The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, Having Gotten James Damore Fired, Now Soft-Censoring Social Science Videos
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

To get to this 16 minute video of Jared Taylor discussing the science of “Race Differences in Intelligence,” you now have to go past this warning screen:

The following content has been identified by the YouTube community as inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.

You are eventually allowed to see the video, so YouTube’s censorship could be worse, but now you can’t do much with it. Youtube writes:

Certain features have been disabled for this video

In response to user reports, we have disabled some features, such as comments, sharing and suggested videos, because this video contains content that may be inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.

Commenter larry lurker writes:

Wow. They wiped the comments, the rating – even the view count.

The message: “We’ll let you watch this, but do realize you’re the only freak interested in this stuff.”

Keep in mind that Susan Wojcicki, whose big break in life was her renting her garage to Sergey Brin and Larry Page in the 1990s (which led to her being hired as a marketer by Google and to her sister being married to Sergey for awhile), is the CEO of Alphabet/Google subsidiary YouTube. She took James Damore’s memo explaining the science behind why Google does what it does when it comes to hiring very personally. According to Recode, she was the winner in the internal power struggle within Google over Damore’s fate.

Interestingly, Susan Wojcicki’s sister Anna founded, with then-husband Sergey’s money, 23andMe, which is in the business of telling you what your racial ancestry is based on your DNA and what your genetic differences imply about you:

 
Hide 144 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. SFG says:

    I just wonder if this sort of thing is really going to be all that effective. Strikes me as a nice way to get teenage boys interested in the content once someone sends them a link. “Hey, here’s the stuff Youtube doesn’t WANT you to see!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Luke Lea
    The Barbara Streisand effect? Maybe a compilation of links to affected videos would be an effective way to counter this kind of censorship?
    , @International Jew
    Well, they say they've "disabled sharing". For now that just means the share icon, but an easy next step for them would be to censor the URL up top (one line of Javascript will do that) and then the only way left for you to spread the word will be to tell your friends what keywords to google-search on. And that won't be so reliable (especially if they choose to make it unreliable).
    , @guest
    The real tricky part is not the warning but the fact that you have to find the video in order to be warned about it. It won't be shared, and it won't pop up in your recommended lists. I suppose outside sources can still link to it, or at least tell you what to search for. But they'll try to prevent that, too.

    People are lazy. They don't want to go around searching for specific videos like a website in the days before popular search engines. They want them laid at their feet as offerings.

    SJWs bank on our lassitude.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/youtube-ceo-susan-wojcicki-having-gotten-james-damore-fired-now-soft-censoring-social-science-videos/#comment-1984591
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Wonder if Susan watched the video. If enough altleft types do some minds may change. If enough change, the narrative may collapse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Leftists of the 20th Century Progressive Era were well aware of innate biological differences that cause racial disparities. But, they still supported socialism as a way to eliminate them. It is not hard to imagine future black radicals demanding state-funded genetic engineering to improve their circumstances.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Make it boomerang.

    Hillary used ‘deplorable’ as insult but became badge of honor.

    Chinese movies used to be promoted in the US as ‘banned in China’. It added to the appeal.

    ‘Flagged by Youtube’ should be a badge of honor.

    Or ‘wojcicked’.

    A video that’s been wojcicked must be special.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thomm
    This video was 'Wojcicked'.......so Watch It!!
    , @academic gossip
    Good idea. But to "susan" is more memorable, and more mocking.
    Bring the pain home, as in "santorum"; make her name a farce.

    This video/URL has been Susaned.

    A Dry White Susan.

    Google Salad with (Soviet) Russian Susaning.

    The 12 Days of Google: "...six Susans censoring..."

    It is plausible and well earned to make her the public face of SJW Internet control, a sort of Diana Moon Glompers.

    , @Pericles
    That video has been 'googled'.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Or ‘wojcicked’.
     
    Wojacked
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. I remember telling a woman that our reality has become 1984. She said that’s silly, she was born in 1990 so why would she have to know about anything that came before she was born?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    I remember telling a woman that our reality has become 1984. She said that’s silly, she was born in 1990 so why would she have to know about anything that came before she was born?
     
    Great - that sums it*** up. To answer your quote in a way, that's even more way back than 1984 - -

    - - Santca simplicitas!


    ***
    Ah what it means in this case: Current day mentality - Geschichtsvergessenheit (=having forgotten about history) - historical narcissism - resistance to educate yourself - being here now whithout understanding what "being" and "here" (as opposed to there...) and now (as opposed to then) mean... sigh - or doing what needs to be done (=live) and ask no questions at all --

    (Sigh, sigh, - - as I said - Sancta simplicitas!)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. I like JT but there’s a certain smugness to his delivery that suggests the affect of an ideologue. It could be quite easy for one to believe he was a deranged extremist. Unfortunately (for Susan) his data does not come from ‘Mein Kampf’ but from rather uncontroversial mainstream sources. How long till the Wikipedia page on ‘Race and Intelligence’ gets the same treatment?

    They haven’t gotten around to Brethren yet, anyway.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  6. Olorin says:

    I’d like Miz Wo to give an example of a video that isn’t “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    What she is really saying is "inappropriate or offensive to me and people like me". She doesn't care about whatever material might be offensive to some other people, as long as it isn't offensive to her.
    , @Mr. Anon

    I’d like Miz Wo to give an example of a video that isn’t “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.”
     
    Until recently at least, YouTube was allowing a large number of sick and disturbing videos to be streamed. These videos seemed designed to be aimed at children. Attempts to flag these videos as "inappropriate" were often ignored by YouTube.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4353182/Disturbing-videos-posed-popular-cartoons.html
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. I’m quite disappointed in Google and YouTube. I’ve been a huge Google fan.

    This damages their reputation as a neutral outlet and gives them a reputation as an ideologically biased platform. This creates an impetus for a me too competitor that simply provides a simple ideologically neutral platform.

    I would bet that Google will come to regret this move when they don’t like the reputation this gives them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I would bet that Google will come to regret this move when they don’t like the reputation this gives them.
     
    They're Google. They can manufacture any reputation they like.
    , @hyperbola
    How the CIA made Google – INSURGE intelligence – Medium
    https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/how-the-cia-made-google-e836451a959e


    Why Google made the NSA – INSURGE intelligence – Medium
    https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/why-google-made-the-nsa-2a80584c9c1
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. dr kill says:

    I wonder who she likes in the fight tonight? I’d bet the other way.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  9. Thomm says:
    @Anon
    Make it boomerang.

    Hillary used 'deplorable' as insult but became badge of honor.

    Chinese movies used to be promoted in the US as 'banned in China'. It added to the appeal.

    'Flagged by Youtube' should be a badge of honor.

    Or 'wojcicked'.

    A video that's been wojcicked must be special.

    This video was ‘Wojcicked’…….so Watch It!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Luke Lea says:

    Are there no easy ways to complain to YouTube?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    I don't think even major content creators, responsible for millions in advertising revenue, have any way of getting in touch with them. YouTube is the Platonic Form of the soulless, autonomic corporation.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. 23andme’s business is selling your genetic information to drug companies. And now they started their own drug discovery efforts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    All Google's AI expertise might come in handy for teasing out the patterns among the 3 billion base pairs and the states they lead to.

    I'll bet it would be interesting to be a fly on the Brin family wall at dinner time.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. Luke Lea says:
    @SFG
    I just wonder if this sort of thing is really going to be all that effective. Strikes me as a nice way to get teenage boys interested in the content once someone sends them a link. "Hey, here's the stuff Youtube doesn't WANT you to see!"

    The Barbara Streisand effect? Maybe a compilation of links to affected videos would be an effective way to counter this kind of censorship?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Index Librorum et Googlorum Prohibitorum
    , @Ganderson
    Semi OT: When my pals and I play golf, when , say, a 7 iron is mishit, but still manages to bounce straight down the fairway the requisite 150-160 yards, we call it a "Barbara Streisand"- it's ugly, but it's still working!
    , @Anonymous
    https://twitter.com/AmRenaissance/status/902199042758893569
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. Whiskey says: • Website

    Is there any way in which Nice White Ladies are NOT the eternal and everlasting enemy of the average White man? Indeed, not.

    In a prior age Ms. Wojo … oh the heck with it too complicated, I’ll call her Wojohowiz after that guy on “Barney Miller” would have been the local PTA President and focusing all her attention on finding suitable mates for either sons or daughters when they turned twenty two or so; and prior to that finding suitable companions and keeping them out of trouble.

    HOWEVER, that instinct which was entirely admirable when focused on keeping kids and young adults from doing stupid things: hanging out with people who shoot heroin, or engage in street racing; it falls down into female matriarchal tyranny aimed directly at the Beta Male who need I remind anyone that White women HATE HATE HATE with a passion.

    Yeah of course YouTube will be full of videos of Black dudes screaming how much they will kill White dudes, or Muslims screaming for Allahu Snackbar! and threatening to behead every infidel. DUH because Youtube is run by a WOMAN. So she acts like a WOMAN. Rewarding those most violent and aggressive and physically dominant and punishing nerdy White guys who think High IQ is the only original male sin for women.

    The trick is to regain dominance while understanding that both the authorities from a power perspective (our society is built upon White men being third class citizens) and Women from an emotional perspective (they HATE HATE HATE White men … for being White and mostly nerdy and nice and cooperative) will punish anything overtly violent. A full frontal assault so to speak is failure like Charlottesville.

    It WOULD be instructive however to make an example out of someone. Perhaps Ms. Wojohowicz has all sorts of dirty laundry begging to be put out to dry: abuse to the help; unpaid taxes, an ugly divorce (what indeed is the story behind her sister’s divorce and what ugly things could be amusingly made public to humiliate the enemy?)

    In short its a fools errand to want women to even like White men; but FEAR is entirely a different matter. It is oh so better in every way to be feared than loved.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  14. unit472 says:

    Its past time to break these internet monopolists up. Content should never be under the control of those who operate the platform. We wouldn’t tolerate the railroads deciding what products they would ship and which they would not and one could only imagine the howls of protest if, back in the days of print newspapers, paper makers withheld newsprint from the New York Times and Washington Post!

    Break the FAANGS up!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    By now it seems quaint that the FED.GOV, FCC and the rest give such scrutiny anytime some company considers consolidating multiple broadcast outlets. Is it only obvious to me that the concentration of market power in the few online platforms, Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc. is much more of an issue than if some company bought a couple of radio or tv stations in a single market?

    Do Facebook, Twitter, Youtube & Google enjoy monopoly power?

    To answer that question, just try to imagine if one of the concerns instead tried to suppress popular revolutionary progressive content? The calls for intervention or regulation would no doubt get pretty loud. The dissident right really needs to appropriate the revolutionary left's tactics. Everything from the patient long march through the institutions to lawsuits that game the system and finally everybody's favorite revolution by judicial activism.

    For further reading, here's a summary of the FCC's criteria for review of market concentration of ownership of media properties. Time to update this for the Current Year?


    Newspaper and Broadcast Station Cross-Ownership

    Although the Commission revised the newspaper/broadcast cross-ownership rule in its 2006 quadrennial review order, the court’s 2011 decision vacated and remanded that modified rule. As a result, the Commission’s rules continue to prohibit common ownership of a daily newspaper and a full-power broadcast station (AM, FM, or TV) if the station’s service contour encompasses the newspaper’s city of publication.

    National TV Ownership

    The rule does not limit the number of TV stations a single entity may own nationwide so long as the station group collectively reaches no more than 39 percent of all U.S. TV households. For the purposes of calculating the “national audience reach” under this rule, TV stations on UHF channels (14 and above) count less than TV stations operating on VHF channels (13 and below), this is also known as the UHF Discount.

    Dual TV Network Ownership

    The rule effectively prohibits a merger between any two of these television networks: ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC.

    Local TV Multiple Ownership

    The rule allows an entity to own up to two TV stations in the same DMA if either (1) the service areas – known as “Grade B signal contours” – of the stations do not overlap; or (2) at least one of the stations is not ranked among the top four stations in the DMA (based on market share), and at least eight independently owned TV stations would remain in the market after the proposed combination.

    Local Radio/TV Cross-Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in markets with at least 20 independently owned “media voices” (defined as full power TV stations and radio stations, major newspapers, and the cable system in the market) an entity can own up to two TV stations and six radio stations (or one TV station and seven radio stations); (2) in markets with at least ten independently owned “media voices” an entity can own up to two TV stations and four radio stations; and (3) in the smallest markets an entity may own two TV stations and one radio station. In all markets, an entity must comply with the local radio and local TV ownership limits.

    Local Radio Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in a radio market with 45 or more stations, an entity may own up to eight radio stations, no more than five of which may be in the same service (AM or FM); (2) in a radio market with between 30 and 44 radio stations, an entity may own up to seven radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; (3) in a radio market hosting between 15 and 29 radio stations, an entity may own up to six radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; and (4) in a radio market with 14 or fewer radio stations, an entity may own up to five radio stations, no more than three of which may be in the same service, as long as the entity does not own more than 50 percent of all radio stations in that market.
     
    Pretty interesting that the FCC guarantees no consolidation of competition among at least the 4 tv network players and that no concern can own any more than 1 of the top 4 broadcasters in a particular market. Much much better competition protection than for Youtube, Facebook & Twitter....

    For now FED.GOV needn't actually intervene. It might be fully sufficient to make some noise and declare that if a satisfactory balance isn't found that intervention & regulation might be considered.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. Ivy says:
    @Luke Lea
    The Barbara Streisand effect? Maybe a compilation of links to affected videos would be an effective way to counter this kind of censorship?

    Index Librorum et Googlorum Prohibitorum

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. I tested it too, and it can’t seem to be embedded. I guess that was the “sharing” part. That is one hell of an admission that youtube is not a believer in free speech – “sharing of the ideas in this video is NOT APPROVED.”

    However, I noticed what I thought was a random instance of an video that could not be embedded more than 1/2 a year back, a 5-minute compilation of the subplot of the “Cigar Store Indian” Seinfeld episode involving specifically the anti-PC lampooning. Maybe it wasn’t so random after all. Another piece of the same episode (funny as hell) that I put here is not embed-blocked, or we are ALLOWED to share.

    Does anyone know if liveleak videos can be embedded? I linked to one, but did not check out whether this was possible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    When a user posts a video YouTube, the user can choose to disallow embedding.

    Embedding is different from sharing, which is the feature that allows you to email the video easily or post it on Twitter, Facebook, etc.
    , @Ganderson
    Wooden Indians you say?

    https://youtu.be/7FY7RWJAtJQ
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Ed says:

    What’s troubling to me is the stated reason why they’re disabling comments, sharing etc.

    It appears that the only criteria is if it’s deemed, “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.” Some people find Beyoncé gyrating in skimpy outfits offensive will her videos now be disabled?

    Read More
    • Agree: Chrisnonymous
    • Replies: @Hawk Toohey
    All audiences are equal, but "some audiences" are more equal than others. Once again, the infamous "who, whom?" rears its ugly head.
    , @Forbes

    It appears that the only criteria is if it’s deemed, “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.”
     
    Boilerplate inoffensive BS language, is all. Reads like a TV/movie rating. Criteria that is mush is no criteria at all.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. O'Really says:

    Does anyone here subscribe to 23andme? If so, how do they handle genes for intelligence? Are those available in your report?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Just not in yours...

    nyah, nyah, nyaaahhhhh... ;D
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’m sure another thing they’re doing is testing the mechanisms for an all-hands-on-deck censorship of “fake news” around the 2018 midterms. Ending sharing and suggestions will help stop things going viral.

    Read More
    • Agree: NickG
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  20. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    This seems to be an opportunity.

    Why rely on Youtube for comments?

    Write an Alt-right plugin for browsers that checks the page for the text “… inappropriate or offensive to some audiences …”.

    If the plugin finds that text, it inserts a button that says “View/Add Comments”.

    If you click that button, it jumps to an Alt-right webserver that contains comments and permits you to add your own.

    We don’t need Youtube (or any other news website) to list comments.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Eonic
    Someone actually created a site for adding comments to any Youtube video. The method was to substitute the site URL for "youtube.com" part in the complete video URL then press"enter" whereupon the video would appear in the developer's site with the facility to add comments using a Disqus account. The site has disappeared after being available for a few months. The problem it had was that is was not publicised suffficiently and if a video on Youtube had comments disabled nobody would know about this alternative.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. Hrw-500 says:

    This is a video to re-upload elsewhere like Vimeo, Vid.me, Veoh, Liveleak, Dailymotion and the recent new commets called Bitchute and DTube.

    I wonder if Susan will be triggered like a trigglypuff when she’ll see her sister video? ;-)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  22. Dr. X says:

    The intellectual schizophrenia of the contemporary Leftist power structure is breathtaking.

    You can get a DNA analysis done on yourself and your prospective partner, or failing that, you can go to a sperm bank where donors are screened for heritable traits and choose your pick. You can an get an amniocentesis done to see if your developing offspring will have a genetic defect and abort him if he does, but, God forbid, you can’t watch Jared Taylor discuss heritable intelligence traits in discrete population groups, which is straight out of Biology 101, on YouTube.

    What happened to all the Lefties who used to chortle about the rubes at the Scopes Monkey Trial???

    Pretty f—ed up, when you really think about it…

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor, Forbes
    • Replies: @Ed
    To you point:

    https://twitter.com/hels/status/901861612935680000

    There's a Jewish doctor that meets mostly black lesbians in bathrooms across NYC to hand over his sperm. Everyone is getting in on the DNA act but yet we're not supposed to explicitly talk about it.

    , @Frau Katze
    Re: Lefties and Scopes trial (evolution):

    They don't believe they're wrong about HBD.

    They believe evolution is true until you get to the obvious: differing IQ averages.

    They don't have to prove they're right, thanks to a lot of lying scientists.

    I think the scientists are losing status by contradicting what can only be called "common sense."

    Maybe their reduced status contributes to the opposition to the theory of global warming.

    If they can flat out deny the obvious, why should anyone support them in the highly technical and non-obvious arguments for global warming?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. MarcB. says:

    The message: “We’ll let you watch this, but do realize you’re the only freak interested in this stuff.”

    The MSM did the same thing as the Trump Phenomenon was gaining steam, so the freaks flocked to Youtube, Twitter, Facebook, blogs; etc., and they eventually realized that they were not the only one’s. This could backfire by becoming forbidden and build up even more steam in the collective pressure cooker.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  24. @unit472
    Its past time to break these internet monopolists up. Content should never be under the control of those who operate the platform. We wouldn't tolerate the railroads deciding what products they would ship and which they would not and one could only imagine the howls of protest if, back in the days of print newspapers, paper makers withheld newsprint from the New York Times and Washington Post!

    Break the FAANGS up!

    By now it seems quaint that the FED.GOV, FCC and the rest give such scrutiny anytime some company considers consolidating multiple broadcast outlets. Is it only obvious to me that the concentration of market power in the few online platforms, Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc. is much more of an issue than if some company bought a couple of radio or tv stations in a single market?

    Do Facebook, Twitter, Youtube & Google enjoy monopoly power?

    To answer that question, just try to imagine if one of the concerns instead tried to suppress popular revolutionary progressive content? The calls for intervention or regulation would no doubt get pretty loud. The dissident right really needs to appropriate the revolutionary left’s tactics. Everything from the patient long march through the institutions to lawsuits that game the system and finally everybody’s favorite revolution by judicial activism.

    For further reading, here’s a summary of the FCC’s criteria for review of market concentration of ownership of media properties. Time to update this for the Current Year?

    [MORE]

    Newspaper and Broadcast Station Cross-Ownership

    Although the Commission revised the newspaper/broadcast cross-ownership rule in its 2006 quadrennial review order, the court’s 2011 decision vacated and remanded that modified rule. As a result, the Commission’s rules continue to prohibit common ownership of a daily newspaper and a full-power broadcast station (AM, FM, or TV) if the station’s service contour encompasses the newspaper’s city of publication.

    National TV Ownership

    The rule does not limit the number of TV stations a single entity may own nationwide so long as the station group collectively reaches no more than 39 percent of all U.S. TV households. For the purposes of calculating the “national audience reach” under this rule, TV stations on UHF channels (14 and above) count less than TV stations operating on VHF channels (13 and below), this is also known as the UHF Discount.

    Dual TV Network Ownership

    The rule effectively prohibits a merger between any two of these television networks: ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC.

    Local TV Multiple Ownership

    The rule allows an entity to own up to two TV stations in the same DMA if either (1) the service areas – known as “Grade B signal contours” – of the stations do not overlap; or (2) at least one of the stations is not ranked among the top four stations in the DMA (based on market share), and at least eight independently owned TV stations would remain in the market after the proposed combination.

    Local Radio/TV Cross-Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in markets with at least 20 independently owned “media voices” (defined as full power TV stations and radio stations, major newspapers, and the cable system in the market) an entity can own up to two TV stations and six radio stations (or one TV station and seven radio stations); (2) in markets with at least ten independently owned “media voices” an entity can own up to two TV stations and four radio stations; and (3) in the smallest markets an entity may own two TV stations and one radio station. In all markets, an entity must comply with the local radio and local TV ownership limits.

    Local Radio Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in a radio market with 45 or more stations, an entity may own up to eight radio stations, no more than five of which may be in the same service (AM or FM); (2) in a radio market with between 30 and 44 radio stations, an entity may own up to seven radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; (3) in a radio market hosting between 15 and 29 radio stations, an entity may own up to six radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; and (4) in a radio market with 14 or fewer radio stations, an entity may own up to five radio stations, no more than three of which may be in the same service, as long as the entity does not own more than 50 percent of all radio stations in that market.

    Pretty interesting that the FCC guarantees no consolidation of competition among at least the 4 tv network players and that no concern can own any more than 1 of the top 4 broadcasters in a particular market. Much much better competition protection than for Youtube, Facebook & Twitter….

    For now FED.GOV needn’t actually intervene. It might be fully sufficient to make some noise and declare that if a satisfactory balance isn’t found that intervention & regulation might be considered.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I understand the EU believes Google is a monopoly.

    EU fines Google record $2.7 billion in first antitrust case (dated June 27/2017)

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-google-antitrust-idUSKBN19I108

    But on the whole, the EU is toxic, supporting mass illegal immigration and "hate speech" laws.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. Bubba says:

    Hmmm… Carly Fiorina, Marissa Mayer and now Susan Wojcicki. What is it with women ruining tech companies?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  26. Interestingly, Susan Wojcicki’s sister Anna founded, with then-husband Sergey’s money, 23andMe…

    From what I’ve read and heard online, 23andMe just can’t let let anyone get away with being of entirely European ancestry. Everybody’s got to be 1% Amerindian 0.5% sub-Saharan African or something. They should send in the DNA of that Bronze Age mummy they found in a glacier in the Alps to see if he’s part Cherokee and Ashkenazi too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    Wasn't 23andMe outed as a scam operation?

    Providing dubious data to customer while accumulating a war chest to be "monetized". Quite a bit like Google, where the the person on the clickety side of things does not happen to be the customer.


    What the search engine is to Google, the Personal Genome Service is to 23andMe. The company is not exactly hiding its ambitions. “The long game here is not to make money selling kits, although the kits are essential to get the base level data,” Patrick Chung, a 23andMe board member, told FastCompany last month. “Once you have the data, [the company] does actually become the Google of personalized health care.” The company has lowered the price of the kit again and again, most recently from $299 to a mere $99, practically making it a stocking-stuffer. All the better to induce volunteers to give 23andMe the data it so desperately wants. (Currently, the database contains the genetic information of some half a million people, a number Wojcicki reportedly wants to double by year end.)
     

    That’s just the beginning, though. 23andMe reserves the right to use your personal information—including your genome—to inform you about events and to try to sell you products and services. There is a much more lucrative market waiting in the wings, too. One could easily imagine how insurance companies and pharmaceutical firms might be interested in getting their hands on your genetic information, the better to sell you products (or deny them to you). According to 23andMe’s privacy policy, that wouldn’t be an acceptable use of the database. Although 23andMe admits that it will share aggregate information about users genomes to third parties, it adamantly insists that it will not sell your personal genetic information without your explicit consent.

    We’ve heard that one before. Back when Google was first launched, the founders insisted that the company would never sell you out to advertisers. The company admitted that it would share aggregate information about users’ behavior with anyone who ponied up enough money, but the company’s privacy policy promised that “[i]ndividually identifiable information about you is not willfully disclosed to any third party without first receiving your permission.” A decade and a half later, after countless minuscule frog-in-boiling-water changes, Google’s privacy policy is craftily worded, diluting the word “consent” so that it’s implicit in most cases.
     

    , @air.liquide
    "From what I’ve read and heard online, 23andMe just can’t let let anyone get away with being of entirely European ancestry. Everybody’s got to be 1% Amerindian 0.5% sub-Saharan African or something. "

    I'm a member of 23andme, have seen many people's ancestry reports, and this simply isn't true. The only white people who routinely come up with amerindian or african ancestry are those with ancestry from places where you would expect it: Latin America, South Africa, and to a lesser extent, Iberia and the Southern US.

    Even 23andme's published study based on member data indicated that non-Euro ancestry was absent in the vast majority of US whites, only present in low single digits in western Europeans, and almost completely undetected in eastern Euros.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. #ILoveFuckingOverScience

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. Alfa158 says:
    @Olorin
    I'd like Miz Wo to give an example of a video that isn't "inappropriate or offensive to some audiences."

    What she is really saying is “inappropriate or offensive to me and people like me”. She doesn’t care about whatever material might be offensive to some other people, as long as it isn’t offensive to her.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. jim jones says:

    Julian Assange has commented on the new policy:

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. @Achmed E. Newman
    I tested it too, and it can't seem to be embedded. I guess that was the "sharing" part. That is one hell of an admission that youtube is not a believer in free speech - "sharing of the ideas in this video is NOT APPROVED."

    However, I noticed what I thought was a random instance of an video that could not be embedded more than 1/2 a year back, a 5-minute compilation of the subplot of the "Cigar Store Indian" Seinfeld episode involving specifically the anti-PC lampooning. Maybe it wasn't so random after all. Another piece of the same episode (funny as hell) that I put here is not embed-blocked, or we are ALLOWED to share.

    Does anyone know if liveleak videos can be embedded? I linked to one, but did not check out whether this was possible.

    When a user posts a video YouTube, the user can choose to disallow embedding.

    Embedding is different from sharing, which is the feature that allows you to email the video easily or post it on Twitter, Facebook, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, Chris, thanks for the explanation of the difference. Anyone who understands copy-and-paste (cntrl-c, cntrl-v) really shouldn't have a problem sharing this stuff then. Why would Jared Taylor not want his video to be embedded, is what I wonder now?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. @O'Really
    Does anyone here subscribe to 23andme? If so, how do they handle genes for intelligence? Are those available in your report?

    Just not in yours…

    nyah, nyah, nyaaahhhhh… ;D

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. Thea says:

    So the same family that censors videos handles peoples’ DNA. Beyond selling you an ancestry report, what exactly is 23 and me doing with the information they have on that person?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  33. @Luke Lea
    Are there no easy ways to complain to YouTube?

    I don’t think even major content creators, responsible for millions in advertising revenue, have any way of getting in touch with them. YouTube is the Platonic Form of the soulless, autonomic corporation.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. e says:

    Assange has tweeted about it, insuring millions know about it. Not good, Google.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  35. @415 reasons
    23andme's business is selling your genetic information to drug companies. And now they started their own drug discovery efforts.

    All Google’s AI expertise might come in handy for teasing out the patterns among the 3 billion base pairs and the states they lead to.

    I’ll bet it would be interesting to be a fly on the Brin family wall at dinner time.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. Thea says:

    Wojcicki grew up around really smart people at Stanford in a family of overachievers.

    her parents had no sons so it was up to her & her sisters to carry on the tradition. She likely realized that some of the men around her were much smarter than she could even comprehend. Combining that with not being very beautiful seem to have created both blindness and resentment despite her incredibly fortunate circumstances in life.

    She isn’t a woman in tech she is a business woman surrounded by men in tech.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    her parents had no sons so it was up to her & her sisters to carry on the tradition. She likely realized that some of the men around her were much smarter than she could even comprehend.
     
    The kernel of our present difficulties.
    , @Anon 2
    Susan Wojcicki is half-Polish, half-Jewish. Her Polish
    father is the former chair of the Physics Dept. at Stanford.
    Wojcicki is a fairly common name in Poland
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Maj. Kong says:
    @Robert Hume
    Wonder if Susan watched the video. If enough altleft types do some minds may change. If enough change, the narrative may collapse.

    Leftists of the 20th Century Progressive Era were well aware of innate biological differences that cause racial disparities. But, they still supported socialism as a way to eliminate them. It is not hard to imagine future black radicals demanding state-funded genetic engineering to improve their circumstances.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. @SFG
    I just wonder if this sort of thing is really going to be all that effective. Strikes me as a nice way to get teenage boys interested in the content once someone sends them a link. "Hey, here's the stuff Youtube doesn't WANT you to see!"

    Well, they say they’ve “disabled sharing”. For now that just means the share icon, but an easy next step for them would be to censor the URL up top (one line of Javascript will do that) and then the only way left for you to spread the word will be to tell your friends what keywords to google-search on. And that won’t be so reliable (especially if they choose to make it unreliable).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. NickG says:

    Sam Harris in his recent podcast with Douglas Murray had something of a meltdown about white identity politics and Jared Taylor.

    Podcast

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  40. guest says:
    @SFG
    I just wonder if this sort of thing is really going to be all that effective. Strikes me as a nice way to get teenage boys interested in the content once someone sends them a link. "Hey, here's the stuff Youtube doesn't WANT you to see!"

    The real tricky part is not the warning but the fact that you have to find the video in order to be warned about it. It won’t be shared, and it won’t pop up in your recommended lists. I suppose outside sources can still link to it, or at least tell you what to search for. But they’ll try to prevent that, too.

    People are lazy. They don’t want to go around searching for specific videos like a website in the days before popular search engines. They want them laid at their feet as offerings.

    SJWs bank on our lassitude.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I guess you can still watch it from the browser, but not after you opened it in the app. Or else you have to go back to the source and share it from there, which is cumbersome. A lot of people won't bother with it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. the cynic says:

    Wojcicki is a jew and her sister was one of the co-founders and current CEO of 23andme

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Wojcicki

    her sister that founded 23andme was married to globalist jew sergey brin who was one of the co-founders of google

    23andme is notorious for telling people that they are 5-25% ashkenazi

    its a genius plan really

    trick the gullible goyim into having allegiance to Israel

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  42. “Woke-jacked.”

    Read More
    • LOL: Negrolphin Pool
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  43. @Anon
    Make it boomerang.

    Hillary used 'deplorable' as insult but became badge of honor.

    Chinese movies used to be promoted in the US as 'banned in China'. It added to the appeal.

    'Flagged by Youtube' should be a badge of honor.

    Or 'wojcicked'.

    A video that's been wojcicked must be special.

    Good idea. But to “susan” is more memorable, and more mocking.
    Bring the pain home, as in “santorum”; make her name a farce.

    This video/URL has been Susaned.

    A Dry White Susan.

    Google Salad with (Soviet) Russian Susaning.

    The 12 Days of Google: “…six Susans censoring…”

    It is plausible and well earned to make her the public face of SJW Internet control, a sort of Diana Moon Glompers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. One of the main reports you get from 23andme is ‘Ashkenazi or not’ which is a bit weird for only 0.1% of the world’s population. Maybe they are building up a database.

    Read More
    • Replies: @biz
    That's at least in part because there are a few very specific loci that show Ashkenazi ancestry or not, because of a bottleneck / founder effect. A similar thing can not be done with other ethnicities.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. Most importantly, they disabled the video sharing functionality from YouTube mobile app. There’s no way to share the video from the phone after watching it.

    Lenin said: “every kitchen maid will be able to learn how to run a state”. That lasted for 70 years. Let’s see how long will YouTube and Google last .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  46. @Thea
    Wojcicki grew up around really smart people at Stanford in a family of overachievers.

    her parents had no sons so it was up to her & her sisters to carry on the tradition. She likely realized that some of the men around her were much smarter than she could even comprehend. Combining that with not being very beautiful seem to have created both blindness and resentment despite her incredibly fortunate circumstances in life.

    She isn't a woman in tech she is a business woman surrounded by men in tech.

    her parents had no sons so it was up to her & her sisters to carry on the tradition. She likely realized that some of the men around her were much smarter than she could even comprehend.

    The kernel of our present difficulties.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  47. @Daniel Chieh
    I remember telling a woman that our reality has become 1984. She said that's silly, she was born in 1990 so why would she have to know about anything that came before she was born?

    I remember telling a woman that our reality has become 1984. She said that’s silly, she was born in 1990 so why would she have to know about anything that came before she was born?

    Great – that sums it*** up. To answer your quote in a way, that’s even more way back than 1984 - -

    - – Santca simplicitas!

    ***
    Ah what it means in this case: Current day mentality – Geschichtsvergessenheit (=having forgotten about history) – historical narcissism – resistance to educate yourself – being here now whithout understanding what “being” and “here” (as opposed to there…) and now (as opposed to then) mean… sigh – or doing what needs to be done (=live) and ask no questions at all –

    (Sigh, sigh, – – as I said – Sancta simplicitas!)

    Read More
    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. Pericles says:
    @Anon
    Make it boomerang.

    Hillary used 'deplorable' as insult but became badge of honor.

    Chinese movies used to be promoted in the US as 'banned in China'. It added to the appeal.

    'Flagged by Youtube' should be a badge of honor.

    Or 'wojcicked'.

    A video that's been wojcicked must be special.

    That video has been ‘googled’.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. I’m sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites – Bermuda for example – are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality – traditional British-style education for example – are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    ‘Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel’… Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn’t say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn’t invent the wheel.

    ‘No blacks had a written language’. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge’ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor’s ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    ‘No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden’. I don’t know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?
     
    Greg Cochran dealt with it recently, see also here. Sub-Saharans could've domesticated ostriches, for example. Probably many other animals. Aurochs and tarpans were extremely difficult animals to work with, and yet two of the most important domesticated animals descended from them.
    , @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Meroitic alphabet. The Meroitic script refers to two alphasyllabaric scripts developed to write the Kushite language at the beginning of the Meroitic Period (3rd century BCE) of the Kingdom of Kush. The two scripts are Meroitic Cursive derived of Demotic Egyptian and Meroitic Hieroglyphs derived of Egyptian Hieroglyphs ...


    Yup, deh wuz kangz all right.
    , @Jared Taylor
    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.
    , @Jared Taylor
    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.
    , @EmmanuelGoldstein
    None of these achievements are sub saharan. Meroitic scripts are derived from Egyptian ones. And Nile connects to Egypt: if you travel in Sudan you will see that it's one Egypt-like country that is very different from sub saharan Africa. And the domestication of camel is from Arabs that had presence in East Africa since at least the 7th century. Same with two story buildings- also from Arabs.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. donut says:
    1985154

    Still on youtube . Like , subscribe , and share .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. donut says:

    This will prolly be gone soon too ’cause it’s raciss .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  52. @guest
    The real tricky part is not the warning but the fact that you have to find the video in order to be warned about it. It won't be shared, and it won't pop up in your recommended lists. I suppose outside sources can still link to it, or at least tell you what to search for. But they'll try to prevent that, too.

    People are lazy. They don't want to go around searching for specific videos like a website in the days before popular search engines. They want them laid at their feet as offerings.

    SJWs bank on our lassitude.

    I guess you can still watch it from the browser, but not after you opened it in the app. Or else you have to go back to the source and share it from there, which is cumbersome. A lot of people won’t bother with it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. @TelfoedJohn
    I'm sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites - Bermuda for example - are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality - traditional British-style education for example - are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    'Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel'... Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn't say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn't invent the wheel.

    'No blacks had a written language'. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge'ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor's ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    'No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden'. I don't know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    Greg Cochran dealt with it recently, see also here. Sub-Saharans could’ve domesticated ostriches, for example. Probably many other animals. Aurochs and tarpans were extremely difficult animals to work with, and yet two of the most important domesticated animals descended from them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Zebras? Elephants?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  54. What I love is the orwellian expression “YouTube community”, which means YouTube, LLC.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  55. El Dato says:
    @Cagey Beast
    Interestingly, Susan Wojcicki’s sister Anna founded, with then-husband Sergey’s money, 23andMe...

    From what I've read and heard online, 23andMe just can't let let anyone get away with being of entirely European ancestry. Everybody's got to be 1% Amerindian 0.5% sub-Saharan African or something. They should send in the DNA of that Bronze Age mummy they found in a glacier in the Alps to see if he's part Cherokee and Ashkenazi too.

    Wasn’t 23andMe outed as a scam operation?

    Providing dubious data to customer while accumulating a war chest to be “monetized”. Quite a bit like Google, where the the person on the clickety side of things does not happen to be the customer.

    What the search engine is to Google, the Personal Genome Service is to 23andMe. The company is not exactly hiding its ambitions. “The long game here is not to make money selling kits, although the kits are essential to get the base level data,” Patrick Chung, a 23andMe board member, told FastCompany last month. “Once you have the data, [the company] does actually become the Google of personalized health care.” The company has lowered the price of the kit again and again, most recently from $299 to a mere $99, practically making it a stocking-stuffer. All the better to induce volunteers to give 23andMe the data it so desperately wants. (Currently, the database contains the genetic information of some half a million people, a number Wojcicki reportedly wants to double by year end.)

    That’s just the beginning, though. 23andMe reserves the right to use your personal information—including your genome—to inform you about events and to try to sell you products and services. There is a much more lucrative market waiting in the wings, too. One could easily imagine how insurance companies and pharmaceutical firms might be interested in getting their hands on your genetic information, the better to sell you products (or deny them to you). According to 23andMe’s privacy policy, that wouldn’t be an acceptable use of the database. Although 23andMe admits that it will share aggregate information about users genomes to third parties, it adamantly insists that it will not sell your personal genetic information without your explicit consent.

    We’ve heard that one before. Back when Google was first launched, the founders insisted that the company would never sell you out to advertisers. The company admitted that it would share aggregate information about users’ behavior with anyone who ponied up enough money, but the company’s privacy policy promised that “[i]ndividually identifiable information about you is not willfully disclosed to any third party without first receiving your permission.” A decade and a half later, after countless minuscule frog-in-boiling-water changes, Google’s privacy policy is craftily worded, diluting the word “consent” so that it’s implicit in most cases.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. @Chrisnonymous
    When a user posts a video YouTube, the user can choose to disallow embedding.

    Embedding is different from sharing, which is the feature that allows you to email the video easily or post it on Twitter, Facebook, etc.

    OK, Chris, thanks for the explanation of the difference. Anyone who understands copy-and-paste (cntrl-c, cntrl-v) really shouldn’t have a problem sharing this stuff then. Why would Jared Taylor not want his video to be embedded, is what I wonder now?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. Ganderson says:
    @Luke Lea
    The Barbara Streisand effect? Maybe a compilation of links to affected videos would be an effective way to counter this kind of censorship?

    Semi OT: When my pals and I play golf, when , say, a 7 iron is mishit, but still manages to bounce straight down the fairway the requisite 150-160 yards, we call it a “Barbara Streisand”- it’s ugly, but it’s still working!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. Ganderson says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I tested it too, and it can't seem to be embedded. I guess that was the "sharing" part. That is one hell of an admission that youtube is not a believer in free speech - "sharing of the ideas in this video is NOT APPROVED."

    However, I noticed what I thought was a random instance of an video that could not be embedded more than 1/2 a year back, a 5-minute compilation of the subplot of the "Cigar Store Indian" Seinfeld episode involving specifically the anti-PC lampooning. Maybe it wasn't so random after all. Another piece of the same episode (funny as hell) that I put here is not embed-blocked, or we are ALLOWED to share.

    Does anyone know if liveleak videos can be embedded? I linked to one, but did not check out whether this was possible.

    Wooden Indians you say?

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @reiner Tor

    With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?
     
    Greg Cochran dealt with it recently, see also here. Sub-Saharans could've domesticated ostriches, for example. Probably many other animals. Aurochs and tarpans were extremely difficult animals to work with, and yet two of the most important domesticated animals descended from them.

    Zebras? Elephants?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    It's quite obvious that the domestication of zebras wouldn't be much more difficult (if at all), than the domestication of tarpans. Elephants are different, because their generation times are so long. Still, Indians (and Burmese, Thai, etc.) managed to at least tame wild elephants. It's often asserted that because African elephants are larger and more aggressive, it's impossible to tame them. Well, Indian mahouts did manage to do that.

    But Africa is full of large tamable animals with shorter life cycles, of which zebras and ostriches are but two examples. It's possible that the African buffalo was impossible to domesticate (due to its "unpredictable nature" - but did aurochs have "predictable nature", when even domesticated bulls are quite unpredictable and aggressive?), but there are many types of antelopes and other large animals, and I think it's quite incredible to believe that not one of them was possible to domesticate. (Except, of course, the ones where it's proven that they could be, like ostriches or zebras.)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. @TelfoedJohn
    I'm sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites - Bermuda for example - are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality - traditional British-style education for example - are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    'Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel'... Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn't say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn't invent the wheel.

    'No blacks had a written language'. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge'ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor's ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    'No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden'. I don't know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    Meroitic alphabet. The Meroitic script refers to two alphasyllabaric scripts developed to write the Kushite language at the beginning of the Meroitic Period (3rd century BCE) of the Kingdom of Kush. The two scripts are Meroitic Cursive derived of Demotic Egyptian and Meroitic Hieroglyphs derived of Egyptian Hieroglyphs …

    Yup, deh wuz kangz all right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    The Phoenician alphabet, an ancestor of the letters you are reading, was derived from hieroglyphs.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. @TelfoedJohn
    I'm sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites - Bermuda for example - are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality - traditional British-style education for example - are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    'Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel'... Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn't say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn't invent the wheel.

    'No blacks had a written language'. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge'ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor's ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    'No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden'. I don't know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    The Kingdom of Kush (Meröe) and Ethiopia are south of the Sahara. I understand your point - Black Africa is not as literary as Europe and this probably has a genetic effect on IQ. But there is no need to invent facts.
    , @Matt
    Ethiopia is south of the Sahara, and they've been writing in Ge'ez for quite a while.. Ge'ez script is derived from south Arabian, but Europeans never came up with any written languages all on their own either (the Greek alphabet is derived from Phoenician, and every other European alphabet is derived ultimately from Greek).

    Ethiopians also have a calendar (which, yes, is derived from the Coptic calendar), contrary to your assertion in the video.

    Finally, you also claim that Africans south of the Sahara never built any two-story buildings. But if you visit the the stone-cut churches of Lalibela (themselves impressive in their own right), you will find two-story houses, built long ago, in the surrounding villages.

    None of this is particularly difficult. You could have inferred that Ethiopians must have had written language, a calendar, and architectural skills, for example. Anyone with a basic level of education knows that Ethiopians were Christian from a very early period (being the second state in world history, after Armenia, to officially adopt Christianity, it Christianized long before most of Europe did. It took until 1387, for example, for Lithuania to finally abandon its primitive ooga-booga nonsense).

    Being Christian, they would have needed to have a liturgy, read the Bible, keep track of their feast days for saints and so on, and build churches. It's not a huge leap from there to realize they needed to have writing, a calendar, and the ability to construct buildings.

    All it takes is a rudimentary, Wikipedia-level understanding of world history, and a slight inclination to give your fellow human beings whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa the benefit of the doubt. Your video forces the conclusion that you lack at least one of these.

    For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it's the former, since I doubt you care much about having the latter, and for someone who makes as much effort to sound educated as you do, lacking the former would be highly embarrassing.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. @TelfoedJohn
    I'm sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites - Bermuda for example - are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality - traditional British-style education for example - are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    'Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel'... Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn't say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn't invent the wheel.

    'No blacks had a written language'. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge'ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor's ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    'No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden'. I don't know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whoever
    Why do you not permit me to comment at your website?
    If I've been absent for months, I may be able to sneak one in without it going to moderation and then being removed, but after a few days the posted item is removed, as well. Why? I don't write anything different from what I write here, yet Unz doesn't gasp and stagger back blindly feeling for his fainting couch when I post. But you do. How are you different from Susan Wojcicki et al?
    Since you've made it clear by your actions that you don't want me reading your website, I won't. That's your goal, right? -- keep the riff-raff, fringe lunatics and crackpots away and only allow access to the rational, educated, professional middle-class.
    (・`ヘ´・)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anon
    Make it boomerang.

    Hillary used 'deplorable' as insult but became badge of honor.

    Chinese movies used to be promoted in the US as 'banned in China'. It added to the appeal.

    'Flagged by Youtube' should be a badge of honor.

    Or 'wojcicked'.

    A video that's been wojcicked must be special.

    Or ‘wojcicked’.

    Wojacked

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy

    Wojacked
     
    If your DNA gets stolen, or just misplaced, just call that handy 800 number, enter your personalized code and the DNA recovery notice will be forwarded to the authorities for appropriate action.

    For emergency service, pay extra to have the secure code transmitted for said DNA to be disabled before it self-replicates in the wild.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. @TelfoedJohn
    I'm sympathetic to the taboo-busting element of the video, but he gets a few things wrong.

    IQ. The areas where blacks perform at a similar level to whites - Bermuda for example - are never mentioned. And so the reasons for the the relative equality - traditional British-style education for example - are never examined. (Interestingly, many prosperous West Africans in Britain send their kids to African schools for the majority of their schooling, because the African schools retain the traditional disciplinarian approach, and a more classical range of subject matters).

    'Before outsiders came, not one African society had invented the wheel'... Well, the wheel was probably invented once or twice somewhere in Eurasia. It doesn't say much about their relative inventiveness that Britons or Japanese didn't invent the wheel.

    'No blacks had a written language'. Meroitic script in Sudan and Ge'ez in and around Ethiopia were used long before Jared Taylor's ancestors could read and write. This is not we-wuz-kangs stuff, just boring history.

    'No blacks had domesticated any beasts of burden'. I don't know, the camel seems to have a long history just under the Sahara. With domestication, you deal with what you have around you. Does he expect Africans to domesticate the Yak, the Reindeer, the Llama?

    None of these achievements are sub saharan. Meroitic scripts are derived from Egyptian ones. And Nile connects to Egypt: if you travel in Sudan you will see that it’s one Egypt-like country that is very different from sub saharan Africa. And the domestication of camel is from Arabs that had presence in East Africa since at least the 7th century. Same with two story buildings- also from Arabs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    The wiki article mentions camel domestication in South Arabia and Somalia around 3000 BC, long before the 7th century.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. Mr. Anon says:
    @Olorin
    I'd like Miz Wo to give an example of a video that isn't "inappropriate or offensive to some audiences."

    I’d like Miz Wo to give an example of a video that isn’t “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.”

    Until recently at least, YouTube was allowing a large number of sick and disturbing videos to be streamed. These videos seemed designed to be aimed at children. Attempts to flag these videos as “inappropriate” were often ignored by YouTube.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4353182/Disturbing-videos-posed-popular-cartoons.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. Mr. Anon says:

    You can see any number of videos of Noel Ignatiev or Tim Wise or Yvette Falarca speaking on YouTube – no disclaimers or warning screens.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  67. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    “What happened to all the Lefties who used to chortle about the rubes at the Scopes Monkey Trial??”

    Past: preaching “science” to illiterate Christian rubes –> we liberals are smarter than you.

    Present: banning the “science” of heredity –> we liberals are morally superior to you.

    It’s simple. Liberals do whatever benefits them personally. That’s what defines a liberal. They certainly aren’t guided by logic and reason.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  68. Mr. Anon says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    I'm quite disappointed in Google and YouTube. I've been a huge Google fan.

    This damages their reputation as a neutral outlet and gives them a reputation as an ideologically biased platform. This creates an impetus for a me too competitor that simply provides a simple ideologically neutral platform.

    I would bet that Google will come to regret this move when they don't like the reputation this gives them.

    I would bet that Google will come to regret this move when they don’t like the reputation this gives them.

    They’re Google. They can manufacture any reputation they like.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. hyperbola says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    I'm quite disappointed in Google and YouTube. I've been a huge Google fan.

    This damages their reputation as a neutral outlet and gives them a reputation as an ideologically biased platform. This creates an impetus for a me too competitor that simply provides a simple ideologically neutral platform.

    I would bet that Google will come to regret this move when they don't like the reputation this gives them.

    How the CIA made Google – INSURGE intelligence – Medium

    https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/how-the-cia-made-google-e836451a959e

    Why Google made the NSA – INSURGE intelligence – Medium

    https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/why-google-made-the-nsa-2a80584c9c1

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. @Cagey Beast
    Interestingly, Susan Wojcicki’s sister Anna founded, with then-husband Sergey’s money, 23andMe...

    From what I've read and heard online, 23andMe just can't let let anyone get away with being of entirely European ancestry. Everybody's got to be 1% Amerindian 0.5% sub-Saharan African or something. They should send in the DNA of that Bronze Age mummy they found in a glacier in the Alps to see if he's part Cherokee and Ashkenazi too.

    “From what I’ve read and heard online, 23andMe just can’t let let anyone get away with being of entirely European ancestry. Everybody’s got to be 1% Amerindian 0.5% sub-Saharan African or something. ”

    I’m a member of 23andme, have seen many people’s ancestry reports, and this simply isn’t true. The only white people who routinely come up with amerindian or african ancestry are those with ancestry from places where you would expect it: Latin America, South Africa, and to a lesser extent, Iberia and the Southern US.

    Even 23andme’s published study based on member data indicated that non-Euro ancestry was absent in the vast majority of US whites, only present in low single digits in western Europeans, and almost completely undetected in eastern Euros.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. I’d love to see what my DNA analysis might reveal, but the two main purveyors of the service creepe out. I don’t trust them one bit, so thanks, but no thanks.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  72. biz says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    One of the main reports you get from 23andme is 'Ashkenazi or not' which is a bit weird for only 0.1% of the world's population. Maybe they are building up a database.

    That’s at least in part because there are a few very specific loci that show Ashkenazi ancestry or not, because of a bottleneck / founder effect. A similar thing can not be done with other ethnicities.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. whoever says: • Website
    @Jared Taylor
    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.

    Why do you not permit me to comment at your website?
    If I’ve been absent for months, I may be able to sneak one in without it going to moderation and then being removed, but after a few days the posted item is removed, as well. Why? I don’t write anything different from what I write here, yet Unz doesn’t gasp and stagger back blindly feeling for his fainting couch when I post. But you do. How are you different from Susan Wojcicki et al?
    Since you’ve made it clear by your actions that you don’t want me reading your website, I won’t. That’s your goal, right? — keep the riff-raff, fringe lunatics and crackpots away and only allow access to the rational, educated, professional middle-class.
    (・`ヘ´・)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. @Ed
    What's troubling to me is the stated reason why they're disabling comments, sharing etc.

    It appears that the only criteria is if it's deemed, "inappropriate or offensive to some audiences." Some people find Beyoncé gyrating in skimpy outfits offensive will her videos now be disabled?

    All audiences are equal, but “some audiences” are more equal than others. Once again, the infamous “who, whom?” rears its ugly head.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Forbes says:
    @Ed
    What's troubling to me is the stated reason why they're disabling comments, sharing etc.

    It appears that the only criteria is if it's deemed, "inappropriate or offensive to some audiences." Some people find Beyoncé gyrating in skimpy outfits offensive will her videos now be disabled?

    It appears that the only criteria is if it’s deemed, “inappropriate or offensive to some audiences.”

    Boilerplate inoffensive BS language, is all. Reads like a TV/movie rating. Criteria that is mush is no criteria at all.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Meroitic alphabet. The Meroitic script refers to two alphasyllabaric scripts developed to write the Kushite language at the beginning of the Meroitic Period (3rd century BCE) of the Kingdom of Kush. The two scripts are Meroitic Cursive derived of Demotic Egyptian and Meroitic Hieroglyphs derived of Egyptian Hieroglyphs ...


    Yup, deh wuz kangz all right.

    The Phoenician alphabet, an ancestor of the letters you are reading, was derived from hieroglyphs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. @Jared Taylor
    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.

    The Kingdom of Kush (Meröe) and Ethiopia are south of the Sahara. I understand your point – Black Africa is not as literary as Europe and this probably has a genetic effect on IQ. But there is no need to invent facts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt

    there is no need to invent facts.
     
    There clearly is. Mr. Taylor has been in the white race huckster industry for far longer than you or me, and I trust him about what he needs to do a lot more than I trust you. Let the man do his job.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  78. @EmmanuelGoldstein
    None of these achievements are sub saharan. Meroitic scripts are derived from Egyptian ones. And Nile connects to Egypt: if you travel in Sudan you will see that it's one Egypt-like country that is very different from sub saharan Africa. And the domestication of camel is from Arabs that had presence in East Africa since at least the 7th century. Same with two story buildings- also from Arabs.

    The wiki article mentions camel domestication in South Arabia and Somalia around 3000 BC, long before the 7th century.

    Read More
    • Replies: @EmmanuelGoldstein
    Exactly, Somalis are related to Arabs and not to sub saharan Africans. Check any haplotype map. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_T-M184
    , @EmmanuelGoldstein
    PS. Any map of African haplogroups shows that while Somalis and Ethiopians do have haplogroup L, they are fundamentally different from sub Saharan Africans in having haplogroups M and N, which makes them close to Arabs
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macro-haplogroup_L_(mtDNA)

    In other words, there's not so much green on this map in Sudan or Ethiopia, but a lot of green in the sub-Saharan Africa:
    http://photobucket.com/gallery/http://s88.photobucket.com/user/argiedude/media/Africay-dna-allstudiescombined7000s.gif.html

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. Anon 2 says:
    @Thea
    Wojcicki grew up around really smart people at Stanford in a family of overachievers.

    her parents had no sons so it was up to her & her sisters to carry on the tradition. She likely realized that some of the men around her were much smarter than she could even comprehend. Combining that with not being very beautiful seem to have created both blindness and resentment despite her incredibly fortunate circumstances in life.

    She isn't a woman in tech she is a business woman surrounded by men in tech.

    Susan Wojcicki is half-Polish, half-Jewish. Her Polish
    father is the former chair of the Physics Dept. at Stanford.
    Wojcicki is a fairly common name in Poland

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Prof. Wojcicki was likely a colleague of William Shockley in the Stanford physics department. Maybe that's where his daughter Ann got her interest in genetics?
    , @Thea
    My own father is a half-polish chemist. He had no sons and really pushed my sister and me into science. He had a " your career is everything" mentality and enjoyed bragging about our math prowess.

    I've been consciously trying to move away from too much hbd centered identity politics but, man, the patterns.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. @Jim Bob Lassiter
    Zebras? Elephants?

    It’s quite obvious that the domestication of zebras wouldn’t be much more difficult (if at all), than the domestication of tarpans. Elephants are different, because their generation times are so long. Still, Indians (and Burmese, Thai, etc.) managed to at least tame wild elephants. It’s often asserted that because African elephants are larger and more aggressive, it’s impossible to tame them. Well, Indian mahouts did manage to do that.

    But Africa is full of large tamable animals with shorter life cycles, of which zebras and ostriches are but two examples. It’s possible that the African buffalo was impossible to domesticate (due to its “unpredictable nature” – but did aurochs have “predictable nature”, when even domesticated bulls are quite unpredictable and aggressive?), but there are many types of antelopes and other large animals, and I think it’s quite incredible to believe that not one of them was possible to domesticate. (Except, of course, the ones where it’s proven that they could be, like ostriches or zebras.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    An Abyssinian king conquered Yemen, and marched up to Mecca and smashed the Kaaba, with an army that included (presumably African bush) elephants. It's mentioned in the Quran and several other sources.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_of_the_Elephant

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraha
    , @Yak-15
    Hannibal had elephants
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. Ivy says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Or ‘wojcicked’.
     
    Wojacked

    Wojacked

    If your DNA gets stolen, or just misplaced, just call that handy 800 number, enter your personalized code and the DNA recovery notice will be forwarded to the authorities for appropriate action.

    For emergency service, pay extra to have the secure code transmitted for said DNA to be disabled before it self-replicates in the wild.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. Matt says:
    @Jared Taylor
    My observation about a lack of written languages was for people South of the Sahara. The Meroitic alphabet was developed in the kingdom of Kush, which is more Saharan than sub-Saharan. Furthermore, both its cursive and hieroglyphic forms are derived from Egyptian writing. For these reasons, I do not think it is appropriate to cite Meroitic writing as a cultural achievement of black Africans.

    Ethiopia is south of the Sahara, and they’ve been writing in Ge’ez for quite a while.. Ge’ez script is derived from south Arabian, but Europeans never came up with any written languages all on their own either (the Greek alphabet is derived from Phoenician, and every other European alphabet is derived ultimately from Greek).

    Ethiopians also have a calendar (which, yes, is derived from the Coptic calendar), contrary to your assertion in the video.

    Finally, you also claim that Africans south of the Sahara never built any two-story buildings. But if you visit the the stone-cut churches of Lalibela (themselves impressive in their own right), you will find two-story houses, built long ago, in the surrounding villages.

    None of this is particularly difficult. You could have inferred that Ethiopians must have had written language, a calendar, and architectural skills, for example. Anyone with a basic level of education knows that Ethiopians were Christian from a very early period (being the second state in world history, after Armenia, to officially adopt Christianity, it Christianized long before most of Europe did. It took until 1387, for example, for Lithuania to finally abandon its primitive ooga-booga nonsense).

    Being Christian, they would have needed to have a liturgy, read the Bible, keep track of their feast days for saints and so on, and build churches. It’s not a huge leap from there to realize they needed to have writing, a calendar, and the ability to construct buildings.

    All it takes is a rudimentary, Wikipedia-level understanding of world history, and a slight inclination to give your fellow human beings whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa the benefit of the doubt. Your video forces the conclusion that you lack at least one of these.

    For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it’s the former, since I doubt you care much about having the latter, and for someone who makes as much effort to sound educated as you do, lacking the former would be highly embarrassing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    *"For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it’s the latter..."
    , @TelfoedJohn
    It takes guts for Jared Taylor to present himself as an expert on Stupidity and Africa when he doesn't seem to know where the fucking Sahara is.
    , @AM
    Okay, so if I summarize your post correctly, Jared Taylor is wrong because Ethiopians managed modest houses and churches because they had Christianity. (They also had Judaism, by the way).

    That arguement doesn't really negate his broader point. Nigeria can't build it's own roads. Most African country can not keep the trains running on time or in some cases, at all. Okay, fine 2 story houses in Ethiopia - not the norm and Ethiopia doesn't get to 3 story houses or cathedrals or trains or calculus.

    It's cherry picking really. You've got a very odd place in Africa as compared to the rest of Africa and then saying it means the general trend observed doesn't exist. Sorry, no.

    All Taylor has to say to be correct,is "except Ethiopia" and even they don't exactly measure up to the West. shrug
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. matt says:
    @reiner Tor
    It's quite obvious that the domestication of zebras wouldn't be much more difficult (if at all), than the domestication of tarpans. Elephants are different, because their generation times are so long. Still, Indians (and Burmese, Thai, etc.) managed to at least tame wild elephants. It's often asserted that because African elephants are larger and more aggressive, it's impossible to tame them. Well, Indian mahouts did manage to do that.

    But Africa is full of large tamable animals with shorter life cycles, of which zebras and ostriches are but two examples. It's possible that the African buffalo was impossible to domesticate (due to its "unpredictable nature" - but did aurochs have "predictable nature", when even domesticated bulls are quite unpredictable and aggressive?), but there are many types of antelopes and other large animals, and I think it's quite incredible to believe that not one of them was possible to domesticate. (Except, of course, the ones where it's proven that they could be, like ostriches or zebras.)

    An Abyssinian king conquered Yemen, and marched up to Mecca and smashed the Kaaba, with an army that included (presumably African bush) elephants. It’s mentioned in the Quran and several other sources.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_of_the_Elephant

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraha

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Yes, Hannibal had elephants too.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. @Anon 2
    Susan Wojcicki is half-Polish, half-Jewish. Her Polish
    father is the former chair of the Physics Dept. at Stanford.
    Wojcicki is a fairly common name in Poland

    Prof. Wojcicki was likely a colleague of William Shockley in the Stanford physics department. Maybe that’s where his daughter Ann got her interest in genetics?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    I checked. Prof. Wojcicki (who specialized in elementary
    particle physics) joined the Stanford Physics faculty in 1966.
    William Shockley joined Stanford very late in his career, in
    1963, after he had already won the Nobel Prize, but he was
    in the Engineering Dept. Nevertheless, physics and engineering
    are close so it's entirely possible that Shockley and Wojcicki
    knew each other personally.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. matt says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    The Kingdom of Kush (Meröe) and Ethiopia are south of the Sahara. I understand your point - Black Africa is not as literary as Europe and this probably has a genetic effect on IQ. But there is no need to invent facts.

    there is no need to invent facts.

    There clearly is. Mr. Taylor has been in the white race huckster industry for far longer than you or me, and I trust him about what he needs to do a lot more than I trust you. Let the man do his job.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. matt says:
    @Matt
    Ethiopia is south of the Sahara, and they've been writing in Ge'ez for quite a while.. Ge'ez script is derived from south Arabian, but Europeans never came up with any written languages all on their own either (the Greek alphabet is derived from Phoenician, and every other European alphabet is derived ultimately from Greek).

    Ethiopians also have a calendar (which, yes, is derived from the Coptic calendar), contrary to your assertion in the video.

    Finally, you also claim that Africans south of the Sahara never built any two-story buildings. But if you visit the the stone-cut churches of Lalibela (themselves impressive in their own right), you will find two-story houses, built long ago, in the surrounding villages.

    None of this is particularly difficult. You could have inferred that Ethiopians must have had written language, a calendar, and architectural skills, for example. Anyone with a basic level of education knows that Ethiopians were Christian from a very early period (being the second state in world history, after Armenia, to officially adopt Christianity, it Christianized long before most of Europe did. It took until 1387, for example, for Lithuania to finally abandon its primitive ooga-booga nonsense).

    Being Christian, they would have needed to have a liturgy, read the Bible, keep track of their feast days for saints and so on, and build churches. It's not a huge leap from there to realize they needed to have writing, a calendar, and the ability to construct buildings.

    All it takes is a rudimentary, Wikipedia-level understanding of world history, and a slight inclination to give your fellow human beings whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa the benefit of the doubt. Your video forces the conclusion that you lack at least one of these.

    For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it's the former, since I doubt you care much about having the latter, and for someone who makes as much effort to sound educated as you do, lacking the former would be highly embarrassing.

    *”For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it’s the latter…”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. Ed says:
    @Dr. X
    The intellectual schizophrenia of the contemporary Leftist power structure is breathtaking.

    You can get a DNA analysis done on yourself and your prospective partner, or failing that, you can go to a sperm bank where donors are screened for heritable traits and choose your pick. You can an get an amniocentesis done to see if your developing offspring will have a genetic defect and abort him if he does, but, God forbid, you can't watch Jared Taylor discuss heritable intelligence traits in discrete population groups, which is straight out of Biology 101, on YouTube.

    What happened to all the Lefties who used to chortle about the rubes at the Scopes Monkey Trial???

    Pretty f---ed up, when you really think about it...

    To you point:

    There’s a Jewish doctor that meets mostly black lesbians in bathrooms across NYC to hand over his sperm. Everyone is getting in on the DNA act but yet we’re not supposed to explicitly talk about it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. @Matt
    Ethiopia is south of the Sahara, and they've been writing in Ge'ez for quite a while.. Ge'ez script is derived from south Arabian, but Europeans never came up with any written languages all on their own either (the Greek alphabet is derived from Phoenician, and every other European alphabet is derived ultimately from Greek).

    Ethiopians also have a calendar (which, yes, is derived from the Coptic calendar), contrary to your assertion in the video.

    Finally, you also claim that Africans south of the Sahara never built any two-story buildings. But if you visit the the stone-cut churches of Lalibela (themselves impressive in their own right), you will find two-story houses, built long ago, in the surrounding villages.

    None of this is particularly difficult. You could have inferred that Ethiopians must have had written language, a calendar, and architectural skills, for example. Anyone with a basic level of education knows that Ethiopians were Christian from a very early period (being the second state in world history, after Armenia, to officially adopt Christianity, it Christianized long before most of Europe did. It took until 1387, for example, for Lithuania to finally abandon its primitive ooga-booga nonsense).

    Being Christian, they would have needed to have a liturgy, read the Bible, keep track of their feast days for saints and so on, and build churches. It's not a huge leap from there to realize they needed to have writing, a calendar, and the ability to construct buildings.

    All it takes is a rudimentary, Wikipedia-level understanding of world history, and a slight inclination to give your fellow human beings whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa the benefit of the doubt. Your video forces the conclusion that you lack at least one of these.

    For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it's the former, since I doubt you care much about having the latter, and for someone who makes as much effort to sound educated as you do, lacking the former would be highly embarrassing.

    It takes guts for Jared Taylor to present himself as an expert on Stupidity and Africa when he doesn’t seem to know where the fucking Sahara is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    That's right! I completely forgot. I said that Taylor must lack either a rudimentary understanding of world history, or a minimal inclination to be charitable toward black Africans. I still think it's highly unlikely he possesses either of these, but there's one more thing he might lack. He might, theoretically, be minimally charitable toward black people, and know that Ethiopia has been Christian for quite some time, but lack the minimal level of intelligence required to infer the obvious conclusions from this.

    Possibly he has some degree of sub-Saharan ancestry, which contributes to his stupidity. Or maybe his theories are just wrong in general.

    , @Chrisnonymous
    Jared Taylor: I was referring to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Beavis: He doesn't even know where the Sahara is.

    Butthead: Yeah, yeah. He can't even read Wikipedia. He must be black or something.

    Beavis & Butthead: Heh heh. Heh heh.

    Wikipedia on "Sub-Saharan Africa":

    Commentators in Arabic in the medieval period used the general term bilâd as-sûdân ("Land of the Blacks") for the vast Sudan region (an expression denoting West and Central Africa[10]), or sometimes extending from the coast of West Africa to Western Sudan.[11] Its equivalent in Southeast Africa was Zanj ("Country of the Blacks"), which was situated in the vicinity of the Great Lakes region.

    The geographers drew an explicit ethnographic distinction between the Sudan region and its analogue Zanj, from the area to their extreme east on the Red Sea coast in the Horn of Africa.[9] In modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea was Al-Habash or Abyssinia,[12] which was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha.[13] In northern Somalia was Barbara or the Bilad al-Barbar ("Land of the Berbers"), which was inhabited by the Eastern Baribah or Barbaroi, as the ancestors of the Somalis were referred to by medieval Arab and ancient Greek geographers, respectively.
     
    I haven't seen the video, but it's pretty obvious just from looking at them that the people of the Horn of Africa, where the buildings, calendars, alphabets etc are from, are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans. Apparently, people have been noticing this for a long time. Or maybe Greek and Arab geographers just didn't understand what "sub-Saharan" meant. After all, they didn't have the UN and high school social studies teachers to tell them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. Anon 2 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Prof. Wojcicki was likely a colleague of William Shockley in the Stanford physics department. Maybe that's where his daughter Ann got her interest in genetics?

    I checked. Prof. Wojcicki (who specialized in elementary
    particle physics) joined the Stanford Physics faculty in 1966.
    William Shockley joined Stanford very late in his career, in
    1963, after he had already won the Nobel Prize, but he was
    in the Engineering Dept. Nevertheless, physics and engineering
    are close so it’s entirely possible that Shockley and Wojcicki
    knew each other personally.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Stanford is probably America's capital of IQ and eugenics.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. @Anon 2
    I checked. Prof. Wojcicki (who specialized in elementary
    particle physics) joined the Stanford Physics faculty in 1966.
    William Shockley joined Stanford very late in his career, in
    1963, after he had already won the Nobel Prize, but he was
    in the Engineering Dept. Nevertheless, physics and engineering
    are close so it's entirely possible that Shockley and Wojcicki
    knew each other personally.

    Stanford is probably America’s capital of IQ and eugenics.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thea
    Growing up surrounded by these people could induce and inferiority complex in the best of us.
    , @Anon 2
    What's funny is that Shockley moved from Bell Labs
    in NJ to Mountain View in 1956 to be closer to his
    ailing mother in Palo Alto, so the fact that Silicon
    Valley came into being in California, and not in
    New Jersey, is partly accidental. New Jersey,
    with Princeton and the Institute for Advanced Studies,
    was also pretty high-powered in the '50s, but it obviously
    couldn't compete with California in weather and scenic
    beauty. Physicists and other high-powered scientists know
    how to live - they organize workshops and summer
    schools at some of the most beautiful places on earth
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. matt says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    It takes guts for Jared Taylor to present himself as an expert on Stupidity and Africa when he doesn't seem to know where the fucking Sahara is.

    That’s right! I completely forgot. I said that Taylor must lack either a rudimentary understanding of world history, or a minimal inclination to be charitable toward black Africans. I still think it’s highly unlikely he possesses either of these, but there’s one more thing he might lack. He might, theoretically, be minimally charitable toward black people, and know that Ethiopia has been Christian for quite some time, but lack the minimal level of intelligence required to infer the obvious conclusions from this.

    Possibly he has some degree of sub-Saharan ancestry, which contributes to his stupidity. Or maybe his theories are just wrong in general.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    And, finally, he could also be a liar.
    , @TelfoedJohn
    My own theory - merely conjecture - is that Jared Taylor has substantial Pygmy ancestry. Pygmies have since time immemorial been enslaved by other Africans, and have an average IQ of only 54. This would explain his animus towards Bantu Africans, and also his inability to grasp certain basic historical and geographical facts.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. Thea says:
    @Anon 2
    Susan Wojcicki is half-Polish, half-Jewish. Her Polish
    father is the former chair of the Physics Dept. at Stanford.
    Wojcicki is a fairly common name in Poland

    My own father is a half-polish chemist. He had no sons and really pushed my sister and me into science. He had a ” your career is everything” mentality and enjoyed bragging about our math prowess.

    I’ve been consciously trying to move away from too much hbd centered identity politics but, man, the patterns.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. Thea says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Stanford is probably America's capital of IQ and eugenics.

    Growing up surrounded by these people could induce and inferiority complex in the best of us.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. matt says:
    @matt
    That's right! I completely forgot. I said that Taylor must lack either a rudimentary understanding of world history, or a minimal inclination to be charitable toward black Africans. I still think it's highly unlikely he possesses either of these, but there's one more thing he might lack. He might, theoretically, be minimally charitable toward black people, and know that Ethiopia has been Christian for quite some time, but lack the minimal level of intelligence required to infer the obvious conclusions from this.

    Possibly he has some degree of sub-Saharan ancestry, which contributes to his stupidity. Or maybe his theories are just wrong in general.

    And, finally, he could also be a liar.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. Anon 2 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Stanford is probably America's capital of IQ and eugenics.

    What’s funny is that Shockley moved from Bell Labs
    in NJ to Mountain View in 1956 to be closer to his
    ailing mother in Palo Alto, so the fact that Silicon
    Valley came into being in California, and not in
    New Jersey, is partly accidental. New Jersey,
    with Princeton and the Institute for Advanced Studies,
    was also pretty high-powered in the ’50s, but it obviously
    couldn’t compete with California in weather and scenic
    beauty. Physicists and other high-powered scientists know
    how to live – they organize workshops and summer
    schools at some of the most beautiful places on earth

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Shockley was friends with Fred Terman, Dean of Engineering at Stanford whose dad Louis Terman introduced IQ testing to America. They'd had parallel jobs in electronic warfare during WWII. Shockley's IQ score famously just missed out being high enough to be included in Louis Terman's famous longitudinal tracking study of high IQ youth.

    I suspect I'm just scratching the surface of how much Stanford, Silicon Valley, electronics, IQ testing, the military-industrial complex, and eugenics advocacy have been interrelated over the last 115 or so years. It didn't just start with Jobs and Wozniak in a garage in 1975.

    , @Anonymous
    WE/Bell Labs was the original home of the transistor and much else of what made Silicon Valley bloom, but they had some of the same problems as Xerox: they were in the phone business, and they worked on things that were useful for the phone network. All else was an offshoot that was spun off eventually. WE had a monopoly with sales of phone equipment to the Bell System, and other telcos bought from other vendors (GTE bought Automatic Electric, or Stromberg Carlson, for example. We'd go through Wisconsin and Michigan on vacation and I would instantly know if that town was Bell or GTE because all the phones were one or the other, payphones, desk sets, everything.).

    I would not be typing this here and you would not be reading it here if Bell hadn't been broken up in 1984. There would be no here here. We'd be reading some obscure print magazine instead.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. @matt
    That's right! I completely forgot. I said that Taylor must lack either a rudimentary understanding of world history, or a minimal inclination to be charitable toward black Africans. I still think it's highly unlikely he possesses either of these, but there's one more thing he might lack. He might, theoretically, be minimally charitable toward black people, and know that Ethiopia has been Christian for quite some time, but lack the minimal level of intelligence required to infer the obvious conclusions from this.

    Possibly he has some degree of sub-Saharan ancestry, which contributes to his stupidity. Or maybe his theories are just wrong in general.

    My own theory – merely conjecture – is that Jared Taylor has substantial Pygmy ancestry. Pygmies have since time immemorial been enslaved by other Africans, and have an average IQ of only 54. This would explain his animus towards Bantu Africans, and also his inability to grasp certain basic historical and geographical facts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM
    In the end, you've devolved almost immediately into name calling and a lack luster, particular argument against Taylor's better, more general ones.

    I can pick out many sub groups of white people that somewhat buck overall trends. Ethiopia had 2 story houses and church or two does not exactly compel a "OMG Taylor was so stupid and wrong" reaction. It's not like you're telling me Ethiopia invented Damascus steel or algebra or something.

    I'd encourage him to absorb your argument and modify what he says so is the whole truth, but he's still more right than the people who need to call a particular person stupid for disagreeing with them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    After seeing newspapers dying and dinosaur media barely drawing viewers on over the air, cable, satellite and phone lines, the brain trust at Google has now gone all in on this failed business model.
    Next I expect they will begin to seek new platforms to ruin with their brilliant strategy of modelling failures across different media.

    GOOGLE. Would you buy this for a Dollar?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  98. @Anon 2
    What's funny is that Shockley moved from Bell Labs
    in NJ to Mountain View in 1956 to be closer to his
    ailing mother in Palo Alto, so the fact that Silicon
    Valley came into being in California, and not in
    New Jersey, is partly accidental. New Jersey,
    with Princeton and the Institute for Advanced Studies,
    was also pretty high-powered in the '50s, but it obviously
    couldn't compete with California in weather and scenic
    beauty. Physicists and other high-powered scientists know
    how to live - they organize workshops and summer
    schools at some of the most beautiful places on earth

    Shockley was friends with Fred Terman, Dean of Engineering at Stanford whose dad Louis Terman introduced IQ testing to America. They’d had parallel jobs in electronic warfare during WWII. Shockley’s IQ score famously just missed out being high enough to be included in Louis Terman’s famous longitudinal tracking study of high IQ youth.

    I suspect I’m just scratching the surface of how much Stanford, Silicon Valley, electronics, IQ testing, the military-industrial complex, and eugenics advocacy have been interrelated over the last 115 or so years. It didn’t just start with Jobs and Wozniak in a garage in 1975.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. @Dr. X
    The intellectual schizophrenia of the contemporary Leftist power structure is breathtaking.

    You can get a DNA analysis done on yourself and your prospective partner, or failing that, you can go to a sperm bank where donors are screened for heritable traits and choose your pick. You can an get an amniocentesis done to see if your developing offspring will have a genetic defect and abort him if he does, but, God forbid, you can't watch Jared Taylor discuss heritable intelligence traits in discrete population groups, which is straight out of Biology 101, on YouTube.

    What happened to all the Lefties who used to chortle about the rubes at the Scopes Monkey Trial???

    Pretty f---ed up, when you really think about it...

    Re: Lefties and Scopes trial (evolution):

    They don’t believe they’re wrong about HBD.

    They believe evolution is true until you get to the obvious: differing IQ averages.

    They don’t have to prove they’re right, thanks to a lot of lying scientists.

    I think the scientists are losing status by contradicting what can only be called “common sense.”

    Maybe their reduced status contributes to the opposition to the theory of global warming.

    If they can flat out deny the obvious, why should anyone support them in the highly technical and non-obvious arguments for global warming?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    By now it seems quaint that the FED.GOV, FCC and the rest give such scrutiny anytime some company considers consolidating multiple broadcast outlets. Is it only obvious to me that the concentration of market power in the few online platforms, Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc. is much more of an issue than if some company bought a couple of radio or tv stations in a single market?

    Do Facebook, Twitter, Youtube & Google enjoy monopoly power?

    To answer that question, just try to imagine if one of the concerns instead tried to suppress popular revolutionary progressive content? The calls for intervention or regulation would no doubt get pretty loud. The dissident right really needs to appropriate the revolutionary left's tactics. Everything from the patient long march through the institutions to lawsuits that game the system and finally everybody's favorite revolution by judicial activism.

    For further reading, here's a summary of the FCC's criteria for review of market concentration of ownership of media properties. Time to update this for the Current Year?


    Newspaper and Broadcast Station Cross-Ownership

    Although the Commission revised the newspaper/broadcast cross-ownership rule in its 2006 quadrennial review order, the court’s 2011 decision vacated and remanded that modified rule. As a result, the Commission’s rules continue to prohibit common ownership of a daily newspaper and a full-power broadcast station (AM, FM, or TV) if the station’s service contour encompasses the newspaper’s city of publication.

    National TV Ownership

    The rule does not limit the number of TV stations a single entity may own nationwide so long as the station group collectively reaches no more than 39 percent of all U.S. TV households. For the purposes of calculating the “national audience reach” under this rule, TV stations on UHF channels (14 and above) count less than TV stations operating on VHF channels (13 and below), this is also known as the UHF Discount.

    Dual TV Network Ownership

    The rule effectively prohibits a merger between any two of these television networks: ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC.

    Local TV Multiple Ownership

    The rule allows an entity to own up to two TV stations in the same DMA if either (1) the service areas – known as “Grade B signal contours” – of the stations do not overlap; or (2) at least one of the stations is not ranked among the top four stations in the DMA (based on market share), and at least eight independently owned TV stations would remain in the market after the proposed combination.

    Local Radio/TV Cross-Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in markets with at least 20 independently owned “media voices” (defined as full power TV stations and radio stations, major newspapers, and the cable system in the market) an entity can own up to two TV stations and six radio stations (or one TV station and seven radio stations); (2) in markets with at least ten independently owned “media voices” an entity can own up to two TV stations and four radio stations; and (3) in the smallest markets an entity may own two TV stations and one radio station. In all markets, an entity must comply with the local radio and local TV ownership limits.

    Local Radio Ownership

    The rule imposes ownership restrictions based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market: (1) in a radio market with 45 or more stations, an entity may own up to eight radio stations, no more than five of which may be in the same service (AM or FM); (2) in a radio market with between 30 and 44 radio stations, an entity may own up to seven radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; (3) in a radio market hosting between 15 and 29 radio stations, an entity may own up to six radio stations, no more than four of which may be in the same service; and (4) in a radio market with 14 or fewer radio stations, an entity may own up to five radio stations, no more than three of which may be in the same service, as long as the entity does not own more than 50 percent of all radio stations in that market.
     
    Pretty interesting that the FCC guarantees no consolidation of competition among at least the 4 tv network players and that no concern can own any more than 1 of the top 4 broadcasters in a particular market. Much much better competition protection than for Youtube, Facebook & Twitter....

    For now FED.GOV needn't actually intervene. It might be fully sufficient to make some noise and declare that if a satisfactory balance isn't found that intervention & regulation might be considered.

    I understand the EU believes Google is a monopoly.

    EU fines Google record $2.7 billion in first antitrust case (dated June 27/2017)

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-google-antitrust-idUSKBN19I108

    But on the whole, the EU is toxic, supporting mass illegal immigration and “hate speech” laws.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. I had my DNA tested a few months ago through 23 and me. I also tested for health issues. For the moment, 23 and me does not test IQ directly. I found the results fascinating and amusing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @grapesoda
    Yeah obviously. I don't think genetic testing could ever test for IQ directly. IQ also depends on development and environment, as well as genetics.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. grapesoda says:
    @Diogenes007
    I had my DNA tested a few months ago through 23 and me. I also tested for health issues. For the moment, 23 and me does not test IQ directly. I found the results fascinating and amusing.

    Yeah obviously. I don’t think genetic testing could ever test for IQ directly. IQ also depends on development and environment, as well as genetics.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diogenes007
    Au contraire, lots of twin studies suggest there is a strong genetic component. And it is measurerable through genetics. Stefan Molyneux has many videos on the subject. There was a researcher (of course I can't remember his name) who got so much push back on his research he stopped his work.
    Here's a link to a random article. http://www.nature.com/news/chinese-project-probes-the-genetics-of-genius-1.12985
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. AM says:
    @Matt
    Ethiopia is south of the Sahara, and they've been writing in Ge'ez for quite a while.. Ge'ez script is derived from south Arabian, but Europeans never came up with any written languages all on their own either (the Greek alphabet is derived from Phoenician, and every other European alphabet is derived ultimately from Greek).

    Ethiopians also have a calendar (which, yes, is derived from the Coptic calendar), contrary to your assertion in the video.

    Finally, you also claim that Africans south of the Sahara never built any two-story buildings. But if you visit the the stone-cut churches of Lalibela (themselves impressive in their own right), you will find two-story houses, built long ago, in the surrounding villages.

    None of this is particularly difficult. You could have inferred that Ethiopians must have had written language, a calendar, and architectural skills, for example. Anyone with a basic level of education knows that Ethiopians were Christian from a very early period (being the second state in world history, after Armenia, to officially adopt Christianity, it Christianized long before most of Europe did. It took until 1387, for example, for Lithuania to finally abandon its primitive ooga-booga nonsense).

    Being Christian, they would have needed to have a liturgy, read the Bible, keep track of their feast days for saints and so on, and build churches. It's not a huge leap from there to realize they needed to have writing, a calendar, and the ability to construct buildings.

    All it takes is a rudimentary, Wikipedia-level understanding of world history, and a slight inclination to give your fellow human beings whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa the benefit of the doubt. Your video forces the conclusion that you lack at least one of these.

    For the sake of your self-esteem, I hope it's the former, since I doubt you care much about having the latter, and for someone who makes as much effort to sound educated as you do, lacking the former would be highly embarrassing.

    Okay, so if I summarize your post correctly, Jared Taylor is wrong because Ethiopians managed modest houses and churches because they had Christianity. (They also had Judaism, by the way).

    That arguement doesn’t really negate his broader point. Nigeria can’t build it’s own roads. Most African country can not keep the trains running on time or in some cases, at all. Okay, fine 2 story houses in Ethiopia – not the norm and Ethiopia doesn’t get to 3 story houses or cathedrals or trains or calculus.

    It’s cherry picking really. You’ve got a very odd place in Africa as compared to the rest of Africa and then saying it means the general trend observed doesn’t exist. Sorry, no.

    All Taylor has to say to be correct,is “except Ethiopia” and even they don’t exactly measure up to the West. shrug

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    Why is Ethiopia odd? Would you care to explain why you think that country goes against the general sub-Saharan trend?
    , @matt
    By the way, I'd encourage you to google "lalibela churches". I'm not sure that I'd describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as "modest". Also, Ethiopia does have cathedrals, like St. George's and Holy Trinity in Addis Ababa. In fact, if you had used some common knowledge about Ethiopia and a little basic reasoning, you should have been able to know that.

    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop. Since Ethiopia practices a very old form of Christianity, it, like Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, is very hierarchical and has bishops. So, it follows that it must have cathedrals, and sure enough it does (for what it's worth, I don't find the cathedrals as impressive as the rock-hewn churches). Again, all it takes is some common knowledge and a little intelligence in order not to fall into these kinds of errors.

    But I'm more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different. After all, any successful interpretation of the evidence needs to account for the all the evidence. So what is it about Ethiopia? I think I can guess what you'll say, but I'd like to hear it from you.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. AM says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    My own theory - merely conjecture - is that Jared Taylor has substantial Pygmy ancestry. Pygmies have since time immemorial been enslaved by other Africans, and have an average IQ of only 54. This would explain his animus towards Bantu Africans, and also his inability to grasp certain basic historical and geographical facts.

    In the end, you’ve devolved almost immediately into name calling and a lack luster, particular argument against Taylor’s better, more general ones.

    I can pick out many sub groups of white people that somewhat buck overall trends. Ethiopia had 2 story houses and church or two does not exactly compel a “OMG Taylor was so stupid and wrong” reaction. It’s not like you’re telling me Ethiopia invented Damascus steel or algebra or something.

    I’d encourage him to absorb your argument and modify what he says so is the whole truth, but he’s still more right than the people who need to call a particular person stupid for disagreeing with them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TelfoedJohn
    To be clear, his general argument may have something to it. But in baldly facing the camera, and being factually incorrect in every other sentence, he subverts his own cause. This approach may work with US presidents like Obama and Trump - politics is a form of theatre - but it doesn't work if you are trying to be scholarly.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. Yak-15 says:
    @reiner Tor
    It's quite obvious that the domestication of zebras wouldn't be much more difficult (if at all), than the domestication of tarpans. Elephants are different, because their generation times are so long. Still, Indians (and Burmese, Thai, etc.) managed to at least tame wild elephants. It's often asserted that because African elephants are larger and more aggressive, it's impossible to tame them. Well, Indian mahouts did manage to do that.

    But Africa is full of large tamable animals with shorter life cycles, of which zebras and ostriches are but two examples. It's possible that the African buffalo was impossible to domesticate (due to its "unpredictable nature" - but did aurochs have "predictable nature", when even domesticated bulls are quite unpredictable and aggressive?), but there are many types of antelopes and other large animals, and I think it's quite incredible to believe that not one of them was possible to domesticate. (Except, of course, the ones where it's proven that they could be, like ostriches or zebras.)

    Hannibal had elephants

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  106. Susan Wojcicki

    Did Poles invent their names by mashing the keyboard randomly?

    Here’s a quiz, Polish name or keyboard mashing:

    Wslov Kuieyntrcekj

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bies Podkrakowski
    That's obviously a Russian name.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon 2
    What's funny is that Shockley moved from Bell Labs
    in NJ to Mountain View in 1956 to be closer to his
    ailing mother in Palo Alto, so the fact that Silicon
    Valley came into being in California, and not in
    New Jersey, is partly accidental. New Jersey,
    with Princeton and the Institute for Advanced Studies,
    was also pretty high-powered in the '50s, but it obviously
    couldn't compete with California in weather and scenic
    beauty. Physicists and other high-powered scientists know
    how to live - they organize workshops and summer
    schools at some of the most beautiful places on earth

    WE/Bell Labs was the original home of the transistor and much else of what made Silicon Valley bloom, but they had some of the same problems as Xerox: they were in the phone business, and they worked on things that were useful for the phone network. All else was an offshoot that was spun off eventually. WE had a monopoly with sales of phone equipment to the Bell System, and other telcos bought from other vendors (GTE bought Automatic Electric, or Stromberg Carlson, for example. We’d go through Wisconsin and Michigan on vacation and I would instantly know if that town was Bell or GTE because all the phones were one or the other, payphones, desk sets, everything.).

    I would not be typing this here and you would not be reading it here if Bell hadn’t been broken up in 1984. There would be no here here. We’d be reading some obscure print magazine instead.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “…so the fact that Silicon Valley came into being in California, and not in New Jersey, is partly accidental.”

    But probably not all that accidental. The military was in the process of miniaturizing avionics, all those early radars, anti-sub electronics, early jammers, and so on. These things needed to be engineered in cooperation with aviation companies. The only question was southern CA or northern. Although southern had more aviation companies, the Bay area had the oldest “flying radar” base (Mofett). And then Lockheed got the contract to build the Polaris missile for nuclear submarines and decided to do this in the Bay area (it was a Navy sub technology locus). This required a big effort and lots of engineers. In total, including support contractors, in only a handful of years probably around 40 thousand engineers and technicians were hired into the Bay area. And of course bought houses. At the time much of the land in what is now silicon valley was open farmland (“the valley of heart’s delight”) rapidly being converted to suburbia. Places like LA and New Jersey were more expensive and harder to get young engineers and the wives to move to. And of course Terman, Stanford, UC, and people like Shockley were up to the eyebrows in all this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Lockheed nuclear sub missile project was the biggest employer in Silicon Valley until the end of the 1980s.

    The military industrial complex largely paid for the tremendous technical infrastructure in the Valley that made it possible for youngsters like Wozniak and Jobs to mess around with microcomputers.

    Stanford missed out on the WWII gold rush in military electronics that boosted Caltech, Harvard, Columbia and some other institutions, so Terman vowed never to let that happen again. By the time the Korean War came along and boosted military budgets he was ready for Stanford to get its share.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @anonymous
    "...so the fact that Silicon Valley came into being in California, and not in New Jersey, is partly accidental."

    But probably not all that accidental. The military was in the process of miniaturizing avionics, all those early radars, anti-sub electronics, early jammers, and so on. These things needed to be engineered in cooperation with aviation companies. The only question was southern CA or northern. Although southern had more aviation companies, the Bay area had the oldest "flying radar" base (Mofett). And then Lockheed got the contract to build the Polaris missile for nuclear submarines and decided to do this in the Bay area (it was a Navy sub technology locus). This required a big effort and lots of engineers. In total, including support contractors, in only a handful of years probably around 40 thousand engineers and technicians were hired into the Bay area. And of course bought houses. At the time much of the land in what is now silicon valley was open farmland ("the valley of heart's delight") rapidly being converted to suburbia. Places like LA and New Jersey were more expensive and harder to get young engineers and the wives to move to. And of course Terman, Stanford, UC, and people like Shockley were up to the eyebrows in all this.

    The Lockheed nuclear sub missile project was the biggest employer in Silicon Valley until the end of the 1980s.

    The military industrial complex largely paid for the tremendous technical infrastructure in the Valley that made it possible for youngsters like Wozniak and Jobs to mess around with microcomputers.

    Stanford missed out on the WWII gold rush in military electronics that boosted Caltech, Harvard, Columbia and some other institutions, so Terman vowed never to let that happen again. By the time the Korean War came along and boosted military budgets he was ready for Stanford to get its share.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. matt says:
    @AM
    Okay, so if I summarize your post correctly, Jared Taylor is wrong because Ethiopians managed modest houses and churches because they had Christianity. (They also had Judaism, by the way).

    That arguement doesn't really negate his broader point. Nigeria can't build it's own roads. Most African country can not keep the trains running on time or in some cases, at all. Okay, fine 2 story houses in Ethiopia - not the norm and Ethiopia doesn't get to 3 story houses or cathedrals or trains or calculus.

    It's cherry picking really. You've got a very odd place in Africa as compared to the rest of Africa and then saying it means the general trend observed doesn't exist. Sorry, no.

    All Taylor has to say to be correct,is "except Ethiopia" and even they don't exactly measure up to the West. shrug

    Why is Ethiopia odd? Would you care to explain why you think that country goes against the general sub-Saharan trend?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. matt says:
    @AM
    Okay, so if I summarize your post correctly, Jared Taylor is wrong because Ethiopians managed modest houses and churches because they had Christianity. (They also had Judaism, by the way).

    That arguement doesn't really negate his broader point. Nigeria can't build it's own roads. Most African country can not keep the trains running on time or in some cases, at all. Okay, fine 2 story houses in Ethiopia - not the norm and Ethiopia doesn't get to 3 story houses or cathedrals or trains or calculus.

    It's cherry picking really. You've got a very odd place in Africa as compared to the rest of Africa and then saying it means the general trend observed doesn't exist. Sorry, no.

    All Taylor has to say to be correct,is "except Ethiopia" and even they don't exactly measure up to the West. shrug

    By the way, I’d encourage you to google “lalibela churches”. I’m not sure that I’d describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as “modest”. Also, Ethiopia does have cathedrals, like St. George’s and Holy Trinity in Addis Ababa. In fact, if you had used some common knowledge about Ethiopia and a little basic reasoning, you should have been able to know that.

    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop. Since Ethiopia practices a very old form of Christianity, it, like Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, is very hierarchical and has bishops. So, it follows that it must have cathedrals, and sure enough it does (for what it’s worth, I don’t find the cathedrals as impressive as the rock-hewn churches). Again, all it takes is some common knowledge and a little intelligence in order not to fall into these kinds of errors.

    But I’m more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different. After all, any successful interpretation of the evidence needs to account for the all the evidence. So what is it about Ethiopia? I think I can guess what you’ll say, but I’d like to hear it from you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    From what can be seen on pictures found on Google, the Lalibela churches do indeed look impressive.
    , @AM

    I’d encourage you to google “lalibela churches”. I’m not sure that I’d describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as “modest”.
     
    I did before I posted. They were so impressive, I couldn't find any pictures of them. I will look again.

    Okay, I'm back. I can see why they aren't on the grand tour.

    A stone Gothic cathedral literally pushes the limits of stone materials, taking generations to build. It's taking stone and creating light and air and awe. European Cathedrals dwarf the people inside.

    Lalibela churches are "very carefully carve out a 2-3 story box out of hillside". There's nothing wrong with their architecture and it would have been a lot of work. Nothing takes away from that. But they are not the cathedrals of Europe from an art or engineering standpoint. I wouldn't fly over to see one.


    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop.
     
    Weeds, but A+ on your homework. Gold star!

    But I’m more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different.
     
    Given your evidence, it's clear that Ethiopia isn't that much different than the rest of Africa. Maybe slightly more advanced, but if that's the best you've got for "Africans have the exact same gifts as Europeans", it's pretty abysmal. I can see why the weeds are very attractive.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. @TelfoedJohn
    The wiki article mentions camel domestication in South Arabia and Somalia around 3000 BC, long before the 7th century.

    Exactly, Somalis are related to Arabs and not to sub saharan Africans. Check any haplotype map. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_T-M184

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. @matt
    By the way, I'd encourage you to google "lalibela churches". I'm not sure that I'd describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as "modest". Also, Ethiopia does have cathedrals, like St. George's and Holy Trinity in Addis Ababa. In fact, if you had used some common knowledge about Ethiopia and a little basic reasoning, you should have been able to know that.

    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop. Since Ethiopia practices a very old form of Christianity, it, like Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, is very hierarchical and has bishops. So, it follows that it must have cathedrals, and sure enough it does (for what it's worth, I don't find the cathedrals as impressive as the rock-hewn churches). Again, all it takes is some common knowledge and a little intelligence in order not to fall into these kinds of errors.

    But I'm more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different. After all, any successful interpretation of the evidence needs to account for the all the evidence. So what is it about Ethiopia? I think I can guess what you'll say, but I'd like to hear it from you.

    From what can be seen on pictures found on Google, the Lalibela churches do indeed look impressive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    They're very interesting too. I've seen YouTube videos of tourists going inside them, and there are things like corners with three "tombs", one each for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. I presume that stems from the Judaic influence.
    , @AM
    They're impressive because they require a great deal of work. They are not impressive from an engineering/organization standpoint.

    2-3 story boxes carved out of stone in place, with a few small windows added are arguably the easiest way to approach the creation of stone building.

    In contrast late European Gothic Cathedrals would require mining operations, skill stone masons, and massive amount of organization spanning generations. Once it was built up to somewhere around the first and second story, if the engineering was off, cave ins were a possibility. Flying buttress don't just look nice - they are required because the roof and walls are so heavy that the walls would collapse outward.

    Sorry, those church are modest. They are the thatched huts of stone masonry, if I've understood what it takes to build late medieval stone cathedral correctly. I think God loves those churches, too, but if anything they highly the stark differences between those of African and European descent.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. matt says:
    @reiner Tor
    From what can be seen on pictures found on Google, the Lalibela churches do indeed look impressive.

    They’re very interesting too. I’ve seen YouTube videos of tourists going inside them, and there are things like corners with three “tombs”, one each for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. I presume that stems from the Judaic influence.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. @TelfoedJohn
    The wiki article mentions camel domestication in South Arabia and Somalia around 3000 BC, long before the 7th century.

    PS. Any map of African haplogroups shows that while Somalis and Ethiopians do have haplogroup L, they are fundamentally different from sub Saharan Africans in having haplogroups M and N, which makes them close to Arabs

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macro-haplogroup_L_(mtDNA)

    In other words, there’s not so much green on this map in Sudan or Ethiopia, but a lot of green in the sub-Saharan Africa:

    http://photobucket.com/gallery/http://s88.photobucket.com/user/argiedude/media/Africay-dna-allstudiescombined7000s.gif.html

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. @AM
    In the end, you've devolved almost immediately into name calling and a lack luster, particular argument against Taylor's better, more general ones.

    I can pick out many sub groups of white people that somewhat buck overall trends. Ethiopia had 2 story houses and church or two does not exactly compel a "OMG Taylor was so stupid and wrong" reaction. It's not like you're telling me Ethiopia invented Damascus steel or algebra or something.

    I'd encourage him to absorb your argument and modify what he says so is the whole truth, but he's still more right than the people who need to call a particular person stupid for disagreeing with them.

    To be clear, his general argument may have something to it. But in baldly facing the camera, and being factually incorrect in every other sentence, he subverts his own cause. This approach may work with US presidents like Obama and Trump – politics is a form of theatre – but it doesn’t work if you are trying to be scholarly.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  117. matt says:

    To be honest, I closed the video around the two minute mark, after hearing the bit about Africa, thinking that there wasn’t much of value in the rest of it if Taylor had gotten such a basic matter so wrong.

    Deciding to torture myself, I opted to watch the rest, just to see if there was anything of substance. Unsurprisingly, there wasn’t, but there was at least one more blatant factual error.

    At around the 11 minute mark, in arguing for a genetic basis for intelligence differences between blacks and whites, Taylor says that “there are strictly biological data that are hard to argue with,” and then goes on to cite Bruce Lahn’s work that discovered “gene variants associated with brain growth” that were differentially distributed between Africans and Europeans. He further notes, correctly, that Lahn went on to speculate that these genes “could have played a direct role in the development of human civilization.”

    However, Taylor omits one minor detail; one which, however, makes Lahn’s data in fact extremely easy to argue with as far as their relevance to the race-IQ debate goes. In 2007 Lahn coauthored a paper that refuted his own speculations about the role of the genes he had discovered.

    Since the paper was published in 2007 and Taylor’s video was filmed a full seven years later, there is no excuse for this omission, other than Taylor’s laziness, stupidity, incuriosity, bigotry, dishonesty, or some combination of these.

    Those are just the blatant factual errors. There’s plenty of other times where I think he jumps to conclusions too hastily, either because I think he’s made a blatantly irrational inference from known facts, or because I think he’s offered an interpretation of the facts that, while possible, is hardly the only reasonable one. But I won’t get into that (if you’re interested in getting an idea as to why I think this, you can peruse my comment history). I just wanted point out two egregious factual errors that alone make this video unworthy of any claim to “social science”.

    It’s a shame that YouTube decided to leave this video up and ban comments, since now it is impossible to rebut Taylor’s nonsense in the place where impressionable people are most likely to look. If YouTube insists on censorship, they should have taken the video down altogether, though I would prefer that they leave it up and allow comments. Instead, by leaving the video up and simultaneously banning comments, YouTube has chosen the worst of the options.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    It’s a shame that YouTube decided
     
    That's just wrong. YouTube didn't decide anything. It was the YouTube Community which made the decision.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  118. @grapesoda
    Yeah obviously. I don't think genetic testing could ever test for IQ directly. IQ also depends on development and environment, as well as genetics.

    Au contraire, lots of twin studies suggest there is a strong genetic component. And it is measurerable through genetics. Stefan Molyneux has many videos on the subject. There was a researcher (of course I can’t remember his name) who got so much push back on his research he stopped his work.
    Here’s a link to a random article. http://www.nature.com/news/chinese-project-probes-the-genetics-of-genius-1.12985

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  119. Thales says:

    More Streisand than Stasi — these videos will just get mirrored and become more popular.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  120. @matt
    To be honest, I closed the video around the two minute mark, after hearing the bit about Africa, thinking that there wasn't much of value in the rest of it if Taylor had gotten such a basic matter so wrong.

    Deciding to torture myself, I opted to watch the rest, just to see if there was anything of substance. Unsurprisingly, there wasn't, but there was at least one more blatant factual error.

    At around the 11 minute mark, in arguing for a genetic basis for intelligence differences between blacks and whites, Taylor says that "there are strictly biological data that are hard to argue with," and then goes on to cite Bruce Lahn's work that discovered "gene variants associated with brain growth" that were differentially distributed between Africans and Europeans. He further notes, correctly, that Lahn went on to speculate that these genes "could have played a direct role in the development of human civilization."

    However, Taylor omits one minor detail; one which, however, makes Lahn's data in fact extremely easy to argue with as far as their relevance to the race-IQ debate goes. In 2007 Lahn coauthored a paper that refuted his own speculations about the role of the genes he had discovered.

    Since the paper was published in 2007 and Taylor's video was filmed a full seven years later, there is no excuse for this omission, other than Taylor's laziness, stupidity, incuriosity, bigotry, dishonesty, or some combination of these.

    Those are just the blatant factual errors. There's plenty of other times where I think he jumps to conclusions too hastily, either because I think he's made a blatantly irrational inference from known facts, or because I think he's offered an interpretation of the facts that, while possible, is hardly the only reasonable one. But I won't get into that (if you're interested in getting an idea as to why I think this, you can peruse my comment history). I just wanted point out two egregious factual errors that alone make this video unworthy of any claim to "social science".

    It's a shame that YouTube decided to leave this video up and ban comments, since now it is impossible to rebut Taylor's nonsense in the place where impressionable people are most likely to look. If YouTube insists on censorship, they should have taken the video down altogether, though I would prefer that they leave it up and allow comments. Instead, by leaving the video up and simultaneously banning comments, YouTube has chosen the worst of the options.

    It’s a shame that YouTube decided

    That’s just wrong. YouTube didn’t decide anything. It was the YouTube Community which made the decision.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    Whoever decided, it's a shame. Allow comments or take it down altogether.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  121. @TelfoedJohn
    It takes guts for Jared Taylor to present himself as an expert on Stupidity and Africa when he doesn't seem to know where the fucking Sahara is.

    Jared Taylor: I was referring to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Beavis: He doesn’t even know where the Sahara is.

    Butthead: Yeah, yeah. He can’t even read Wikipedia. He must be black or something.

    Beavis & Butthead: Heh heh. Heh heh.

    Wikipedia on “Sub-Saharan Africa”:

    Commentators in Arabic in the medieval period used the general term bilâd as-sûdân (“Land of the Blacks”) for the vast Sudan region (an expression denoting West and Central Africa[10]), or sometimes extending from the coast of West Africa to Western Sudan.[11] Its equivalent in Southeast Africa was Zanj (“Country of the Blacks”), which was situated in the vicinity of the Great Lakes region.

    The geographers drew an explicit ethnographic distinction between the Sudan region and its analogue Zanj, from the area to their extreme east on the Red Sea coast in the Horn of Africa.[9] In modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea was Al-Habash or Abyssinia,[12] which was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha.[13] In northern Somalia was Barbara or the Bilad al-Barbar (“Land of the Berbers”), which was inhabited by the Eastern Baribah or Barbaroi, as the ancestors of the Somalis were referred to by medieval Arab and ancient Greek geographers, respectively.

    I haven’t seen the video, but it’s pretty obvious just from looking at them that the people of the Horn of Africa, where the buildings, calendars, alphabets etc are from, are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans. Apparently, people have been noticing this for a long time. Or maybe Greek and Arab geographers just didn’t understand what “sub-Saharan” meant. After all, they didn’t have the UN and high school social studies teachers to tell them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    Most English speakers, when hearing the word "sub-Saharan", tend to interpret this as referring to the area below ("sub") the Sahara ("Sahara") desert. Ethiopia is found entirely below the Sahara, so it is usually considered sub-Saharan in contemporary discourse, regardless of what terms medieval Arabs used for it.

    For what it's worth, many ancient sources, such as the Old and New Testaments, use "Cushite" and "Ethiopian" as generic terms for black Africans.
    , @matt
    Here is a google map of Africa.

    The African Continent

    Try to see if you can identify the Sahara. Bonus points if you can figure out what is below ("sub") the Sahara.

    Of course, this could well be a cultural Marxist psy-op on the part of Goolag (or whatever you guys are calling it now). If it is, please let me know immediately and point me to an acceptable map of the Sahara desert.
    , @matt
    I have no idea what this means. It's pretty obvious just from looking at them that Horn Africans are distinct from other sub-Saharan groups. But that's true for all sorts of groups living south of the Sahara. Nilotic peoples are pretty obviously distinct from Bantus, who are in turn pretty easily distinguishable from Khoisan. Horn Africans are distinct from all these groups, but all of them are sub-Saharan, living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  122. matt says:
    @reiner Tor

    It’s a shame that YouTube decided
     
    That's just wrong. YouTube didn't decide anything. It was the YouTube Community which made the decision.

    Whoever decided, it’s a shame. Allow comments or take it down altogether.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  123. matt says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Jared Taylor: I was referring to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Beavis: He doesn't even know where the Sahara is.

    Butthead: Yeah, yeah. He can't even read Wikipedia. He must be black or something.

    Beavis & Butthead: Heh heh. Heh heh.

    Wikipedia on "Sub-Saharan Africa":

    Commentators in Arabic in the medieval period used the general term bilâd as-sûdân ("Land of the Blacks") for the vast Sudan region (an expression denoting West and Central Africa[10]), or sometimes extending from the coast of West Africa to Western Sudan.[11] Its equivalent in Southeast Africa was Zanj ("Country of the Blacks"), which was situated in the vicinity of the Great Lakes region.

    The geographers drew an explicit ethnographic distinction between the Sudan region and its analogue Zanj, from the area to their extreme east on the Red Sea coast in the Horn of Africa.[9] In modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea was Al-Habash or Abyssinia,[12] which was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha.[13] In northern Somalia was Barbara or the Bilad al-Barbar ("Land of the Berbers"), which was inhabited by the Eastern Baribah or Barbaroi, as the ancestors of the Somalis were referred to by medieval Arab and ancient Greek geographers, respectively.
     
    I haven't seen the video, but it's pretty obvious just from looking at them that the people of the Horn of Africa, where the buildings, calendars, alphabets etc are from, are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans. Apparently, people have been noticing this for a long time. Or maybe Greek and Arab geographers just didn't understand what "sub-Saharan" meant. After all, they didn't have the UN and high school social studies teachers to tell them.

    Most English speakers, when hearing the word “sub-Saharan”, tend to interpret this as referring to the area below (“sub”) the Sahara (“Sahara”) desert. Ethiopia is found entirely below the Sahara, so it is usually considered sub-Saharan in contemporary discourse, regardless of what terms medieval Arabs used for it.

    For what it’s worth, many ancient sources, such as the Old and New Testaments, use “Cushite” and “Ethiopian” as generic terms for black Africans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    According to Wiktionary, the Greek word aethiopia means "charred complexion" and was historically used to refer to all of sub-Saharan Africa.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  124. matt says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Jared Taylor: I was referring to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Beavis: He doesn't even know where the Sahara is.

    Butthead: Yeah, yeah. He can't even read Wikipedia. He must be black or something.

    Beavis & Butthead: Heh heh. Heh heh.

    Wikipedia on "Sub-Saharan Africa":

    Commentators in Arabic in the medieval period used the general term bilâd as-sûdân ("Land of the Blacks") for the vast Sudan region (an expression denoting West and Central Africa[10]), or sometimes extending from the coast of West Africa to Western Sudan.[11] Its equivalent in Southeast Africa was Zanj ("Country of the Blacks"), which was situated in the vicinity of the Great Lakes region.

    The geographers drew an explicit ethnographic distinction between the Sudan region and its analogue Zanj, from the area to their extreme east on the Red Sea coast in the Horn of Africa.[9] In modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea was Al-Habash or Abyssinia,[12] which was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha.[13] In northern Somalia was Barbara or the Bilad al-Barbar ("Land of the Berbers"), which was inhabited by the Eastern Baribah or Barbaroi, as the ancestors of the Somalis were referred to by medieval Arab and ancient Greek geographers, respectively.
     
    I haven't seen the video, but it's pretty obvious just from looking at them that the people of the Horn of Africa, where the buildings, calendars, alphabets etc are from, are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans. Apparently, people have been noticing this for a long time. Or maybe Greek and Arab geographers just didn't understand what "sub-Saharan" meant. After all, they didn't have the UN and high school social studies teachers to tell them.

    Here is a google map of Africa.

    The African Continent

    Try to see if you can identify the Sahara. Bonus points if you can figure out what is below (“sub”) the Sahara.

    Of course, this could well be a cultural Marxist psy-op on the part of Goolag (or whatever you guys are calling it now). If it is, please let me know immediately and point me to an acceptable map of the Sahara desert.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  125. matt says:
    @matt
    Most English speakers, when hearing the word "sub-Saharan", tend to interpret this as referring to the area below ("sub") the Sahara ("Sahara") desert. Ethiopia is found entirely below the Sahara, so it is usually considered sub-Saharan in contemporary discourse, regardless of what terms medieval Arabs used for it.

    For what it's worth, many ancient sources, such as the Old and New Testaments, use "Cushite" and "Ethiopian" as generic terms for black Africans.

    According to Wiktionary, the Greek word aethiopia means “charred complexion” and was historically used to refer to all of sub-Saharan Africa.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  126. matt says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Jared Taylor: I was referring to sub-Saharan Africa.

    Beavis: He doesn't even know where the Sahara is.

    Butthead: Yeah, yeah. He can't even read Wikipedia. He must be black or something.

    Beavis & Butthead: Heh heh. Heh heh.

    Wikipedia on "Sub-Saharan Africa":

    Commentators in Arabic in the medieval period used the general term bilâd as-sûdân ("Land of the Blacks") for the vast Sudan region (an expression denoting West and Central Africa[10]), or sometimes extending from the coast of West Africa to Western Sudan.[11] Its equivalent in Southeast Africa was Zanj ("Country of the Blacks"), which was situated in the vicinity of the Great Lakes region.

    The geographers drew an explicit ethnographic distinction between the Sudan region and its analogue Zanj, from the area to their extreme east on the Red Sea coast in the Horn of Africa.[9] In modern-day Ethiopia and Eritrea was Al-Habash or Abyssinia,[12] which was inhabited by the Habash or Abyssinians, who were the forebears of the Habesha.[13] In northern Somalia was Barbara or the Bilad al-Barbar ("Land of the Berbers"), which was inhabited by the Eastern Baribah or Barbaroi, as the ancestors of the Somalis were referred to by medieval Arab and ancient Greek geographers, respectively.
     
    I haven't seen the video, but it's pretty obvious just from looking at them that the people of the Horn of Africa, where the buildings, calendars, alphabets etc are from, are distinct from sub-Saharan Africans. Apparently, people have been noticing this for a long time. Or maybe Greek and Arab geographers just didn't understand what "sub-Saharan" meant. After all, they didn't have the UN and high school social studies teachers to tell them.

    I have no idea what this means. It’s pretty obvious just from looking at them that Horn Africans are distinct from other sub-Saharan groups. But that’s true for all sorts of groups living south of the Sahara. Nilotic peoples are pretty obviously distinct from Bantus, who are in turn pretty easily distinguishable from Khoisan. Horn Africans are distinct from all these groups, but all of them are sub-Saharan, living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Taylor is talking about people, not cartography.

    There was obviously something special going on in Africa in the corridor between the mouth of the Nile and the Horn. Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea etc, maybe something else, but the people in that corridor don't resemble other Africans south of the Sahara and maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein's posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.

    Taylor has a weird way of speaking and occasionally makes strange turns of phrase. But I think it's pretty clear that, when he says "Africa south of the Sahara", he means "those people typifying Africa south of the Sahara, which doesn't include these anomalous regions next to the Red Sea, different in culture and biology".

    I, personally, have always associated "sub-Saharan Africans" with the peoples of West, South, and Central Africa. I don't know how I made this association, but it's obvious that I'm not alone and that associating these blacks and distinguishing them from other people in the eastern corridor goes back quite a ways in history.

    Insisting that "south of the Sahara" can only and must refer to geographic areas strictly demarcated by the Saharan desert is legalistic or shallow.

    Being intentionally obtuse about all this doesn't mean Taylor is stupid or doesn't know where the Sahara is, but it sure makes you and Telfoed sound like Beavis & Butthead.
    , @Chrisnonymous

    living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.
     
    BTW, that's a microaggression that just reveals your colonialist Eurocentric biases. You're an evil, evil man.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  127. Svigor says:

    “Inoffensive” = leftist. Leftists only killed 100 million people in the 20th century; nothing offensive about them or their beliefs.

    A frame site could easily solve this, though g**gle would fight it by moving URLs around.

    Anonymous 2:00 am GMT gives another solution, though I’d go with “free speech” branding, not altright.

    Whoever 6:04pm GMT has a point. I stopped reading Amren years ago because the moderation is so milquetoast. There’s a niche for that but it ain’t me.

    It’s simple. Liberals do whatever benefits them personally. That’s what defines a liberal. They certainly aren’t guided by logic and reason.

    While your comment makes a good point, there are millions of leftist useful idiots who only benefit from their leftism in one sense; other leftists won’t do bad things to them. Leftism itself is actually harming them.

    August 27, 2017 at 9:49 pm GMT • 100 Words

    Kudos, you worked hard for those nits. Enjoy.

    You too, matt.

    I can pick out many sub groups of white people that somewhat buck overall trends. Ethiopia had 2 story houses and church or two does not exactly compel a “OMG Taylor was so stupid and wrong” reaction. It’s not like you’re telling me Ethiopia invented Damascus steel or algebra or something.

    The demand is that Taylor give a teensy bit of benefit of the doubt to blacks. Not that anyone give a teensy bit of benefit of the doubt to Taylor, silly!

    I’d encourage him to absorb your argument and modify what he says so is the whole truth, but he’s still more right than the people who need to call a particular person stupid for disagreeing with them.

    UN projects 4 to 15 BILLION people in Africa by 2100. So obviously the thing to do is quibble and haggle over some 2 story houses, because stupid race-denying fuck.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    So obviously the thing to do is quibble and haggle over some 2 story houses, because stupid race-denying fuck.
     
    I pretty much agree. But I think some offers a counter argument that will drag everyone into the weeds, it's easier to just acknowledge and incorporate it and move on. The existence of the exception that proves the rule will derail some.

    To me, the easiest way to derail matt's poderous volumes is "Yep, you're right. Doesn't negate my point one bit and thanks for the history update. I'll keep it in mind for future talks"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  128. Svigor says:

    “Jared Taylor race huckster” yes everyone knows the big money is in pro-white politics. Obviously all about the shekels for Taylor.

    Pick those nits from those nappy heads, boys.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  129. Svigor says:

    “Rudimentary understanding of the world” = black countries are shitholes.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  130. @Hippopotamusdrome


    Susan Wojcicki

     

    Did Poles invent their names by mashing the keyboard randomly?

    Here's a quiz, Polish name or keyboard mashing:

    Wslov Kuieyntrcekj

    That’s obviously a Russian name.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  131. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Luke Lea
    The Barbara Streisand effect? Maybe a compilation of links to affected videos would be an effective way to counter this kind of censorship?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  132. @matt
    I have no idea what this means. It's pretty obvious just from looking at them that Horn Africans are distinct from other sub-Saharan groups. But that's true for all sorts of groups living south of the Sahara. Nilotic peoples are pretty obviously distinct from Bantus, who are in turn pretty easily distinguishable from Khoisan. Horn Africans are distinct from all these groups, but all of them are sub-Saharan, living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.

    Taylor is talking about people, not cartography.

    There was obviously something special going on in Africa in the corridor between the mouth of the Nile and the Horn. Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea etc, maybe something else, but the people in that corridor don’t resemble other Africans south of the Sahara and maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein’s posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.

    Taylor has a weird way of speaking and occasionally makes strange turns of phrase. But I think it’s pretty clear that, when he says “Africa south of the Sahara”, he means “those people typifying Africa south of the Sahara, which doesn’t include these anomalous regions next to the Red Sea, different in culture and biology”.

    I, personally, have always associated “sub-Saharan Africans” with the peoples of West, South, and Central Africa. I don’t know how I made this association, but it’s obvious that I’m not alone and that associating these blacks and distinguishing them from other people in the eastern corridor goes back quite a ways in history.

    Insisting that “south of the Sahara” can only and must refer to geographic areas strictly demarcated by the Saharan desert is legalistic or shallow.

    Being intentionally obtuse about all this doesn’t mean Taylor is stupid or doesn’t know where the Sahara is, but it sure makes you and Telfoed sound like Beavis & Butthead.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt

    Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea
     
    The cultural exchange (and the armies and navies, more on that below) went both ways.

    maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein’s posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.
     
    It's not just maybe, there's definitely evidence of this. But it's not as important as you might think, for several reasons.

    One, their West Asian ancestry never went away, and yet today it doesn't seem to be doing them all that much good in the IQ department. According to Lynn and Vanhanen, Ethiopia's average IQ is 63, which is I think the lowest of any sub-Saharan country. I don't actually find that all that believable (I don't find Lynn and Vanhanen's figures on sub-Saharan Africa in general believable), but at the very least, we can say that there is no evidence that Ethiopia scores higher than the sub-Saharan average, and that there is some evidence that they score below it. That's the opposite of what you would expect to find if their Caucasoid genes were making them smarter.

    There's also social statistics like GDP per capita. By that measure, Ethiopia is the 15th poorest country in Africa. Eritrea and Somalia are numbers 5 and 6, respectively, and they're even more Caucasian than Ethiopia, if anything. Somalia hasn't had a centralized state in about a quarter of a century, and Eritrea looks like it might easily collapse.

    (As an aside, I've always found it ironic that Somalis are the Alt-Right's go-to example of a dysfunctional Third World group ["Isn't it great to be enriched by Somalis!", etc.], given that they're maybe the most Caucasoid of sub-Saharan ethnic groups. It never seems to dawn on anyone that there is a tension here.)

    Also, there's history to consider. If what gives Ethiopia its magic is that special South Arabian blood, then you'd expect the South Arabians, who have a lot more of the special South Arabian blood and a lot less of the dirty sub-Saharan blood, to have dominated Ethiopia. But that's not how it's worked out. The Arabs never quite managed to conquer Ethiopia (they certainly never Islamized it). The Ethiopians, on the other hand, managed to conquer parts of Arabia a few times between the 3rd and 6th centuries AD.

    I mentioned in a comment above the story of the Aksumite king Abraha, who smashed and annexed the Jewish Himyarite KIngdom of Yemen (which had been persecuting Christians; there's something for you if you're looking for something to be mad at the Jews for) some time in the 500s with an army that apparently included elephants (so much for the claim that sub-Saharans can't tame elephants). With Byzantine help, he built a cathedral in Yemen that was intended to rival the Kaaba, and then decided to take matters into his own hands and march up the Hejaz with his elephants, conquer Mecca, and smash the black stone. I said above that he managed to do it, but that may not be right; his army may have been stopped by some mysterious force, which the Quran records as birds carrying brimstone, but which could also have been something more mundane like smallpox. It's also possible that he got as far as Medina (then called Yathrib).

    He wasn't the first Aksumite ruler to set foot in the Arabian peninsula. We know from inscriptions and coins and the like that Aksum had a military presence in Southern Arabia from the 2nd century, on and off.

    The Yemenites had to call on the Persians to kick out the Ethiopians for them. The Sassanids demanded that the Yemenites vassalize themselves in return, which is why Persia controlled Yemen around the time of Muhammad.

    In short, while it's true that Ethiopians are more closely related to Near Easterners than other sub-Saharans, both the contemporary and the historical record make it unclear what relevance that fact has, if any.

    As for the phrase "sub-Saharan", I've always associated it with exactly what it sounds like it says: sub-Saharan. I don't know how you got the idea that the Horn of Africa was, while south of the Sahara, somehow not sub-Saharan. I'm not trying to be legalistic or pedantic here, it just seems like you somehow missed out on this particular aspect of the semantics of the English language.

    With regard to your more substantive point, I'm not sure why we should split Horn Africans off from the rest of Africa south of the Sahara, so that everyone else is sub-Saharan (wink, nudge), while Horn Africans are merely sub-Saharan. It's true that Horn Africans are in many ways closer, culturally and genetically, to southwest Asia than other sub-Saharans are. I've acknowledged that, and explained why it's still not quite as clear cut as it seems.

    But there are also sorts of differences among the sub-Saharan (wink, nudge) Africans too. Recent genetic evidence, I gather, is telling us that Khoisan peoples split off from the rest of humanity long before any other population divergences occurred, meaning that Bantus are genetically closer to Ethiopians and Somalis (not to mention Norwegians and Ainus and everybody else) than they are to Bushmen. So you're proposal to call everyone in sub-Saharan Africa outside of the Horn sub-Saharan, doesn't make much biological sense. It also doesn't make a whole lot of cultural sense, since there's a ton of cultural diversity among these groups, and lumping everyone from southern Mauritania to the Cape of Good hope together and splitting them off from the Horn on cultural grounds seems pretty arbitrary as well.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  133. @matt
    I have no idea what this means. It's pretty obvious just from looking at them that Horn Africans are distinct from other sub-Saharan groups. But that's true for all sorts of groups living south of the Sahara. Nilotic peoples are pretty obviously distinct from Bantus, who are in turn pretty easily distinguishable from Khoisan. Horn Africans are distinct from all these groups, but all of them are sub-Saharan, living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.

    living, as they do, ya know, below the Sahara.

    BTW, that’s a microaggression that just reveals your colonialist Eurocentric biases. You’re an evil, evil man.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  134. matt says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Taylor is talking about people, not cartography.

    There was obviously something special going on in Africa in the corridor between the mouth of the Nile and the Horn. Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea etc, maybe something else, but the people in that corridor don't resemble other Africans south of the Sahara and maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein's posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.

    Taylor has a weird way of speaking and occasionally makes strange turns of phrase. But I think it's pretty clear that, when he says "Africa south of the Sahara", he means "those people typifying Africa south of the Sahara, which doesn't include these anomalous regions next to the Red Sea, different in culture and biology".

    I, personally, have always associated "sub-Saharan Africans" with the peoples of West, South, and Central Africa. I don't know how I made this association, but it's obvious that I'm not alone and that associating these blacks and distinguishing them from other people in the eastern corridor goes back quite a ways in history.

    Insisting that "south of the Sahara" can only and must refer to geographic areas strictly demarcated by the Saharan desert is legalistic or shallow.

    Being intentionally obtuse about all this doesn't mean Taylor is stupid or doesn't know where the Sahara is, but it sure makes you and Telfoed sound like Beavis & Butthead.

    Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea

    The cultural exchange (and the armies and navies, more on that below) went both ways.

    maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein’s posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.

    It’s not just maybe, there’s definitely evidence of this. But it’s not as important as you might think, for several reasons.

    One, their West Asian ancestry never went away, and yet today it doesn’t seem to be doing them all that much good in the IQ department. According to Lynn and Vanhanen, Ethiopia’s average IQ is 63, which is I think the lowest of any sub-Saharan country. I don’t actually find that all that believable (I don’t find Lynn and Vanhanen’s figures on sub-Saharan Africa in general believable), but at the very least, we can say that there is no evidence that Ethiopia scores higher than the sub-Saharan average, and that there is some evidence that they score below it. That’s the opposite of what you would expect to find if their Caucasoid genes were making them smarter.

    There’s also social statistics like GDP per capita. By that measure, Ethiopia is the 15th poorest country in Africa. Eritrea and Somalia are numbers 5 and 6, respectively, and they’re even more Caucasian than Ethiopia, if anything. Somalia hasn’t had a centralized state in about a quarter of a century, and Eritrea looks like it might easily collapse.

    (As an aside, I’ve always found it ironic that Somalis are the Alt-Right’s go-to example of a dysfunctional Third World group ["Isn't it great to be enriched by Somalis!", etc.], given that they’re maybe the most Caucasoid of sub-Saharan ethnic groups. It never seems to dawn on anyone that there is a tension here.)

    Also, there’s history to consider. If what gives Ethiopia its magic is that special South Arabian blood, then you’d expect the South Arabians, who have a lot more of the special South Arabian blood and a lot less of the dirty sub-Saharan blood, to have dominated Ethiopia. But that’s not how it’s worked out. The Arabs never quite managed to conquer Ethiopia (they certainly never Islamized it). The Ethiopians, on the other hand, managed to conquer parts of Arabia a few times between the 3rd and 6th centuries AD.

    I mentioned in a comment above the story of the Aksumite king Abraha, who smashed and annexed the Jewish Himyarite KIngdom of Yemen (which had been persecuting Christians; there’s something for you if you’re looking for something to be mad at the Jews for) some time in the 500s with an army that apparently included elephants (so much for the claim that sub-Saharans can’t tame elephants). With Byzantine help, he built a cathedral in Yemen that was intended to rival the Kaaba, and then decided to take matters into his own hands and march up the Hejaz with his elephants, conquer Mecca, and smash the black stone. I said above that he managed to do it, but that may not be right; his army may have been stopped by some mysterious force, which the Quran records as birds carrying brimstone, but which could also have been something more mundane like smallpox. It’s also possible that he got as far as Medina (then called Yathrib).

    He wasn’t the first Aksumite ruler to set foot in the Arabian peninsula. We know from inscriptions and coins and the like that Aksum had a military presence in Southern Arabia from the 2nd century, on and off.

    The Yemenites had to call on the Persians to kick out the Ethiopians for them. The Sassanids demanded that the Yemenites vassalize themselves in return, which is why Persia controlled Yemen around the time of Muhammad.

    In short, while it’s true that Ethiopians are more closely related to Near Easterners than other sub-Saharans, both the contemporary and the historical record make it unclear what relevance that fact has, if any.

    As for the phrase “sub-Saharan”, I’ve always associated it with exactly what it sounds like it says: sub-Saharan. I don’t know how you got the idea that the Horn of Africa was, while south of the Sahara, somehow not sub-Saharan. I’m not trying to be legalistic or pedantic here, it just seems like you somehow missed out on this particular aspect of the semantics of the English language.

    With regard to your more substantive point, I’m not sure why we should split Horn Africans off from the rest of Africa south of the Sahara, so that everyone else is sub-Saharan (wink, nudge), while Horn Africans are merely sub-Saharan. It’s true that Horn Africans are in many ways closer, culturally and genetically, to southwest Asia than other sub-Saharans are. I’ve acknowledged that, and explained why it’s still not quite as clear cut as it seems.

    But there are also sorts of differences among the sub-Saharan (wink, nudge) Africans too. Recent genetic evidence, I gather, is telling us that Khoisan peoples split off from the rest of humanity long before any other population divergences occurred, meaning that Bantus are genetically closer to Ethiopians and Somalis (not to mention Norwegians and Ainus and everybody else) than they are to Bushmen. So you’re proposal to call everyone in sub-Saharan Africa outside of the Horn sub-Saharan, doesn’t make much biological sense. It also doesn’t make a whole lot of cultural sense, since there’s a ton of cultural diversity among these groups, and lumping everyone from southern Mauritania to the Cape of Good hope together and splitting them off from the Horn on cultural grounds seems pretty arbitrary as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    In fact, Taylor mentions in the video that Ethiopia, despite having never been colonized is one of the poorest countries in Africa. He uses this as an argument against the idea that colonialism has caused all of Africa's problems, but the point cuts both ways. Ethiopia not only was never colonized, it's also one of the most Caucasoid sub-Saharan countries. But if it's also one of the poorest countries in Africa, what does that say for the theory of Caucasoid supremacy vis a vis sub-Saharans?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  135. matt says:
    @matt

    Maybe it was cultural exchange across the Red Sea
     
    The cultural exchange (and the armies and navies, more on that below) went both ways.

    maybe there is also some genetic evidence (see EmmanuelGoldstein’s posts) of biological similarity with other non-sub-Saharans.
     
    It's not just maybe, there's definitely evidence of this. But it's not as important as you might think, for several reasons.

    One, their West Asian ancestry never went away, and yet today it doesn't seem to be doing them all that much good in the IQ department. According to Lynn and Vanhanen, Ethiopia's average IQ is 63, which is I think the lowest of any sub-Saharan country. I don't actually find that all that believable (I don't find Lynn and Vanhanen's figures on sub-Saharan Africa in general believable), but at the very least, we can say that there is no evidence that Ethiopia scores higher than the sub-Saharan average, and that there is some evidence that they score below it. That's the opposite of what you would expect to find if their Caucasoid genes were making them smarter.

    There's also social statistics like GDP per capita. By that measure, Ethiopia is the 15th poorest country in Africa. Eritrea and Somalia are numbers 5 and 6, respectively, and they're even more Caucasian than Ethiopia, if anything. Somalia hasn't had a centralized state in about a quarter of a century, and Eritrea looks like it might easily collapse.

    (As an aside, I've always found it ironic that Somalis are the Alt-Right's go-to example of a dysfunctional Third World group ["Isn't it great to be enriched by Somalis!", etc.], given that they're maybe the most Caucasoid of sub-Saharan ethnic groups. It never seems to dawn on anyone that there is a tension here.)

    Also, there's history to consider. If what gives Ethiopia its magic is that special South Arabian blood, then you'd expect the South Arabians, who have a lot more of the special South Arabian blood and a lot less of the dirty sub-Saharan blood, to have dominated Ethiopia. But that's not how it's worked out. The Arabs never quite managed to conquer Ethiopia (they certainly never Islamized it). The Ethiopians, on the other hand, managed to conquer parts of Arabia a few times between the 3rd and 6th centuries AD.

    I mentioned in a comment above the story of the Aksumite king Abraha, who smashed and annexed the Jewish Himyarite KIngdom of Yemen (which had been persecuting Christians; there's something for you if you're looking for something to be mad at the Jews for) some time in the 500s with an army that apparently included elephants (so much for the claim that sub-Saharans can't tame elephants). With Byzantine help, he built a cathedral in Yemen that was intended to rival the Kaaba, and then decided to take matters into his own hands and march up the Hejaz with his elephants, conquer Mecca, and smash the black stone. I said above that he managed to do it, but that may not be right; his army may have been stopped by some mysterious force, which the Quran records as birds carrying brimstone, but which could also have been something more mundane like smallpox. It's also possible that he got as far as Medina (then called Yathrib).

    He wasn't the first Aksumite ruler to set foot in the Arabian peninsula. We know from inscriptions and coins and the like that Aksum had a military presence in Southern Arabia from the 2nd century, on and off.

    The Yemenites had to call on the Persians to kick out the Ethiopians for them. The Sassanids demanded that the Yemenites vassalize themselves in return, which is why Persia controlled Yemen around the time of Muhammad.

    In short, while it's true that Ethiopians are more closely related to Near Easterners than other sub-Saharans, both the contemporary and the historical record make it unclear what relevance that fact has, if any.

    As for the phrase "sub-Saharan", I've always associated it with exactly what it sounds like it says: sub-Saharan. I don't know how you got the idea that the Horn of Africa was, while south of the Sahara, somehow not sub-Saharan. I'm not trying to be legalistic or pedantic here, it just seems like you somehow missed out on this particular aspect of the semantics of the English language.

    With regard to your more substantive point, I'm not sure why we should split Horn Africans off from the rest of Africa south of the Sahara, so that everyone else is sub-Saharan (wink, nudge), while Horn Africans are merely sub-Saharan. It's true that Horn Africans are in many ways closer, culturally and genetically, to southwest Asia than other sub-Saharans are. I've acknowledged that, and explained why it's still not quite as clear cut as it seems.

    But there are also sorts of differences among the sub-Saharan (wink, nudge) Africans too. Recent genetic evidence, I gather, is telling us that Khoisan peoples split off from the rest of humanity long before any other population divergences occurred, meaning that Bantus are genetically closer to Ethiopians and Somalis (not to mention Norwegians and Ainus and everybody else) than they are to Bushmen. So you're proposal to call everyone in sub-Saharan Africa outside of the Horn sub-Saharan, doesn't make much biological sense. It also doesn't make a whole lot of cultural sense, since there's a ton of cultural diversity among these groups, and lumping everyone from southern Mauritania to the Cape of Good hope together and splitting them off from the Horn on cultural grounds seems pretty arbitrary as well.

    In fact, Taylor mentions in the video that Ethiopia, despite having never been colonized is one of the poorest countries in Africa. He uses this as an argument against the idea that colonialism has caused all of Africa’s problems, but the point cuts both ways. Ethiopia not only was never colonized, it’s also one of the most Caucasoid sub-Saharan countries. But if it’s also one of the poorest countries in Africa, what does that say for the theory of Caucasoid supremacy vis a vis sub-Saharans?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  136. Eonic says:
    @Anonymous
    This seems to be an opportunity.

    Why rely on Youtube for comments?

    Write an Alt-right plugin for browsers that checks the page for the text "... inappropriate or offensive to some audiences ...".

    If the plugin finds that text, it inserts a button that says "View/Add Comments".

    If you click that button, it jumps to an Alt-right webserver that contains comments and permits you to add your own.

    We don't need Youtube (or any other news website) to list comments.

    Someone actually created a site for adding comments to any Youtube video. The method was to substitute the site URL for “youtube.com” part in the complete video URL then press”enter” whereupon the video would appear in the developer’s site with the facility to add comments using a Disqus account. The site has disappeared after being available for a few months. The problem it had was that is was not publicised suffficiently and if a video on Youtube had comments disabled nobody would know about this alternative.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  137. OK, Steve. That’s 6 page views and 2 comments from me by 8:30am. Just trying to help. More later.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  138. AM says:
    @Svigor
    "Inoffensive" = leftist. Leftists only killed 100 million people in the 20th century; nothing offensive about them or their beliefs.

    A frame site could easily solve this, though g**gle would fight it by moving URLs around.

    Anonymous 2:00 am GMT gives another solution, though I'd go with "free speech" branding, not altright.

    Whoever 6:04pm GMT has a point. I stopped reading Amren years ago because the moderation is so milquetoast. There's a niche for that but it ain't me.

    It’s simple. Liberals do whatever benefits them personally. That’s what defines a liberal. They certainly aren’t guided by logic and reason.
     
    While your comment makes a good point, there are millions of leftist useful idiots who only benefit from their leftism in one sense; other leftists won't do bad things to them. Leftism itself is actually harming them.

    August 27, 2017 at 9:49 pm GMT • 100 Words
    @TelfoedJohn
     
    Kudos, you worked hard for those nits. Enjoy.

    You too, matt.

    I can pick out many sub groups of white people that somewhat buck overall trends. Ethiopia had 2 story houses and church or two does not exactly compel a “OMG Taylor was so stupid and wrong” reaction. It’s not like you’re telling me Ethiopia invented Damascus steel or algebra or something.
     
    The demand is that Taylor give a teensy bit of benefit of the doubt to blacks. Not that anyone give a teensy bit of benefit of the doubt to Taylor, silly!

    I’d encourage him to absorb your argument and modify what he says so is the whole truth, but he’s still more right than the people who need to call a particular person stupid for disagreeing with them.
     
    UN projects 4 to 15 BILLION people in Africa by 2100. So obviously the thing to do is quibble and haggle over some 2 story houses, because stupid race-denying fuck.

    So obviously the thing to do is quibble and haggle over some 2 story houses, because stupid race-denying fuck.

    I pretty much agree. But I think some offers a counter argument that will drag everyone into the weeds, it’s easier to just acknowledge and incorporate it and move on. The existence of the exception that proves the rule will derail some.

    To me, the easiest way to derail matt’s poderous volumes is “Yep, you’re right. Doesn’t negate my point one bit and thanks for the history update. I’ll keep it in mind for future talks”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  139. AM says:
    @matt
    By the way, I'd encourage you to google "lalibela churches". I'm not sure that I'd describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as "modest". Also, Ethiopia does have cathedrals, like St. George's and Holy Trinity in Addis Ababa. In fact, if you had used some common knowledge about Ethiopia and a little basic reasoning, you should have been able to know that.

    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop. Since Ethiopia practices a very old form of Christianity, it, like Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, is very hierarchical and has bishops. So, it follows that it must have cathedrals, and sure enough it does (for what it's worth, I don't find the cathedrals as impressive as the rock-hewn churches). Again, all it takes is some common knowledge and a little intelligence in order not to fall into these kinds of errors.

    But I'm more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different. After all, any successful interpretation of the evidence needs to account for the all the evidence. So what is it about Ethiopia? I think I can guess what you'll say, but I'd like to hear it from you.

    I’d encourage you to google “lalibela churches”. I’m not sure that I’d describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as “modest”.

    I did before I posted. They were so impressive, I couldn’t find any pictures of them. I will look again.

    Okay, I’m back. I can see why they aren’t on the grand tour.

    A stone Gothic cathedral literally pushes the limits of stone materials, taking generations to build. It’s taking stone and creating light and air and awe. European Cathedrals dwarf the people inside.

    Lalibela churches are “very carefully carve out a 2-3 story box out of hillside”. There’s nothing wrong with their architecture and it would have been a lot of work. Nothing takes away from that. But they are not the cathedrals of Europe from an art or engineering standpoint. I wouldn’t fly over to see one.

    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop.

    Weeds, but A+ on your homework. Gold star!

    But I’m more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different.

    Given your evidence, it’s clear that Ethiopia isn’t that much different than the rest of Africa. Maybe slightly more advanced, but if that’s the best you’ve got for “Africans have the exact same gifts as Europeans”, it’s pretty abysmal. I can see why the weeds are very attractive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @matt
    The argument I'm making is very simple. I'm sure you can get it if you read slowly.

    I'm not arguing that Ethiopian civilizational achievements are the same as those of Eurasians. I'm arguing:

    (A) That Ethiopian civilizational achievements are above the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa; and
    (B) that (A) can't be explained by the greater Eurasian admixture found in Ethiopians. Therefore,
    (C) Eurasian admixture doesn't do you much good.

    Your alternative, when you blow past all the verbiage, is not to deny (B), but to explain (A) by.... well, to not explain (A) at all. To just shrug your shoulders and say you're not interested in "weeds". OK.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  140. AM says:
    @reiner Tor
    From what can be seen on pictures found on Google, the Lalibela churches do indeed look impressive.

    They’re impressive because they require a great deal of work. They are not impressive from an engineering/organization standpoint.

    2-3 story boxes carved out of stone in place, with a few small windows added are arguably the easiest way to approach the creation of stone building.

    In contrast late European Gothic Cathedrals would require mining operations, skill stone masons, and massive amount of organization spanning generations. Once it was built up to somewhere around the first and second story, if the engineering was off, cave ins were a possibility. Flying buttress don’t just look nice – they are required because the roof and walls are so heavy that the walls would collapse outward.

    Sorry, those church are modest. They are the thatched huts of stone masonry, if I’ve understood what it takes to build late medieval stone cathedral correctly. I think God loves those churches, too, but if anything they highly the stark differences between those of African and European descent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  141. matt says:
    @AM

    I’d encourage you to google “lalibela churches”. I’m not sure that I’d describe these (the largest monolithic churches in the world) as “modest”.
     
    I did before I posted. They were so impressive, I couldn't find any pictures of them. I will look again.

    Okay, I'm back. I can see why they aren't on the grand tour.

    A stone Gothic cathedral literally pushes the limits of stone materials, taking generations to build. It's taking stone and creating light and air and awe. European Cathedrals dwarf the people inside.

    Lalibela churches are "very carefully carve out a 2-3 story box out of hillside". There's nothing wrong with their architecture and it would have been a lot of work. Nothing takes away from that. But they are not the cathedrals of Europe from an art or engineering standpoint. I wouldn't fly over to see one.


    A cathedral is a church that seats a bishop.
     
    Weeds, but A+ on your homework. Gold star!

    But I’m more interested in why you think Ethiopia is different.
     
    Given your evidence, it's clear that Ethiopia isn't that much different than the rest of Africa. Maybe slightly more advanced, but if that's the best you've got for "Africans have the exact same gifts as Europeans", it's pretty abysmal. I can see why the weeds are very attractive.

    The argument I’m making is very simple. I’m sure you can get it if you read slowly.

    I’m not arguing that Ethiopian civilizational achievements are the same as those of Eurasians. I’m arguing:

    (A) That Ethiopian civilizational achievements are above the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa; and
    (B) that (A) can’t be explained by the greater Eurasian admixture found in Ethiopians. Therefore,
    (C) Eurasian admixture doesn’t do you much good.

    Your alternative, when you blow past all the verbiage, is not to deny (B), but to explain (A) by…. well, to not explain (A) at all. To just shrug your shoulders and say you’re not interested in “weeds”. OK.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  142. The history in America of being able to discuss publicly features of human sexuality may have
    some relevance? We might be much better informed about this issue here if , say, the Taylor
    video and previous AR Conference presentations of relevance to it—if these were simply
    presented before various literate population samples within the U.S.—not altogether different from what television advertising agencies do–to see specifically what is found offensive. The assumption
    in most comments here seems to be that it is the topic that is subject to censorship and repression.
    But there is the question of whether it is more the MANNER of the presentation/s than the substance of the topic. This certainly proved to be the key element of permitting in due course
    sex manuals and discussions of human sexuality to be overtly published in the period after WW II.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  143. Shay says: • Website

    Heya ich bin zum eersten Mal hier. Ich stieß auf fand dieses Board und icch finde es wirklich
    wirklich nützlich und es half mir eine Mengee viel.
    Ich hoffe, etwas zurück und Hilfe geben, andere wiee Sie half me.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  144. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @matt
    An Abyssinian king conquered Yemen, and marched up to Mecca and smashed the Kaaba, with an army that included (presumably African bush) elephants. It's mentioned in the Quran and several other sources.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_of_the_Elephant

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraha

    Yes, Hannibal had elephants too.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation