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WSJ to Trump: Nice Little Business You Got Here, Shame if Anything Happened to It
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Holman Jenkins writes in the Wall Street Journal:

Trump’s Ceiling Is His Wallet
Running for president is about to become a lot more expensive, and his business interests are vulnerable.

By HOLMAN W. JENKINS, JR.
Dec. 18, 2015 6:29 p.m. ET

None of his offenses against propriety seem to have dinged the support that, in a crowded race, keeps Donald Trump atop the GOP primary polls.

… But unless we miss our guess, our long national nightmare-cum-sketch comedy show actually has a termination date. It will end the moment campaigning begins to threaten Mr. Trump’s finances and business interests.

Mr. Trump has gotten extraordinarily far based on free media plus a degree of self-funding that might come from petty cash. But he hasn’t shown even the willingness to spend the $44 million that Mitt Romney spent on his failed 2008 effort.

And assets that he could reasonably convert to cash are even less. Bloomberg puts the figure as low as $70 million, less than what several candidates in the race (Bush, Clinton, Cruz) and their super PACs already have raised.

And running is about to become a lot more expensive. When the campaign goes national after Iowa and New Hampshire, Mr. Trump would have to spend money on TV ads. To participate in widespread primaries and a convention fight he would have to hire staff. Mr. Trump, from day one, has likely never been down with any of that.

… Mr. Trump’s $3.7 million in “unsolicited donations” (average: $50) in the third quarter were nice, but these aren’t the makings of a major fundraising network even in the unlikely event that Mr. Trump could find an army of like-minded affluent Americans who want to support his campaign.

The second way he’s vulnerable is damage to his business interests. Mr. Trump has had an easy punching bag in the U.S. immigration system, which, at last count, was sufficiently incompetent that 12 million people reside in the U.S. illegally. To say Muslim immigration should be suspended until we’re sure we can tell who is a terrorist might seem reasonable on first glance.

But the idea becomes insupportable when you remember there are one billion Muslims in the world, and that many important U.S. business leaders and entrepreneurs and professionals are immigrants and can hardly be barred from departing and returning on a routine basis.

In any case, his comments have become an opening. Already Mr. Trump’s Middle Eastern business interests are under assault. He lost a few U.S. deals early on due to his slurs on Mexican-Americans. Now a handful of Silicon Valley biggies—the CEOs of Apple, Facebook and Google—have ventured criticism without mustering quite the courage to mention him by name.

Hasn’t Trump already been under this kind of corporate oligarch pressure for six months now? It may well eventually break him, but isn’t the real story, and the source of so much of the Establishment’s rage, that he’s endured longer than just about anybody else in our cautious, materialistic age?

 
    []
  1. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Off topic, a little:

    FAA registered military style jet aircraft registrations BY GEOGRAPHICAL AREA :

    https://www.classicjets.org/content/faas-list-1075-n-registered-classic-jets

    There is some stevishness here. Look at the geography.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan D Mute
    Not sure how valid this is, shows two fighter jets at my kid's elementary school. Pretty sure they're not tucked under a tarp on the playground.
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  2. WillBest says:

    Glad the WSJ is a couple weeks behind me. He is basically banking on the GOP apparatus to kick in and support him when he wins. And it isn’t necessarily a crazy bet because it is a MAD scenario for the GOPe

    His business interests are almost certainly under contract. It is not likely that Macy’s can just up and drop the Trump line without certain buyouts and forfeitures. And there should be another company willing to take their place.

    The negative affects on his real estate holding are short lived paper issues, and will correct when the 2-minute hate drills are directed elsewhere.

    The liquid cash, and willingness to spend, of course, are another issue entirely. For all his bluster I doubt he wants to spend it. Then again, Balmer just dropped 2 billion on the LA Clippers, and a quarter of all billionaires are investing piles of cash in space flight, so maybe dropping a billion to be President for 4 years isn’t out of consideration.

    What he could sell tomorrow isn’t really an issue for billionaires. They can always leverage their assets and then default.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The biggest financial casualty he's taken seems to be Univision dumping his beauty pagent, and essentially forcing him to sell. I have to wonder if he gained any liquidity out of it.

    http://nypost.com/2015/10/10/donald-trumps-sale-of-miss-universe-actually-fell-short/
    , @Clyde
    Excellent analysis of Donald Trump's finances. Donald Trump has spent 30 years building Trump™ up, he can mentally deal with the Trump brand name being tarnished a bit. It is his three children who are in the family business who will get quite perturbed. They are the X factor that can exert the pressure on him to quit, to cut the losses to the brand name "Trump".

    But at age 68 and in excellent health (his Doc released his checkup the other day) Donald Trump (and his ego) have new worlds to conquer. Still, my advice to him is lose 20 pounds. Your face is flushed red too often.
    , @AndrewR
    The man will be 7o years old next year, loves running things and being the center of attention, and he has more money than most people could spend in ten thousand years. Why wouldn't he be willing to drop most of his fortune now to become President? He could give away 99.9% of his weatlh and still be worth more than the vast majority of people.
  3. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’m sure that after Trump intentionally throws the general election to Hillary, and subsequently loudly recants all his “Make America Great Again” positions, our bipartisan oligarch class will forgive him for everything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    ...Or gives her the presidency by going third party.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    And then Trump is better off than before he began?

    Maybe you should try a plausible scenario where Trump's politically incorrect (but accurate) actions leave him wealthier. The reality is that his campaign makes his business dealings less profitable.

    Maybe you are right, but it is much more likely that you have offered a stupid assessment of someone who really does want to improve America.

    Trump can win. And if he does you will have to work hard to keep yourself from gnawing off one of your limbs in your sleep.
  4. Maj. Kong says:

    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy. The knives will come out.

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there’s a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there’s a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

     

    Walter Mondale got a job in 1985 that paid more than twice what the presidency did.
    , @anon
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy.

    But, man, wouldn't that be exciting? It would be like actually being there to witness the moment that Icarus flew too close to the sun.

    , @CK
    A man who has never in 69 years been someone's employee is going to suddenly sell out and become an employee? Your confusion is astounding. Cantor has always been an employee of someone.
  5. iSteveFan says:

    Mr. Trump has had an easy punching bag in the U.S. immigration system, which, at last count, was sufficiently incompetent that 12 million people reside in the U.S. illegally.

    What I find odd is that both sides agree that the immigration system is incompetent due to the presence of 12 million (if not more) people residing illegally in the US. But their solutions are polar opposites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @415 reasons
    The WSJ's solution is open borders. Zero total illegal immigrants overnight.
  6. TangoMan says:

    Mr. Trump has gotten extraordinarily far based on free media plus a degree of self-funding that might come from petty cash.

    Surprisingly, the old rules don’t seem to apply to Trump.

    And running is about to become a lot more expensive. When the campaign goes national after Iowa and New Hampshire, Mr. Trump would have to spend money on TV ads.

    First, the rules haven’t applied to Trump but that’ll change any day now and then the rules will apply and then he’s a goner. Prove to us that the free publicity strategy will stop. So long as people are interested in what Trump is saying and doing, they’ll tune into media reports and so long as media finds an audience for Trump-related news, they’ll keep providing Trump with free media coverage. The Huffington Post tried to marginalize Trump by putting him into their entertainment section but they still covered him and even they weren’t so stupid as to forego any coverage, thus ceding the coverage, and audience, to competitors. No media outlet is going to forego covering Trump so long as the public wants news about Trump.

    Jeez, you’d think that reporters for the Wall Street Journal would understand business fundamentals, but hey, why let business fundamentals get in the way of wishcasting a story that pleases their bias.

    But he hasn’t shown even the willingness to spend the $44 million that Mitt Romney spent on his failed 2008 effort.

    This isn’t a substantiated claim. What Trump has spent, or not spent, doesn’t lead one to conclude anything about his willingness to spend. Does it appear that Trump NEEDS to spend?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Question: Is the WSJ in Jeb!'s corner? This type of article appears to have fingerprints from his campaign on it, only not too directly.

    About five months ago in mid-summer, the national conservative media was saying "Well, he obviously can't keep this up going into the fall." But then, whoops, 25 million people tuned into oe of the late summer debates and around 23 million in the other late summer debate. And last week saw the third highest rating ever for a GOP nominee debate.

    Who are actually watching the debates? Answer: for the most part, the GOP base. Apparently they still like what they are hearing from the Donald.

    Also the WSJ appears to neglect the power of "free" media as in: The internet. Supposedly the 2010's are the age of the 'net and social media is stronger than ever before. Does anyone know how well Trump is covered on the internet at large? As in, does he still have strong name recognition across all generations (as opposed to say, Santorum; Huckabee; Graham; etc).

    Question: Suppose Trump does indeed win the GOP nomination. Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the '16 campaign? As in, enough to win the presidency? Also, and if Trump should win the GOP nomination, how will such venerable organs of conservatism as the WSJ react? Will they do a 180 and fully support him with the same passion and enthusiasm as they are reacting vs. him at present?

    'Tis a puzzlement, a puzzlement.
  7. iSteveFan says:

    Mr. Trump has gotten extraordinarily far based on free media plus a degree of self-funding that might come from petty cash. But he hasn’t shown even the willingness to spend the $44 million that Mitt Romney spent on his failed 2008 effort.

    It appears he is going to continue to get free media so long as he remains the top dog in the race. I doubt he will have to spend what other candidates have.

    Mr. Trump’s $3.7 million in “unsolicited donations” (average: $50) in the third quarter were nice, but these aren’t the makings of a major fundraising network even in the unlikely event that Mr. Trump could find an army of like-minded affluent Americans who want to support his campaign.

    Thanks for pointing out that he is taking donations. If he were to get 2 million fifty dollar donations, he’d book $100 million. In a nation of 320 million people, 30 percent of whom seriously want Trump to continue, I don’t think it is unreasonable for him to get 2 million $50 donations. If Trump ever seemed to be hurting for funds, I think he could easily raise $100 million, if not more.

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  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-meets-with-billionaire-sheldon-adelson-2015-12

    Presumably he met with him because he may need to ask him for money in the future.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary. Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China. Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.

    Or its all hasbara, but what do I know.
    , @MQ
    Then so much for Trump's freedom to speak the truth about US policy in the middle east...
    , @International Jew

    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson
     
    ...and he said nice things about Trump:

    https://ca.news.yahoo.com/republican-donor-adelson-trump-may-aligning-israel-003125447--finance.html

    Adelson in Trump's corner, or at least not opposing Trump, is a devastating blow to the establishment Republicans.
    , @Marc
    I doubt Trump has his hand out. One of Trump's confidants, Roger Stone, has been mercilessly bashing Adelson & associates on Twitter and in interviews.
  9. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    So, US is just an oligarchy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Blessed are they who expect nothing, for they shall not be disappointed.
  10. Maj. Kong says:
    @WillBest
    Glad the WSJ is a couple weeks behind me. He is basically banking on the GOP apparatus to kick in and support him when he wins. And it isn't necessarily a crazy bet because it is a MAD scenario for the GOPe

    His business interests are almost certainly under contract. It is not likely that Macy's can just up and drop the Trump line without certain buyouts and forfeitures. And there should be another company willing to take their place.

    The negative affects on his real estate holding are short lived paper issues, and will correct when the 2-minute hate drills are directed elsewhere.

    The liquid cash, and willingness to spend, of course, are another issue entirely. For all his bluster I doubt he wants to spend it. Then again, Balmer just dropped 2 billion on the LA Clippers, and a quarter of all billionaires are investing piles of cash in space flight, so maybe dropping a billion to be President for 4 years isn't out of consideration.

    What he could sell tomorrow isn't really an issue for billionaires. They can always leverage their assets and then default.

    The biggest financial casualty he’s taken seems to be Univision dumping his beauty pagent, and essentially forcing him to sell. I have to wonder if he gained any liquidity out of it.

    http://nypost.com/2015/10/10/donald-trumps-sale-of-miss-universe-actually-fell-short/

    Read More
  11. @iSteveFan

    Mr. Trump has had an easy punching bag in the U.S. immigration system, which, at last count, was sufficiently incompetent that 12 million people reside in the U.S. illegally.
     
    What I find odd is that both sides agree that the immigration system is incompetent due to the presence of 12 million (if not more) people residing illegally in the US. But their solutions are polar opposites.

    The WSJ’s solution is open borders. Zero total illegal immigrants overnight.

    Read More
  12. I think a lot of Trump supporters are boycotting Macy’s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @unit472
    Macy's dumping Trump's clothing line is interesting given Macy's own business model. Locally they closed their store in the more 'vibrant' area of the county to open a new deluxe store in the more Republican area of Manatee/Sarasota county. They are doing this nationally too. When the melanin content of the Macy's shopper/shoplifter gets too high the store closes.
  13. @Maj. Kong
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy. The knives will come out.

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there's a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there’s a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

    Walter Mondale got a job in 1985 that paid more than twice what the presidency did.

    Read More
  14. Maj. Kong says:
    @Anonymous
    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-meets-with-billionaire-sheldon-adelson-2015-12

    Presumably he met with him because he may need to ask him for money in the future.

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary. Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China. Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.

    Or its all hasbara, but what do I know.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary.
     
    Sheldon leans toward Rubio but has not endorsed, his wife leans toward Cruz. He recently said he'd support Trump if he's nominated.

    Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China.
     
    How so? Adelson's money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.

    Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.
     
    Sheldon's #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He's right on the merits, which you may realize if you have any problem online gamblers who are close to you. I'd happily offer him a deal on this issue if it stops him from supporting an open boarders Republican in the primary.
  15. To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation's problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?

    I suspect that there are lots of guys like Trump, smart guys but they're rooted in a philosophy and a society that's no longer fashionable. I never watched Trump on TV, I didn't know that he was peripherally involved with wresting, I thought of him as a carnival barker, in other words his tastes ran different from mine, but I did get the sense that the streets of Queens had left an impression on him even though he was Little Lord Fauntleroy with his military schooling and rich family and despite the wealth gap he connects across class.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

     

    Neither was Warren Harding. But he signed the immigration bill, and good times followed. Though you still had to hide the booze. Warren did.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though."

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don't necessarily go together.
    , @Zed, Lord of the Brutals
    Thoughtfulness and/or intelligence isn't the issue. The issue is loyalty, or more accurately lack thereof. The majority of the productive sector of the American people have been betrayed and abandoned, and they're realizing it.
    , @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    I'll lay odds that Trump has a higher IQ than the last two White House occupants.
    , @Boomstick
    I think he's fairly intelligent, but doesn't fit into the ruling class's template of what a smart guy sounds like. We've all seen the "Ivy league smart guy" template. Polite, knows the right people, evasive, thinks that the right arrangement of words creates its own reality.

    Trump's a throwback to an earlier era, the savvy street operator. Think Walter Burns in "His Girl Friday." Brash, moves fast, a salesman, uses mockery to effect. He's probably not any more or less ethical than the Ivy template, but he has practical experience working with people other than Ivy templates. I could see Trump dealing with New York concrete building contractors. Hillary or Kerry or Obama? No way.
    , @MarkinLA
    Trump has street smarts and that is a type of intelligence that is hard to measure.
  16. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Jenkins mentions $3.7 million in unsolicited donations. What about all of the “Make America Great Again” swag Trump is selling here: http://shop.donaldjtrump.com/ ? I bet he’s raised a lot more from that.

    As for Jenkins’s doubt that there’d be Americans willing to help Trump out with the ground game, has he seen the people flocking to Trump’s rallies?

    And as for Trump’s liquid assets, what about his income? IIRC, it was something like $300 million last year. And I bet most of it is a lot more secure than his former clothing line at Macy’s. A lot of his organization’s income comes from licensing fees from international developers using the Trump brand on their properties. It’s one thing for Macy’s to drop Trump’s ties, but if you’re a Brazilian developer who raised a bunch of money locally using the Trump name, I’d think you’re committed.

    Read More
  17. anon says: • Disclaimer

    It’ll be fun watching all the liberals cheering on the enormously wealthy corporations, as they strive to overcome the desires of the common voter.

    Read More
  18. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Maj. Kong
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy. The knives will come out.

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there's a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy.

    But, man, wouldn’t that be exciting? It would be like actually being there to witness the moment that Icarus flew too close to the sun.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    More like watching the Night of the Long Knives, without the homoeroticism.
    , @Henry Bowman
    Seeing how Icarus is trying to save us, this nation and our future, I do not see how seeing him fail would be a good thing.
  19. Maj. Kong says:
    @anon
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy.

    But, man, wouldn't that be exciting? It would be like actually being there to witness the moment that Icarus flew too close to the sun.

    More like watching the Night of the Long Knives, without the homoeroticism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Oh, come on. It'll be 2016. I'm sure there will be plenty of homoeroticism.

    And they're not going to kill him. Whatever happens, I'm sure he has enough money stashed away somewhere they can't get to that he'll be able to live the rest of his life in the tropical paradise of his choice.

    Or maybe not. He still took one for the team. When was the last time you saw such a spectacular flameout for someone saying what he believed in? If he's really that worried that he might go under for this, but he's still pushing it as far as he has anyway, the man must have balls the size of Mercury, at the least.
  20. Steven J. says:

    Donald Trump, already aged 69, probably doesn’t care a whole lot about losing some $. He will regardless, by anyone’s standards, be rich for the rest of his life. He already has a family & now he’s clearly focused on cementing his legacy.

    Read More
  21. TangoMan says:
    @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation’s problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?

    I suspect that there are lots of guys like Trump, smart guys but they’re rooted in a philosophy and a society that’s no longer fashionable. I never watched Trump on TV, I didn’t know that he was peripherally involved with wresting, I thought of him as a carnival barker, in other words his tastes ran different from mine, but I did get the sense that the streets of Queens had left an impression on him even though he was Little Lord Fauntleroy with his military schooling and rich family and despite the wealth gap he connects across class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Are the nation’s problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems…
     
    Minnesota did quite well under Jesse Ventura, and he was basically AWOL the last year or two of his term.

    My fantasy is that Trump gets bored, too, and starts pulling us out of places he can't be bothered with.
    , @Desiderius

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation’s problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?
     
    One would hope that in a nation with a third of billion citizens, that wouldn't have to be an either/or proposition.

    But yeah, at this point that's kind of all you have if you're forced to back-rationalize Trump support (it's of a piece with "Well, he'll get good people like Sessions") but it is also that important and he's the only candidate guaranteed to have it.

    Sucks though in that it should be a pre-requisite for all candidates in the first place.
  22. @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Neither was Warren Harding. But he signed the immigration bill, and good times followed. Though you still had to hide the booze. Warren did.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CK
    And it was against the republican ticket of Harding and Coolidge that the NYT ran its first front page editorial.
    The good years.
    , @Momus
    Hillary's hiding the booze.
  23. @TangoMan
    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation's problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?

    I suspect that there are lots of guys like Trump, smart guys but they're rooted in a philosophy and a society that's no longer fashionable. I never watched Trump on TV, I didn't know that he was peripherally involved with wresting, I thought of him as a carnival barker, in other words his tastes ran different from mine, but I did get the sense that the streets of Queens had left an impression on him even though he was Little Lord Fauntleroy with his military schooling and rich family and despite the wealth gap he connects across class.

    Are the nation’s problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems…

    Minnesota did quite well under Jesse Ventura, and he was basically AWOL the last year or two of his term.

    My fantasy is that Trump gets bored, too, and starts pulling us out of places he can’t be bothered with.

    Read More
  24. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Maj. Kong
    More like watching the Night of the Long Knives, without the homoeroticism.

    Oh, come on. It’ll be 2016. I’m sure there will be plenty of homoeroticism.

    And they’re not going to kill him. Whatever happens, I’m sure he has enough money stashed away somewhere they can’t get to that he’ll be able to live the rest of his life in the tropical paradise of his choice.

    Or maybe not. He still took one for the team. When was the last time you saw such a spectacular flameout for someone saying what he believed in? If he’s really that worried that he might go under for this, but he’s still pushing it as far as he has anyway, the man must have balls the size of Mercury, at the least.

    Read More
  25. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Trump does not respond like their bitch to threats. Instead he hits back hard.

    Look for places like NYT to be shocked and dismayed throughout 2016 as Trump repeatedly fails to respond like their bitch.

    Trump is not afraid to mix it up with punk thugs on twitter. It’s very funny when these nobodies get direct replies from Trump with phrases like “you ungrateful dog”…

    Newsflash: Trump likes to sue people. Trump likes to fight. It energizes him. It’s still early in the campaign and many of his antagonists have already shut up. They realize 1) he doesn’t seek their approval and 2) he hits back very very hard.

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  26. Trump is probably above average in intellect but not remotely a genius. It doesn’t take a genius to see the issues. You just have to not be beholden to the people almost all politicians are.

    That’s why I suspect the other shoe has yet to drop. You don’t get to be a Trump by just your own hard work and risk taking. I think there is someone he is beholden to, I just don’t know who.

    Unfortunately, we’ll probably find out sometime between the RNC and the general election.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I think it's reasonably likely that Trump is at genius level. Genius level IQ is really not that high in the scheme of things. Someone like Isaac Newton would be well above that bar. I daresay most major business magnates who have either grown their own business or enlarged the family dynasty are at genius level. Running a business involves countless decisions, and life is an IQ test.

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G's shtick and shut him down? Steve commented on it. Trump is not polite, he doesn't tolerate fools gladly, and some say he is a buffoon. I think those who judge him unintelligent would get soundly beaten by him in most intellectual endeavours, especially the ones Trump is good at.

    Trump's IQ would be a good iStevish topic. I see 156 on the internet, not sure if it is correct but doesn't seem unlikely.
  27. TangoMan says:

    OT – The NYT Magazine has a long article entitled “Has Europe Reached the Breaking Point?” and working my way downwards in the “Readers’ Picks” comment sections I’ve given up looking for a pro-NYT viewpoint, it seems that all of the commenters are blaming the NYT and the elite for the idiotic policies they advocated for Europe.

    I found it quite jarring to be reading the reporter’s reporting of facts and then he inserts his leftist commentary with remarks like “that was a bigoted remark” and his in your face effort to redefine jihad. I guess these leftists just can’t help themselves and must insert their social justice warrior instructions into every damn thing they write.

    Read More
  28. @TangoMan
    Mr. Trump has gotten extraordinarily far based on free media plus a degree of self-funding that might come from petty cash.

    Surprisingly, the old rules don't seem to apply to Trump.

    And running is about to become a lot more expensive. When the campaign goes national after Iowa and New Hampshire, Mr. Trump would have to spend money on TV ads.

    First, the rules haven't applied to Trump but that'll change any day now and then the rules will apply and then he's a goner. Prove to us that the free publicity strategy will stop. So long as people are interested in what Trump is saying and doing, they'll tune into media reports and so long as media finds an audience for Trump-related news, they'll keep providing Trump with free media coverage. The Huffington Post tried to marginalize Trump by putting him into their entertainment section but they still covered him and even they weren't so stupid as to forego any coverage, thus ceding the coverage, and audience, to competitors. No media outlet is going to forego covering Trump so long as the public wants news about Trump.

    Jeez, you'd think that reporters for the Wall Street Journal would understand business fundamentals, but hey, why let business fundamentals get in the way of wishcasting a story that pleases their bias.

    But he hasn’t shown even the willingness to spend the $44 million that Mitt Romney spent on his failed 2008 effort.

    This isn't a substantiated claim. What Trump has spent, or not spent, doesn't lead one to conclude anything about his willingness to spend. Does it appear that Trump NEEDS to spend?

    Question: Is the WSJ in Jeb!’s corner? This type of article appears to have fingerprints from his campaign on it, only not too directly.

    About five months ago in mid-summer, the national conservative media was saying “Well, he obviously can’t keep this up going into the fall.” But then, whoops, 25 million people tuned into oe of the late summer debates and around 23 million in the other late summer debate. And last week saw the third highest rating ever for a GOP nominee debate.

    Who are actually watching the debates? Answer: for the most part, the GOP base. Apparently they still like what they are hearing from the Donald.

    Also the WSJ appears to neglect the power of “free” media as in: The internet. Supposedly the 2010′s are the age of the ‘net and social media is stronger than ever before. Does anyone know how well Trump is covered on the internet at large? As in, does he still have strong name recognition across all generations (as opposed to say, Santorum; Huckabee; Graham; etc).

    Question: Suppose Trump does indeed win the GOP nomination. Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign? As in, enough to win the presidency? Also, and if Trump should win the GOP nomination, how will such venerable organs of conservatism as the WSJ react? Will they do a 180 and fully support him with the same passion and enthusiasm as they are reacting vs. him at present?

    ‘Tis a puzzlement, a puzzlement.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.
  29. If elected, President Trump will have a problem managing his empire. Most Presidents put their assets into a blind trust so they cannot be accused of insider trading. Financial assets such as stocks or bonds are relatively simple because they are publicly traded and easy to diversify. Because Trump’s holdings are private, his real estate and businesses holdings are probably quite messy with many different outstanding loans and multiple properties used as collateral. If inflation kicks in, he probably stands to make a killing but he will be open to criticism from every detractor on the planet.

    Read More
  30. “If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy.”

    Trump, in exile? With comments like that, its hard to believe NY-based WSJ has covered him all these decades and now would behave as if they have no idea who they’re writing about. Exile? How is that word associated in any way with someone of Trump’s personality? And Trump has also been in bankruptcy or near it before. Didn’t seem to stop him or slow him down.

    “He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.”

    Didn’t Trump graduate from Penn’s Wharton Business School? Have to have a pretty high IQ (e.g. around 122, the same as Obama, btw) to do well there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Trump's undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama's.
  31. @anon
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy.

    But, man, wouldn't that be exciting? It would be like actually being there to witness the moment that Icarus flew too close to the sun.

    Seeing how Icarus is trying to save us, this nation and our future, I do not see how seeing him fail would be a good thing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    You're right, it wouldn't. But if it was unavoidable, and it did happen, I'd rather see it happen like that than to just see him sort of wuss out.
  32. Mr. Anon says:

    “And assets that he could reasonably convert to cash are even less. Bloomberg puts the figure as low as $70 million, less than what several candidates in the race (Bush, Clinton, Cruz) and their super PACs already have raised.”

    Of course, that is because Bush, Clinton, and Cruz (and Kasich, and Rubio, and Christie) are bought-and-paid-for stooges – hirelings of the “donor class”.

    “And running is about to become a lot more expensive. When the campaign goes national after Iowa and New Hampshire, Mr. Trump would have to spend money on TV ads.”

    The primary purpose of TV ads is likely not to tell voters what your positions are, it is to make voters aware that you exist. Probably about two-thirds of the electorate (or more) had never heard of Kasich or Rubio until that moment that they see a TV spot touting them for President. Trump has had – what? – about thirty years of publicity (including a popular, long-running TV show) informing people that he exists.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Trump has had – what? – about thirty years of publicity (including a popular, long-running TV show) informing people that he exists.
     
    This one is easy to bat out of the park. Instant celebrity came easy to Obama as the mass media built him up starting February 2007. True to Democrat Party leechism Obama was given a billion dollars worth freebie advertising via various Democrat media (you go count them)

    By way of contrast, Donald Trump built up his celebrity status the hard way over 30 years. Sorry to even talk this stoopid celebrity oriented way but mass media can build you up and take you down. Trump knows how to counteract their take down. Trump has been using-abusing mass media for 30 years to build up the Trump™ name in a way they cannot take him down. Trump is too imprinted on too many American minds and in a positive way via his TV shows/


    What Dems and Republicans are going to learn in November 2016 is that lo-information voters will be running to vote Trump this time around

  33. Mr. Anon says:
    @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    “He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.”

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together.
     
    Good point. Useful distinction.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together
     
    I always thought Mensa's owl mascot was misguided. While intelligence is ubiquitous there, wisdom occurs much more sporadically.

    Do Rice and Temple live up to their mascots?
  34. Clyde says:
    @WillBest
    Glad the WSJ is a couple weeks behind me. He is basically banking on the GOP apparatus to kick in and support him when he wins. And it isn't necessarily a crazy bet because it is a MAD scenario for the GOPe

    His business interests are almost certainly under contract. It is not likely that Macy's can just up and drop the Trump line without certain buyouts and forfeitures. And there should be another company willing to take their place.

    The negative affects on his real estate holding are short lived paper issues, and will correct when the 2-minute hate drills are directed elsewhere.

    The liquid cash, and willingness to spend, of course, are another issue entirely. For all his bluster I doubt he wants to spend it. Then again, Balmer just dropped 2 billion on the LA Clippers, and a quarter of all billionaires are investing piles of cash in space flight, so maybe dropping a billion to be President for 4 years isn't out of consideration.

    What he could sell tomorrow isn't really an issue for billionaires. They can always leverage their assets and then default.

    Excellent analysis of Donald Trump’s finances. Donald Trump has spent 30 years building Trump™ up, he can mentally deal with the Trump brand name being tarnished a bit. It is his three children who are in the family business who will get quite perturbed. They are the X factor that can exert the pressure on him to quit, to cut the losses to the brand name “Trump”.

    But at age 68 and in excellent health (his Doc released his checkup the other day) Donald Trump (and his ego) have new worlds to conquer. Still, my advice to him is lose 20 pounds. Your face is flushed red too often.

    Read More
    • Replies: @e
    Your face is flushed red too often.

    I think that effect might be the makeup and the lights. I saw him in person, up close, at Spyglass Hill a few years back, the AT&T(formerly, the Crosby.) I remember thinking, "Man, what white, white skin." BTW, he was very kind to the kids asking for his autograph, not that that would make him a good POTUS, but it said something about him. He bantered with them a bit, encouraging them in their golf and their studies. One of his celebrity playing partners that day, Mark Wahlberg, couldn't be bothered and just kept walking past the kids off the 18th green.

  35. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy."

    Trump, in exile? With comments like that, its hard to believe NY-based WSJ has covered him all these decades and now would behave as if they have no idea who they're writing about. Exile? How is that word associated in any way with someone of Trump's personality? And Trump has also been in bankruptcy or near it before. Didn't seem to stop him or slow him down.


    "He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though."

    Didn't Trump graduate from Penn's Wharton Business School? Have to have a pretty high IQ (e.g. around 122, the same as Obama, btw) to do well there.

    Trump’s undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama’s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Trump’s undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama’s.
     
    But then Trump went on to Wharton Business School....... Trump would be very refreshing president because he is not a stinkin' lawyer.
    --Obama-Biden-lawyers
    --Bill Clintoon-lawyer - AlGore went to Vanderbilt law for a year plus but did not graduate for a good reason. He ran off to run for Representative and won.

    George W Bush- not a lawyer, went to Harvard B school
    George HW Bush- not a lawyer but "As Yale team captain, Bush met Babe Ruth before a game during his senior year" ___wiki cite

    Jimmy Carter--- not a lawyer but an actual Jeffersonian farmer who (horrors) sent his daughter Amy to a DC public school. An enhanced kind of public school one but a righteous contrast to Obama sending his two daughters to a 40,000 per year private school though in the real world we know he did not pay a dime. Life is good for an x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia...
  36. What the WSJ fails to mention is that running as a populist candidate who is giving the people what they want does not cost all that much money. Only candidates who push oligarch-friendly policies need huge ad campaigns – and more importantly, an opposing oligarch-sponsored candidate pushing similar unpopular policies. So Trump really does not need an ad campaign to will the nomination.

    In fact many Americans (especially the more liberal minded) propose hatred of the impact of money on politics. So it will be a huge strategic advantage for Trump during the general to NOT run ads – but to point out that every time Hillary runs an ad she is revealing the hidden face of the corporate sponsors backing her. Trump will have many opportunities to attack Hillary from the Left during the general – his health care plan will be free from the influence of Big Health lobbyists, for example.

    One potential problem for Trump is Congress. What Trump is actually doing is fleshing out an American Front National over the dying carcass of the Republican Party. So he needs Trump-approved GOP candidates in the House and Senate seats. And the only way you can be Trump approved is to not take corporate or oligarchic political donations. This is a huge challenge for Trump which I believe he will have to tap into the wallets of his die-hard followers which make-up 30% of America. This is important because Trump is already 69 years old and doesn’t have a daughter named Marine or a granddaughter named Marion…

    On the Sheldon Adelson meeting – being something of an optimist; and having seen Trump’s speech to the Jewish Republican Business group – I believe Trump is playing hardball on Israel and telling prominent Jews that if they go after him as a group, and he is elected President, Trump will force a hard peace on Israel or he will cut off their funding one way or another. I’m sure as Commander in Chief he has the discretion to make life very difficult for Israel.

    Like I said though, I tend to be an optimist….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Trump, who is giving the people what they want ____
     
    You neglected to cite Ray Davies
  37. Mr. Anon says:

    “But he hasn’t shown even the willingness to spend the $44 million that Mitt Romney spent on his failed 2008 effort.”

    Why would Trump want to spend $44 million on a failed effort, when he has – to date – spent far less than that on a so-far successful effort. Copying a guy like Romney, who spent a lot of money on a campaign that he essentially gave up on sometime in August of 2012, doesn’t sound like a good plan to me.

    Read More
  38. Is Trump going to give up running all his business interests to be President? My impression is he likes managing things with his name on them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.
    , @vinteuil
    "He thought of the days behind him. He wished it were possible to light a neon sign above them, saying: Rearden Life."
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The Trump presidential administration, has a nice ring to it.

    Also, Trump likes to name things after himself. The border wall or rather the Trump Wall; The Trump Wall of America; The Great Trump Wall of America. All have a nice sound to it. And of course the name goes on the wall.

    In some ways, Donald Trump reminds one of Andrew Jackson. A man of the people who had strong instincts of how to lead a people/masses/etc.

    Trumpian Democracy writ large, and all with his name on the movement as well. Not too bad of a legacy to build for himself.

    , @Bugg
    Trump has 2 adult sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, and his daughter, Ivana, who already are very involved in running his businesses. Not a stretch to expect they would simply take a greater role if Trump wins.
  39. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Henry Bowman
    Seeing how Icarus is trying to save us, this nation and our future, I do not see how seeing him fail would be a good thing.

    You’re right, it wouldn’t. But if it was unavoidable, and it did happen, I’d rather see it happen like that than to just see him sort of wuss out.

    Read More
  40. TangoMan says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Question: Is the WSJ in Jeb!'s corner? This type of article appears to have fingerprints from his campaign on it, only not too directly.

    About five months ago in mid-summer, the national conservative media was saying "Well, he obviously can't keep this up going into the fall." But then, whoops, 25 million people tuned into oe of the late summer debates and around 23 million in the other late summer debate. And last week saw the third highest rating ever for a GOP nominee debate.

    Who are actually watching the debates? Answer: for the most part, the GOP base. Apparently they still like what they are hearing from the Donald.

    Also the WSJ appears to neglect the power of "free" media as in: The internet. Supposedly the 2010's are the age of the 'net and social media is stronger than ever before. Does anyone know how well Trump is covered on the internet at large? As in, does he still have strong name recognition across all generations (as opposed to say, Santorum; Huckabee; Graham; etc).

    Question: Suppose Trump does indeed win the GOP nomination. Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the '16 campaign? As in, enough to win the presidency? Also, and if Trump should win the GOP nomination, how will such venerable organs of conservatism as the WSJ react? Will they do a 180 and fully support him with the same passion and enthusiasm as they are reacting vs. him at present?

    'Tis a puzzlement, a puzzlement.

    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There’s an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery – it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they’ll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that’s going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump’s medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can’t wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don’t understand that bias.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery – it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.
     
    A lottery with seven subscribers can't pay out much.

    I'm surprised one doesn't see more references to that show, since its purpose was social commentary to begin with. Too downscale, I guess. Dobie aimed higher.
    , @SFG
    The modern obsession with the quarterly report and running publicly traded companies where you have to make money NOW and can't plan long-term, I think.
    , @vinteuil
    Hi, Tangoman - glad to see you around here, lately.

    Personally, I don't see the Republican establishment rallying around Trump. Have you read the kind of stuff guys like Krauthammer & Jonah Goldberg have been writing about him? If he gets the nomination, I think they'll jump ship & (at least tacitly) support Hillary.

    And if they do, and if Hillary gets in, I think it might be for the best, in the long run. When the great financial reckoning hits, as it soon must, I desperately want an unambiguous lefty sitting in the White House.
    , @JackOH
    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the [Republican] donor class . . . ".

    I've read elsewhere (can't recall the source) that the Presidency will be Hillary's. She's most acceptable to corporate America's donor class through her own credentials and, vicariously, through Bill's. She can be counted on to execute corporate wishes while tossing out social justice rhetoric to left-wing partisan toe-rags. Her troubled marriage may still offer corporate operators extortionist leverage. I'm not sure the Republicans have anyone who can likely deliver the legislative and policy guarantees to corporate America that Hillary can. (BTW-I'm a longtime Libertarian Party voter.)
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    However, the donor class or rather their offspring find no compunction whatsoever of mingling with the "wrong sort" of folks. Look at the likes of Paris Hilton. Her family (and her as well) both are a part of that top 1%. How many billionaires are ostracizing the Hilton family?

    Look at rappers/athletes who are worth multi millions. Is Rap mogul Russell Simmons (ironically a pal of Trumps) ostracized by the likes of venture capitalists and wealthy donors? Of course not. Money is money is money and always welcome; if the individual has the bucks then he is more than welcome into the VIP room.

    And finally look at organized crime. From Capone to Gotti, the ultra wealthy had no compunction of associating with gangstas. Admittedly back in the day it wasn't very public but in 2015land wealthy thugs find no barriers to hanging out with the exclusively wealthy. Maybe because both at some level are thieves/thugs etc.

    The Kardashians. Do they have any barriers to hanging out with venture capitalists/tech moguls? Of course not.

    Gilligan is definitely allowed into the club, provided that he wins the right lottery. As in, the largest in history. Those kinds tend to get their calls returned, perhaps because some of the elite wealthy would like to help manage the newly found riches of the lottery winner.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine
     
    Where do you get mass deportations? The focus on Muslims won't be religious, it will be political. And we already have the Leftists/Liberals/Democrats/RINOs dealing out as much nastiness as they can muster (cf. Holman Jenkins). Does The Boy Who Cried Wolf ring a bell with you?

    Maybe mass deportations are what Trump has in mind. Or maybe he just reset the spectrum on "reasonable" dialog. Perhaps that is what he needs to negotiate a genuine solution to the problem.
  41. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Here we go with the idiotic Trump Is Not Intelligent meme.

    Hey smart guy, Trump would kick your ass in any strategy competition. His social skills and social IQ are far beyond your capability. Trump will spot your weakness then exploit it until you’re bleeding out on the floor.

    New York City is the toughest shark tank on earth and Trump thrives in that environment.

    Trump just invented a completely original presidential campaign strategy that has confounded every political expert in the country and still “he’s not very intelligent.”

    These media jerks only see liberals boycotting the Trump brand. They don’t consider everyone else gravitating toward it as the months go by.

    Sheldon Adelson just folded! One of the smartest gamblers in the world just threw in the towel because Trump singlehandedly changed the paradigm. You know Bill Clinton told Hillary tonight that she’s not going to be President…

    Read More
    • Agree: Anonym, IA
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Trump just invented a completely original presidential campaign strategy "

    ahhh not really. I'm a hillbilly who dropped out of high school in '88 and trump is just now saying what many of us have been saying for decades

    Give him credit for being a rich guy and saying it but it is nothing original
  42. Clyde says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Trump's undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama's.

    Trump’s undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama’s.

    But then Trump went on to Wharton Business School……. Trump would be very refreshing president because he is not a stinkin’ lawyer.
    –Obama-Biden-lawyers
    –Bill Clintoon-lawyer – AlGore went to Vanderbilt law for a year plus but did not graduate for a good reason. He ran off to run for Representative and won.

    George W Bush- not a lawyer, went to Harvard B school
    George HW Bush- not a lawyer but “As Yale team captain, Bush met Babe Ruth before a game during his senior year” ___wiki cite

    Jimmy Carter— not a lawyer but an actual Jeffersonian farmer who (horrors) sent his daughter Amy to a DC public school. An enhanced kind of public school one but a righteous contrast to Obama sending his two daughters to a 40,000 per year private school though in the real world we know he did not pay a dime. Life is good for an x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia
     
    How do you know Obama is an "x-choomer"? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session. Obama, choomer-in-chief, originator of the adage "a blunt-a-day keeps the doctor away" and "choom, choom, choom your boat, gently down the stream, breezily, hazily, waftily, choomin, life is but a dream."

    Choom on bro, dope smokers of the world unite! All you have to lose is the fetters of the (white) man!
  43. Clyde says:
    @Shine a Light
    What the WSJ fails to mention is that running as a populist candidate who is giving the people what they want does not cost all that much money. Only candidates who push oligarch-friendly policies need huge ad campaigns – and more importantly, an opposing oligarch-sponsored candidate pushing similar unpopular policies. So Trump really does not need an ad campaign to will the nomination.

    In fact many Americans (especially the more liberal minded) propose hatred of the impact of money on politics. So it will be a huge strategic advantage for Trump during the general to NOT run ads – but to point out that every time Hillary runs an ad she is revealing the hidden face of the corporate sponsors backing her. Trump will have many opportunities to attack Hillary from the Left during the general – his health care plan will be free from the influence of Big Health lobbyists, for example.

    One potential problem for Trump is Congress. What Trump is actually doing is fleshing out an American Front National over the dying carcass of the Republican Party. So he needs Trump-approved GOP candidates in the House and Senate seats. And the only way you can be Trump approved is to not take corporate or oligarchic political donations. This is a huge challenge for Trump which I believe he will have to tap into the wallets of his die-hard followers which make-up 30% of America. This is important because Trump is already 69 years old and doesn’t have a daughter named Marine or a granddaughter named Marion…

    On the Sheldon Adelson meeting – being something of an optimist; and having seen Trump’s speech to the Jewish Republican Business group – I believe Trump is playing hardball on Israel and telling prominent Jews that if they go after him as a group, and he is elected President, Trump will force a hard peace on Israel or he will cut off their funding one way or another. I’m sure as Commander in Chief he has the discretion to make life very difficult for Israel.

    Like I said though, I tend to be an optimist….

    Trump, who is giving the people what they want ____

    You neglected to cite Ray Davies

    Read More
    • Replies: @IBC
    When Sheldon backed Jeb, he was insane
    But still he gave him money again and again...
  44. @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery – it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    A lottery with seven subscribers can’t pay out much.

    I’m surprised one doesn’t see more references to that show, since its purpose was social commentary to begin with. Too downscale, I guess. Dobie aimed higher.

    Read More
  45. Horseball says:

    OT

    http://www.dw.com/en/germanys-afd-distances-itself-from-h%C3%B6ckes-almost-racist-remarks/a-18917049

    Höcke referred to an “African life-affirming propagation type” and an overpopulation of Africa. “As long as we are prepared to take on this population surplus, Africans’ reproductive habits will not change,” Höcke had said

    Read More
  46. Clyde says:
    @Mr. Anon
    "And assets that he could reasonably convert to cash are even less. Bloomberg puts the figure as low as $70 million, less than what several candidates in the race (Bush, Clinton, Cruz) and their super PACs already have raised."

    Of course, that is because Bush, Clinton, and Cruz (and Kasich, and Rubio, and Christie) are bought-and-paid-for stooges - hirelings of the "donor class".

    "And running is about to become a lot more expensive. When the campaign goes national after Iowa and New Hampshire, Mr. Trump would have to spend money on TV ads."

    The primary purpose of TV ads is likely not to tell voters what your positions are, it is to make voters aware that you exist. Probably about two-thirds of the electorate (or more) had never heard of Kasich or Rubio until that moment that they see a TV spot touting them for President. Trump has had - what? - about thirty years of publicity (including a popular, long-running TV show) informing people that he exists.

    Trump has had – what? – about thirty years of publicity (including a popular, long-running TV show) informing people that he exists.

    This one is easy to bat out of the park. Instant celebrity came easy to Obama as the mass media built him up starting February 2007. True to Democrat Party leechism Obama was given a billion dollars worth freebie advertising via various Democrat media (you go count them)

    By way of contrast, Donald Trump built up his celebrity status the hard way over 30 years. Sorry to even talk this stoopid celebrity oriented way but mass media can build you up and take you down. Trump knows how to counteract their take down. Trump has been using-abusing mass media for 30 years to build up the Trump™ name in a way they cannot take him down. Trump is too imprinted on too many American minds and in a positive way via his TV shows/

    What Dems and Republicans are going to learn in November 2016 is that lo-information voters will be running to vote Trump this time around

    Read More
  47. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Donald Trump’s great crime in the eyes of the PC fascists and the pussy-whipped is ‘acting like a man’.
    For whites, at least ‘acting like a man’ is strictly verboten and provokes nasty, cowardly, little hisses and catcalls. Why, it’s just like breaking wind loudly at a Toni Morrison ‘poetry’ reading.

    But for hot-headed young Arabs and Magrehbis ‘acting like a man’ and letting your Kalashnikov do the talking is the plight of oppressed and misunderstood.

    Read More
  48. Jefferson says:

    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don’t they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation? When it comes to political ideology, would the likes of Lindsey Graham and John Kasich really stick out like a sore thumb in the DNC? I don’t think so. How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Why don’t the pro-open borders elites in both parties just unite under 1 umbrella? Why are they against a 1 party nation unification when they both have the same goals to turn The United States into a 3rd world country. What do they gain from having two parties?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    I recall an exiled former Putin adviser claiming that he advised the formation of a fake two party system. Putin decided against it, and as a consequence of only having one "party of power", it looks like a dictatorship. Singapore, also with one dominant party, considered the same thing, but unlike Russia it delivers good government.

    Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution.

    We should also remember the difference between the parties known as, "capital gains taxes". Another one is "labor unions".

    Just because the elite is globalist, does not mean there are not different views of globalism.

    For everyone else that TL;DR

    Duverger's Law
    , @Anonymous
    "What do they gain from having two parties?"

    Support of the sheeple.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don’t they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation?
     
    They did. It has a bear on its flag and fancies itself a "republic".

    Steve lives there.
    , @AP

    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place...How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?
     
    Labor unions, affirmative action, abortion, gun control, etc. Also, while both favor immigration, one does so in order to provide cheap wages (thus, schemes like providing residency certificates without citizenship for otherwise law-abiding illegals), the other in order to replace inconvenient natives with a new population of loyal voters.
  49. Maj. Kong says:
    @Jefferson
    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don't they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation? When it comes to political ideology, would the likes of Lindsey Graham and John Kasich really stick out like a sore thumb in the DNC? I don't think so. How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Why don't the pro-open borders elites in both parties just unite under 1 umbrella? Why are they against a 1 party nation unification when they both have the same goals to turn The United States into a 3rd world country. What do they gain from having two parties?

    I recall an exiled former Putin adviser claiming that he advised the formation of a fake two party system. Putin decided against it, and as a consequence of only having one “party of power”, it looks like a dictatorship. Singapore, also with one dominant party, considered the same thing, but unlike Russia it delivers good government.

    Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution.

    We should also remember the difference between the parties known as, “capital gains taxes”. Another one is “labor unions”.

    Just because the elite is globalist, does not mean there are not different views of globalism.

    For everyone else that TL;DR

    Duverger’s Law

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution."

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?
  50. Jefferson says:
    @Maj. Kong
    I recall an exiled former Putin adviser claiming that he advised the formation of a fake two party system. Putin decided against it, and as a consequence of only having one "party of power", it looks like a dictatorship. Singapore, also with one dominant party, considered the same thing, but unlike Russia it delivers good government.

    Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution.

    We should also remember the difference between the parties known as, "capital gains taxes". Another one is "labor unions".

    Just because the elite is globalist, does not mean there are not different views of globalism.

    For everyone else that TL;DR

    Duverger's Law

    “Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution.”

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?
     
    Once the CSPGMGOs are cut down to size, there'll be plenty. The problem is that actually accomplishing that goal has been a Sisyphean task.

    Maybe eventually they'll give up and try something else.
  51. @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Thoughtfulness and/or intelligence isn’t the issue. The issue is loyalty, or more accurately lack thereof. The majority of the productive sector of the American people have been betrayed and abandoned, and they’re realizing it.

    Read More
  52. Jefferson says:

    Bernie Sanders comes off as extremely beta male everytime he debates Hillary Clinton. He is her bitch and she wears the pants in those debates. Is he aspiring for the vice president spot? Because he certainly does not behave like a candidate who wants to be president. Bernie Sanders is not a very ambitious politician, he seems content with just settling. He does not have the characteristics to be a natural born leader. Bernie is scared to take off the gloves and play dirty politics against Hillary Clinton. He does not have the spine for it. He might as well get the hell out of the race. The Democratic primary is no country for old beta men.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thea
    He reminds of McCain basically campaigning for Obama.

    You can take Bernie out of Vermont but you can't take Vermont out of Bernie
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    Unfortunately, you're correct.

    I actually like Sanders a lot. It dismays me to see how deferentially he behaves, especially when he's around women (Hillary, Black Lives protesters). I'm not sure how he's going to win this nomination.
  53. Anonym says:
    @Former Darfur
    Trump is probably above average in intellect but not remotely a genius. It doesn't take a genius to see the issues. You just have to not be beholden to the people almost all politicians are.

    That's why I suspect the other shoe has yet to drop. You don't get to be a Trump by just your own hard work and risk taking. I think there is someone he is beholden to, I just don't know who.

    Unfortunately, we'll probably find out sometime between the RNC and the general election.

    I think it’s reasonably likely that Trump is at genius level. Genius level IQ is really not that high in the scheme of things. Someone like Isaac Newton would be well above that bar. I daresay most major business magnates who have either grown their own business or enlarged the family dynasty are at genius level. Running a business involves countless decisions, and life is an IQ test.

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G’s shtick and shut him down? Steve commented on it. Trump is not polite, he doesn’t tolerate fools gladly, and some say he is a buffoon. I think those who judge him unintelligent would get soundly beaten by him in most intellectual endeavours, especially the ones Trump is good at.

    Trump’s IQ would be a good iStevish topic. I see 156 on the internet, not sure if it is correct but doesn’t seem unlikely.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pat Gilligan

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G’s shtick and shut him down? Steve commented on it. Trump is not polite, he doesn’t tolerate fools gladly, and some say he is a buffoon. I think those who judge him unintelligent would get soundly beaten by him in most intellectual endeavours, especially the ones Trump is good at.
     
    I thought Trump was as polite to Ali G as was possible without wasting more time and being made to look like a fool. I met Trump about 5-6 years ago and spent 20 minutes one-on-one chatting with him. I worked for a federal agency and he was in the D.C. area on business related to a golf course. It was a security-related issue and he was going through a government area. The guy is exceeding polite and respectful. He exudes and walks with an air of confidence like no one I've ever seen (and I've been up close and personal with a lot of important people, including Trump's golfing partner in White Plains). Trump in person is a lot more powerful than TV. One of my coworkers was talking crap about Trump a few hours before we met up with him. Called him a punk and said he'd give him a dirty look. This coworker is black and a tough former Army special forces guy. So when Trump came through, mingled, and walked by and personally acknowledged him, my coworker expressed the fawningness and giddiness of a teenage girl at a Jonas Brothers concert.
  54. @TangoMan
    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation's problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?

    I suspect that there are lots of guys like Trump, smart guys but they're rooted in a philosophy and a society that's no longer fashionable. I never watched Trump on TV, I didn't know that he was peripherally involved with wresting, I thought of him as a carnival barker, in other words his tastes ran different from mine, but I did get the sense that the streets of Queens had left an impression on him even though he was Little Lord Fauntleroy with his military schooling and rich family and despite the wealth gap he connects across class.

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Are the nation’s problems so complex that we need a very intelligent person in the White House in order to understand and solve the problems or do we need someone with the backbone to make difficult decisions on pretty simple to understand problems and then follow through on implementing his decisions?

    One would hope that in a nation with a third of billion citizens, that wouldn’t have to be an either/or proposition.

    But yeah, at this point that’s kind of all you have if you’re forced to back-rationalize Trump support (it’s of a piece with “Well, he’ll get good people like Sessions”) but it is also that important and he’s the only candidate guaranteed to have it.

    Sucks though in that it should be a pre-requisite for all candidates in the first place.

    Read More
  55. unit472 says:
    @Mike Sylwester
    I think a lot of Trump supporters are boycotting Macy's.

    Macy’s dumping Trump’s clothing line is interesting given Macy’s own business model. Locally they closed their store in the more ‘vibrant’ area of the county to open a new deluxe store in the more Republican area of Manatee/Sarasota county. They are doing this nationally too. When the melanin content of the Macy’s shopper/shoplifter gets too high the store closes.

    Read More
  56. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump going to give up running all his business interests to be President? My impression is he likes managing things with his name on them.

    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.

     

    It's generally a good idea to leave family members out of one's campaign literature. But if it ever comes down to "my kids vs my opponents'", this is one area where Trump looks as good as anybody. Make his day.
  57. @Jefferson
    "Having an opposition party, even a nominal one, diffuses passions that would otherwise lead to radicalism or even revolution."

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?

    Once the CSPGMGOs are cut down to size, there’ll be plenty. The problem is that actually accomplishing that goal has been a Sisyphean task.

    Maybe eventually they’ll give up and try something else.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Once the CSPGMGOs are cut down to size, there’ll be plenty."

    So in your opinion most African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Homosexuals, and Millennials would oppose a party 1 nation where The Democratic Party is the only game in town? Yeah because those demographic groups are such huge swing voters right? Their voting habits are so unpredictable right? There is no voting pattern with them at all.
  58. @Mr. Anon
    "He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though."

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don't necessarily go together.

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together.

    Good point. Useful distinction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    Trump has a kind of quick, incisive intelligence that cuts through all the BS. For example, before San Bernardino, Chuck Todd (who hates Trump with a passion) asked him about creating no fly zones in Syria to hem in Isis. Trump replied, "ISIS has airplanes?" Todd was speechless, because Trump's response revealed the question to be irrelevant to Isis. That was the kind of remark that shows that Trump can get to the heart of a problem very quickly. That is an excellent quality, and essential in a leader.

    He's not particularly thoughtful or reflective. That would not really matter much, if Trump other qualities that a leader needs. I don't think he has them. I'm skeptical. I have a sick feeling that all of this is going to evaporate and that Hillary will be president.

  59. Off-topic Steve but have you heard about the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecile Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Ridiculous I genuinely thought Britain (and especially Oxbridge) was above that:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/universities-and-colleges/12058543/The-campaign-to-topple-Oxford-Universitys-Cecil-Rhodes-statue-is-too-silly-for-words.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    Once you admit negroes and teach them that their negritude makes their thoughts valuable, you're going to experience some very stupid things.
    , @Gordo
    From what we know about Rhodes perhaps we should be toppling his statue.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    …the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel college.
     
    Well, he did pay for Bill Clinton to attend. And you know what happened next…

    (Er, no, you don't, because it's covered up. More so than MLK.)
    , @Steve Sailer
    The Democratic frontrunner's husband will pay back his Rhodes Scholarship write after he quit Trump's golf club.
  60. To participate in widespread primaries and a convention fight he would have to hire staff. Mr. Trump, from day one, has likely never been down with any of that.

    Who does this guy think is scheduling, promoting and operating the 20,000 person rallies?

    Read More
  61. SFG says:
    @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    The modern obsession with the quarterly report and running publicly traded companies where you have to make money NOW and can’t plan long-term, I think.

    Read More
  62. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Jefferson
    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don't they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation? When it comes to political ideology, would the likes of Lindsey Graham and John Kasich really stick out like a sore thumb in the DNC? I don't think so. How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Why don't the pro-open borders elites in both parties just unite under 1 umbrella? Why are they against a 1 party nation unification when they both have the same goals to turn The United States into a 3rd world country. What do they gain from having two parties?

    “What do they gain from having two parties?”

    Support of the sheeple.

    Read More
  63. Thea says:
    @Jefferson
    Bernie Sanders comes off as extremely beta male everytime he debates Hillary Clinton. He is her bitch and she wears the pants in those debates. Is he aspiring for the vice president spot? Because he certainly does not behave like a candidate who wants to be president. Bernie Sanders is not a very ambitious politician, he seems content with just settling. He does not have the characteristics to be a natural born leader. Bernie is scared to take off the gloves and play dirty politics against Hillary Clinton. He does not have the spine for it. He might as well get the hell out of the race. The Democratic primary is no country for old beta men.

    He reminds of McCain basically campaigning for Obama.

    You can take Bernie out of Vermont but you can’t take Vermont out of Bernie

    Read More
  64. vinteuil says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump going to give up running all his business interests to be President? My impression is he likes managing things with his name on them.

    “He thought of the days behind him. He wished it were possible to light a neon sign above them, saying: Rearden Life.”

    Read More
  65. Meet your new victim class – Blonde, White, Palestinian and Muslim

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20151218_ap_6b1cbff168e942fc9380c421a093b91b.html?c=r

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Meet your new victim class – Blonde, White, Palestinian and Muslim"


    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20151218_ap_6b1cbff168e942fc9380c421a093b91b.html?c=r

    The Palestinian Muslim woman is the curly haired brunette on the left. The blue eyed blonde woman on the right is a Jewish Infidel. Next time you post links actually read the entire article.
  66. @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    I’ll lay odds that Trump has a higher IQ than the last two White House occupants.

    Read More
  67. 5371 says:
    @Zachary Latif
    Off-topic Steve but have you heard about the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecile Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Ridiculous I genuinely thought Britain (and especially Oxbridge) was above that:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/universities-and-colleges/12058543/The-campaign-to-topple-Oxford-Universitys-Cecil-Rhodes-statue-is-too-silly-for-words.html

    Once you admit negroes and teach them that their negritude makes their thoughts valuable, you’re going to experience some very stupid things.

    Read More
  68. vinteuil says:
    @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    Hi, Tangoman – glad to see you around here, lately.

    Personally, I don’t see the Republican establishment rallying around Trump. Have you read the kind of stuff guys like Krauthammer & Jonah Goldberg have been writing about him? If he gets the nomination, I think they’ll jump ship & (at least tacitly) support Hillary.

    And if they do, and if Hillary gets in, I think it might be for the best, in the long run. When the great financial reckoning hits, as it soon must, I desperately want an unambiguous lefty sitting in the White House.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IA
    If governments created wealth the communist ones would be the richest.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    I don't know whether the Republican Establishment rallying behind Donald Trump would be a good or bad thing in the end. If they do they'll expect Washington jobs in his administration, and they won't change their fundamental attitudes just because of who's in the Oval Office.

    I hope that Donald Trump is giving some thought at this stage as to how he plans to staff his administration, although I know that might be premature. But personnel is policy, as the Reaganites used to say, and trying to turn the course of a career Washington bureaucracy that might be in quasi-rebellion over a Trump victory will be a Herculean task.
  69. WhatEvvs [AKA "Internet Addict"] says:
    @Desiderius

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together.
     
    Good point. Useful distinction.

    Trump has a kind of quick, incisive intelligence that cuts through all the BS. For example, before San Bernardino, Chuck Todd (who hates Trump with a passion) asked him about creating no fly zones in Syria to hem in Isis. Trump replied, “ISIS has airplanes?” Todd was speechless, because Trump’s response revealed the question to be irrelevant to Isis. That was the kind of remark that shows that Trump can get to the heart of a problem very quickly. That is an excellent quality, and essential in a leader.

    He’s not particularly thoughtful or reflective. That would not really matter much, if Trump other qualities that a leader needs. I don’t think he has them. I’m skeptical. I have a sick feeling that all of this is going to evaporate and that Hillary will be president.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Makes sense.

    He’s not particularly thoughtful or reflective. That would not really matter much, if Trump other qualities that a leader needs. I don’t think he has them. I’m skeptical.
     
    Well, I'm skeptical because it's my duty as a citizen.

    At the end of the day, though, a choice must be made, so one has to construct a plausible case for each candidate to test if it can hang together.

    I think Trump is reflective, but he looks with the eyes of faith alone. There is only One who merits such a gaze, and His Name isn't Trump. There's ruin down that road, though not near the ruin that lies down the one without faith at all.

    He's counting on hiring the thoughtfulness, dedicating himself to action. Not sure that labor can be so readily divided.

    See Arnold's discussion of the complementarity here:

    http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/arnold/writings/4.html
  70. Gordo says:
    @Zachary Latif
    Off-topic Steve but have you heard about the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecile Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Ridiculous I genuinely thought Britain (and especially Oxbridge) was above that:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/universities-and-colleges/12058543/The-campaign-to-topple-Oxford-Universitys-Cecil-Rhodes-statue-is-too-silly-for-words.html

    From what we know about Rhodes perhaps we should be toppling his statue.

    Read More
  71. JackOH says:
    @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the [Republican] donor class . . . “.

    I’ve read elsewhere (can’t recall the source) that the Presidency will be Hillary’s. She’s most acceptable to corporate America’s donor class through her own credentials and, vicariously, through Bill’s. She can be counted on to execute corporate wishes while tossing out social justice rhetoric to left-wing partisan toe-rags. Her troubled marriage may still offer corporate operators extortionist leverage. I’m not sure the Republicans have anyone who can likely deliver the legislative and policy guarantees to corporate America that Hillary can. (BTW-I’m a longtime Libertarian Party voter.)

    Read More
  72. @Zachary Latif
    Off-topic Steve but have you heard about the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecile Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Ridiculous I genuinely thought Britain (and especially Oxbridge) was above that:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/universities-and-colleges/12058543/The-campaign-to-topple-Oxford-Universitys-Cecil-Rhodes-statue-is-too-silly-for-words.html

    …the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Well, he did pay for Bill Clinton to attend. And you know what happened next…

    (Er, no, you don’t, because it’s covered up. More so than MLK.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @gbloco
    yes that's what's stopping me donating any money to my alma mater!!!
    , @rod1963
    He raped a woman while at Oxford. That seems to be the starting point of Clinton's other career as a serial rapist.
  73. @Mr. Anon
    "He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though."

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don't necessarily go together.

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together

    I always thought Mensa’s owl mascot was misguided. While intelligence is ubiquitous there, wisdom occurs much more sporadically.

    Do Rice and Temple live up to their mascots?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Mensa's motto could be: The smartest group of people who never amounted to anything.
  74. @Jefferson
    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don't they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation? When it comes to political ideology, would the likes of Lindsey Graham and John Kasich really stick out like a sore thumb in the DNC? I don't think so. How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Why don't the pro-open borders elites in both parties just unite under 1 umbrella? Why are they against a 1 party nation unification when they both have the same goals to turn The United States into a 3rd world country. What do they gain from having two parties?

    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don’t they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation?

    They did. It has a bear on its flag and fancies itself a “republic”.

    Steve lives there.

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  75. CK says:
    @Maj. Kong
    If Trump fails to win either the nomination or the general election, it may well force him into exile and personal bankruptcy. The knives will come out.

    But if the other GOP candidate fall short, there's a six-figure job waiting for them, at least. Eric Cantor got way more than that.

    A man who has never in 69 years been someone’s employee is going to suddenly sell out and become an employee? Your confusion is astounding. Cantor has always been an employee of someone.

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  76. @Dave Pinsen
    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.

    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.

    It’s generally a good idea to leave family members out of one’s campaign literature. But if it ever comes down to “my kids vs my opponents’”, this is one area where Trump looks as good as anybody. Make his day.

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  77. CK says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

     

    Neither was Warren Harding. But he signed the immigration bill, and good times followed. Though you still had to hide the booze. Warren did.

    And it was against the republican ticket of Harding and Coolidge that the NYT ran its first front page editorial.
    The good years.

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  78. Momus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    He doesn’t actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

     

    Neither was Warren Harding. But he signed the immigration bill, and good times followed. Though you still had to hide the booze. Warren did.

    Hillary’s hiding the booze.

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  79. MQ says:
    @Anonymous
    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-meets-with-billionaire-sheldon-adelson-2015-12

    Presumably he met with him because he may need to ask him for money in the future.

    Then so much for Trump’s freedom to speak the truth about US policy in the middle east…

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    -Rome wasn't built in a day.
    -Don't let perfect be the enemy of the good.

    If Trump tried to implement all of the policies that most people here favor, society would go into cardiac arrest on the operating table. Considering that NO ONE ELSE is proposing ANY of what Trump has advocated, the nation would be blessed if he followed through on even one policy position. What's the alternative?
  80. Svigor says:

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G’s shtick and shut him down?

    I’ve never seen the clip, but assuming the consensus is correct (that he did shut AG down), and given how many public figures AG played, I do find the example illustrative. It’s the difference between IQ and “weaponized” IQ. Lots of smart people aren’t very “sharp.” “Situational awareness” and “street smarts” might be other terms for it.

    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.

    In other words, face time with the kids = executive decisions. If they’re really good, it can all be done with non-verbal cues.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    >>>>>>>
    assuming the consensus is correct (that he did shut AG down)
    >>>>>

    What Trump did with Ali G is reframe and dominate multiple times during the conversation which through AG completely off his own script. AG became the mewling supplicant begging Trump not to run with Trump's own off-the-cuff ice cream innovation.

    Look at Ali's facial expressions. Body language. Ali looks like a general watching his troops get routed.

    The clip is on YouTube. The tone is set immediately when Trump responds to the first question with "music." Right there all of the humor goes out of Ali GM's act because he's forced to scramble and somehow make his script work, but it can't work because Trump keeps blowing up the script's premise.
  81. Sutton says:

    The WSJ has done more to undermine the Republic and the economy than any leftist publication or institution.

    For years I was deluded, like so many “conservatives” who conserve nothing.

    That paper was like the fire that prevents the cleansing fire from happening.

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  82. @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    However, the donor class or rather their offspring find no compunction whatsoever of mingling with the “wrong sort” of folks. Look at the likes of Paris Hilton. Her family (and her as well) both are a part of that top 1%. How many billionaires are ostracizing the Hilton family?

    Look at rappers/athletes who are worth multi millions. Is Rap mogul Russell Simmons (ironically a pal of Trumps) ostracized by the likes of venture capitalists and wealthy donors? Of course not. Money is money is money and always welcome; if the individual has the bucks then he is more than welcome into the VIP room.

    And finally look at organized crime. From Capone to Gotti, the ultra wealthy had no compunction of associating with gangstas. Admittedly back in the day it wasn’t very public but in 2015land wealthy thugs find no barriers to hanging out with the exclusively wealthy. Maybe because both at some level are thieves/thugs etc.

    The Kardashians. Do they have any barriers to hanging out with venture capitalists/tech moguls? Of course not.

    Gilligan is definitely allowed into the club, provided that he wins the right lottery. As in, the largest in history. Those kinds tend to get their calls returned, perhaps because some of the elite wealthy would like to help manage the newly found riches of the lottery winner.

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  83. @Anonym
    I think it's reasonably likely that Trump is at genius level. Genius level IQ is really not that high in the scheme of things. Someone like Isaac Newton would be well above that bar. I daresay most major business magnates who have either grown their own business or enlarged the family dynasty are at genius level. Running a business involves countless decisions, and life is an IQ test.

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G's shtick and shut him down? Steve commented on it. Trump is not polite, he doesn't tolerate fools gladly, and some say he is a buffoon. I think those who judge him unintelligent would get soundly beaten by him in most intellectual endeavours, especially the ones Trump is good at.

    Trump's IQ would be a good iStevish topic. I see 156 on the internet, not sure if it is correct but doesn't seem unlikely.

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G’s shtick and shut him down? Steve commented on it. Trump is not polite, he doesn’t tolerate fools gladly, and some say he is a buffoon. I think those who judge him unintelligent would get soundly beaten by him in most intellectual endeavours, especially the ones Trump is good at.

    I thought Trump was as polite to Ali G as was possible without wasting more time and being made to look like a fool. I met Trump about 5-6 years ago and spent 20 minutes one-on-one chatting with him. I worked for a federal agency and he was in the D.C. area on business related to a golf course. It was a security-related issue and he was going through a government area. The guy is exceeding polite and respectful. He exudes and walks with an air of confidence like no one I’ve ever seen (and I’ve been up close and personal with a lot of important people, including Trump’s golfing partner in White Plains). Trump in person is a lot more powerful than TV. One of my coworkers was talking crap about Trump a few hours before we met up with him. Called him a punk and said he’d give him a dirty look. This coworker is black and a tough former Army special forces guy. So when Trump came through, mingled, and walked by and personally acknowledged him, my coworker expressed the fawningness and giddiness of a teenage girl at a Jonas Brothers concert.

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  84. @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump going to give up running all his business interests to be President? My impression is he likes managing things with his name on them.

    The Trump presidential administration, has a nice ring to it.

    Also, Trump likes to name things after himself. The border wall or rather the Trump Wall; The Trump Wall of America; The Great Trump Wall of America. All have a nice sound to it. And of course the name goes on the wall.

    In some ways, Donald Trump reminds one of Andrew Jackson. A man of the people who had strong instincts of how to lead a people/masses/etc.

    Trumpian Democracy writ large, and all with his name on the movement as well. Not too bad of a legacy to build for himself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    In some ways, Donald Trump reminds one of Andrew Jackson.
     
    If so, I wouldn't want to be Janet Yellen or a Moslem.
  85. pyrrhus says:

    “The liquid cash, and willingness to spend, of course, are another issue entirely. For all his bluster I doubt he wants to spend it. Then again, Balmer just dropped 2 billion on the LA Clippers, and a quarter of all billionaires are investing piles of cash in space flight, so maybe dropping a billion to be President for 4 years isn’t out of consideration.”

    Running for President has to be smarter than either of those, and will get him into the history books….Trump is 70 and isn’t going to live forever, so I don’t buy the WSJ’s argument at all. They are also forgetting that Trump’s many fans will donate a lot of money if he gets the nomination.

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  86. At this point, nobody will convince me that these articles aren’t written by bots.

    Trump, with as much support as his competitors combined, is on his way out. ¡Jéb!, at .0001%, is really sitting pretty!

    Trump just won the Iowa caucuses. Here’s 10 reasons why this means his campaign is in free fall.

    Early voting polls show Trump up 80-20 over Clinton, causing Trump’s staffers to panic! Mass resignations expected any day.

    President-elect Trump will basically be a lame duck from day one.

    It reminds me of those headlines about Napoleon that Steve posted a while back.

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  87. e says:
    @Clyde
    Excellent analysis of Donald Trump's finances. Donald Trump has spent 30 years building Trump™ up, he can mentally deal with the Trump brand name being tarnished a bit. It is his three children who are in the family business who will get quite perturbed. They are the X factor that can exert the pressure on him to quit, to cut the losses to the brand name "Trump".

    But at age 68 and in excellent health (his Doc released his checkup the other day) Donald Trump (and his ego) have new worlds to conquer. Still, my advice to him is lose 20 pounds. Your face is flushed red too often.

    Your face is flushed red too often.

    I think that effect might be the makeup and the lights. I saw him in person, up close, at Spyglass Hill a few years back, the AT&T(formerly, the Crosby.) I remember thinking, “Man, what white, white skin.” BTW, he was very kind to the kids asking for his autograph, not that that would make him a good POTUS, but it said something about him. He bantered with them a bit, encouraging them in their golf and their studies. One of his celebrity playing partners that day, Mark Wahlberg, couldn’t be bothered and just kept walking past the kids off the 18th green.

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    • Replies: @Da-Mith
    e... I believe the correct spelling is... " Mark Whore-berg"
  88. But the idea becomes insupportable when you remember there are one billion Muslims in the world, and that many important U.S. business leaders and entrepreneurs and professionals are immigrants and can hardly be barred from departing and returning on a routine basis.

    He’s right, you know. The 32nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution clearly states “Congress shall make no law impeding the right of rich bigshots to enter and leave the United States at will.” It’s how Raj Rajaratnam got in.

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  89. Here we go:

    March 9 The Monster has escaped from his place of banishment.
    March 10 The Corsican Ogre has landed at Cape Juan
    March 11 The Tiger has shown himself at Gap. The Troops are advancing on all sides to arrest his progress. He will conclude his miserable adventure by becoming a wanderer among the mountains.
    March 12 The Monster has actually advanced as far as Grenoble
    March 13 The Tyrant is now at Lyon. Fear and Terror seized all at his appeaance.
    March 18 The Usurper has ventured to approach to within 60 hours’ march of the capital.
    March 19 Bonaparte is advancing by forced marches, but it is impossible he can reach Paris.
    March 20 Napoleon will arrive under the walls of Paris tomorrow.
    March 21 The Emperor Napoleon is at Fountainbleau
    March 22 Yesteday evening His Majesty the Emperor made his public entry and arrived at the Tuileries. Nothing can exceed the universal joy.

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  90. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I get it! We can’t do anything about immigation because…

    “…But the idea becomes insupportable when you remember there are one billion Muslims in the world, and that many important U.S. business leaders and entrepreneurs and professionals are immigrants and can hardly be barred from departing and returning on a routine basis.”

    Have you heard? There are one billion Muslims in the world. So we have to let them all in, what else could we do? Be sure to remember that. And thank the WSJ. We are just looking out for you all the time, who else would do that?

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  91. AP says:
    @anonymous
    I'm sure that after Trump intentionally throws the general election to Hillary, and subsequently loudly recants all his "Make America Great Again" positions, our bipartisan oligarch class will forgive him for everything.

    …Or gives her the presidency by going third party.

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  92. Boomstick says:
    @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    I think he’s fairly intelligent, but doesn’t fit into the ruling class’s template of what a smart guy sounds like. We’ve all seen the “Ivy league smart guy” template. Polite, knows the right people, evasive, thinks that the right arrangement of words creates its own reality.

    Trump’s a throwback to an earlier era, the savvy street operator. Think Walter Burns in “His Girl Friday.” Brash, moves fast, a salesman, uses mockery to effect. He’s probably not any more or less ethical than the Ivy template, but he has practical experience working with people other than Ivy templates. I could see Trump dealing with New York concrete building contractors. Hillary or Kerry or Obama? No way.

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    • Replies: @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.
  93. gbloco says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    …the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel college.
     
    Well, he did pay for Bill Clinton to attend. And you know what happened next…

    (Er, no, you don't, because it's covered up. More so than MLK.)

    yes that’s what’s stopping me donating any money to my alma mater!!!

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  94. AP says:
    @Jefferson
    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place? Why don't they just officially shut down the Republican party to join forces with the Democratic party to create one big powerful unstoppable 1 party nation? When it comes to political ideology, would the likes of Lindsey Graham and John Kasich really stick out like a sore thumb in the DNC? I don't think so. How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Why don't the pro-open borders elites in both parties just unite under 1 umbrella? Why are they against a 1 party nation unification when they both have the same goals to turn The United States into a 3rd world country. What do they gain from having two parties?

    Why does the GOP establishment even favor a two party system in the first place…How are they ideologically different from Hussein Obama and Hillary Clinton?

    Labor unions, affirmative action, abortion, gun control, etc. Also, while both favor immigration, one does so in order to provide cheap wages (thus, schemes like providing residency certificates without citizenship for otherwise law-abiding illegals), the other in order to replace inconvenient natives with a new population of loyal voters.

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  95. Bugg says:

    A complete nonissue. Trump has equity in a lot of very valuable real estate across the world; there’s no danger him nor any of his kids nor their kids and grandkids have to worry about residing in fridge boxes under highway overpasses. If the powers that be wanted to send a message, it’s long since been delivered to no effect to Trump. And the message the GOPe sent everyone this week was much more loud and clear to Americans and the GOP base voters. Trump may have started this campaign as a lark, but now it’s much more than that. And clearly Tump himself now sees not only as a capstone to his life but as bigger than himself. And with his ego that’s saying something. The Establishment now grasps they’re in very big trouble.

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  96. Mr. Anon says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Intelligent? Yes. Thoughtful? Maybe not. Those two things don’t necessarily go together
     
    I always thought Mensa's owl mascot was misguided. While intelligence is ubiquitous there, wisdom occurs much more sporadically.

    Do Rice and Temple live up to their mascots?

    Mensa’s motto could be: The smartest group of people who never amounted to anything.

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  97. Bugg says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump going to give up running all his business interests to be President? My impression is he likes managing things with his name on them.

    Trump has 2 adult sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, and his daughter, Ivana, who already are very involved in running his businesses. Not a stretch to expect they would simply take a greater role if Trump wins.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Where is it written into law that a president must put his assets into a blind trust? members of Congress don't, that's for sure.
  98. @Jefferson
    Bernie Sanders comes off as extremely beta male everytime he debates Hillary Clinton. He is her bitch and she wears the pants in those debates. Is he aspiring for the vice president spot? Because he certainly does not behave like a candidate who wants to be president. Bernie Sanders is not a very ambitious politician, he seems content with just settling. He does not have the characteristics to be a natural born leader. Bernie is scared to take off the gloves and play dirty politics against Hillary Clinton. He does not have the spine for it. He might as well get the hell out of the race. The Democratic primary is no country for old beta men.

    Unfortunately, you’re correct.

    I actually like Sanders a lot. It dismays me to see how deferentially he behaves, especially when he’s around women (Hillary, Black Lives protesters). I’m not sure how he’s going to win this nomination.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I'd love to see him debate Trump. The gloves have already come off.

    https://www.yahoo.com/politics/bernie-sanders-donald-trump-pathological-liar-170730628.html

    Trump very well may be a pathological liar, but most politicians are, and openly calling someone that is anything but diplomatic, let alone deferential.

    We'll see if Sanders has the balls to call Hillary what he called Trump.

    In Hillary's defense, she is nowhere near as sloppy of a liar as Trump is.

    , @Boomstick
    Sanders' objective isn't to win the nomination, it's to drive the Democratic party towards his preferred policy choices. If he gets a significant number of votes from the progressive wing then Clinton will have to pander to him and his voters. Minus that Clinton will run to the right whenever possible.

    For Sanders to get what he wants is essential for Clinton to remain a viable candidate in the general election. That's why he took the email server issue off the table. He can't actually turn her into damaged goods to "win" his campaign.
  99. My guess is that this is all about golf. Clinton and Trump were golfing one day and made a bet:

    “If I sink this one,” said Clinton, “you have to run for president on less than X dollars.”

    “You’re on, and I’ll win!” Trump replied, and now here we are.

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  100. rod1963 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    …the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel college.
     
    Well, he did pay for Bill Clinton to attend. And you know what happened next…

    (Er, no, you don't, because it's covered up. More so than MLK.)

    He raped a woman while at Oxford. That seems to be the starting point of Clinton’s other career as a serial rapist.

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  101. Glossy says: • Website
    @Boomstick
    I think he's fairly intelligent, but doesn't fit into the ruling class's template of what a smart guy sounds like. We've all seen the "Ivy league smart guy" template. Polite, knows the right people, evasive, thinks that the right arrangement of words creates its own reality.

    Trump's a throwback to an earlier era, the savvy street operator. Think Walter Burns in "His Girl Friday." Brash, moves fast, a salesman, uses mockery to effect. He's probably not any more or less ethical than the Ivy template, but he has practical experience working with people other than Ivy templates. I could see Trump dealing with New York concrete building contractors. Hillary or Kerry or Obama? No way.

    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it’s important to be realistic. He’s less intelligent than the average politician. I’d guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 – 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn’t know a lot of facts. You could say “well, he’s only been a politician for 6 months.” But he’s been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there’s his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don’t think it’s possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn’t close to theirs. I don’t think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don’t think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She’s smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He’s a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people’s weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father’s fortune gave him a head start.

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    • Replies: @Glossy
    Some more IQ guesstimates of the candidates: Jeb 120, Rand Paul 140, Fiorina 130, Kasich 125, Huckabee 140 (he's genuinely funny), Rubio 125, Christie 120, O'Malley 120, Bernie 130.
    , @anonymous

    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it’s important to be realistic. He’s less intelligent than the average politician. I’d guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 – 130 range.
     
    How do you arrive at these numbers? This is just a cut above horoscope readings.
    , @Anonymous
    >>>>>>Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140.>>>>>>

    Bwaaahahahhaa. Her decision making sucks. She was a mediocre lawyer and her political career is empty of achievement except for the awful decisions.

    Trump 115 IQ? Total nonsense. If Trump chose a career in law he'd be as famous a prosecutor as any ever lived. He would dominate the courtroom and completely own the jury.

    Trump=not so smart is the old story of the company guys in the lab resenting the hell out of the execs upstairs.

    Glossy, you think Wolf Blitzer is high IQ, right?
    , @rod1963
    Dead wrong. The man is a Wharton school of business graduate who made and runs a multibillion dollar empire. You think a loser like Fiorina whose been black balled from business could do it? No. She could destroy it since she's ruined two other corporations in record time.

    Hillary, is a expert in graft and sociopathy, never accomplished anything of note, except extortion and murder.

    Cruz has only ran his mouth, and is no Constitutional scholar if you look at his voting record. He never managed anything.

    As for Obama's IQ, he can't talk extemporaneously without coming off as a stutterer and ignoramus. Hence the reason that all questions to Obama must be submitted beforehand. His Harvard grades are sealed, so I suspect he another AA graduate. His early political career shows a man totally indifferent to everything.

    Trump connects with people for a reason. He brings up the issues that the other oligarchic puppets won't. This allows him to bypass the media and political experts. Yes he's brusque but it's not something the average working person isn't used to.

    BTW a smart man can talk to the masses, you just don't condescend or play mind games. You simply speak the truth in a straightforward manner. Trump does.

    The reason why your so-called brainiacs can't talk to them is because they are all liars and frauds. They don't dare to tell the American people that their policies will result in further mass economic rapes, the obliteration of the middle-class and later the demise of the country.

    So they hire PR hacks by the gross to make their poison palatable to the people and by the time they are done. Their message is so white washed and bland that no will listen to them.

    The people aren't as stupid as you think, they know these "smart men" of yours are grotesque frauds.

    , @Boomstick
    Trump is no super genius, but at the same time I think he's smarter than the media give him credit for. He went to Fordham for a couple years, where he reportedly got "respectable" grades, before transferring to Wharton. The current 75th percentile for SAT scores at Fordham is around 1350, which translates into an IQ of around 130. Knock off a few points for Trump privilege, and I can see 120-125-ish. I think he punches above his weight intellectually because as you say he's an alpha, and he's got street smarts. He tends to be improvisational and stream of consciousness in his thinking, but has enough interpersonal skills to pull it off.

    There's a lot more that goes into personality than IQ. We tend to focus on IQ because it can be approximately measured. If we could reliably quantify, say, the Big Five in the same way we'd talk about that as well. And then there's judgement, how you make decisions when information is imperfect, which is to say all the time. Trump has a good skill set where most modern politicians are lacking; so far he's defined the campaign on his ground to exploit his strengths. I don't think he'd make a very good president.

    I don't think Hillary's intellect has aged well, and she's pretty clearly on the decline now. The emails released don't paint a pretty picture. Probably right about Obama, and Cruz is clearly a very, very smart guy.
  102. AnAnon says:

    “To say Muslim immigration should be suspended until we’re sure we can tell who is a terrorist might seem reasonable on first glance.” – I had to burst out laughing at this one.

    “Hasn’t Trump already been under this kind of corporate oligarch pressure for six months now? It may well eventually break him, but isn’t the real story, and the source of so much of the Establishment’s rage, that he’s endured longer than just about anybody else in our cautious, materialistic age?” – They’ve created a monster here, whatever his original plan, the only way out for him is through. Even if he grovels before their feet, they will destroy him.

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  103. Glossy says: • Website
    @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.

    Some more IQ guesstimates of the candidates: Jeb 120, Rand Paul 140, Fiorina 130, Kasich 125, Huckabee 140 (he’s genuinely funny), Rubio 125, Christie 120, O’Malley 120, Bernie 130.

    Read More
    • Replies: @midwestmark
    Trump and Huckabee are both funny and have the common touch but you conclude that Huckabee has 25 IQ points on Trump. I actually don't think Rubio is smarter than Jeb or Christie and it is hard to argue that he has run a much more successful campaign. Fiorina has been over her head at every important job she has held but that might not argue against 130. Anyway, interesting guesses but your numbers seem a little off.
  104. AndrewR says:
    @WillBest
    Glad the WSJ is a couple weeks behind me. He is basically banking on the GOP apparatus to kick in and support him when he wins. And it isn't necessarily a crazy bet because it is a MAD scenario for the GOPe

    His business interests are almost certainly under contract. It is not likely that Macy's can just up and drop the Trump line without certain buyouts and forfeitures. And there should be another company willing to take their place.

    The negative affects on his real estate holding are short lived paper issues, and will correct when the 2-minute hate drills are directed elsewhere.

    The liquid cash, and willingness to spend, of course, are another issue entirely. For all his bluster I doubt he wants to spend it. Then again, Balmer just dropped 2 billion on the LA Clippers, and a quarter of all billionaires are investing piles of cash in space flight, so maybe dropping a billion to be President for 4 years isn't out of consideration.

    What he could sell tomorrow isn't really an issue for billionaires. They can always leverage their assets and then default.

    The man will be 7o years old next year, loves running things and being the center of attention, and he has more money than most people could spend in ten thousand years. Why wouldn’t he be willing to drop most of his fortune now to become President? He could give away 99.9% of his weatlh and still be worth more than the vast majority of people.

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  105. AndrewR says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Unfortunately, you're correct.

    I actually like Sanders a lot. It dismays me to see how deferentially he behaves, especially when he's around women (Hillary, Black Lives protesters). I'm not sure how he's going to win this nomination.

    I’d love to see him debate Trump. The gloves have already come off.

    https://www.yahoo.com/politics/bernie-sanders-donald-trump-pathological-liar-170730628.html

    Trump very well may be a pathological liar, but most politicians are, and openly calling someone that is anything but diplomatic, let alone deferential.

    We’ll see if Sanders has the balls to call Hillary what he called Trump.

    In Hillary’s defense, she is nowhere near as sloppy of a liar as Trump is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    All politicians are liars, because all politicians are people. The man who says some people don't lie should be asked if his wife ever asked him, "Does this dress make my ass look fat?"

    Trump is a liar, but he is not a pathological liar, per se. Like George W. Bush, who was one of the finest liars that ever inhabited the White House, he lies when he thinks he has to, but always because he sees necessity in it, and he lies about things and in a way that is plausibly deniable later on. He is not especially good at it, and doesn't pretend to be. Being good at lying isn't a skill you particularly want in a chief executive from the standpoint of being one so ruled.
  106. Boomstick says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Unfortunately, you're correct.

    I actually like Sanders a lot. It dismays me to see how deferentially he behaves, especially when he's around women (Hillary, Black Lives protesters). I'm not sure how he's going to win this nomination.

    Sanders’ objective isn’t to win the nomination, it’s to drive the Democratic party towards his preferred policy choices. If he gets a significant number of votes from the progressive wing then Clinton will have to pander to him and his voters. Minus that Clinton will run to the right whenever possible.

    For Sanders to get what he wants is essential for Clinton to remain a viable candidate in the general election. That’s why he took the email server issue off the table. He can’t actually turn her into damaged goods to “win” his campaign.

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  107. Maybe off-topic, but I think this is related: Seems in tandem with the media’s effort to dislodge Trump is an effort to convince everyone that dissenting from the left’s agenda is nothing more than being childish–namely, being irrationally “fearful” and “anxious”.

    There is no shortage of examples of this. From a headline in today’s NY Times: “As Obama Checks Off List of Goals Met, a Nervous Nation Dwells on Terror”

    Recent op-ed from the WaPo: “Obama is a rationalist president in the age of anxiety”

    Etc.

    I guess the endless stream of hysterical ad hominem smears wasn’t demonstrating the cudgeling effect it has long had, so now they’re moving onto the tried-and-true “pathologize your dissidents” strategy.

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  108. whorefinder says: • Website

    It seems to me the WSJ is nudging or directing the anti-Trumpers to quit attacking Trump on being “shocking” and “loudmouthed” and “racist” because it’s not working and only making him stronger.

    Instead, they’re telling the MSM to hit him in the pocketbook.

    Except that the Univision-crowd tried this already and failed (cancelling contracts, bookings, refusing his beauty pageant). It would take a mega-concerted effort to really hit Trump hard in the pocketbook, and that would bring out lawsuits galore from Trump against them.

    Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi is the public figure that most resembles Trump: shameless, right of center for his country, younger women (one at 18 while he’s in his 70s), oodles of bombastic charm, smirks, billionaire, sharply dressed, telegenic. He’s won the Italian leadership several times, off and on. The major difference is Silvio owns his own media-TV channels there, which gives him his own platform. Trump is running against even the right-wing (Fox) network’s open-borders viewpoint. Trump has countered this by being so outrageous that he’s gotten free air time.

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    • Replies: @5371
    Berlusconi entered electoral politics when he was much younger than Trump was.
  109. @Bugg
    Trump has 2 adult sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, and his daughter, Ivana, who already are very involved in running his businesses. Not a stretch to expect they would simply take a greater role if Trump wins.

    Where is it written into law that a president must put his assets into a blind trust? members of Congress don’t, that’s for sure.

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  110. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.

    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it’s important to be realistic. He’s less intelligent than the average politician. I’d guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 – 130 range.

    How do you arrive at these numbers? This is just a cut above horoscope readings.

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  111. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    What’s with the IQ worship? Wasn’t it Buckley (IQ~170+) who said he would rather be governed by random names from the phone book and by the high IQ’ed faculty of Yale or Harvard? There are a lot of characteristics far, far more important than IQ.

    As a top manager the ability to manage or manipulate people is crucial, social skills not often associated with high IQ. To stay in a leadership or management position the ability to consistently and loyally support your team is another qualification not often correlated with IQ. The ability to get support from capable, high IQ, and hard-working individuals requires trust; so the leader must be trustworthy, implying honesty and dependability, also not correlated with high IQ. And finally to be good at business one must be able to make hard decisions and stand by them; commonly known as ‘backbone’ and not associated with high IQ either.

    Donald Trump’s support does not come from people who are amazed by his great insight or revelations. His mass of supporters are energized by the simple fact that Trump — and Trump alone — is saying what everyone has seen for years and is too cowardly or weaselly to do or even say anything about it.

    Yes there’s a minimum IQ requirement to be president that Trump possesses. But the government is full of high IQ idiots that we don’t need more of. What Trump brings to the table is something that no one else seems to possess: directness, honest appraisals, and the ability to stand, even flourish, under enemy direct fire.

    Read More
    • Replies: @hoodathunkit
    corr:
    "by random names from the phone book than by the high IQ’ed faculty of Yale or Harvard?"
  112. @Anonymous
    What's with the IQ worship? Wasn't it Buckley (IQ~170+) who said he would rather be governed by random names from the phone book and by the high IQ'ed faculty of Yale or Harvard? There are a lot of characteristics far, far more important than IQ.

    As a top manager the ability to manage or manipulate people is crucial, social skills not often associated with high IQ. To stay in a leadership or management position the ability to consistently and loyally support your team is another qualification not often correlated with IQ. The ability to get support from capable, high IQ, and hard-working individuals requires trust; so the leader must be trustworthy, implying honesty and dependability, also not correlated with high IQ. And finally to be good at business one must be able to make hard decisions and stand by them; commonly known as 'backbone' and not associated with high IQ either.

    Donald Trump's support does not come from people who are amazed by his great insight or revelations. His mass of supporters are energized by the simple fact that Trump — and Trump alone — is saying what everyone has seen for years and is too cowardly or weaselly to do or even say anything about it.

    Yes there's a minimum IQ requirement to be president that Trump possesses. But the government is full of high IQ idiots that we don't need more of. What Trump brings to the table is something that no one else seems to possess: directness, honest appraisals, and the ability to stand, even flourish, under enemy direct fire.

    corr:
    “by random names from the phone book than by the high IQ’ed faculty of Yale or Harvard?”

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  113. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon
    So, US is just an oligarchy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCMarRkVRk4

    Blessed are they who expect nothing, for they shall not be disappointed.

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  114. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.

    >>>>>>Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140.>>>>>>

    Bwaaahahahhaa. Her decision making sucks. She was a mediocre lawyer and her political career is empty of achievement except for the awful decisions.

    Trump 115 IQ? Total nonsense. If Trump chose a career in law he’d be as famous a prosecutor as any ever lived. He would dominate the courtroom and completely own the jury.

    Trump=not so smart is the old story of the company guys in the lab resenting the hell out of the execs upstairs.

    Glossy, you think Wolf Blitzer is high IQ, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Trump's older sister is a federal appeals court judge.
  115. @Glossy
    Some more IQ guesstimates of the candidates: Jeb 120, Rand Paul 140, Fiorina 130, Kasich 125, Huckabee 140 (he's genuinely funny), Rubio 125, Christie 120, O'Malley 120, Bernie 130.

    Trump and Huckabee are both funny and have the common touch but you conclude that Huckabee has 25 IQ points on Trump. I actually don’t think Rubio is smarter than Jeb or Christie and it is hard to argue that he has run a much more successful campaign. Fiorina has been over her head at every important job she has held but that might not argue against 130. Anyway, interesting guesses but your numbers seem a little off.

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  116. @Anonymous
    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-meets-with-billionaire-sheldon-adelson-2015-12

    Presumably he met with him because he may need to ask him for money in the future.

    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson

    …and he said nice things about Trump:

    https://ca.news.yahoo.com/republican-donor-adelson-trump-may-aligning-israel-003125447–finance.html

    Adelson in Trump’s corner, or at least not opposing Trump, is a devastating blow to the establishment Republicans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder

    Adelson in Trump’s corner, or at least not opposing Trump, is a devastating blow to the establishment Republicans.
     
    Or it's a blow to us.

    Adelson is an open-borders freak, right? And he likes Trump? Does that mean Trump is faking his immigration stand?
  117. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Svigor

    Do you recall how Trump figured out Ali G’s shtick and shut him down?
     
    I've never seen the clip, but assuming the consensus is correct (that he did shut AG down), and given how many public figures AG played, I do find the example illustrative. It's the difference between IQ and "weaponized" IQ. Lots of smart people aren't very "sharp." "Situational awareness" and "street smarts" might be other terms for it.

    He addressed that question in a rally a while back. Said his business would be in good hands with his kids.
     
    In other words, face time with the kids = executive decisions. If they're really good, it can all be done with non-verbal cues.

    >>>>>>>
    assuming the consensus is correct (that he did shut AG down)
    >>>>>

    What Trump did with Ali G is reframe and dominate multiple times during the conversation which through AG completely off his own script. AG became the mewling supplicant begging Trump not to run with Trump’s own off-the-cuff ice cream innovation.

    Look at Ali’s facial expressions. Body language. Ali looks like a general watching his troops get routed.

    The clip is on YouTube. The tone is set immediately when Trump responds to the first question with “music.” Right there all of the humor goes out of Ali GM’s act because he’s forced to scramble and somehow make his script work, but it can’t work because Trump keeps blowing up the script’s premise.

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  118. whorefinder says: • Website
    @International Jew

    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson
     
    ...and he said nice things about Trump:

    https://ca.news.yahoo.com/republican-donor-adelson-trump-may-aligning-israel-003125447--finance.html

    Adelson in Trump's corner, or at least not opposing Trump, is a devastating blow to the establishment Republicans.

    Adelson in Trump’s corner, or at least not opposing Trump, is a devastating blow to the establishment Republicans.

    Or it’s a blow to us.

    Adelson is an open-borders freak, right? And he likes Trump? Does that mean Trump is faking his immigration stand?

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  119. Jefferson says:
    @Milo Minderbinder
    Meet your new victim class - Blonde, White, Palestinian and Muslim

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20151218_ap_6b1cbff168e942fc9380c421a093b91b.html?c=r

    “Meet your new victim class – Blonde, White, Palestinian and Muslim”

    http://www.philly.com/philly/news/new_jersey/20151218_ap_6b1cbff168e942fc9380c421a093b91b.html?c=r

    The Palestinian Muslim woman is the curly haired brunette on the left. The blue eyed blonde woman on the right is a Jewish Infidel. Next time you post links actually read the entire article.

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  120. Jefferson says:
    @Desiderius

    Outside of Cisgender Stale Pale Gringo Male Gun Owners, which other demographic groups in the U.S would oppose a 1 party nation run by Left Wing Democrats?
     
    Once the CSPGMGOs are cut down to size, there'll be plenty. The problem is that actually accomplishing that goal has been a Sisyphean task.

    Maybe eventually they'll give up and try something else.

    “Once the CSPGMGOs are cut down to size, there’ll be plenty.”

    So in your opinion most African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Homosexuals, and Millennials would oppose a party 1 nation where The Democratic Party is the only game in town? Yeah because those demographic groups are such huge swing voters right? Their voting habits are so unpredictable right? There is no voting pattern with them at all.

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  121. IA says:
    @vinteuil
    Hi, Tangoman - glad to see you around here, lately.

    Personally, I don't see the Republican establishment rallying around Trump. Have you read the kind of stuff guys like Krauthammer & Jonah Goldberg have been writing about him? If he gets the nomination, I think they'll jump ship & (at least tacitly) support Hillary.

    And if they do, and if Hillary gets in, I think it might be for the best, in the long run. When the great financial reckoning hits, as it soon must, I desperately want an unambiguous lefty sitting in the White House.

    If governments created wealth the communist ones would be the richest.

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  122. Svigor says:

    115 IQ non-AA at Wharton seems like fantasy.

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    • Replies: @AP
    I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father's 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all.

    115 might be a reasonable guess. Someone with an IQ of 115 can go far with the advantages of street smarts, confidence, charisma, and dad's 300 million dollar fortune.

  123. rod1963 says:
    @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.

    Dead wrong. The man is a Wharton school of business graduate who made and runs a multibillion dollar empire. You think a loser like Fiorina whose been black balled from business could do it? No. She could destroy it since she’s ruined two other corporations in record time.

    Hillary, is a expert in graft and sociopathy, never accomplished anything of note, except extortion and murder.

    Cruz has only ran his mouth, and is no Constitutional scholar if you look at his voting record. He never managed anything.

    As for Obama’s IQ, he can’t talk extemporaneously without coming off as a stutterer and ignoramus. Hence the reason that all questions to Obama must be submitted beforehand. His Harvard grades are sealed, so I suspect he another AA graduate. His early political career shows a man totally indifferent to everything.

    Trump connects with people for a reason. He brings up the issues that the other oligarchic puppets won’t. This allows him to bypass the media and political experts. Yes he’s brusque but it’s not something the average working person isn’t used to.

    BTW a smart man can talk to the masses, you just don’t condescend or play mind games. You simply speak the truth in a straightforward manner. Trump does.

    The reason why your so-called brainiacs can’t talk to them is because they are all liars and frauds. They don’t dare to tell the American people that their policies will result in further mass economic rapes, the obliteration of the middle-class and later the demise of the country.

    So they hire PR hacks by the gross to make their poison palatable to the people and by the time they are done. Their message is so white washed and bland that no will listen to them.

    The people aren’t as stupid as you think, they know these “smart men” of yours are grotesque frauds.

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  124. Svigor says:

    Trump should promise to release his SAT scores after Hussein releases his.

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  125. MarkinLA says:
    @415 reasons
    To me this is Trumps main appeal: he says common sense things our corporate overlords have decided is unsayable.

    He doesn't actually seem like a very intelligent or thoughtful person though.

    Trump has street smarts and that is a type of intelligence that is hard to measure.

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  126. IA says:

    sent his daughter Amy to a DC public school

    She only went there for about three months. After that, Sidwell Friends, same as Obama. I will give Carter credit for actually making a token gesture. Nowadays they don’t even bother with that.

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  127. Boomstick says:
    @Glossy
    I think that Trump is the best candidate with a chance. By a lot. But it's important to be realistic. He's less intelligent than the average politician. I'd guess 115. Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140. Ted Cruz could well be above 150. Barry O is likely in the 125 - 130 range.

    If you listen to Trump talk, you soon realize that he doesn't know a lot of facts. You could say "well, he's only been a politician for 6 months." But he's been talking about running for president for at least 20 years before that.

    Then there's his tone of voice, his general manner. You could say that to build his brand he had to be entertaining to the masses. But I don't think it's possible to personally connect with the masses if your mentality isn't close to theirs. I don't think you can really fake that kind of stuff. I don't think Oprah, for example, is smart either. She's smarter than her audience, but not by very much.

    How could a person with a 115 IQ have become a billionaire?

    1) He's a natural alpha. He instinctively senses people's weaknesses and then bends them to his will through force of personality.

    2) His father's fortune gave him a head start.

    Trump is no super genius, but at the same time I think he’s smarter than the media give him credit for. He went to Fordham for a couple years, where he reportedly got “respectable” grades, before transferring to Wharton. The current 75th percentile for SAT scores at Fordham is around 1350, which translates into an IQ of around 130. Knock off a few points for Trump privilege, and I can see 120-125-ish. I think he punches above his weight intellectually because as you say he’s an alpha, and he’s got street smarts. He tends to be improvisational and stream of consciousness in his thinking, but has enough interpersonal skills to pull it off.

    There’s a lot more that goes into personality than IQ. We tend to focus on IQ because it can be approximately measured. If we could reliably quantify, say, the Big Five in the same way we’d talk about that as well. And then there’s judgement, how you make decisions when information is imperfect, which is to say all the time. Trump has a good skill set where most modern politicians are lacking; so far he’s defined the campaign on his ground to exploit his strengths. I don’t think he’d make a very good president.

    I don’t think Hillary’s intellect has aged well, and she’s pretty clearly on the decline now. The emails released don’t paint a pretty picture. Probably right about Obama, and Cruz is clearly a very, very smart guy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But remember, a large part of being a president is being a leader, the ability to make decisions often on very little information during real time.

    Much of the same things you listed could easily be applied to Andrew Jackson. The elite politicos of his day discounted his candidacy and considered him to be a semi-literate bumpkin. And yet most respectable historians have ranked him as one of the greatest presidents in US history. He was a leader and had the ability to make decisions. The modern presidency of the Commander in Chief comes largely from his administration.

    Put it this way: For most posters here, forget political bias in either direction. Does anyone think that George W. Bush will be remembered as one the US's greatest presidents of the 21st century? That's a fair question.

    Some of what you first were saying about Trump could be applied to W. as well, except perhaps with the fact he was a much poorer communicator. Yet he was elected twice.

    Perhaps the relevant question, the game changer, is if he is elected, could a President Trump consistently work well with Congress, particularly with members of his own party? If the answer is yes, then he will probably fare no worse than did W.

    In addition to some of the adjectives that have been mentioned about Trump in this post perhaps another one should be mentioned: As a leader for most of his adult life, he has learned which people to listen to/hire in order to get the proper details (extrapolate that for assessing which congressmen to listen to, e.g. Jeff Sessions, regarding his particular policies most notably on immigration). In other words, for the leader, details are the fine points and can best be left to associates/underlings/those who are hired on the basis of their ideas. The great leaders always seem to have a knack for hiring the best people and knowing when to listen to them and when to make their own decisions. If Trump chooses a VP candidate, say Cruz, then that what speak volumes about his abilities namely, that he believes that Cruz is the right politician that can best help him implement his policies.
  128. AP says:
    @Svigor
    115 IQ non-AA at Wharton seems like fantasy.

    I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father’s 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all.

    115 might be a reasonable guess. Someone with an IQ of 115 can go far with the advantages of street smarts, confidence, charisma, and dad’s 300 million dollar fortune.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    May be true, may not be, but again, being 115 IQ is in and of itself not the worst trait a President could have. Jiminy Carter was very high IQ, Gerald Ford one of the lower ones, and both were ineffectual and damaging. I'm guessing had Reagan had to take an IQ test after his shooting, the numbers would have been shocking. And as I have stated before, it's my belief that Barack Obama is very likely below 115 in IQ-I'd suspect 95-105 - but that isn't the prime reason he is so destructive and dangerous, it's because he is thoroughly imbued with an ideology which detests most of what makes America even function, let alone great and because he is a tool for people who also hate the same things but who are very much smarter.
    , @Neil Templeton
    "I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father’s 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all."

    Not only indirect, but not sourced. Anecdotal evidence and not persuasive.
  129. The most amazing thing to me about Hillary is how rigid she is. She has been on the national stage since 1992 and is still astoundingly wooden. I am not a natural born politician, as Bill is, but I would at least take some acting lessons if politics were my profession. Hillary reportedly refused advice to do just that.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "The most amazing thing to me about Hillary is how rigid she is. She has been on the national stage since 1992 and is still astoundingly wooden. I am not a natural born politician, as Bill is, but I would at least take some acting lessons if politics were my profession. Hillary reportedly refused advice to do just that."

    Hillary Clinton is about as charismatic as Al Gore. When was the last time the American people elected a Cyborg for president?
  130. TangoMan says:
    @MQ
    Then so much for Trump's freedom to speak the truth about US policy in the middle east...

    -Rome wasn’t built in a day.
    -Don’t let perfect be the enemy of the good.

    If Trump tried to implement all of the policies that most people here favor, society would go into cardiac arrest on the operating table. Considering that NO ONE ELSE is proposing ANY of what Trump has advocated, the nation would be blessed if he followed through on even one policy position. What’s the alternative?

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    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Hear him! Hear him! I'll admit it, I'm a Trump fan. I've been listening to the "Perot 2.0" arguments, the prearranged deal with Bill arguments. Trump is eating all the sacred cows. Show him one, he sees a tasty hamburger. Yes, yes, yes you can drag out your American fascist accusations, you can throw around your buffoon and your clown charges. I'm reminded of Captain Renault from "Casablanca."

    Major Strasser: You give him credit for too much cleverness. My impression was that he's just another blundering American.
    Captain Renault: We musn't underestimate "American blundering". I was with them when they "blundered" into Berlin in 1918.

    Just look at how much the establishment hates him, when he says things like "The question is, do we have a country or not?" That's gold, and they hate it. "Israel has a wall." Like vampires to sunlight, that's how they react. "Yeah let Putin get ISIS in Syria. Good for him." Aiiiiiieeeeeee!

    Where does the ride go? Who knows.

    But some of the things we've been worrying about and obsessing about for years are all of a sudden a part of the conversation, even if it's an awkward part. Walls, borders, national identity, "I met with Sheldon Adelson but I don't want his money." Look, I was a Ron Paul man from way back, from back in the early 1980s with the whole newsletter thing. I'm proud of what Ron Paul did, both in his time in the government, and in his run for the presidency. Trump has already introduced concepts, tropes, ideas, that Ron Paul somehow couldn't get into the discussion.

    And if Trump stabs us in the back? If he turns out to be a for real and for true no shit American Hitler? Well, he'll have broken the artificial stagnant pool of water that is American politics. That cannot have been an intended consequence of any false flag or deal with Billy operation.
  131. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    >>>>>>Hillary, like her husband, is probably around 140.>>>>>>

    Bwaaahahahhaa. Her decision making sucks. She was a mediocre lawyer and her political career is empty of achievement except for the awful decisions.

    Trump 115 IQ? Total nonsense. If Trump chose a career in law he'd be as famous a prosecutor as any ever lived. He would dominate the courtroom and completely own the jury.

    Trump=not so smart is the old story of the company guys in the lab resenting the hell out of the execs upstairs.

    Glossy, you think Wolf Blitzer is high IQ, right?

    Trump’s older sister is a federal appeals court judge.

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  132. I’d expect as much from the usual volunteer-hasbara commenters here but is Steve also so blind or just so far in the tank to deny that Trump will have a much harder time winning news cycles against Hillary than the ineffectual divided-and-conquered primary field? It *is* going to cost money and those funds have to come from somewhere; ergo Trump might want to plan for this. He *does* need to hire campaign staff in each state– to observe this is not Zionist Bilderberger Carlos Slim blustery fearmongering. Yet according to the genius political consultancy iSteve & iUnz (who were divining a triumph by Classic French Prose in their regional elections until actual polling data threw a wet blanket on that romantic notion) Trump will just skate on SNL guest-host appearances & Twitter buzz for the rest of the general before ascending to the Oval Office by 60% or 70% popular vote. This mythological candidate functions as their alt-right golem who only grows stronger from MSM attacks (see also: “left/right politics are obsolete,” lol). Thus the virtuous will be exalted, etc.

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    • Replies: @MarkinLA
    Well if Trump wins the nomination the GOP will have to support him with their resources or be exposed even more than they were when they did everything to destroy Ron Paul's campaign. That might just put an end to the GOP as presently constituted.

    Trump will also go on fundraising campaigns and small donors suck of DC might just surprise you. I might even give the maximum for a little guy same as I did for Paul.
  133. @Boomstick
    Trump is no super genius, but at the same time I think he's smarter than the media give him credit for. He went to Fordham for a couple years, where he reportedly got "respectable" grades, before transferring to Wharton. The current 75th percentile for SAT scores at Fordham is around 1350, which translates into an IQ of around 130. Knock off a few points for Trump privilege, and I can see 120-125-ish. I think he punches above his weight intellectually because as you say he's an alpha, and he's got street smarts. He tends to be improvisational and stream of consciousness in his thinking, but has enough interpersonal skills to pull it off.

    There's a lot more that goes into personality than IQ. We tend to focus on IQ because it can be approximately measured. If we could reliably quantify, say, the Big Five in the same way we'd talk about that as well. And then there's judgement, how you make decisions when information is imperfect, which is to say all the time. Trump has a good skill set where most modern politicians are lacking; so far he's defined the campaign on his ground to exploit his strengths. I don't think he'd make a very good president.

    I don't think Hillary's intellect has aged well, and she's pretty clearly on the decline now. The emails released don't paint a pretty picture. Probably right about Obama, and Cruz is clearly a very, very smart guy.

    But remember, a large part of being a president is being a leader, the ability to make decisions often on very little information during real time.

    Much of the same things you listed could easily be applied to Andrew Jackson. The elite politicos of his day discounted his candidacy and considered him to be a semi-literate bumpkin. And yet most respectable historians have ranked him as one of the greatest presidents in US history. He was a leader and had the ability to make decisions. The modern presidency of the Commander in Chief comes largely from his administration.

    Put it this way: For most posters here, forget political bias in either direction. Does anyone think that George W. Bush will be remembered as one the US’s greatest presidents of the 21st century? That’s a fair question.

    Some of what you first were saying about Trump could be applied to W. as well, except perhaps with the fact he was a much poorer communicator. Yet he was elected twice.

    Perhaps the relevant question, the game changer, is if he is elected, could a President Trump consistently work well with Congress, particularly with members of his own party? If the answer is yes, then he will probably fare no worse than did W.

    In addition to some of the adjectives that have been mentioned about Trump in this post perhaps another one should be mentioned: As a leader for most of his adult life, he has learned which people to listen to/hire in order to get the proper details (extrapolate that for assessing which congressmen to listen to, e.g. Jeff Sessions, regarding his particular policies most notably on immigration). In other words, for the leader, details are the fine points and can best be left to associates/underlings/those who are hired on the basis of their ideas. The great leaders always seem to have a knack for hiring the best people and knowing when to listen to them and when to make their own decisions. If Trump chooses a VP candidate, say Cruz, then that what speak volumes about his abilities namely, that he believes that Cruz is the right politician that can best help him implement his policies.

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    • Replies: @Boomstick
    It's possible that Trump could be a good President, but Presidenting is a team sport. All winning Presidential campaigns and successful administrations are coalitions of multiple constituencies. Reagan held together evangelicals, white urban ethnics, libertarians, defense hawks, and cultural conservatives. FDR carried white southerners, blacks, and urban northeners. Obama put together SWPLs, the Free Stuff Army, and colored ethnics.

    Trump's a one man band so far. I haven't seen much evidence of coalition building, but it's still early.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    One advantage Trump would have over other recent GOP Presidents is he wouldn't be wedded to a basket of Sisyphean GOP policy preferences (on taxes, or Social Security, for example). So, he'd have more room to negotiate to achieve his priorities.
  134. Lot says:
    @Maj. Kong
    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary. Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China. Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.

    Or its all hasbara, but what do I know.

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary.

    Sheldon leans toward Rubio but has not endorsed, his wife leans toward Cruz. He recently said he’d support Trump if he’s nominated.

    Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China.

    How so? Adelson’s money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.

    Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.

    Sheldon’s #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He’s right on the merits, which you may realize if you have any problem online gamblers who are close to you. I’d happily offer him a deal on this issue if it stops him from supporting an open boarders Republican in the primary.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "How so? Adelson’s money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart."

    Could you see the the traditionally Republican Walton family voting for Hillary Clinton if Donald Trump wins the GOP nomination? Do you believe that for them being pro-open borders trumps being a Republican? After all, Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers make a shitload of money off of blue collar lower working class Hispanic consumers of both the Illegal and Legal kind.

    , @5371
    [Sheldon’s #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He’s right on the merits]

    How very convenient for "Sheldon". (Is he a friend or relative of yours?)
    , @David
    Changing US tax law about bringing home foreign profits could have a huge impact on Adelson's income. Funny how uninformed you become when it helps make an argument.

    Do you actually believe Adelson cares about your gambling addicted relatives? Maybe, but I think that's only true in special cases like yours.

  135. @AndrewR
    I'd love to see him debate Trump. The gloves have already come off.

    https://www.yahoo.com/politics/bernie-sanders-donald-trump-pathological-liar-170730628.html

    Trump very well may be a pathological liar, but most politicians are, and openly calling someone that is anything but diplomatic, let alone deferential.

    We'll see if Sanders has the balls to call Hillary what he called Trump.

    In Hillary's defense, she is nowhere near as sloppy of a liar as Trump is.

    All politicians are liars, because all politicians are people. The man who says some people don’t lie should be asked if his wife ever asked him, “Does this dress make my ass look fat?”

    Trump is a liar, but he is not a pathological liar, per se. Like George W. Bush, who was one of the finest liars that ever inhabited the White House, he lies when he thinks he has to, but always because he sees necessity in it, and he lies about things and in a way that is plausibly deniable later on. He is not especially good at it, and doesn’t pretend to be. Being good at lying isn’t a skill you particularly want in a chief executive from the standpoint of being one so ruled.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The man who says some people don’t lie should be asked if his wife ever asked him, “Does this dress make my ass look fat?”
     
    "No, dear. The excess cellulite and fat rolls do. The dress contains them."


    All politicians are liars, because all politicians are people.

     

    Politicians lie because if they didn't, the voters would throw them out and replace them with those that do.
  136. @AP
    I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father's 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all.

    115 might be a reasonable guess. Someone with an IQ of 115 can go far with the advantages of street smarts, confidence, charisma, and dad's 300 million dollar fortune.

    May be true, may not be, but again, being 115 IQ is in and of itself not the worst trait a President could have. Jiminy Carter was very high IQ, Gerald Ford one of the lower ones, and both were ineffectual and damaging. I’m guessing had Reagan had to take an IQ test after his shooting, the numbers would have been shocking. And as I have stated before, it’s my belief that Barack Obama is very likely below 115 in IQ-I’d suspect 95-105 – but that isn’t the prime reason he is so destructive and dangerous, it’s because he is thoroughly imbued with an ideology which detests most of what makes America even function, let alone great and because he is a tool for people who also hate the same things but who are very much smarter.

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  137. @anonymous
    I'm sure that after Trump intentionally throws the general election to Hillary, and subsequently loudly recants all his "Make America Great Again" positions, our bipartisan oligarch class will forgive him for everything.

    And then Trump is better off than before he began?

    Maybe you should try a plausible scenario where Trump’s politically incorrect (but accurate) actions leave him wealthier. The reality is that his campaign makes his business dealings less profitable.

    Maybe you are right, but it is much more likely that you have offered a stupid assessment of someone who really does want to improve America.

    Trump can win. And if he does you will have to work hard to keep yourself from gnawing off one of your limbs in your sleep.

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  138. @AP
    I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father's 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all.

    115 might be a reasonable guess. Someone with an IQ of 115 can go far with the advantages of street smarts, confidence, charisma, and dad's 300 million dollar fortune.

    “I admit this is indirect, but I know someone whose friend studied with Trump at Wharton. Trump was perceived as one of the dimmest people in the class. His father’s 300 million dollar fortune probably played a role in his admission. GWB went to Yale, after all.”

    Not only indirect, but not sourced. Anecdotal evidence and not persuasive.

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  139. Jefferson says:
    @Jim Don Bob
    The most amazing thing to me about Hillary is how rigid she is. She has been on the national stage since 1992 and is still astoundingly wooden. I am not a natural born politician, as Bill is, but I would at least take some acting lessons if politics were my profession. Hillary reportedly refused advice to do just that.

    “The most amazing thing to me about Hillary is how rigid she is. She has been on the national stage since 1992 and is still astoundingly wooden. I am not a natural born politician, as Bill is, but I would at least take some acting lessons if politics were my profession. Hillary reportedly refused advice to do just that.”

    Hillary Clinton is about as charismatic as Al Gore. When was the last time the American people elected a Cyborg for president?

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  140. @TangoMan
    Will the GOP officially go to bat for him and spend the money on the ’16 campaign?

    There's an entire Republican ecosystem of professionals who want power and prestige and their only path to offices, high and low, is through a Republican President. I expect that this professional class will fall in line behind candidate Trump.

    The faction that will have the greatest trepidation is the donor class because much of the class distinction that they so relish is predicated upon their class embracing liberal values and if Trump represents the middle/lower class insurgence, then backing Trump with generous donations undermines their own status. Think of Thurston and Lovey sniffing at Gilligan win he wins the lottery - it pains them to mingle with the wrong kind of people.

    If we look at what Trump says and expect him to follow through with policies, then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine, they'll disrupt the order of things, from which the wealthy profit, and that's going to be distasteful to the donor class. What I find surprising is the consensus rejection of Trump's medicine as something that is needed to fix the health of American society. These people must really look at Brazil and see utopia (for them) and can't wait for that glorious outcome to descend on the US so that they can live a better life. There must exist a strong, a very strong bias, to favor immediate returns on investment even if that path leads to ultimate ruin rather than reduced returns on investment where the path leads to stabilization. I don't understand that bias.

    then mass deportations, religion-focused barriers for Muslims, etc are going to be nasty medicine

    Where do you get mass deportations? The focus on Muslims won’t be religious, it will be political. And we already have the Leftists/Liberals/Democrats/RINOs dealing out as much nastiness as they can muster (cf. Holman Jenkins). Does The Boy Who Cried Wolf ring a bell with you?

    Maybe mass deportations are what Trump has in mind. Or maybe he just reset the spectrum on “reasonable” dialog. Perhaps that is what he needs to negotiate a genuine solution to the problem.

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  141. Hunsdon says:
    @TangoMan
    -Rome wasn't built in a day.
    -Don't let perfect be the enemy of the good.

    If Trump tried to implement all of the policies that most people here favor, society would go into cardiac arrest on the operating table. Considering that NO ONE ELSE is proposing ANY of what Trump has advocated, the nation would be blessed if he followed through on even one policy position. What's the alternative?

    Hear him! Hear him! I’ll admit it, I’m a Trump fan. I’ve been listening to the “Perot 2.0″ arguments, the prearranged deal with Bill arguments. Trump is eating all the sacred cows. Show him one, he sees a tasty hamburger. Yes, yes, yes you can drag out your American fascist accusations, you can throw around your buffoon and your clown charges. I’m reminded of Captain Renault from “Casablanca.”

    Major Strasser: You give him credit for too much cleverness. My impression was that he’s just another blundering American.
    Captain Renault: We musn’t underestimate “American blundering”. I was with them when they “blundered” into Berlin in 1918.

    Just look at how much the establishment hates him, when he says things like “The question is, do we have a country or not?” That’s gold, and they hate it. “Israel has a wall.” Like vampires to sunlight, that’s how they react. “Yeah let Putin get ISIS in Syria. Good for him.” Aiiiiiieeeeeee!

    Where does the ride go? Who knows.

    But some of the things we’ve been worrying about and obsessing about for years are all of a sudden a part of the conversation, even if it’s an awkward part. Walls, borders, national identity, “I met with Sheldon Adelson but I don’t want his money.” Look, I was a Ron Paul man from way back, from back in the early 1980s with the whole newsletter thing. I’m proud of what Ron Paul did, both in his time in the government, and in his run for the presidency. Trump has already introduced concepts, tropes, ideas, that Ron Paul somehow couldn’t get into the discussion.

    And if Trump stabs us in the back? If he turns out to be a for real and for true no shit American Hitler? Well, he’ll have broken the artificial stagnant pool of water that is American politics. That cannot have been an intended consequence of any false flag or deal with Billy operation.

    Read More
  142. Jefferson says:
    @Lot

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary.
     
    Sheldon leans toward Rubio but has not endorsed, his wife leans toward Cruz. He recently said he'd support Trump if he's nominated.

    Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China.
     
    How so? Adelson's money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.

    Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.
     
    Sheldon's #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He's right on the merits, which you may realize if you have any problem online gamblers who are close to you. I'd happily offer him a deal on this issue if it stops him from supporting an open boarders Republican in the primary.

    “How so? Adelson’s money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.”

    Could you see the the traditionally Republican Walton family voting for Hillary Clinton if Donald Trump wins the GOP nomination? Do you believe that for them being pro-open borders trumps being a Republican? After all, Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers make a shitload of money off of blue collar lower working class Hispanic consumers of both the Illegal and Legal kind.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    After all, Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers make a shitload of money off of blue collar lower working class Hispanic consumers of both the Illegal and Legal kind.
     
    All NAMs (immigrants, illegals and the native born) love those Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers. What opened near me is a huge Walmart 24 Hour grocery store. I never knew so many NAMs lived near me. In fact they don't, but they flock to the Walmarts in nicer neighborhoods. These Walmarts are cultural beachheads for them before they start moving in. I have to start planning on selling and moving out to greener pastures.

    My belief is that Obama/Democrat wealth redistribution schemes during the last seven years have given a great boost to Walmart's bottom line. It's party time as they (NAMs, even illiterate Haitians) drive off in their new (on ten year payment plans) Detroit and Japanese iron. Hopefully their party (on your dime) ends on DTrump's inauguration day.

  143. @Clyde

    Trump’s undergraduate career was fairly similar to Obama’s.
     
    But then Trump went on to Wharton Business School....... Trump would be very refreshing president because he is not a stinkin' lawyer.
    --Obama-Biden-lawyers
    --Bill Clintoon-lawyer - AlGore went to Vanderbilt law for a year plus but did not graduate for a good reason. He ran off to run for Representative and won.

    George W Bush- not a lawyer, went to Harvard B school
    George HW Bush- not a lawyer but "As Yale team captain, Bush met Babe Ruth before a game during his senior year" ___wiki cite

    Jimmy Carter--- not a lawyer but an actual Jeffersonian farmer who (horrors) sent his daughter Amy to a DC public school. An enhanced kind of public school one but a righteous contrast to Obama sending his two daughters to a 40,000 per year private school though in the real world we know he did not pay a dime. Life is good for an x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia...

    x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia

    How do you know Obama is an “x-choomer”? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session. Obama, choomer-in-chief, originator of the adage “a blunt-a-day keeps the doctor away” and “choom, choom, choom your boat, gently down the stream, breezily, hazily, waftily, choomin, life is but a dream.”

    Choom on bro, dope smokers of the world unite! All you have to lose is the fetters of the (white) man!

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    How do you know Obama is an “x-choomer”? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session.
     
    The reason Obama + family always jet off to Hawaii (a seventy million dollar vacation) is so Obie can score some weed from his old suppliers and relive his salad days. This just might be! My favorite tale from his high school stoner days is, Obie and his buddie would smoke up a storm in a ratty ol VW van with all the windows closed. When the marijuana was finished they would all put their heads/mouths close to the ceiling and suck in the smoke until it was gone. The van owner was an older gay dude who years later was killed by a boyfriend. (all this is on the www)

    In his book he says he was stoned his last two years of high school.

  144. Boomstick says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But remember, a large part of being a president is being a leader, the ability to make decisions often on very little information during real time.

    Much of the same things you listed could easily be applied to Andrew Jackson. The elite politicos of his day discounted his candidacy and considered him to be a semi-literate bumpkin. And yet most respectable historians have ranked him as one of the greatest presidents in US history. He was a leader and had the ability to make decisions. The modern presidency of the Commander in Chief comes largely from his administration.

    Put it this way: For most posters here, forget political bias in either direction. Does anyone think that George W. Bush will be remembered as one the US's greatest presidents of the 21st century? That's a fair question.

    Some of what you first were saying about Trump could be applied to W. as well, except perhaps with the fact he was a much poorer communicator. Yet he was elected twice.

    Perhaps the relevant question, the game changer, is if he is elected, could a President Trump consistently work well with Congress, particularly with members of his own party? If the answer is yes, then he will probably fare no worse than did W.

    In addition to some of the adjectives that have been mentioned about Trump in this post perhaps another one should be mentioned: As a leader for most of his adult life, he has learned which people to listen to/hire in order to get the proper details (extrapolate that for assessing which congressmen to listen to, e.g. Jeff Sessions, regarding his particular policies most notably on immigration). In other words, for the leader, details are the fine points and can best be left to associates/underlings/those who are hired on the basis of their ideas. The great leaders always seem to have a knack for hiring the best people and knowing when to listen to them and when to make their own decisions. If Trump chooses a VP candidate, say Cruz, then that what speak volumes about his abilities namely, that he believes that Cruz is the right politician that can best help him implement his policies.

    It’s possible that Trump could be a good President, but Presidenting is a team sport. All winning Presidential campaigns and successful administrations are coalitions of multiple constituencies. Reagan held together evangelicals, white urban ethnics, libertarians, defense hawks, and cultural conservatives. FDR carried white southerners, blacks, and urban northeners. Obama put together SWPLs, the Free Stuff Army, and colored ethnics.

    Trump’s a one man band so far. I haven’t seen much evidence of coalition building, but it’s still early.

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    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Trump’s a one man band so far. I haven’t seen much evidence of coalition building, but it’s still early.

    This is the part that worries me. Trump needs lieutenants, thousands upon thousands of them, in order to implement his policies. There is quite a disparity between how voters view Trump and how the political class, whence we draw those lieutenants, view him. For these people the calculation becomes 1.) don't taint yourself, don't get involved, let someone else go down with Trump's sinking ship of an administration; 2.) Get involved but subvert everything Trump wants to do in fulfillment of the Greater Glory of the Donors who will reward you when you leave office; or 3.) this is a reorientation of the Republican Party and there is no going back to the way things were because the voters will never again support the old-style of Republican Party politics, so I best make peace with this new world and get in on the ground floor.

    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The greatest US Presidents share one thing in common: They were all leaders and pretty much individuals. Their force of personality, charisma, call it what you will, is the main thing that held together the various groups and factions from splintering apart.

    It's the Commander in Chief, not the leading by committee. Leading, is after all, a one man role. So it has been throughout history and so it shall ever be. Throughout his adult life in the private sector Trump has been an individual leader, but at the same time he has also shown abilities to persuade and build coalitions in order to achieve his largest goals. He knows well how to build a group for the larger goal at hand. How this will translate to the public sector is anyone's guess but so long as he stays on message and focuses on being a leader and the individual aspects of being the Commander in Chief, the individual role of the presidency, (which would tend to play to his instincts and strengths) he should do pretty well. Behind the scenes of course he will choose certain lieutenants to help implement his policies. He can always hire the "right people" to sort out all the various details, whether its an H-1B; Triad; etc. The details come and go; the larger goal/big picture remains the same and in that sense, Donald Trump could be the right man to get the job done. The big question of course is whether or not the GOP leaders at large will be satisfied with the lieutenants that are chosen to implement his policies.

    Remember: Ronald Reagan, like Trump, did not obsessively focus on details. He focused on the big picture and achieved many of them during his two administrations.

  145. TangoMan says:
    @Boomstick
    It's possible that Trump could be a good President, but Presidenting is a team sport. All winning Presidential campaigns and successful administrations are coalitions of multiple constituencies. Reagan held together evangelicals, white urban ethnics, libertarians, defense hawks, and cultural conservatives. FDR carried white southerners, blacks, and urban northeners. Obama put together SWPLs, the Free Stuff Army, and colored ethnics.

    Trump's a one man band so far. I haven't seen much evidence of coalition building, but it's still early.

    Trump’s a one man band so far. I haven’t seen much evidence of coalition building, but it’s still early.

    This is the part that worries me. Trump needs lieutenants, thousands upon thousands of them, in order to implement his policies. There is quite a disparity between how voters view Trump and how the political class, whence we draw those lieutenants, view him. For these people the calculation becomes 1.) don’t taint yourself, don’t get involved, let someone else go down with Trump’s sinking ship of an administration; 2.) Get involved but subvert everything Trump wants to do in fulfillment of the Greater Glory of the Donors who will reward you when you leave office; or 3.) this is a reorientation of the Republican Party and there is no going back to the way things were because the voters will never again support the old-style of Republican Party politics, so I best make peace with this new world and get in on the ground floor.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    A Trump admin focused on restricting immigration and balancing trade to create more jobs in the US would find a lot supporters in economically depressed parts of the country. Bear in mind that those supporters need not necessarily be Republicans. It may be that Trump causes a realignment, where the remaining nationalist Dems come over to the GOP, and some of the globalist GOPs switch to the Dems. In other words. the Dems remain a high-low coalition, but the GOP gets a bigger chunk of the middle while losing some of its own top layer.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump even on all the ballots for the primaries?
  146. Jefferson says:

    First The New York Times compared Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler, now they are comparing Ted Cruz to George Wallace.

    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/12/21/us/politics/in-nod-to-donald-trump-ted-cruz-on-tour-sharpens-tone.html?_r=0&referer=

    That newspaper should change their name to The Democratic Party Times. They have not endorsed a Republican for president since 1956. Steve Sailer was not even born yet, that is how long it has been. It is definitely not a centrist swing vote newspaper.

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  147. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    But remember, a large part of being a president is being a leader, the ability to make decisions often on very little information during real time.

    Much of the same things you listed could easily be applied to Andrew Jackson. The elite politicos of his day discounted his candidacy and considered him to be a semi-literate bumpkin. And yet most respectable historians have ranked him as one of the greatest presidents in US history. He was a leader and had the ability to make decisions. The modern presidency of the Commander in Chief comes largely from his administration.

    Put it this way: For most posters here, forget political bias in either direction. Does anyone think that George W. Bush will be remembered as one the US's greatest presidents of the 21st century? That's a fair question.

    Some of what you first were saying about Trump could be applied to W. as well, except perhaps with the fact he was a much poorer communicator. Yet he was elected twice.

    Perhaps the relevant question, the game changer, is if he is elected, could a President Trump consistently work well with Congress, particularly with members of his own party? If the answer is yes, then he will probably fare no worse than did W.

    In addition to some of the adjectives that have been mentioned about Trump in this post perhaps another one should be mentioned: As a leader for most of his adult life, he has learned which people to listen to/hire in order to get the proper details (extrapolate that for assessing which congressmen to listen to, e.g. Jeff Sessions, regarding his particular policies most notably on immigration). In other words, for the leader, details are the fine points and can best be left to associates/underlings/those who are hired on the basis of their ideas. The great leaders always seem to have a knack for hiring the best people and knowing when to listen to them and when to make their own decisions. If Trump chooses a VP candidate, say Cruz, then that what speak volumes about his abilities namely, that he believes that Cruz is the right politician that can best help him implement his policies.

    One advantage Trump would have over other recent GOP Presidents is he wouldn’t be wedded to a basket of Sisyphean GOP policy preferences (on taxes, or Social Security, for example). So, he’d have more room to negotiate to achieve his priorities.

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  148. 5371 says:
    @whorefinder
    It seems to me the WSJ is nudging or directing the anti-Trumpers to quit attacking Trump on being "shocking" and "loudmouthed" and "racist" because it's not working and only making him stronger.

    Instead, they're telling the MSM to hit him in the pocketbook.

    Except that the Univision-crowd tried this already and failed (cancelling contracts, bookings, refusing his beauty pageant). It would take a mega-concerted effort to really hit Trump hard in the pocketbook, and that would bring out lawsuits galore from Trump against them.

    Italy's Silvio Berlusconi is the public figure that most resembles Trump: shameless, right of center for his country, younger women (one at 18 while he's in his 70s), oodles of bombastic charm, smirks, billionaire, sharply dressed, telegenic. He's won the Italian leadership several times, off and on. The major difference is Silvio owns his own media-TV channels there, which gives him his own platform. Trump is running against even the right-wing (Fox) network's open-borders viewpoint. Trump has countered this by being so outrageous that he's gotten free air time.

    Berlusconi entered electoral politics when he was much younger than Trump was.

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  149. @Boomstick
    It's possible that Trump could be a good President, but Presidenting is a team sport. All winning Presidential campaigns and successful administrations are coalitions of multiple constituencies. Reagan held together evangelicals, white urban ethnics, libertarians, defense hawks, and cultural conservatives. FDR carried white southerners, blacks, and urban northeners. Obama put together SWPLs, the Free Stuff Army, and colored ethnics.

    Trump's a one man band so far. I haven't seen much evidence of coalition building, but it's still early.

    The greatest US Presidents share one thing in common: They were all leaders and pretty much individuals. Their force of personality, charisma, call it what you will, is the main thing that held together the various groups and factions from splintering apart.

    It’s the Commander in Chief, not the leading by committee. Leading, is after all, a one man role. So it has been throughout history and so it shall ever be. Throughout his adult life in the private sector Trump has been an individual leader, but at the same time he has also shown abilities to persuade and build coalitions in order to achieve his largest goals. He knows well how to build a group for the larger goal at hand. How this will translate to the public sector is anyone’s guess but so long as he stays on message and focuses on being a leader and the individual aspects of being the Commander in Chief, the individual role of the presidency, (which would tend to play to his instincts and strengths) he should do pretty well. Behind the scenes of course he will choose certain lieutenants to help implement his policies. He can always hire the “right people” to sort out all the various details, whether its an H-1B; Triad; etc. The details come and go; the larger goal/big picture remains the same and in that sense, Donald Trump could be the right man to get the job done. The big question of course is whether or not the GOP leaders at large will be satisfied with the lieutenants that are chosen to implement his policies.

    Remember: Ronald Reagan, like Trump, did not obsessively focus on details. He focused on the big picture and achieved many of them during his two administrations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Good comments.

    The greatest US Presidents share one thing in common: They were all leaders and pretty much individuals.
     
    Washington and Reagan come to mind.

    Not known for close personal friendships, for instance.
  150. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @TangoMan
    Trump’s a one man band so far. I haven’t seen much evidence of coalition building, but it’s still early.

    This is the part that worries me. Trump needs lieutenants, thousands upon thousands of them, in order to implement his policies. There is quite a disparity between how voters view Trump and how the political class, whence we draw those lieutenants, view him. For these people the calculation becomes 1.) don't taint yourself, don't get involved, let someone else go down with Trump's sinking ship of an administration; 2.) Get involved but subvert everything Trump wants to do in fulfillment of the Greater Glory of the Donors who will reward you when you leave office; or 3.) this is a reorientation of the Republican Party and there is no going back to the way things were because the voters will never again support the old-style of Republican Party politics, so I best make peace with this new world and get in on the ground floor.

    A Trump admin focused on restricting immigration and balancing trade to create more jobs in the US would find a lot supporters in economically depressed parts of the country. Bear in mind that those supporters need not necessarily be Republicans. It may be that Trump causes a realignment, where the remaining nationalist Dems come over to the GOP, and some of the globalist GOPs switch to the Dems. In other words. the Dems remain a high-low coalition, but the GOP gets a bigger chunk of the middle while losing some of its own top layer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Trump gathering up supporters is not a problem, it's the administrators that are going to be the problem for these political appointment people exist in an ecosystem characterized by a revolving door between doing work in government and getting paid off in the corporate system after they leave government. For these guys who end up working as Trump's lieutenants, much of what they do is going to hurt the Chamber of Commerce by disrupting the cheap labor pipeline and so there is no reward for them when they leave government. The reward would come from disrupting Trump's plans so that the COC can continue to privatize the gains and socialize the losses associated with cheap labor.
  151. 5371 says:
    @Lot

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary.
     
    Sheldon leans toward Rubio but has not endorsed, his wife leans toward Cruz. He recently said he'd support Trump if he's nominated.

    Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China.
     
    How so? Adelson's money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.

    Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.
     
    Sheldon's #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He's right on the merits, which you may realize if you have any problem online gamblers who are close to you. I'd happily offer him a deal on this issue if it stops him from supporting an open boarders Republican in the primary.

    [Sheldon’s #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He’s right on the merits]

    How very convenient for “Sheldon”. (Is he a friend or relative of yours?)

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  152. TangoMan says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    A Trump admin focused on restricting immigration and balancing trade to create more jobs in the US would find a lot supporters in economically depressed parts of the country. Bear in mind that those supporters need not necessarily be Republicans. It may be that Trump causes a realignment, where the remaining nationalist Dems come over to the GOP, and some of the globalist GOPs switch to the Dems. In other words. the Dems remain a high-low coalition, but the GOP gets a bigger chunk of the middle while losing some of its own top layer.

    Trump gathering up supporters is not a problem, it’s the administrators that are going to be the problem for these political appointment people exist in an ecosystem characterized by a revolving door between doing work in government and getting paid off in the corporate system after they leave government. For these guys who end up working as Trump’s lieutenants, much of what they do is going to hurt the Chamber of Commerce by disrupting the cheap labor pipeline and so there is no reward for them when they leave government. The reward would come from disrupting Trump’s plans so that the COC can continue to privatize the gains and socialize the losses associated with cheap labor.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Not every industry relies on cheap labor. In fact, many don't.

    Trump won't be cancelling capitalism. There will be plenty of competent executives in industries that would profit in a non-cheap labor environment. It's not as if there weren't booming American companies during the 40 year immigration pause.
  153. @TangoMan
    Trump’s a one man band so far. I haven’t seen much evidence of coalition building, but it’s still early.

    This is the part that worries me. Trump needs lieutenants, thousands upon thousands of them, in order to implement his policies. There is quite a disparity between how voters view Trump and how the political class, whence we draw those lieutenants, view him. For these people the calculation becomes 1.) don't taint yourself, don't get involved, let someone else go down with Trump's sinking ship of an administration; 2.) Get involved but subvert everything Trump wants to do in fulfillment of the Greater Glory of the Donors who will reward you when you leave office; or 3.) this is a reorientation of the Republican Party and there is no going back to the way things were because the voters will never again support the old-style of Republican Party politics, so I best make peace with this new world and get in on the ground floor.

    Is Trump even on all the ballots for the primaries?

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    I don't know. I do know that he's recently filed in Texas and Ohio and thus blocked himself from running as an independent in those states, these in addition to other states where he's already filed. I don't know if he's filed everywhere though.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    If you click on "States" on his website, it looks like he only has 21 of them listed: https://www.donaldjtrump.com/states/
  154. Clyde says:
    @Charles Erwin Wilson

    x-choomer from Hawaii-Indonesia
     
    How do you know Obama is an "x-choomer"? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session. Obama, choomer-in-chief, originator of the adage "a blunt-a-day keeps the doctor away" and "choom, choom, choom your boat, gently down the stream, breezily, hazily, waftily, choomin, life is but a dream."

    Choom on bro, dope smokers of the world unite! All you have to lose is the fetters of the (white) man!

    How do you know Obama is an “x-choomer”? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session.

    The reason Obama + family always jet off to Hawaii (a seventy million dollar vacation) is so Obie can score some weed from his old suppliers and relive his salad days. This just might be! My favorite tale from his high school stoner days is, Obie and his buddie would smoke up a storm in a ratty ol VW van with all the windows closed. When the marijuana was finished they would all put their heads/mouths close to the ceiling and suck in the smoke until it was gone. The van owner was an older gay dude who years later was killed by a boyfriend. (all this is on the www)

    In his book he says he was stoned his last two years of high school.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    correction to my post just above-------

    WASHINGTON: President Barack Obama's 16-day Christmas getaway in Hawaii will bring the cost of his family's personal travel during his time in office to more than $70 million, according to a new study.

    This year alone the estimated bill for the First Family's holidays was $11.6 million, including golf trips to Florida and California, and Michelle Obama going skiing in Aspen.

    Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, the conservative watchdog which compiled the study, said: "The Obamas are treating Air Force One like an Uber ride.

    "President Obama seems oblivious to the burden he is placing on Americans with his continuous vacations, getaways and political junkets at taxpayer expense."

    It costs just over $200,000 an hour to fly Air Force One, meaning $3.6 million for the round trip from Washington to Hawaii. It is the Obamas' seventh family holiday in Hawaii during his presidency.

    Mr Obama has taken 23 holidays, a total of 177 days, during his presidency.

     

  155. TangoMan says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump even on all the ballots for the primaries?

    I don’t know. I do know that he’s recently filed in Texas and Ohio and thus blocked himself from running as an independent in those states, these in addition to other states where he’s already filed. I don’t know if he’s filed everywhere though.

    Read More
  156. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Is Trump even on all the ballots for the primaries?

    If you click on “States” on his website, it looks like he only has 21 of them listed: https://www.donaldjtrump.com/states/

    Read More
  157. @Zachary Latif
    Off-topic Steve but have you heard about the ridiculous campaign emerging in Oxford to topple the statue of Cecile Rhodes from Oriel college.

    Ridiculous I genuinely thought Britain (and especially Oxbridge) was above that:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/universityeducation/universities-and-colleges/12058543/The-campaign-to-topple-Oxford-Universitys-Cecil-Rhodes-statue-is-too-silly-for-words.html

    The Democratic frontrunner’s husband will pay back his Rhodes Scholarship write after he quit Trump’s golf club.

    Read More
  158. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @TangoMan
    Trump gathering up supporters is not a problem, it's the administrators that are going to be the problem for these political appointment people exist in an ecosystem characterized by a revolving door between doing work in government and getting paid off in the corporate system after they leave government. For these guys who end up working as Trump's lieutenants, much of what they do is going to hurt the Chamber of Commerce by disrupting the cheap labor pipeline and so there is no reward for them when they leave government. The reward would come from disrupting Trump's plans so that the COC can continue to privatize the gains and socialize the losses associated with cheap labor.

    Not every industry relies on cheap labor. In fact, many don’t.

    Trump won’t be cancelling capitalism. There will be plenty of competent executives in industries that would profit in a non-cheap labor environment. It’s not as if there weren’t booming American companies during the 40 year immigration pause.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TangoMan
    Presuming Trump lives up to his rhetoric, he will be canceling "profit at any cost capitalism" and replacing it with "use American workers in order to earn your profit capitalism."

    Disney was making fine profits but felt it could boost profits by firing their programmers and hiring imported Indian programmers. Rinse and repeat millions of times. Drywallers made money hiring Americans but now make more money by hiring Mexicans.

    What's indisputable is that post-65 Labor's share of National Income has declined and Capital's share has increased and productivity gains are, year after year, being increasingly being captured by Capital. This shouldn't be a surprise in a flooded labor market, where surplus labor drives down labor costs and increases profits. If Trump manages to live up to his statements and deports millions of infiltrators, this is going to begin having an effect on wage levels and returns to Labor will come at the expense of Capital. This means that the stock market will fall, so the investor class will suffer. Disney didn't get better quality of work by hiring an army of Apus, they lowered their labor costs and boosted profitability, thus increasing share prices and making management and shareholders better off. Too bad about those 250 American middle class employees, I guess they can go work at 7-11.

    Like Steve points out, it's a who, whom question. Trump will screw up the business model which has been operational for 50 years - import more workers, drive down labor's share of the National Income, boost profits and get huge stock bonuses. These interests are not going to be happy if they have to begin paying more for labor and I'm not even touching on the protectionist noises that Trump is making, imagine if he links American labor force requirements to corporate residence or selling into the American market - Apple will be screaming like a baby with a bad toothache.

  159. @WhatEvvs
    Trump has a kind of quick, incisive intelligence that cuts through all the BS. For example, before San Bernardino, Chuck Todd (who hates Trump with a passion) asked him about creating no fly zones in Syria to hem in Isis. Trump replied, "ISIS has airplanes?" Todd was speechless, because Trump's response revealed the question to be irrelevant to Isis. That was the kind of remark that shows that Trump can get to the heart of a problem very quickly. That is an excellent quality, and essential in a leader.

    He's not particularly thoughtful or reflective. That would not really matter much, if Trump other qualities that a leader needs. I don't think he has them. I'm skeptical. I have a sick feeling that all of this is going to evaporate and that Hillary will be president.

    Makes sense.

    He’s not particularly thoughtful or reflective. That would not really matter much, if Trump other qualities that a leader needs. I don’t think he has them. I’m skeptical.

    Well, I’m skeptical because it’s my duty as a citizen.

    At the end of the day, though, a choice must be made, so one has to construct a plausible case for each candidate to test if it can hang together.

    I think Trump is reflective, but he looks with the eyes of faith alone. There is only One who merits such a gaze, and His Name isn’t Trump. There’s ruin down that road, though not near the ruin that lies down the one without faith at all.

    He’s counting on hiring the thoughtfulness, dedicating himself to action. Not sure that labor can be so readily divided.

    See Arnold’s discussion of the complementarity here:

    http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/arnold/writings/4.html

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  160. TangoMan says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Not every industry relies on cheap labor. In fact, many don't.

    Trump won't be cancelling capitalism. There will be plenty of competent executives in industries that would profit in a non-cheap labor environment. It's not as if there weren't booming American companies during the 40 year immigration pause.

    Presuming Trump lives up to his rhetoric, he will be canceling “profit at any cost capitalism” and replacing it with “use American workers in order to earn your profit capitalism.”

    Disney was making fine profits but felt it could boost profits by firing their programmers and hiring imported Indian programmers. Rinse and repeat millions of times. Drywallers made money hiring Americans but now make more money by hiring Mexicans.

    What’s indisputable is that post-65 Labor’s share of National Income has declined and Capital’s share has increased and productivity gains are, year after year, being increasingly being captured by Capital. This shouldn’t be a surprise in a flooded labor market, where surplus labor drives down labor costs and increases profits. If Trump manages to live up to his statements and deports millions of infiltrators, this is going to begin having an effect on wage levels and returns to Labor will come at the expense of Capital. This means that the stock market will fall, so the investor class will suffer. Disney didn’t get better quality of work by hiring an army of Apus, they lowered their labor costs and boosted profitability, thus increasing share prices and making management and shareholders better off. Too bad about those 250 American middle class employees, I guess they can go work at 7-11.

    Like Steve points out, it’s a who, whom question. Trump will screw up the business model which has been operational for 50 years – import more workers, drive down labor’s share of the National Income, boost profits and get huge stock bonuses. These interests are not going to be happy if they have to begin paying more for labor and I’m not even touching on the protectionist noises that Trump is making, imagine if he links American labor force requirements to corporate residence or selling into the American market – Apple will be screaming like a baby with a bad toothache.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Like Steve points out, it’s a who, whom question. Trump will screw up the business model which has been operational for 50 years – import more workers, drive down labor’s share of the National Income, boost profits and get huge stock bonuses. These interests are not going to be happy if they have to begin paying more for labor and I’m not even touching on the protectionist noises that Trump is making, imagine if he links American labor force requirements to corporate residence or selling into the American market – Apple will be screaming like a baby with a bad toothache.
     
    I agree with all of this and hopefully Donald Trump get in and gets to disrupt and spoil Capital's with a big C party. I like your line about corporate residence. Most free market types are dolts when it comes to who and whom. They will cheer when Toyota or BMW opens a factory here and calling them job creators. Who makes the profits and where the profits go (to Japan and Europe) never enters their silly little heads. Sickening! Where is the common sense?
    Nothing that you and I said here is taught in American universities. Economic nationalism is forbidden. And no border fences....all while Speaker Paul Ryan has just put a new one around his Jaynesville, Wisconsin home. Security fences for me but not for thee.

    Paul Ryan Explains Defeat In Hometown Of Janesville, Wisconsin
    www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/14/paul-ryan-election_n_2130885.html
    Nov 14, 2012 · Former GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan opened up about losing his hometown of Janesville, Wisconsin in last week's election, attributing the ...
     
  161. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The greatest US Presidents share one thing in common: They were all leaders and pretty much individuals. Their force of personality, charisma, call it what you will, is the main thing that held together the various groups and factions from splintering apart.

    It's the Commander in Chief, not the leading by committee. Leading, is after all, a one man role. So it has been throughout history and so it shall ever be. Throughout his adult life in the private sector Trump has been an individual leader, but at the same time he has also shown abilities to persuade and build coalitions in order to achieve his largest goals. He knows well how to build a group for the larger goal at hand. How this will translate to the public sector is anyone's guess but so long as he stays on message and focuses on being a leader and the individual aspects of being the Commander in Chief, the individual role of the presidency, (which would tend to play to his instincts and strengths) he should do pretty well. Behind the scenes of course he will choose certain lieutenants to help implement his policies. He can always hire the "right people" to sort out all the various details, whether its an H-1B; Triad; etc. The details come and go; the larger goal/big picture remains the same and in that sense, Donald Trump could be the right man to get the job done. The big question of course is whether or not the GOP leaders at large will be satisfied with the lieutenants that are chosen to implement his policies.

    Remember: Ronald Reagan, like Trump, did not obsessively focus on details. He focused on the big picture and achieved many of them during his two administrations.

    Good comments.

    The greatest US Presidents share one thing in common: They were all leaders and pretty much individuals.

    Washington and Reagan come to mind.

    Not known for close personal friendships, for instance.

    Read More
  162. Clyde says:
    @Clyde

    How do you know Obama is an “x-choomer”? How, when, where or why would anyone stop his chooming? Benghazi? Just an unfortunate interruption of a choom session.
     
    The reason Obama + family always jet off to Hawaii (a seventy million dollar vacation) is so Obie can score some weed from his old suppliers and relive his salad days. This just might be! My favorite tale from his high school stoner days is, Obie and his buddie would smoke up a storm in a ratty ol VW van with all the windows closed. When the marijuana was finished they would all put their heads/mouths close to the ceiling and suck in the smoke until it was gone. The van owner was an older gay dude who years later was killed by a boyfriend. (all this is on the www)

    In his book he says he was stoned his last two years of high school.

    correction to my post just above——-

    WASHINGTON: President Barack Obama’s 16-day Christmas getaway in Hawaii will bring the cost of his family’s personal travel during his time in office to more than $70 million, according to a new study.

    This year alone the estimated bill for the First Family’s holidays was $11.6 million, including golf trips to Florida and California, and Michelle Obama going skiing in Aspen.

    Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, the conservative watchdog which compiled the study, said: “The Obamas are treating Air Force One like an Uber ride.

    “President Obama seems oblivious to the burden he is placing on Americans with his continuous vacations, getaways and political junkets at taxpayer expense.”

    It costs just over $200,000 an hour to fly Air Force One, meaning $3.6 million for the round trip from Washington to Hawaii. It is the Obamas’ seventh family holiday in Hawaii during his presidency.

    Mr Obama has taken 23 holidays, a total of 177 days, during his presidency.

    Read More
  163. Clyde says:
    @Jefferson
    "How so? Adelson’s money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart."

    Could you see the the traditionally Republican Walton family voting for Hillary Clinton if Donald Trump wins the GOP nomination? Do you believe that for them being pro-open borders trumps being a Republican? After all, Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers make a shitload of money off of blue collar lower working class Hispanic consumers of both the Illegal and Legal kind.

    After all, Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers make a shitload of money off of blue collar lower working class Hispanic consumers of both the Illegal and Legal kind.

    All NAMs (immigrants, illegals and the native born) love those Walmart 24 Hour Super Centers. What opened near me is a huge Walmart 24 Hour grocery store. I never knew so many NAMs lived near me. In fact they don’t, but they flock to the Walmarts in nicer neighborhoods. These Walmarts are cultural beachheads for them before they start moving in. I have to start planning on selling and moving out to greener pastures.

    My belief is that Obama/Democrat wealth redistribution schemes during the last seven years have given a great boost to Walmart’s bottom line. It’s party time as they (NAMs, even illiterate Haitians) drive off in their new (on ten year payment plans) Detroit and Japanese iron. Hopefully their party (on your dime) ends on DTrump’s inauguration day.

    Read More
  164. Clyde says:
    @TangoMan
    Presuming Trump lives up to his rhetoric, he will be canceling "profit at any cost capitalism" and replacing it with "use American workers in order to earn your profit capitalism."

    Disney was making fine profits but felt it could boost profits by firing their programmers and hiring imported Indian programmers. Rinse and repeat millions of times. Drywallers made money hiring Americans but now make more money by hiring Mexicans.

    What's indisputable is that post-65 Labor's share of National Income has declined and Capital's share has increased and productivity gains are, year after year, being increasingly being captured by Capital. This shouldn't be a surprise in a flooded labor market, where surplus labor drives down labor costs and increases profits. If Trump manages to live up to his statements and deports millions of infiltrators, this is going to begin having an effect on wage levels and returns to Labor will come at the expense of Capital. This means that the stock market will fall, so the investor class will suffer. Disney didn't get better quality of work by hiring an army of Apus, they lowered their labor costs and boosted profitability, thus increasing share prices and making management and shareholders better off. Too bad about those 250 American middle class employees, I guess they can go work at 7-11.

    Like Steve points out, it's a who, whom question. Trump will screw up the business model which has been operational for 50 years - import more workers, drive down labor's share of the National Income, boost profits and get huge stock bonuses. These interests are not going to be happy if they have to begin paying more for labor and I'm not even touching on the protectionist noises that Trump is making, imagine if he links American labor force requirements to corporate residence or selling into the American market - Apple will be screaming like a baby with a bad toothache.

    Like Steve points out, it’s a who, whom question. Trump will screw up the business model which has been operational for 50 years – import more workers, drive down labor’s share of the National Income, boost profits and get huge stock bonuses. These interests are not going to be happy if they have to begin paying more for labor and I’m not even touching on the protectionist noises that Trump is making, imagine if he links American labor force requirements to corporate residence or selling into the American market – Apple will be screaming like a baby with a bad toothache.

    I agree with all of this and hopefully Donald Trump get in and gets to disrupt and spoil Capital’s with a big C party. I like your line about corporate residence. Most free market types are dolts when it comes to who and whom. They will cheer when Toyota or BMW opens a factory here and calling them job creators. Who makes the profits and where the profits go (to Japan and Europe) never enters their silly little heads. Sickening! Where is the common sense?
    Nothing that you and I said here is taught in American universities. Economic nationalism is forbidden. And no border fences….all while Speaker Paul Ryan has just put a new one around his Jaynesville, Wisconsin home. Security fences for me but not for thee.

    Paul Ryan Explains Defeat In Hometown Of Janesville, Wisconsin
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/14/paul-ryan-election_n_2130885.html
    Nov 14, 2012 · Former GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan opened up about losing his hometown of Janesville, Wisconsin in last week’s election, attributing the …

    Read More
  165. David says:
    @Lot

    Prior occurances led me to think that Adelson would join his friend Haim Saban in supporting Hillary.
     
    Sheldon leans toward Rubio but has not endorsed, his wife leans toward Cruz. He recently said he'd support Trump if he's nominated.

    Trump is someone who could actually cause Adelson financial pain in regards to China.
     
    How so? Adelson's money is Macau casinos, not importing Chinese junk sold by Wal-Mart.

    Perhaps he trades Israel for slashing immigration.
     
    Sheldon's #1 issue is shutting down online gambling. He's right on the merits, which you may realize if you have any problem online gamblers who are close to you. I'd happily offer him a deal on this issue if it stops him from supporting an open boarders Republican in the primary.

    Changing US tax law about bringing home foreign profits could have a huge impact on Adelson’s income. Funny how uninformed you become when it helps make an argument.

    Do you actually believe Adelson cares about your gambling addicted relatives? Maybe, but I think that’s only true in special cases like yours.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Adelson, like Trump, is a casino-owner.

    Trump may be saying something like this to Adelson:

    - We both have a financial interest in cracking down on online gambling in favor of making people go to specific places to gamble.

    - Your wife is Israeli, so you are really into Israel. I'll be ardent for Israel too.

    - Tightening up on Israel is my thing, like Israel is your's. It will cost me and you some higher wages, but we can afford it. So let's trade.

  166. @David
    Changing US tax law about bringing home foreign profits could have a huge impact on Adelson's income. Funny how uninformed you become when it helps make an argument.

    Do you actually believe Adelson cares about your gambling addicted relatives? Maybe, but I think that's only true in special cases like yours.

    Adelson, like Trump, is a casino-owner.

    Trump may be saying something like this to Adelson:

    - We both have a financial interest in cracking down on online gambling in favor of making people go to specific places to gamble.

    - Your wife is Israeli, so you are really into Israel. I’ll be ardent for Israel too.

    - Tightening up on Israel is my thing, like Israel is your’s. It will cost me and you some higher wages, but we can afford it. So let’s trade.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    If such a scenario has occurred then this is making my case: Leaders are men of action; they are able to make deals behind the scenes to get things done via persuasion, deal making, etc. Being a real estate/casino/brand unto himself for several decades now, Trump has well learned how this "art of the deal" works. So long as action is taken, the details of the policies can get sorted out down the road, usually by others. Men of action don't stop to worry about the details ('cause they'll get done down the road).

    Another example came up here with one of your questions, Trump on the ballot of all 50 states. Normally by this late date one would've assumed that he was, but again, that's a "detail" and perhaps he'd prefer to let underlings manage that sort of thing.

    I would assume that Trump made sure to be on the top 21 "relevant" states first (NY; CA; etc) with most delegates at this late stage and not simply on states that carry no weight.
  167. @vinteuil
    Hi, Tangoman - glad to see you around here, lately.

    Personally, I don't see the Republican establishment rallying around Trump. Have you read the kind of stuff guys like Krauthammer & Jonah Goldberg have been writing about him? If he gets the nomination, I think they'll jump ship & (at least tacitly) support Hillary.

    And if they do, and if Hillary gets in, I think it might be for the best, in the long run. When the great financial reckoning hits, as it soon must, I desperately want an unambiguous lefty sitting in the White House.

    I don’t know whether the Republican Establishment rallying behind Donald Trump would be a good or bad thing in the end. If they do they’ll expect Washington jobs in his administration, and they won’t change their fundamental attitudes just because of who’s in the Oval Office.

    I hope that Donald Trump is giving some thought at this stage as to how he plans to staff his administration, although I know that might be premature. But personnel is policy, as the Reaganites used to say, and trying to turn the course of a career Washington bureaucracy that might be in quasi-rebellion over a Trump victory will be a Herculean task.

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  168. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The Trump presidential administration, has a nice ring to it.

    Also, Trump likes to name things after himself. The border wall or rather the Trump Wall; The Trump Wall of America; The Great Trump Wall of America. All have a nice sound to it. And of course the name goes on the wall.

    In some ways, Donald Trump reminds one of Andrew Jackson. A man of the people who had strong instincts of how to lead a people/masses/etc.

    Trumpian Democracy writ large, and all with his name on the movement as well. Not too bad of a legacy to build for himself.

    In some ways, Donald Trump reminds one of Andrew Jackson.

    If so, I wouldn’t want to be Janet Yellen or a Moslem.

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  169. BB753 says:

    Trump can get more bang for his money by donating to alt-right webzines and bloggers like Steve Sailer than any other way. Even if they don’t support him 100%, you can be sure that they’ll heap scorn and ridicule upon other candidates.
    You can’t win without modern media outlets and social media. Isn’t that how Obama kicked Hillary to the curb eight years ago?

    100k bucks here, 200k bucks there, Trump doesn’t need to invest more than a couple of million dollars. ( Hopefully a large chunk of it to Steve and others).

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  170. MarkinLA says:
    @Steinemite
    I'd expect as much from the usual volunteer-hasbara commenters here but is Steve also so blind or just so far in the tank to deny that Trump will have a much harder time winning news cycles against Hillary than the ineffectual divided-and-conquered primary field? It *is* going to cost money and those funds have to come from somewhere; ergo Trump might want to plan for this. He *does* need to hire campaign staff in each state-- to observe this is not Zionist Bilderberger Carlos Slim blustery fearmongering. Yet according to the genius political consultancy iSteve & iUnz (who were divining a triumph by Classic French Prose in their regional elections until actual polling data threw a wet blanket on that romantic notion) Trump will just skate on SNL guest-host appearances & Twitter buzz for the rest of the general before ascending to the Oval Office by 60% or 70% popular vote. This mythological candidate functions as their alt-right golem who only grows stronger from MSM attacks (see also: "left/right politics are obsolete," lol). Thus the virtuous will be exalted, etc.

    Well if Trump wins the nomination the GOP will have to support him with their resources or be exposed even more than they were when they did everything to destroy Ron Paul’s campaign. That might just put an end to the GOP as presently constituted.

    Trump will also go on fundraising campaigns and small donors suck of DC might just surprise you. I might even give the maximum for a little guy same as I did for Paul.

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  171. @Steve Sailer
    Adelson, like Trump, is a casino-owner.

    Trump may be saying something like this to Adelson:

    - We both have a financial interest in cracking down on online gambling in favor of making people go to specific places to gamble.

    - Your wife is Israeli, so you are really into Israel. I'll be ardent for Israel too.

    - Tightening up on Israel is my thing, like Israel is your's. It will cost me and you some higher wages, but we can afford it. So let's trade.

    If such a scenario has occurred then this is making my case: Leaders are men of action; they are able to make deals behind the scenes to get things done via persuasion, deal making, etc. Being a real estate/casino/brand unto himself for several decades now, Trump has well learned how this “art of the deal” works. So long as action is taken, the details of the policies can get sorted out down the road, usually by others. Men of action don’t stop to worry about the details (’cause they’ll get done down the road).

    Another example came up here with one of your questions, Trump on the ballot of all 50 states. Normally by this late date one would’ve assumed that he was, but again, that’s a “detail” and perhaps he’d prefer to let underlings manage that sort of thing.

    I would assume that Trump made sure to be on the top 21 “relevant” states first (NY; CA; etc) with most delegates at this late stage and not simply on states that carry no weight.

    Read More
  172. Ragno says:

    If you truly need a reminder of why our Constitutional Republic desperately needs a Trump in there frightening the livestock, just warm your hands over the oily glow of triumph of every sentence of this screed as the message goes out don’t worry….we’ll fix this so that nobody, not even a #$!@& trillionaire, will attempt any unauthorized populist campaigns ever again.

    Unbelievable, isn’t it? Yet this is what we’ve come to: “meet the new boss, same as the old boss” is how the pinko press now reassures us that all is well, and (no) God’s in His (nonexistent, dammit!) Heaven.

    Read More
  173. @Former Darfur
    All politicians are liars, because all politicians are people. The man who says some people don't lie should be asked if his wife ever asked him, "Does this dress make my ass look fat?"

    Trump is a liar, but he is not a pathological liar, per se. Like George W. Bush, who was one of the finest liars that ever inhabited the White House, he lies when he thinks he has to, but always because he sees necessity in it, and he lies about things and in a way that is plausibly deniable later on. He is not especially good at it, and doesn't pretend to be. Being good at lying isn't a skill you particularly want in a chief executive from the standpoint of being one so ruled.

    The man who says some people don’t lie should be asked if his wife ever asked him, “Does this dress make my ass look fat?”

    “No, dear. The excess cellulite and fat rolls do. The dress contains them.”

    All politicians are liars, because all politicians are people.

    Politicians lie because if they didn’t, the voters would throw them out and replace them with those that do.

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  174. Svigor says:

    Polls may actually underestimate Trump’s support, study finds

    Donald Trump leads the GOP presidential field in polls of Republican voters nationally and in most early-voting states, but some polls may actually be understating his support, according to a new study.

    The analysis, by Morning Consult, a polling and market research company, looked at an odd occurrence that has cropped up repeatedly this year: Trump generally does better in online polls than in surveys done by phone.

    Why is that, and which polls are more accurate — the online surveys that tend to show Trump with support of nearly four-in-10 GOP voters or the telephone surveys that have generally shown him with the backing of one-third or fewer?

    Morning Consult ran an experiment: It polled 2,397 potential Republican voters earlier this month using three different methods — a traditional telephone survey with live interviewers calling landlines and cellphones, an online survey and an interactive dialing technique that calls people by telephone and asks them to respond to recorded questions by hitting buttons on their phone.

    By randomly assigning people to the three different approaches and running all at the same time, they hoped to eliminate factors that might cause results to vary from one poll to another.

    The experiment confirmed that “voters are about six points more likely to support Trump when they’re taking the poll online then when they’re talking to a live interviewer,” said Morning Consult’s polling director, Kyle Dropp.

    “People are slightly less likely to say that they support him when they’re talking to a live human” than when they are in the “anonymous environment” of an online survey, Dropp said.

    The most telling part of the experiment, however, was that not all types of people responded the same way. Among blue-collar Republicans, who have formed the core of Trump’s support, the polls were about the same regardless of method. But among college-educated Republicans, a bigger difference appeared, with Trump scoring 9 points better in the online poll.

    Social-desirability bias — the well-known tendency of people to hesitate to confess certain unpopular views to a pollster — provides the most likely explanation for that education gap, Dropp and his colleagues believe.

    The Establishment has a serious problem.

    Read More
  175. TheJester says:

    This is GOOD and funny! Donald Trump recast as a British aristocrat by simple over voicing him speaking with a “high brow” British accent.

    https://www.rt.com/news/326680-trump-comedian-accent-english/?utm_source=browser&utm_medium=aplication_chrome&utm_campaign=chrome

    Wow! The Donald’s credibility just quadroupled listening to him with the credibility of the BBC :-)

    Maybe we should listen to what he has to say ….

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  176. IBC says:
    @Clyde

    Trump, who is giving the people what they want ____
     
    You neglected to cite Ray Davies

    When Sheldon backed Jeb, he was insane
    But still he gave him money again and again…

    Read More
  177. […] Steve Sailer noticed reporter Holman Jenkins’s kind of sort of maybe airing a broad threat against Donald […]

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  178. Marc says:
    @Anonymous
    Trump recently had a meeting with Sheldon Adelson:

    http://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-meets-with-billionaire-sheldon-adelson-2015-12

    Presumably he met with him because he may need to ask him for money in the future.

    I doubt Trump has his hand out. One of Trump’s confidants, Roger Stone, has been mercilessly bashing Adelson & associates on Twitter and in interviews.

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  179. @Anonymous
    Off topic, a little:

    FAA registered military style jet aircraft registrations BY GEOGRAPHICAL AREA :
    https://www.classicjets.org/content/faas-list-1075-n-registered-classic-jets

    There is some stevishness here. Look at the geography.

    Not sure how valid this is, shows two fighter jets at my kid’s elementary school. Pretty sure they’re not tucked under a tarp on the playground.

    Read More
  180. Clyde says:
    @IBC
    When Sheldon backed Jeb, he was insane
    But still he gave him money again and again...

    Score!!!

    Read More
  181. Da-Mith says:
    @e
    Your face is flushed red too often.

    I think that effect might be the makeup and the lights. I saw him in person, up close, at Spyglass Hill a few years back, the AT&T(formerly, the Crosby.) I remember thinking, "Man, what white, white skin." BTW, he was very kind to the kids asking for his autograph, not that that would make him a good POTUS, but it said something about him. He bantered with them a bit, encouraging them in their golf and their studies. One of his celebrity playing partners that day, Mark Wahlberg, couldn't be bothered and just kept walking past the kids off the 18th green.

    e… I believe the correct spelling is… ” Mark Whore-berg”

    Read More
  182. Benez says:

    Why does he need to invest substantial money? He is doing great by flying around for rallies-personal contact is the best way to garner votes.

    Read More
  183. […] The strong horse. Related: NYT threatens Trump. […]

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  184. Lurker says:

    Its funny them kvetching over campaign finances. Trump has demonstrated that if you say stuff that lots of voters like, then you just don’t have to spend as much money as the other more boring, empty candidates.

    Read More
  185. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Here we go with the idiotic Trump Is Not Intelligent meme.

    Hey smart guy, Trump would kick your ass in any strategy competition. His social skills and social IQ are far beyond your capability. Trump will spot your weakness then exploit it until you're bleeding out on the floor.

    New York City is the toughest shark tank on earth and Trump thrives in that environment.

    Trump just invented a completely original presidential campaign strategy that has confounded every political expert in the country and still "he's not very intelligent."

    These media jerks only see liberals boycotting the Trump brand. They don't consider everyone else gravitating toward it as the months go by.

    Sheldon Adelson just folded! One of the smartest gamblers in the world just threw in the towel because Trump singlehandedly changed the paradigm. You know Bill Clinton told Hillary tonight that she's not going to be President...

    “Trump just invented a completely original presidential campaign strategy “

    ahhh not really. I’m a hillbilly who dropped out of high school in ’88 and trump is just now saying what many of us have been saying for decades

    Give him credit for being a rich guy and saying it but it is nothing original

    Read More

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