitting someone as different as Mowgli into the jungle is a really bad idea. There was a moment after Mowgli inadvertantly starts a forest fire, that I thought Shere Khan might actually turn the other animals against him--a well-done scene where Shere Khan says, "No, I think they're worried about something else," indicating the forest fire. Shere Khan dies and PC is preserved, but I wonder if some screenplay author didn't have a secret "Outcome B."

    It was based on a story by Rudyard Kipling, who was anything but PC (by modern standards).

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Very loosely based on Kipling's original.
    , @Bill Jones
    THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON
    by Rudyard Kipling


    It was not part of their blood,
    It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
    They were icy -- willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
    Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
    Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
    It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
    It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
    When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.
  49. I guess I’m pointing out the obvious, but hasn’t it always been the case that kids like animal stories
    (around the world, really) and that the animals in the stories behave more like metaphors for human traits or, in the modern era, groups or personality types, than like actual animals? It’s one of these cross-cultural human tropes that work for deep evo-psych reasons I admit I don’t understand (never cared that much for animal stories even as a kid), but that seem to be true everywhere. It’s like asking why romance stories never show the heroine growing old and fighting with her kids, or eventually dying of cancer or heart disease.

  50. “And why, in the scene that get the biggest laughs, are all the clerks at the Van Nuys Department of Motor Vehicles (pretty much the Van Nuys DMV I go to and where Homer Simpson’s sister-in-laws Patty and Selma work) sloths? ”

    Are Patty and Selma as nice in real life as they appear on the show?

    BTW it looks like you have a platoon of secret agents working for Disney, but they have not yet acquired high positions of authority to ensure their scenes aren’t cut from the final film.

  51. @Yep
    Slightly off topic but Game of Thrones has morphed into the most pc tv show I've ever seen.

    Please elaborate.

    • Replies: @Yep
    Admittedly I don't watch a lot of tv so maybe I'm out of the loop on how bad the pc conformity is on other shows compared to Thrones. My complaints about GOT are all the girl power crap, the slavery angle involving the Targaryen girl, the trashing of the show's fake religion via a completely invented lgbt angle that isn't present in the books, the attempt to normalize incest (yeah, that's what it is), and the "black washing" mentioned by another commenter. Brienne of Tarth beats the Hound in a fight? Come on! That's almost as bad as Scarlett johanson beating up several men the size of pro football players in the new Captain America movie. And oh btw, captain America is clearly gay in that movie.
  52. @Lurker

    Still, after decades of questionable and/or downright racist on-screen depictions of people of color
     
    Of course, decades! Why only last year there was . . .er. . .OK. Well in 2014 there was. . .um. . . then back in . . er, um . . . anyhow, decades I tell ya, decades!

    I guess those “decades” of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born. The first TV show I remember which had a prominent black character was called “Julia”. I can’t remember the details, but she was a flawless princess. All that racism must have happened just before I was born. Can anyone give me an example of a racist TV show? Just curious. I guess Eisenhower must have put an end to all those “racist depictions.” What a great guy he must have been.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    I think that you'd have to go back to the 1940s to find "racist" depictions. The animation Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows and there are some Pluto cartoons that feature a black mammy.

    I'm kind of surprised Uncle Ben's and Aunt Jemima still feature black mascots.
    , @SPMoore8
    I don't think there's a been a racist depiction of black folks in movies since the 1940's. As far as TV goes, "Amos 'n' Andy" from the '50's was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than "The Jeffersons."

    But this is yet another example of the "Before you were born, remember kids?" (Carlin) mentality of the grievance industry, that has to keep reaching into the past to find an obscure object to feed their persecution mania.

    , @CJ
    I guess those “decades” of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born.

    You're on to something that has been discussed here before, but I don't have a name for it. For about 60 years young people have been told that right up to yesterday women and minorities were hunted for sport. Old people have been demonized as bigots. I was born in the early 1950s and grew up in an isolated socially conservative area, but even there we had teachers who were folk song liberals. Since then I've observed succeeding generations get indoctrinated.
  53. @Moses
    Disney has neutered Pixar.

    Pixar used to slip realtalk, anti-PC themes into its wildly successful films. My favorite is 2004's "The Incredibles." The whole film rails against equalism and PC. "Wall-E" railed against fat and sedentary people.

    Would either film be made under Disney's control today? I doubt it.

    I fear there are darker forces at work within Disney...

    I think Pixar has neutered Pixar. Literally. They used to run a list of all the babies born in the course of making one of their movies; they called them production babies. They’ve gotten rid of that. Instead in Finding Dory they had a note thanking their families. And of course the message of Finding Dory is that your family consists of whoever you think is your family.

  54. @Diversity Heretic
    Another recent movie that skirted the bounds of PC at times was The Jungle Book. The tiger, Shere Khan, although the villain, is in many ways a sympathetic character. He has a genuine reason to hate men and in his own way, he tries to tell the other animals that admitting someone as different as Mowgli into the jungle is a really bad idea. There was a moment after Mowgli inadvertantly starts a forest fire, that I thought Shere Khan might actually turn the other animals against him--a well-done scene where Shere Khan says, "No, I think they're worried about something else," indicating the forest fire. Shere Khan dies and PC is preserved, but I wonder if some screenplay author didn't have a secret "Outcome B."

    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.

    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Point taken; and Shere Khan dies; but there were a few un-PC moments for those who could spot them.
    , @cloudbuster
    An ending opposite to that of the old animated Disney version, and of the Kipling original, of course. Because PC.
    , @J1234

    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.
     
    Good point. I'm surprised, however, that they kept the "I Want to Be Like You" song in the new movie, which came across as very un-PC in the old 1960's movie. But I guess the reason the old version would be so touchy for liberals today is because Louis Prima made the head ape sound like a stupid, dancing, self-absorbed black guy. The new version doesn't convey that so much. Disney wasn't trying to program children back in the 60's like they're trying to do today. Most other Disney movies from that era don't seem to have any agenda other than telling a story in a way that might be interesting to kids.

    Steve said [of Zootopia]:

    The movie is still quite decent, although it’s painful to think about how good it could have been if that much talent had been given free rein to follow their instincts without PC being given a chokehold on their creativity.
     
    Or a shock collar. John Lasseter, true to Hollywood form, owns a winery and vintage classic car collection. I wonder if he has any guard dogs protecting his vast and valuable property? If so, I wonder if he'll be replacing them with guard bunnies? Because, you know, who's to say that a bunny can't be whatever it want's to be? Or that it can't be just as tough as a Doberman?

    It's weird to think that The Wizard of Oz, as produced in the late 1930's, would be heavily critiqued today, if not banned. Not because of racial stereotypes, but merely because the overriding message of the movie is, "There's no place like home," where people look, act and function like you do. The Scarecrow and Tin Man were lovely people, but Dorothy was more than willing to leave them to be among her own.
  55. @SFG
    It was based on a story by Rudyard Kipling, who was anything but PC (by modern standards).

    Very loosely based on Kipling’s original.

  56. @Brohemius
    I guess those "decades" of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born. The first TV show I remember which had a prominent black character was called "Julia". I can't remember the details, but she was a flawless princess. All that racism must have happened just before I was born. Can anyone give me an example of a racist TV show? Just curious. I guess Eisenhower must have put an end to all those "racist depictions." What a great guy he must have been.

    I think that you’d have to go back to the 1940s to find “racist” depictions. The animation Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows and there are some Pluto cartoons that feature a black mammy.

    I’m kind of surprised Uncle Ben’s and Aunt Jemima still feature black mascots.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows"

    But they're cool, clever crows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v2exWrsGOc

  57. @Keypusher
    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.

    Point taken; and Shere Khan dies; but there were a few un-PC moments for those who could spot them.

  58. @whorefinder

    I wonder if Angry Birds will be the last movie based on a smartphone game. When the movie got the green light, Angry Birds was the top game in the app store. Now the highest-ranked Angry Birds game on iOS is at #41.
     
    Although rarely super-successful, movies based on video games have been made for about twenty-five years (Super Mario Bros). Hollywood will steal, ahem, be inspired by a popular idea from anywhere, and since video games haven't lost popularity over all, Hollywood will continue to try to make films out of them.

    (Even long-dead franchises will get the Hollywood movie/TV show; The Lone Ranger, anyone? Studios take their ownership rights very seriously and are constantly trying to use it to their advantage or hang on for dear life until they can find someone to do something with it. Remember that it took nearly eighty years for Universal to sell the rights to Oswald the Lucky Rabbit back to Disney, despite doing nothing with the character since owning it.)

    Like with comic book movies, studios will need to develop a template for making them profitable. It took until X-Men (2000) and Spiderman (2002) for the template to be set for superhero films; yes, they'd had hits before (like Christopher Reeve's Superman, Tim Burton's Batman, and the TV version of The Incredible Hulk) but none of those set a formula for making money, as the many failed movies and TV shows along the way showed.


    The other issue with it is that, if, as Steve says, the movie is geared toward very young kids, those kid are probably too young to have enjoyed the game
     
    Eh, a movie can feed kids into a previous comic book/show/video game. If Angry Birds's designers were smart, they'dve had some new tie in games to the film, making the animation seem like the films. The Robert Downey Iron Man sent a lot of people back into looking at the character's history in the comics and made the previous-dusty old character more popular.

    And Universal only gave up Oswald so they could get Al Michaels from Disney.

  59. @BenKenobi
    Best. Album. Ever.

    And Daltrey was pro Brexit.

  60. @Keypusher
    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.

    An ending opposite to that of the old animated Disney version, and of the Kipling original, of course. Because PC.

  61. @Whiskey
    Given that: most of the movie and TV revenues now come from overseas and in particular, CHINA, and given that leaving money on the table with PC can have serious consequences for studios that are totally hit-driven (Frozen created $1 billion in merchandise revenue two years after showing in theaters) ...

    How long can PC reign supreme when Chinese audiences and critically, the government, demand un-PC content?

    The globalists forgot that globalism is defacto, the Chinese government sets the media content rules. Just ask Lady Gaga, banned from China for meeting the Dalai Lama.

    wait a sec. These kids’ movies generate merchandise revenue for years because that’s often the only stuff that Target sells. when I go to buy shorts or a swimsuit for my little one and there’s the bright, happy Disney colors (the movie behind it doesn’t matter), guess what? That’s what he or she wants. Let’s see, a Star Wars towel, or a plain one?

    Merchandising, feh.

  62. @Matthew Kelly

    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.
     
    Well, almost. 99.9999% of the population will never see that clip. Those who will are already aware.

    I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema. Such a huge, untapped market.

    “I am hungering for a Fox News (for lack of a better analogy) of cinema.”

    Its not a great analogy because Fox was producing movies before they started a broadcast network.

  63. @Brohemius
    I guess those "decades" of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born. The first TV show I remember which had a prominent black character was called "Julia". I can't remember the details, but she was a flawless princess. All that racism must have happened just before I was born. Can anyone give me an example of a racist TV show? Just curious. I guess Eisenhower must have put an end to all those "racist depictions." What a great guy he must have been.

    I don’t think there’s a been a racist depiction of black folks in movies since the 1940’s. As far as TV goes, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” from the ’50’s was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than “The Jeffersons.”

    But this is yet another example of the “Before you were born, remember kids?” (Carlin) mentality of the grievance industry, that has to keep reaching into the past to find an obscure object to feed their persecution mania.

    • Replies: @peterike

    All that racism must have happened just before I was born.

     

    I reckon "Good Times" and "Sanford and Son" are now considered racist because they show blacks in the ghetto. "All in the Family" was racist because it showed you a racist, even if he was routinely mocked as such. Every show ever that didn't have a regular, stellar black character is racist because obviously. Like "Friends" or "Seinfeld" (though "Seinfeld" has a ((((protective halo)))) around it).

    Every show with a strong black man is racist if it doesn't also have a strong black woman.

    Every show with a strong black woman is racist if it doesn't also have a strong black man.

    Every show with a black man getting it on with a white woman (which is pretty much every show) is racist because white woman.

    See how easy? Racism: it's all about how you play the game.

    , @tbraton
    "As far as TV goes, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” from the ’50′s was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than “The Jeffersons.” "

    I totally agree. I was a child at the time and thought the show was hilarious. Rather than feel contempt for the characters, I had a rather innocent affection for all the characters, and I was heartbroken when the show was suddenly cancelled. I thought all the black actors were first rate. BTW "Amos 'n' Andy," as you probably know, originally started on radio with the main characters white actors feigning black accents. It was enormously popular, but the Kingfish character gave Huey Long his popular nickname of "Kingfish."
  64. @whorefinder
    Slate exists to offer Salon something to aspire to, and for the rest of us to laugh at it's monkey-fishing excuse for journalistic "thought."

    Those folks are so deeply-programmed it's a wonder they don't occasionally have a glitch in their programming and start spouting out "Hope and Change! Yes We can!" or "Impeach Nixon!" on occasion when caught without anything to say, necessitating a reboot by Master Soros.

    “Ze”.

    Misspelling or new gender neutral term?
    If so, what is the singular of ze ?

  65. @Anonymous
    "A German Woman Called LBC In Tears Over The Abuse She Says She’s Received Since The Brexit Vote

    “I’m so scared. I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said."

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/victoriasanusi/a-german-woman-called-lbc-in-tears-over-the-abuse-she-says-s

    A German woman called James O’Brien’s LBC radio show in tears on Tuesday as she recalled the xenophobic abuse she said she has received since it was announced the UK had voted to leave the EU.

    The caller, who said her name was Karen, told O’Brien she moved to the UK in 1973 alongside her late husband, who was a GP.

    Through sobs, Karen told O’Brien that dog excrement had been thrown at her window and that people she knows have said they don’t want to be friends with her any more.

    “I haven’t been out the house in three days because I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I live in a middle-class area and the people who are doing it [making her feel unwelcome] are middle-class pensioners. I don’t understand what is going on.”

    Karen said that since the Brexit vote, people have made her feel like she needs to “go back to Germany”, but added that she no longer had friends there. “I’m so scared,” she added. “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    The woman said she had contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, who she claims told her that she should “understand people are frustrated”.

    She also told the radio host about another incident she had heard of: “My friend Rosemary has a grandson who was beaten up because he has a foreign grandma.”
     

    Anonymous, I guess the answer for Rosemary’s beaten grandson is to have him flee to Honduras and from there to Mexico and then into the States. Obama will have his back as a refugee.

  66. Well, I don’t know about the lions laying down with the lambs, but in Oakland, apparently 30 police officers managed to lay down with one stray pussy…..close enough for a metaphor?

  67. Punitive shock behavior modification technique (an aversive) is used in real life at Massachusetts’s Judge Rotenberg Educational Center.

    The Center made the news in 2007 when a former inmate “prank called” staff on duty and convinced them to shock current patients while he waited.

    Back when I used to lurk FARK threads, this comment by “Doctor Funkenstein” was legendary:

    What kind of dumbasses do they have working there? Doesn’t sound like much of a prank.

    [ring, ring, ring]

    School Guy> Hello. This is Tard Shockin’ School. How can I help you?

    Prankster> Hello. Would you please shock some tards?

    School Guy> I need proper authorization for that.

    Prankster> OK, I’m the boss. Now get to shocking.

    School Guy> Right away, sir.

    Tard> I like pie…rawr…[ZAP]

  68. Ivy says:
    @Moses
    Disney has neutered Pixar.

    Pixar used to slip realtalk, anti-PC themes into its wildly successful films. My favorite is 2004's "The Incredibles." The whole film rails against equalism and PC. "Wall-E" railed against fat and sedentary people.

    Would either film be made under Disney's control today? I doubt it.

    I fear there are darker forces at work within Disney...

    There are little signs in various movies to show that someone is slipping in images. For example, the Train Sequence clip has a sign reference to Fishtown, likely from Charles Murray’s Belmont and Fishtown book Coming Apart. Might as well speed by that working class decay.

    In movies, people seem to want to go somewhere, and come from somewhere, on a train, whether in Harry Potter or The Hunger Games. Perhaps that is indicative of the desire or fantasy to move, anywhere, rather than get one’s life derailed.

    • Replies: @whorefinder
    The way anti-Left messages are occasionally slipped into films reminds me of when the Left slipped in sexual messages or marxist messages into films in the Hays Code era. Nowadays they have the Marxist Code.

    It's interesting that the most anti-Lefty stuff comes from animation, especially Pixar, who's head I believe donates a bunch to Pepperdine. The only thing they don't touch is feminism, but race and affirmative action are up for grabs many times (e.g. The Incredibles is an attack on the equalist mentality and affirmative action).

  69. @SPMoore8
    I don't think there's a been a racist depiction of black folks in movies since the 1940's. As far as TV goes, "Amos 'n' Andy" from the '50's was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than "The Jeffersons."

    But this is yet another example of the "Before you were born, remember kids?" (Carlin) mentality of the grievance industry, that has to keep reaching into the past to find an obscure object to feed their persecution mania.

    All that racism must have happened just before I was born.

    I reckon “Good Times” and “Sanford and Son” are now considered racist because they show blacks in the ghetto. “All in the Family” was racist because it showed you a racist, even if he was routinely mocked as such. Every show ever that didn’t have a regular, stellar black character is racist because obviously. Like “Friends” or “Seinfeld” (though “Seinfeld” has a ((((protective halo)))) around it).

    Every show with a strong black man is racist if it doesn’t also have a strong black woman.

    Every show with a strong black woman is racist if it doesn’t also have a strong black man.

    Every show with a black man getting it on with a white woman (which is pretty much every show) is racist because white woman.

    See how easy? Racism: it’s all about how you play the game.

  70. @Yep
    Slightly off topic but Game of Thrones has morphed into the most pc tv show I've ever seen.

    By todays standards the show is pretty darn not P.C.

    However, I have noticed they buckled to the criticisms of being “too White,” by stuffing P.O.C. in later and later seasons.

    For instance, their treatment of Dorne is pretty blackwashing. Dorne in the book is supposed to be similar to medieval Greece but it has lots of black characters thrown in and given a very Arab flair for the show.

    Same thing for the world outside of Westeros that Daenarys story takes place. It seems like the entire point of that location is having an excuse to hire enough people to make their P.O.C. quotas.

    I’ve noticed a large growth in fiction shows that place in historical or semi-historical settings, and I think it is an excuse in order to keep the actors 90% White. Just throw some “moor” who’s the moral paragon into a historical fiction show about medieval England and your’re good to go.

  71. @Keypusher
    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.

    Yes, but the movie ends with the boy rejecting the human village and returning to live with the wolves (who are now lead by a female). Quite PC.

    Good point. I’m surprised, however, that they kept the “I Want to Be Like You” song in the new movie, which came across as very un-PC in the old 1960’s movie. But I guess the reason the old version would be so touchy for liberals today is because Louis Prima made the head ape sound like a stupid, dancing, self-absorbed black guy. The new version doesn’t convey that so much. Disney wasn’t trying to program children back in the 60’s like they’re trying to do today. Most other Disney movies from that era don’t seem to have any agenda other than telling a story in a way that might be interesting to kids.

    Steve said [of Zootopia]:

    The movie is still quite decent, although it’s painful to think about how good it could have been if that much talent had been given free rein to follow their instincts without PC being given a chokehold on their creativity.

    Or a shock collar. John Lasseter, true to Hollywood form, owns a winery and vintage classic car collection. I wonder if he has any guard dogs protecting his vast and valuable property? If so, I wonder if he’ll be replacing them with guard bunnies? Because, you know, who’s to say that a bunny can’t be whatever it want’s to be? Or that it can’t be just as tough as a Doberman?

    It’s weird to think that The Wizard of Oz, as produced in the late 1930’s, would be heavily critiqued today, if not banned. Not because of racial stereotypes, but merely because the overriding message of the movie is, “There’s no place like home,” where people look, act and function like you do. The Scarecrow and Tin Man were lovely people, but Dorothy was more than willing to leave them to be among her own.

  72. @SPMoore8
    I don't think there's a been a racist depiction of black folks in movies since the 1940's. As far as TV goes, "Amos 'n' Andy" from the '50's was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than "The Jeffersons."

    But this is yet another example of the "Before you were born, remember kids?" (Carlin) mentality of the grievance industry, that has to keep reaching into the past to find an obscure object to feed their persecution mania.

    “As far as TV goes, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” from the ’50′s was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than “The Jeffersons.” ”

    I totally agree. I was a child at the time and thought the show was hilarious. Rather than feel contempt for the characters, I had a rather innocent affection for all the characters, and I was heartbroken when the show was suddenly cancelled. I thought all the black actors were first rate. BTW “Amos ‘n’ Andy,” as you probably know, originally started on radio with the main characters white actors feigning black accents. It was enormously popular, but the Kingfish character gave Huey Long his popular nickname of “Kingfish.”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    tbraton, No chance to hear the old Jack Benny Show with his "man", Rochester. And thank you. Did not know Amos and Andy started on radio with a white cast in, well, vocal blackface.
  73. @AKAHorace
    I watched the link to the taming party. Pretty intense. Something incredible has slipped through the system.

    I never knew bears believed in circumcision.

    Agreed that this would make for a major movie about what is gained and lost by suppressing aspects of unfettered masculinity. The dam holding back the flood of red pill knowledge has to let some through the floodgates every once in a while, or it cracks and dissolves.

  74. @SFG
    Nixon is long since forgotten by your average liberal, unless ze were around in the 70s. I remember quite a few Bush jokes though.

    To the Left, it’s always 1968.

    That said, plenty of the old guard boomer Left uses Nixon as a boogeyman when Hitler won’t do.

    Yeah, “Bush is stupidHitler” is another thing I expect their mouths to sputter out.

  75. Brohemius, the establishment never vilified blacks the way it has been vilifying whites for a generation now. Prominent whites didn’t say stuff about “hideously black” neighborhoods (that also happened to be perfectly civilized and law-abiding) the way they do about whites today.

    These talking animals are stand-ins for people. CS Lewis’s talking lion was a stand-in for Jesus, IIRC.

    I don’t recall any divine origins for the rest of the talking animals, who got along pretty well. On the other hand, there were “bad” talking species, like wolves, IIRC.

    Aslan was Jesus. The whole point was that he could easily eat all the people who opposed him, but instead, he sacrificed his own life to save Edmund. That’s a frickin children’s book. I read that in elementary school and I got it, how did you not?

    Zootopia is a kids’ movie.

    Aslan killed lots of evil creatures in the battle at the end of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.

    Christ was resurrected, and is supposed to come back “with the sword,” if you follow.

  76. That three-humped camel joke shouldn’t be in a movie marketed towards children. I’m so sick and tired of Twenty-First century animated films made for and by jerk-off adults with no consideration for what’s appropriate.

    Animators are kind of famous among artists for being sick twists. Not that I have any idea who writes the jokes at Pixar; I kind of doubt it’s the artists.

  77. @Ivy
    There are little signs in various movies to show that someone is slipping in images. For example, the Train Sequence clip has a sign reference to Fishtown, likely from Charles Murray's Belmont and Fishtown book Coming Apart. Might as well speed by that working class decay.

    In movies, people seem to want to go somewhere, and come from somewhere, on a train, whether in Harry Potter or The Hunger Games. Perhaps that is indicative of the desire or fantasy to move, anywhere, rather than get one's life derailed.

    The way anti-Left messages are occasionally slipped into films reminds me of when the Left slipped in sexual messages or marxist messages into films in the Hays Code era. Nowadays they have the Marxist Code.

    It’s interesting that the most anti-Lefty stuff comes from animation, especially Pixar, who’s head I believe donates a bunch to Pepperdine. The only thing they don’t touch is feminism, but race and affirmative action are up for grabs many times (e.g. The Incredibles is an attack on the equalist mentality and affirmative action).

  78. @Diversity Heretic
    Fess up, now--you've been reading Chateau Heartiste and/or Return of Kings, haven't you? Female sexuality also has its darker side.

    by now this is pretty much the the standard point of view among hbd-people, isn´t it?

  79. I think the cover story is that audiences want movies that pretend to believe women can out-muscle men – to hell with upper-body strength – and drag queens belong in the same bathroom as kindergarten-age girls. But I’ll just bet it was studio execs and other hanger-on suits who peppered the film with these universally despised, conventional-wisdom fairy tales. The average American (I’m one) has as much regard for the New York Times prayer book as I do for modern art, Israel, and cockroaches.

  80. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Knocking the [this state] Dept. of Motor Vehicles is getting to be a lazy joke, handed down from generation to generation of comedy hack. I deal with CA & county agencies’ branches from Arcata to Zzyzx Springs and the DMV’s not the worst by any stretch– N.B. with appointment to get a shorter wait + doing as much of it online as possible. The only halfway-hellish aspect results more from the vibrant, informed, literate motorists mobbed out front than from the office hands’ efficiency (which could be better due to the cheap-laugh criticism singling them out, but more likely it’s the computerization w/ bar code scanners). There’s a reason CA politicians view DMV fees as the perfect ATM.

    Anyway Sailer, you try getting a copy of a probate record or judge’s order from a county court window-woman, then give us a nostalgic contrast of civil servant citizenism. Talk about “Zootopia”… the stamp-wielding cows there won’t make any petty displays of vindictiveness or arrogance, they’re rather content to chew their cud till the lights get turned off at 4pm

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yes, the often-parodied Van Nuys DMV office has become much more efficient in the 41 years I've been going there. There was a big reorganization in this century that solved the nightmare problem of not knowing which of the endless lines to stand in. Now you initially stand in one line to deal with a sort of concierge who listens to your problem and gives you a number so you can sit down until you are called by a clerk who specializes in your area of need. The last time I was there, the concierge was a particularly on the ball young white man.
  81. Elimination of the taming collars aside, I thought the whole plot by the Deputy Mayor was quite a statement about identity politics and the discontents thereof ….

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I lost the thread on the Deputy Mayor plotline that makes up the last third of the movie -- what's your interpretation of it?
  82. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Elimination of the taming collars aside, I thought the whole plot by the Deputy Mayor was quite a statement about identity politics and the discontents thereof ....

    I lost the thread on the Deputy Mayor plotline that makes up the last third of the movie — what’s your interpretation of it?

    • Replies: @The Only Catholic Unionist
    Well, I guess the comment-sized version is that disregarding the stated proportions of the kinds of creatures that are supposed to present in Zootopia, it is an example of how the government of a "majority minority" America might go, in the sense that the predators (Whites) had a faint stamp of opprobrium as it was, and as they lose control still get blamed for everything, even as they're the ones still getting stuff done. If that makes any sense. Hrrmmm. I'll try and send you the longer version by email if I get the chance.
  83. @Anonymous
    Knocking the [this state] Dept. of Motor Vehicles is getting to be a lazy joke, handed down from generation to generation of comedy hack. I deal with CA & county agencies' branches from Arcata to Zzyzx Springs and the DMV's not the worst by any stretch-- N.B. with appointment to get a shorter wait + doing as much of it online as possible. The only halfway-hellish aspect results more from the vibrant, informed, literate motorists mobbed out front than from the office hands' efficiency (which could be better due to the cheap-laugh criticism singling them out, but more likely it's the computerization w/ bar code scanners). There's a reason CA politicians view DMV fees as the perfect ATM.

    Anyway Sailer, you try getting a copy of a probate record or judge's order from a county court window-woman, then give us a nostalgic contrast of civil servant citizenism. Talk about "Zootopia"... the stamp-wielding cows there won't make any petty displays of vindictiveness or arrogance, they're rather content to chew their cud till the lights get turned off at 4pm

    Yes, the often-parodied Van Nuys DMV office has become much more efficient in the 41 years I’ve been going there. There was a big reorganization in this century that solved the nightmare problem of not knowing which of the endless lines to stand in. Now you initially stand in one line to deal with a sort of concierge who listens to your problem and gives you a number so you can sit down until you are called by a clerk who specializes in your area of need. The last time I was there, the concierge was a particularly on the ball young white man.

  84. @Anonymous
    "A German Woman Called LBC In Tears Over The Abuse She Says She’s Received Since The Brexit Vote

    “I’m so scared. I don’t know what’s going to happen next,” she said."

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/victoriasanusi/a-german-woman-called-lbc-in-tears-over-the-abuse-she-says-s

    A German woman called James O’Brien’s LBC radio show in tears on Tuesday as she recalled the xenophobic abuse she said she has received since it was announced the UK had voted to leave the EU.

    The caller, who said her name was Karen, told O’Brien she moved to the UK in 1973 alongside her late husband, who was a GP.

    Through sobs, Karen told O’Brien that dog excrement had been thrown at her window and that people she knows have said they don’t want to be friends with her any more.

    “I haven’t been out the house in three days because I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I live in a middle-class area and the people who are doing it [making her feel unwelcome] are middle-class pensioners. I don’t understand what is going on.”

    Karen said that since the Brexit vote, people have made her feel like she needs to “go back to Germany”, but added that she no longer had friends there. “I’m so scared,” she added. “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

    The woman said she had contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau, who she claims told her that she should “understand people are frustrated”.

    She also told the radio host about another incident she had heard of: “My friend Rosemary has a grandson who was beaten up because he has a foreign grandma.”
     

    Granny better be careful out there. British chavs, emboldened by Brexit, are hunting down Jerries to pogrom.

  85. @Diversity Heretic
    I think that you'd have to go back to the 1940s to find "racist" depictions. The animation Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows and there are some Pluto cartoons that feature a black mammy.

    I'm kind of surprised Uncle Ben's and Aunt Jemima still feature black mascots.

    “Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows”

    But they’re cool, clever crows:

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows”

    But they’re cool, clever crows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v2exWrsGOc
     
    Yeah. I've known some Black academics who have defended the crows in Dumbo.
  86. @SFG
    It was based on a story by Rudyard Kipling, who was anything but PC (by modern standards).

    THE WRATH OF THE AWAKENED SAXON
    by Rudyard Kipling

    It was not part of their blood,
    It came to them very late,
    With long arrears to make good,
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    They were not easily moved,
    They were icy — willing to wait
    Till every count should be proved,
    Ere the Saxon began to hate.

    Their voices were even and low.
    Their eyes were level and straight.
    There was neither sign nor show
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not preached to the crowd.
    It was not taught by the state.
    No man spoke it aloud
    When the Saxon began to hate.

    It was not suddently bred.
    It will not swiftly abate.
    Through the chilled years ahead,
    When Time shall count from the date
    That the Saxon began to hate.

  87. @Awesome
    Have you reviewed Angry Birds before and I missed it? If not then I'm surprised you had so little to say about it. It was by far the most Alt Right, shitlordy movie I've ever seen. The fact that it had to get made independently and could only get it's winks and nods across in a kids movie speaks volumes about how hard it is to slip genuinely counter narrative messages into the mainstream.
    Why was there a truck with 'hamesty international' on it on the pig island? Somebody is aware. For gods sake it had Muslims/green pigs with beards flying planes! It even had the Europeans waking up that america aka the great eagle had grown fat and lazy and they would have to save themselves - and we've just had the brexit vote before america has had a chance to make it's own anti-immigration voice heard.. There were seriously dozens of shout outs in this movie.

    Is the Angry Red(-feathered) Bird by any chance a real estate developer?

  88. @Steve Sailer
    I saw a preview awhile ago for an upcoming Mel Gibson movie in the "Taken" genre about a father fighting a motorcycle gang to get his daughter back. The preview looked okay.

    Isn’t there an Easter sequel to Passion of the Christ in the works?

  89. @Steve Sailer
    I lost the thread on the Deputy Mayor plotline that makes up the last third of the movie -- what's your interpretation of it?

    Well, I guess the comment-sized version is that disregarding the stated proportions of the kinds of creatures that are supposed to present in Zootopia, it is an example of how the government of a “majority minority” America might go, in the sense that the predators (Whites) had a faint stamp of opprobrium as it was, and as they lose control still get blamed for everything, even as they’re the ones still getting stuff done. If that makes any sense. Hrrmmm. I’ll try and send you the longer version by email if I get the chance.

  90. OT (and it almost certainly won’t make it to a second-run movie theater), but do check out “Hello My Name is Doris” with Sally Fields. It features (among other things) catfishing….

  91. @Abe

    or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner
     
    Ok, ok, I see what's going on here. 20+ comments in and no one has yet hit this softball out of the yard. Guess it falls on me to play the nerd for this thread:

    "The Lord of the Eagles would not take them anywhere near where men lived. “They would shoot at us with their great bows of yew,” he said, “for they would think we were after their sheep. And at other times they would be right."

    While your playing nerd, would you also please come up with a good estimate of the size of a prepubescent hobbit and then speculate as to what percentage of childhood mortality in the Shire would be accounted for by foxes, weasels, predatory birds, and really big rats?

    • Replies: @SFG
    If you're wondering how he eats and breathes, and other science facts/Then repeat to yourself, 'It's just a show; I should really just relax...'
  92. @jon

    So you think Aslan not eating people ... means that ... CS Lewis [is a] mushy liberal[]
     
    Aslan was Jesus. The whole point was that he could easily eat all the people who opposed him, but instead, he sacrificed his own life to save Edmund. That's a frickin children's book. I read that in elementary school and I got it, how did you not?

    He’s not a tame lion.

  93. CJ says:
    @Brohemius
    I guess those "decades" of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born. The first TV show I remember which had a prominent black character was called "Julia". I can't remember the details, but she was a flawless princess. All that racism must have happened just before I was born. Can anyone give me an example of a racist TV show? Just curious. I guess Eisenhower must have put an end to all those "racist depictions." What a great guy he must have been.

    I guess those “decades” of racist depictions must have ended just as I was born.

    You’re on to something that has been discussed here before, but I don’t have a name for it. For about 60 years young people have been told that right up to yesterday women and minorities were hunted for sport. Old people have been demonized as bigots. I was born in the early 1950s and grew up in an isolated socially conservative area, but even there we had teachers who were folk song liberals. Since then I’ve observed succeeding generations get indoctrinated.

  94. @rvg
    So you think Aslan not eating people or the Eagles in JRR Tolkien not acting in a predatory manner means that JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are mushy liberals? What about the Bears not eating Goldilocks or the bear not eating Mowgli, all part of the liberal conspiracy by Kipling?

    The Eagles DO act in a predatory manner, commenting that the humans whose homes they pass over shoot arrows in fear for their flocks – and that on another day, they’d be correct to do so!

  95. @tbraton
    "As far as TV goes, “Amos ‘n’ Andy” from the ’50′s was frequently described that way, but the show was very funny and is still funny (you can find episodes floating around), and most of the humor related to the blowhard antics of the multi-talented Tim Moore who played The Kingfish, which in turn means that it was no more racist, in reality, than “The Jeffersons.” "

    I totally agree. I was a child at the time and thought the show was hilarious. Rather than feel contempt for the characters, I had a rather innocent affection for all the characters, and I was heartbroken when the show was suddenly cancelled. I thought all the black actors were first rate. BTW "Amos 'n' Andy," as you probably know, originally started on radio with the main characters white actors feigning black accents. It was enormously popular, but the Kingfish character gave Huey Long his popular nickname of "Kingfish."

    tbraton, No chance to hear the old Jack Benny Show with his “man”, Rochester. And thank you. Did not know Amos and Andy started on radio with a white cast in, well, vocal blackface.

    • Replies: @tbraton
    The radio show started long before I was born, and I never heard one episode on the radio. But I am certain about the Huey "Kingfish" Long connection, who was assassinated before I was born. That killing occurred in '35 or '36, as I recall, which means the radio show started sometimes in the 20's. By all accounts, it was very popular, which, of course, led in the early 50's to the TV show, which, of course, required black actors, who were, as far as I could tell at that young age, all top rate. They were all very funny, and I was shocked when I later found out that the show was cancelled because of racial stereotyping.

    Growing up in the 50's, Jack Benny (and his beloved Rochester) was one of the regular staples on TV, along with Bob Hope, Groucho Marx ("You Bet Your Life"), George Burns and Gracie Allen, "I Love Lucy," "The Honeymooners," and Red Skelton. A whole lot of great comedians. Milton Berle and the zany Sid Caesar (with his great team of comedy writers, including a teenage Woody Allen) only lasted a few years, as I recall. I also saw a lot of "old" movies on TV and only became aware of their greatness when I went away to college ("Citizen Kane" comes to mind, which I liked very much seeing for the first time as a mid-teen).
  96. @Steve Sailer
    "Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows"

    But they're cool, clever crows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v2exWrsGOc

    Dumbo has blacks depicted as crows”

    But they’re cool, clever crows:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_v2exWrsGOc

    Yeah. I’ve known some Black academics who have defended the crows in Dumbo.

  97. @K.
    While your playing nerd, would you also please come up with a good estimate of the size of a prepubescent hobbit and then speculate as to what percentage of childhood mortality in the Shire would be accounted for by foxes, weasels, predatory birds, and really big rats?

    If you’re wondering how he eats and breathes, and other science facts/Then repeat to yourself, ‘It’s just a show; I should really just relax…’

  98. Steve, the Zootopia rabbit hole goes even deeper!

    Very iSteve.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks, I'll post!
  99. @AnonymousCoward
    Steve, the Zootopia rabbit hole goes even deeper!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNY3TBMILgI

    Very iSteve.

    Thanks, I’ll post!

  100. Yep says:
    @Yak-15
    Please elaborate.

    Admittedly I don’t watch a lot of tv so maybe I’m out of the loop on how bad the pc conformity is on other shows compared to Thrones. My complaints about GOT are all the girl power crap, the slavery angle involving the Targaryen girl, the trashing of the show’s fake religion via a completely invented lgbt angle that isn’t present in the books, the attempt to normalize incest (yeah, that’s what it is), and the “black washing” mentioned by another commenter. Brienne of Tarth beats the Hound in a fight? Come on! That’s almost as bad as Scarlett johanson beating up several men the size of pro football players in the new Captain America movie. And oh btw, captain America is clearly gay in that movie.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The upside is that, in addition to beating up on men, they can end up being sliced into small bits by other men.
  101. @Erik Sieven
    in a hbd way civilization rather depends on the suppression of some female instincts. "Choose the male who is expected to have children who would most likely survive in a Hunger Games with only MMA-style fights allowed scenario and totally ignore IQ and the ability to create wealth and civilization". And because this suppression has been taken away in recent decades I have the impression that masculinity now plays a bigger role than before.

    MMA is a product of wealth and civilization. Even chimpanzees have the good sense to improvise weapons.

    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    good point. the modern wealth of humans has created an awkward partner market
  102. @K.
    MMA is a product of wealth and civilization. Even chimpanzees have the good sense to improvise weapons.

    good point. the modern wealth of humans has created an awkward partner market

  103. @Buffalo Joe
    tbraton, No chance to hear the old Jack Benny Show with his "man", Rochester. And thank you. Did not know Amos and Andy started on radio with a white cast in, well, vocal blackface.

    The radio show started long before I was born, and I never heard one episode on the radio. But I am certain about the Huey “Kingfish” Long connection, who was assassinated before I was born. That killing occurred in ’35 or ’36, as I recall, which means the radio show started sometimes in the 20’s. By all accounts, it was very popular, which, of course, led in the early 50’s to the TV show, which, of course, required black actors, who were, as far as I could tell at that young age, all top rate. They were all very funny, and I was shocked when I later found out that the show was cancelled because of racial stereotyping.

    Growing up in the 50’s, Jack Benny (and his beloved Rochester) was one of the regular staples on TV, along with Bob Hope, Groucho Marx (“You Bet Your Life”), George Burns and Gracie Allen, “I Love Lucy,” “The Honeymooners,” and Red Skelton. A whole lot of great comedians. Milton Berle and the zany Sid Caesar (with his great team of comedy writers, including a teenage Woody Allen) only lasted a few years, as I recall. I also saw a lot of “old” movies on TV and only became aware of their greatness when I went away to college (“Citizen Kane” comes to mind, which I liked very much seeing for the first time as a mid-teen).

  104. @Steve Sailer
    I saw a preview awhile ago for an upcoming Mel Gibson movie in the "Taken" genre about a father fighting a motorcycle gang to get his daughter back. The preview looked okay.

    He’s also a producer/art-director on The Bombing and the director of Hacksaw Ridge, both of which come out just this year. Seems like a pretty full docket.

  105. @Yep
    Admittedly I don't watch a lot of tv so maybe I'm out of the loop on how bad the pc conformity is on other shows compared to Thrones. My complaints about GOT are all the girl power crap, the slavery angle involving the Targaryen girl, the trashing of the show's fake religion via a completely invented lgbt angle that isn't present in the books, the attempt to normalize incest (yeah, that's what it is), and the "black washing" mentioned by another commenter. Brienne of Tarth beats the Hound in a fight? Come on! That's almost as bad as Scarlett johanson beating up several men the size of pro football players in the new Captain America movie. And oh btw, captain America is clearly gay in that movie.

    The upside is that, in addition to beating up on men, they can end up being sliced into small bits by other men.

  106. CJ says:
    @Awesome
    Have you reviewed Angry Birds before and I missed it? If not then I'm surprised you had so little to say about it. It was by far the most Alt Right, shitlordy movie I've ever seen. The fact that it had to get made independently and could only get it's winks and nods across in a kids movie speaks volumes about how hard it is to slip genuinely counter narrative messages into the mainstream.
    Why was there a truck with 'hamesty international' on it on the pig island? Somebody is aware. For gods sake it had Muslims/green pigs with beards flying planes! It even had the Europeans waking up that america aka the great eagle had grown fat and lazy and they would have to save themselves - and we've just had the brexit vote before america has had a chance to make it's own anti-immigration voice heard.. There were seriously dozens of shout outs in this movie.

    There were seriously dozens of shout outs in this movie.

    I just saw The Angry Birds Movie at my local second-run theatre and I agree with you. Some more of the shout outs are a Coexist bumper sticker in Green Pig City, a Go Green! sign held by a pig in the audience when the Pig King speaks to his subjects, lines at critical moments like “It takes a long time to build up something like this” and “Something like this doesn’t just happen by accident”, and “Did you notice nobody minded when you moved out of the village” (spoken by the judge to Mr. Red, who had indeed moved out of the hip city center and into the sticks). And then of course there was the eagle – clearly a bald eagle, not one of the many other species found around the world – fat, lazy, narcissistic, and grooving to American disco music.

    Sometimes people on this site see politically incorrect messages that may not really be there, but not this time. That was a sociopolitical commentary thinly disguised as a children’s animation movie.

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