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WSJ in 1999: Your Bank Should Not Let You Spend Your Own Money if You Are on the Wrong Side of History
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Here’s something I wrote back in the last century:

WSJ: Banks should block depositors’ gifts to politically incorrect
Jun 11, 1999

Anyone interested in preserving freedom of speech on controversial topics should read the Wall Street Journal of today (Friday, June 11th). A lengthy, remarkable front page article advocates that banks should block their depositors from transferring their own personal money to politically incorrect organizations. I shall attempt to give a flavor of the article, but you really have to read it to believe it. …

The only note of sanity and respect for freedom in the article comes from Morgan spokesman Joe Evangelista: “We can’t tell our customers how to spend their money.”

From the Wall Street Journal way back on June 11, 1999:

Silent Partner: How the South’s Fight To Uphold Segregation Was Funded Up North

New York Millionaire Secretly Sent Cash to Mississippi Via His Morgan Account

‘Wall Street Gang’ Pitches In

By DOUGLAS A. BLACKMON
Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

JACKSON, Miss. – On the afternoon of Sept. 12, 1963, a vice president of Morgan Guaranty Trust Co. sent a telegram to the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, the agency created by local politicians to fight the civil-rights movement and preserve racial segregation.

A Morgan client, the telegram said, was “setting aside as an anonymous gift” stock valued at $100,000. …

Once the money arrived in Mississippi, it was funneled to an account in Washington, D.C., where segregationists were launching a fierce campaign to defeat landmark civil-rights legislation abolishing segregation in most public facilities. …

In other words, a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress.

Those records show large transfers of money by Morgan on behalf of a client who turns out be a wealthy and reclusive New Yorker named Wickliffe Preston Draper. Mr. Draper used his private banker to transfer nearly $215,000 in stock and cash to the Sovereignty Commission for use in its fight against the Civil Rights Act. …

The files also highlight the ethical issues that confront an institution like Morgan Guaranty, the private-banking unit of J.P.Morgan & Co., when it is drawn, even unwittingly, into a client’s support for repugnant causes….

Morgan insists that the Sovereignty Commission transactions it processed for Mr. Draper were routine procedures carried out on behalf of a client, over which the bank had no influence or control.

“A thousand times a day, somebody sends money to an organization that 30 years later looks really terrible,” says Morgan spokesman Joe Evangelisti. “We can’t tell our customers how to spend their money.”

Mr. Evangelisti says the role Morgan played was no different from the way Wall Street banks today facilitate gifts to organizations that could be equally controversial. He cites donations made to Planned Parenthood (often criticized for its pro-choice stance), or to the Boy Scouts of America (which prohibits gays from becoming troop leaders).

Morgan’s policy, he says, is to pass no judgment on any client’s activities, except in the “rare situation” when “the wishes of a client … conflict with the principles that we stand for as a firm.” In those cases, the firm may close a client’s account, Mr. Evangelisti says.

Since the Sovereignty Commission was a legal, state-created entity, says Hildy J. Simmons, a managing director at Morgan Guaranty, the bank had no choice but to follow its client’s wishes. It would be no different today. “As long as the receiving party is legal, we have no discretion,” says Ms. Simmons.

Morgan did close the asset-management account it maintained for the Pioneer Fund after the furor erupted over “The Bell Curve” in 1994, according to people familiar with the situation. The bank won’t give details on why it did so.

That option is something banks should consider, says Thomas Donaldson, a business-ethics professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “Good bankers should have the words ‘Know thy client’ tattooed somewhere on their chests,” Mr. Donaldson says. “When the activities of the client or customer reach the point where they offend vital, deeply held values of the institution, you have to say no.” …

The result was a new national lobbying organization, called the Coordinating Committee for Fundamental American Freedoms. The Sovereignty Commission provided money to rent a Washington office and hire staff, and largely controlled the group from Mississippi.

On July 22, 1963, Mr. Satterfield received the first private contribution to the cause, a $10,000 Morgan Guaranty cashier’s check drawn from Mr. Draper’s accounts. It was deposited into a special account in the Mississippi state treasury and logged into Sovereignty Commission records with a simple notation: “Morgan Guaranty Trust Co.” …

Citing bank policy, executives at Morgan won’t discuss whether the bankers who worked with Mr. Draper knew of his racial leanings or the true nature of the Sovereignty Commission. …

Morgan says none of that is relevant. The bank likely had clients supporting the civil-rights movement as well, executives say. And, adds Mr. Evangelisti, “doing business with a particular client doesn’t mean that we endorse that client’s beliefs of actions.” It would be “offensive” for a bank to police how its clients conduct their affairs.

“That’s a privilege of being rich in America,” says Ms. Simmons at Morgan. “You can spend your money the way you want to.”

Douglas A. Blackmon, “Silent Partner: How the South’s Fight To Uphold Segregation Was Funded Up North,” Wall Street Journal (Friday June 11, 1999) p. 1; A8.

But for how much longer will your bank allow you to spend your own money if you are on the Wrong Side of History?

I used to know the guy who, more or less, ran the Wall Street Journal. I sent him a note suggesting that it was nuts for the WSJ to campaign for banks in effect stealing their customers money by not letting them use it.

My recollection was that he replied that he hadn’t thought of it that way.

 
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  1. Yes, and anyone we don’t like, we call racist.

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  2. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Purse strings are Puppet Strings.

    Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS?

    We are all Palestinians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    "Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS"

    Both houses of Congress and the President?

    http://imgur.com/a/tyFzOIt


    "We are all Palestinians"

    Are you in an arranged marriage with your 14 year old first cousin?

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  3. (Grrr…edit button no longer appearing on phone browser…) I mean to add, it’s not coincidental or meaningless that PayPal is holding on to VDARE’s money for six months or more now. Recourse? Ha!

    They’ll come for all of us eventually. And I don’t mean PayPal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    If there already weren't enough reasons to use blockchain technology like bitcoin.

    Give them Bitcoin, ethereum, etc.
    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    All because Jason Kessler of Unite the Right contributed a couple of freelance articles.
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  4. whorefinder says: • Website

    Man, there’s something about embezzlement/criminal conversion going on there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    JPMorganChase was in on the Madoff pyramid scheme. And no one there was punished for it.
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  5. Achilles says:

    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FKA Max
    God bless Tucker ``We don't care!'' Carlson:

    https://youtu.be/r2rO9boyLL0?t=1m12s

    Then I just saw this amazing clip with Tucker Carlson, who will take over Bill O’Reilly’s 8PM prime-time slot, where he states that he is extremely inquisitive, curious, and believes it is important and that he is not afraid to ask the hard questions and deal with controversial subject matters, because, get this… he is Protestant! WTF
    [...]
    This is a very welcome new development for the Alt Right
    [...]
    Tucker Carlson Tonight as (one of) the last true bastion(s) of “free speech” in the MSM
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/health-care-failure-may-mean-trump-immigration-pivot-against-ryanism-finally-at-hand-it-better-be/#comment-1920703

    This is true and authentic noblesse oblige in action.

    God bless Tucker ``We don't care!'' Carlson!
    , @Clark Westwood

    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.
     
    This is a real threat. The feds have been using the War on Terror as a cover for getting their tentacles deeper and deeper into what used to be considered a person's private business (such quaint ideas Americans used to have!).

    Something else the feds have been pushing for for years is to get states to refuse to allow people to form or maintain corporations or LLCs unless the corporation or LLC provides to the government the identities of actual human beings who own them directly or indirectly, no matter how far up the chain of ownership you may have to go before you reach the "ultimate" human owner.
    , @Elli
    Your travels, purchases, interests, and associates can all be tracked, analyzed and commodified.

    Credit cards, internet, cell phone. License plate cameras on major roads, spreading to minor.

    I've drawn my own line at Facebook and the Internet of Things. Do I want a SmartBed connected to my Smartphone? Sex, bathroom trips, sleeplessness, nightmares, pillow talk potentially collected and collated?
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Hence the war on cash by the usual suspects.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Very important stuff here, but I don't seem to remember too many of the alt-right type conservatives giving a damn about the constitutionalists, preppers, and real libertarians (not the Reason.com imbecile version) in the recent past. In fact, I keep seeing the phrase "muh Constitution", like liberty doesn't matter to the alt-righters.

    Anyway, this is not to single anyone out, but I've said it before, and I'll say it again: Conservatives have got a lot to learn from the Libertarians/Constitutionalists and vice-versa. Great replies too, to this comment.

    As far as the whole "Cashless Society" thing, besides hundreds of derogatory posts that have been published on Zerohedge on this mark-o-the-beast stuff, I have written about it in a series, here, here, and here.
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  6. BenKenobi says:

    “and none could buy or sell save he had The Mark.”

    Read More
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  7. MEH 0910 says:

    Here’s something I wrote back in the last century:

    RAMONES – Do You Remember Rock ‘N Roll Radio

    Do you remember Hullabaloo,
    Upbeat, Shindig and Ed Sullivan too?.
    Do You Remember Rock’N’Roll radio?
    Do You Remember Rock’N’Roll radio?

    Do you remember Murray the K,
    Alan Freed, and high energy?
    It’s the end, the end of the 70′s.
    It’s the end, the end of the century.

    Do you remember lying in bed with your covers
    Pulled up over your head? Radio playin’ so no one can see.
    We need change, we need it fast before rock’s just part
    Of the past. ‘Cause lately it all sound the same to me.

    Oh-oh. Will you remember Jerry Lee,
    John Lennon, T. Rex and Ol’ Moulty?
    It’s the end, the end of the 70′s.
    It’s the end, the end of the century.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Bear in mind that while left-wing Joey and right-wing Johnny frequently feuded (a situation not alleviated when Johnny stole and married Joey's girlfriend), they did not let it interfere with their playing. After Joey's death, Johnny (fighting tears), acknowledged that Joey understood that being a Ramone was more important. They adhered to their own chivalric code.
    In a late interview (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/johnnys-last-stand-20040916), Johnny coolly revealed that he didn't go to Joey's funeral and wouldn't have wanted him at his own had he died first, then discussed suggestions he'd received of post-Joey tours:

    The band had been asked if it would perform with another singer taking Joey's place. "I said, 'No way. See us like we were, or don't see us at all. Go buy the DVD,'" said Johnny. "I would never perform without Joey. He was our singer."
     
    Can you imagine either the Kluxers or the antifas being capable of this kind of loyalty to a higher cause (in this case, the cause of perfect 2-minute songs)?
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  8. For an article from 1999 (and even moreso, a WSJ article) it’s remarkably 2017-ish in its totalitarian tone.

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor, prole
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    Also remarkably 1917-ish. The West is still "in the hands of the perpetrators," as Solzhenitsyn said.

    Theft as well as murder, is the eternal feature of the so-called banksters.

    Hang on to your wallets, and keep your kids out of their schools. Also stockpile weapons and ammunition. Lots of them.
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  9. “n other words, a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress.”

    That is a finding of fact that neither you nor I nor anyone else who professes to be anywhere right of center- left on the political spectrum have the right to make.

    We live in the era of thought-crime, and that Constitutional (not to mention moral) ban on ex post facto law and bills of attainder no longer applies. We are all guilty of the crimes of our forefathers, if we are not from a protected class, and we are guilty of crimes for thinking this is not right or just. We are criminal simply for existing.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.
     
    Because BLACK BODIES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    , @Mr. Anon

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.
     
    Just as they act as if blacks were the only people who were ever lynched. So much so that the noose is now considered a racist symbol. If it were purely a matter of finding a thing that was associated with black people being murdered, a tricked-out athletic shoe might do just as well, as plenty of blacks have been killed (by other blacks of course) for those.
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    I keep saying the logical end of all this is permanent Goy showers. There is no way this beast will ever be satiated.
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  10. reiner Tor says: • Website

    As I wrote a few days (i.e. hundreds of threads) ago, in the perfect utopia no-one will be able spend their money on food if they are on the wrong side of history – their politically incorrect thoughts will enable the private grocery stores to block him from entering. Libertarians will applaud it because “Freedom of Association! Property Rights! It’s Not The Government Who Is Doing It, So It’s Okay!” In any event, badthinkers will not have to worry about spending their money, because their businesses will be boycotted out of existence, and their employment will be terminated (again, by private employers, so it will be okay).

    These people are seriously planning to make it happen.

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal, Ron Unz, Grace Jones
    • Replies: @Dr. X

    As I wrote a few days (i.e. hundreds of threads) ago, in the perfect utopia no-one will be able spend their money on food if they are on the wrong side of history – their politically incorrect thoughts will enable the private grocery stores to block him from entering. Libertarians will applaud it because “Freedom of Association! Property Rights! It’s Not The Government Who Is Doing It, So It’s Okay!” In any event, badthinkers will not have to worry about spending their money, because their businesses will be boycotted out of existence, and their employment will be terminated (again, by private employers, so it will be okay).

    These people are seriously planning to make it happen.
     

    There is going to be a major contradiction shaping up because back in the 1960s and 1970s the government decreed, and the Supreme Court ruled, that under the Commerce Clause private companies could be forced to do business with, and forced to hire blacks, women, and minorities.

    The present situation, where private companies are actively starting to deny services (i.e., web domains, PayPal transactions) or employment to individuals deemed "anti-gay" or "white supremacist" would seem to run afoul of the Civil Rights-era precedents.

    But the government and the courts will simply impose a double-standard -- the very essence of totalitarianism. George Soros and the DNC will be able to conduct all the financial transactions they want to fund street rioters and antifa, but woe betide the man who gives so much as a nickel to a so-called "white supremacist" group.

    As with so many other things, Orwell got it right when he wrote "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

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  11. Lot says:
    @Anon
    Purse strings are Puppet Strings.

    Guess who's trying to criminalize BDS?

    We are all Palestinians.

    “Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS”

    Both houses of Congress and the President?

    http://imgur.com/a/tyFzOIt

    “We are all Palestinians”

    Are you in an arranged marriage with your 14 year old first cousin?

    Read More
    • LOL: Nico
    • Replies: @Lot
    http://imgur.com/a/tyFzO
    , @Mr. Anon

    “Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS”

    Both houses of Congress and the President?
     
    And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?
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  12. Lot says:

    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don’t earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.

    If you want to so this, remember that while quoted spot gold prices are accurate for small private transactions, physical silver almost always trades for more than “spot.” Also never keep it anywhere but your home or a safe deposit box. Off site storage companies often turn out to be scams.

    Here are fair prices for common silver coins:

    1oz American Silver Eagle, spot + $2.10
    1oz Mexican Libertad, spot + 2.50
    1oz Canada maple leaf, spot + 1.15
    1oz private mint (aka generic), spot + .80
    10oz private mint, spot + $5
    US silver dollars from 1878-1921, about $20
    Mercury dimes, about $1.50
    Ben Franklin and Walking Libery half dollars, $7.50
    Canadian silver dollars, 1920-1967, $10

    Read More
    • Replies: @mobi

    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don’t earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.
     
    Private possession of gold has already been outlawed, for extended periods.

    Banks and businesses, I believe, are already under no obligation to accept them if they don't want to.

    I'm afraid it's going to take more than this.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Lot, I agree except the "keep it in a safe deposit box" part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws for, you know, your motherland's security and all.

    Most of the coins you write about are called "junk silver", even though that name is pretty damn erroneous. The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value. One doesn't have to do a lot of calculations, as 1 quarter has the same amount of silver as 2.5 dimes, a half-dollar has the same amount of silver as 2 quarters, etc. Maybe that is obvious to some, but just sayin ...
    , @Anon
    Gold is no longer a haven. The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed. Every time the market drops, the Fed sells billions of dollars'worth of paper gold contracts--in one single second-on the market to force the price down hard so investors will be shoved out of gold and back into stocks, thus propping up stocks. The size of the margin account you must constantly maintain with a broker just to trade paper gold in that quantity is in the hundreds of millions. Only a government entity with endless pockets can choose to deliberately lose billions of dollars' worth of money on gold, because if you're slamming gold down hard every time gold is trying to rise significantly, losing money is exactly what you're doing, so you have to have an ulterior motive for it. Bitcoin has gone up by a factor of 7 in the past year, but gold is cheaper now than it was a year ago. That's because the price of gold is being artificially forced down. Go look at their price charts in the past year. If gold were still operating like a traditional financial haven, its price should have risen parallel that of bitcoin, but it hasn't.

    Gold investors are well aware of this practice of the Fed's, and they have been complaining about it for a long time. Watch gold prices on a chart whenever the market drops big and you'll figure it out. Gold is no longer a haven for financial safety because the Fed thinks gold is not a productive asset, and it hates it when investors put their money in gold. Because the Fed prints money--creates it out of thin air, basically-- it can buy all the paper gold contracts it wants unto eternity to be used to manipulate gold prices.
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  13. Maj. Kong says:
    @whorefinder
    Man, there's something about embezzlement/criminal conversion going on there.

    JPMorganChase was in on the Madoff pyramid scheme. And no one there was punished for it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Madoff had a business account at JP Morgan and antecdent banks. Who employed there do you fancy should be punished, and why?
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  14. Nico says:

    My recollection was that he replied that he hadn’t thought of it that way.

    Aww how quaint. Sounds just like Miss Melanie.

    Read More
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  15. Nico says:
    @The Alarmist

    "n other words, a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress."
     
    That is a finding of fact that neither you nor I nor anyone else who professes to be anywhere right of center- left on the political spectrum have the right to make.

    We live in the era of thought-crime, and that Constitutional (not to mention moral) ban on ex post facto law and bills of attainder no longer applies. We are all guilty of the crimes of our forefathers, if we are not from a protected class, and we are guilty of crimes for thinking this is not right or just. We are criminal simply for existing.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    Because BLACK BODIES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. Lot says:
    @Lot
    "Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS"

    Both houses of Congress and the President?

    http://imgur.com/a/tyFzOIt


    "We are all Palestinians"

    Are you in an arranged marriage with your 14 year old first cousin?

    Read More
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  17. Olorin says:

    But for how much longer will your bank allow you to spend your own money if you are on the Wrong Side of History?

    “Your own money”?

    Well there’s your problem. There’s no such thing.

    Fractional reserve banking/fiat currency have long been discussed in corridors of power as means of social and political coercion. And as you note, there are ample examples of it.

    What slays me about the supposedly progressive left is that they believe that if poor people just had more money the world would be just. As though money belongs to us, not those who issue it out of thin air and determine its value.

    Read More
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  18. AndrewR says:

    It’s not stealing if you cant use your money how you want per se, as long as you can use it on other stuff. It’s messed up, but we need a word besides “stealing.”

    What is concerning is that they’ll freeze the bank accounts of heretics. The last few days have shown that there may not be any limit to what our betters will do to keep power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Actually, it is indeed stealing. Just as we no longer require specific forms of pleading, whereby if one doesn't use precisely the magic words in one's complaint, it is summarily rejected, we also no longer much distinguish among theft, embezzlement, etc. (we do distinguish burglary and robbery, because of the heightened danger those methods of theft present for interpersonal violence and confrontation...).

    Conversion is not merely absconding with another's property absolutely. It is depriving another of the use of that property without permission. This prevents the classic scenario of the thief caught in posession of your car or your lawnmower from claiming he was merely borrowing it and intended to return it in an hour, thus committing some kind of trepass rather than theft. Nope: by depriving you of its use, he committed theft (or conversion, if tou wish to stick to the old, stricter taxonomy in use at common law).

    The behaviour of the banks Steve described is indeed theft, because it deprives the rightful owners of the funds their full use and enjoyment in any lawful way they deem fit.
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  19. Lot says:

    Steve Bannon randomly calls up old unionist leftie reporter Robert Kuttner for a chat

    http://prospect.org/article/steve-bannon-unrepentant

    A great read. There is nobody in DC better than him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal

    In his interview with the US magazine, Mr Bannon was asked if there was a connection between the economic nationalism that he supports and the white nationalism seen in Charlottesville.

    "Ethno-nationalism - it's losers," he said. "It's a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more."

    "These guys are a collection of clowns," he added.

    Mr Bannon has distanced himself from "ethno-nationalism" before, telling the New York Times his interest in nationalism stems from wanting to curb the negative effects of globalisation.

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40958329

    Looking forward to seeing how Bannon intends to "help crush....uh, help crush it more" the "ethno-nationalists".

    Like too many people on the right, he fails to understand (or refuses to understand) that in "crushing" the "racist" right he will be helping the left to create the tools, precedents, institutions and attitudes that will then be used against all other right-wing positions that are "on the wrong side of history".

    The left and establishment right don't distinguish between ethno-nationalist "haters" and homophobic, islamophobic, antisemitic etc etc "haters".
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  20. Ed says:

    Limbaugh made a comment that nothing has really changed. He cited how he used to do local interviews with local TV stations when a market picked him up. He said one woman interviewed ready to demonize him but was shocked that he sounded normal. He shot back some questions on her and asked why it was ok for liberals to protest violently. She said it was the only way they could be heard.

    Read More
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  21. FKA Max says:
    @Achilles
    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    God bless Tucker “We don’t care!” Carlson:

    Then I just saw this amazing clip with Tucker Carlson, who will take over Bill O’Reilly’s 8PM prime-time slot, where he states that he is extremely inquisitive, curious, and believes it is important and that he is not afraid to ask the hard questions and deal with controversial subject matters, because, get this… he is Protestant! WTF
    [...]
    This is a very welcome new development for the Alt Right
    [...]
    Tucker Carlson Tonight as (one of) the last true bastion(s) of “free speech” in the MSM

    http://www.unz.com/article/health-care-failure-may-mean-trump-immigration-pivot-against-ryanism-finally-at-hand-it-better-be/#comment-1920703

    This is true and authentic noblesse oblige in action.

    God bless Tucker “We don’t care!” Carlson!

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    The constitution is just a piece of paper to 98% of Americans. Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now, and half of them are autistic or low-key SJWs who condone the most appalling actions as long as it's "private entities" doing it.
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  22. Cortes says:

    Seems to be OK since the Citizens United vs FEC case at the SCOTUS for “people” corporation executives to spend their shareholders’ funds in ways individuals may disapprove of, however. An individual decision is one thing; corporate donations quite another.

    Read More
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  23. Randal says:
    @Lot
    Steve Bannon randomly calls up old unionist leftie reporter Robert Kuttner for a chat

    http://prospect.org/article/steve-bannon-unrepentant

    A great read. There is nobody in DC better than him.

    In his interview with the US magazine, Mr Bannon was asked if there was a connection between the economic nationalism that he supports and the white nationalism seen in Charlottesville.

    “Ethno-nationalism – it’s losers,” he said. “It’s a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more.”

    “These guys are a collection of clowns,” he added.

    Mr Bannon has distanced himself from “ethno-nationalism” before, telling the New York Times his interest in nationalism stems from wanting to curb the negative effects of globalisation.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40958329

    Looking forward to seeing how Bannon intends to “help crush….uh, help crush it more” the “ethno-nationalists”.

    Like too many people on the right, he fails to understand (or refuses to understand) that in “crushing” the “racist” right he will be helping the left to create the tools, precedents, institutions and attitudes that will then be used against all other right-wing positions that are “on the wrong side of history”.

    The left and establishment right don’t distinguish between ethno-nationalist “haters” and homophobic, islamophobic, antisemitic etc etc “haters”.

    Read More
    • Agree: lavoisier
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Bannon also needs those "clowns" to his right to show how They Are The Real Racists. Why is it difficult for him to understand? Once they are purged, suddenly Bannon will find himself in the most uncomfortable position of being the most rightwing person in America. Then the left and the "respectable" right will concentrate their fire on him.
    , @German_reader
    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn't racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.
    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.
    , @ben tillman

    “Ethno-nationalism – it’s losers,” he said. “It’s a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more.”
     
    It's not a fringe element. The war against Trump is entirely a matter of ethnonationalism. The only way to fight aggressive ethnonationalism is to respond with ethnonationalism.
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  24. @AndrewR
    It's not stealing if you cant use your money how you want per se, as long as you can use it on other stuff. It's messed up, but we need a word besides "stealing."

    What is concerning is that they'll freeze the bank accounts of heretics. The last few days have shown that there may not be any limit to what our betters will do to keep power.

    Actually, it is indeed stealing. Just as we no longer require specific forms of pleading, whereby if one doesn’t use precisely the magic words in one’s complaint, it is summarily rejected, we also no longer much distinguish among theft, embezzlement, etc. (we do distinguish burglary and robbery, because of the heightened danger those methods of theft present for interpersonal violence and confrontation…).

    Conversion is not merely absconding with another’s property absolutely. It is depriving another of the use of that property without permission. This prevents the classic scenario of the thief caught in posession of your car or your lawnmower from claiming he was merely borrowing it and intended to return it in an hour, thus committing some kind of trepass rather than theft. Nope: by depriving you of its use, he committed theft (or conversion, if tou wish to stick to the old, stricter taxonomy in use at common law).

    The behaviour of the banks Steve described is indeed theft, because it deprives the rightful owners of the funds their full use and enjoyment in any lawful way they deem fit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maus
    An excellent recap of the current law of theft (at least as reflected in the CA Penal Code). As a former prosecutor, one of my pet bugaboos is explaining the distinction between robbery (taking property from a person by force) and burglary (entering a building with the intent to commit a felony). The former is generally more violent, and hence more heinous, than the latter. But most lay people continue to speak of being "robbed" when relating that their unoccupied residence was entered and property was stolen, which is actually burglary.
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  25. @Achilles
    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    This is a real threat. The feds have been using the War on Terror as a cover for getting their tentacles deeper and deeper into what used to be considered a person’s private business (such quaint ideas Americans used to have!).

    Something else the feds have been pushing for for years is to get states to refuse to allow people to form or maintain corporations or LLCs unless the corporation or LLC provides to the government the identities of actual human beings who own them directly or indirectly, no matter how far up the chain of ownership you may have to go before you reach the “ultimate” human owner.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Very true on the registration of LLCs and corporations.
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  26. AndrewR says:
    @FKA Max
    God bless Tucker ``We don't care!'' Carlson:

    https://youtu.be/r2rO9boyLL0?t=1m12s

    Then I just saw this amazing clip with Tucker Carlson, who will take over Bill O’Reilly’s 8PM prime-time slot, where he states that he is extremely inquisitive, curious, and believes it is important and that he is not afraid to ask the hard questions and deal with controversial subject matters, because, get this… he is Protestant! WTF
    [...]
    This is a very welcome new development for the Alt Right
    [...]
    Tucker Carlson Tonight as (one of) the last true bastion(s) of “free speech” in the MSM
     
    - http://www.unz.com/article/health-care-failure-may-mean-trump-immigration-pivot-against-ryanism-finally-at-hand-it-better-be/#comment-1920703

    This is true and authentic noblesse oblige in action.

    God bless Tucker ``We don't care!'' Carlson!

    The constitution is just a piece of paper to 98% of Americans. Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now, and half of them are autistic or low-key SJWs who condone the most appalling actions as long as it’s “private entities” doing it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now,

    They're not. There's an old-school or antiquarian section of libertarians who do (Ted Cruz, Wm. Voegli, Thomas Woods), but most soi-disant libertarians are only interested in the drug laws or the immigration laws or discrediting the police or discrediting the military.
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  27. @Randal

    In his interview with the US magazine, Mr Bannon was asked if there was a connection between the economic nationalism that he supports and the white nationalism seen in Charlottesville.

    "Ethno-nationalism - it's losers," he said. "It's a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more."

    "These guys are a collection of clowns," he added.

    Mr Bannon has distanced himself from "ethno-nationalism" before, telling the New York Times his interest in nationalism stems from wanting to curb the negative effects of globalisation.

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40958329

    Looking forward to seeing how Bannon intends to "help crush....uh, help crush it more" the "ethno-nationalists".

    Like too many people on the right, he fails to understand (or refuses to understand) that in "crushing" the "racist" right he will be helping the left to create the tools, precedents, institutions and attitudes that will then be used against all other right-wing positions that are "on the wrong side of history".

    The left and establishment right don't distinguish between ethno-nationalist "haters" and homophobic, islamophobic, antisemitic etc etc "haters".

    Bannon also needs those “clowns” to his right to show how They Are The Real Racists. Why is it difficult for him to understand? Once they are purged, suddenly Bannon will find himself in the most uncomfortable position of being the most rightwing person in America. Then the left and the “respectable” right will concentrate their fire on him.

    Read More
    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Randal
    That's the basic stupidity of the respectable right on racism - they think it's a case of avoiding being associated with an unpopular minority cause, when in fact it's a case of drawing a line to halt what has been and will be an inexorable tightening of the lines defining what is "acceptable".

    First they came for the white supremacists.....
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  28. @Randal

    In his interview with the US magazine, Mr Bannon was asked if there was a connection between the economic nationalism that he supports and the white nationalism seen in Charlottesville.

    "Ethno-nationalism - it's losers," he said. "It's a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more."

    "These guys are a collection of clowns," he added.

    Mr Bannon has distanced himself from "ethno-nationalism" before, telling the New York Times his interest in nationalism stems from wanting to curb the negative effects of globalisation.

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40958329

    Looking forward to seeing how Bannon intends to "help crush....uh, help crush it more" the "ethno-nationalists".

    Like too many people on the right, he fails to understand (or refuses to understand) that in "crushing" the "racist" right he will be helping the left to create the tools, precedents, institutions and attitudes that will then be used against all other right-wing positions that are "on the wrong side of history".

    The left and establishment right don't distinguish between ethno-nationalist "haters" and homophobic, islamophobic, antisemitic etc etc "haters".

    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn’t racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.
    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Bannon has made it clear f

    Clear to you. I cannot show you what appears on our Facebook wall from the vociferous partisan Democrats in our circle of friends (abnormally studded with people who have post-baccalaureate degrees). These people think in talking points and memes. No exceptions.
    , @ben tillman

    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn’t racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.

    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.
     
    Class is a social construct. It's never the right answer.
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  29. Randal says:
    @reiner Tor
    Bannon also needs those "clowns" to his right to show how They Are The Real Racists. Why is it difficult for him to understand? Once they are purged, suddenly Bannon will find himself in the most uncomfortable position of being the most rightwing person in America. Then the left and the "respectable" right will concentrate their fire on him.

    That’s the basic stupidity of the respectable right on racism – they think it’s a case of avoiding being associated with an unpopular minority cause, when in fact it’s a case of drawing a line to halt what has been and will be an inexorable tightening of the lines defining what is “acceptable”.

    First they came for the white supremacists…..

    Read More
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  30. Kirt says:

    Slightly OT but maybe relevant, I find it impossible to access Andy and Colin’s Alt-right blogspot this morning and had some difficulty yesterday. Anyone else having this problem? I don’t doubt the SJW/Antifa hackers will soon come for this site – and many others.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kirt
    The referenced blog has been removed.
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  31. Dr. X says:
    @reiner Tor
    As I wrote a few days (i.e. hundreds of threads) ago, in the perfect utopia no-one will be able spend their money on food if they are on the wrong side of history - their politically incorrect thoughts will enable the private grocery stores to block him from entering. Libertarians will applaud it because "Freedom of Association! Property Rights! It's Not The Government Who Is Doing It, So It's Okay!" In any event, badthinkers will not have to worry about spending their money, because their businesses will be boycotted out of existence, and their employment will be terminated (again, by private employers, so it will be okay).

    These people are seriously planning to make it happen.

    As I wrote a few days (i.e. hundreds of threads) ago, in the perfect utopia no-one will be able spend their money on food if they are on the wrong side of history – their politically incorrect thoughts will enable the private grocery stores to block him from entering. Libertarians will applaud it because “Freedom of Association! Property Rights! It’s Not The Government Who Is Doing It, So It’s Okay!” In any event, badthinkers will not have to worry about spending their money, because their businesses will be boycotted out of existence, and their employment will be terminated (again, by private employers, so it will be okay).

    These people are seriously planning to make it happen.

    There is going to be a major contradiction shaping up because back in the 1960s and 1970s the government decreed, and the Supreme Court ruled, that under the Commerce Clause private companies could be forced to do business with, and forced to hire blacks, women, and minorities.

    The present situation, where private companies are actively starting to deny services (i.e., web domains, PayPal transactions) or employment to individuals deemed “anti-gay” or “white supremacist” would seem to run afoul of the Civil Rights-era precedents.

    But the government and the courts will simply impose a double-standard — the very essence of totalitarianism. George Soros and the DNC will be able to conduct all the financial transactions they want to fund street rioters and antifa, but woe betide the man who gives so much as a nickel to a so-called “white supremacist” group.

    As with so many other things, Orwell got it right when he wrote “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

    Read More
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  32. The political system and the banking system both still rest on popular consent, or if we prefer, on herd-level social trust.

    I submit that the level of the major stock indices (and the level of interest rates) is a measure of that trust.

    It seems that those who fancy themselves “Masters of the Universe” confuse the inertia of a complex system with the power of control. No tree grows to the sky. Interest rates appear to have bottomed in a secular 35 year bond price bull market a year ago. The bull run off 2009′s lows is fully developed and getting pretty long in the tooth for a rally.

    It is in exactly such a place we should expect to see those atop the system, besotted with self-satisfaction and drowning in hubris, act to undermine the very trust on which all their power, wealth and prestige rest.

    These guys are fools. I sincerely look forward to them entering their own crash-and-burn phase.

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  33. Yak-15 says:
    @Kyle McKenna
    (Grrr...edit button no longer appearing on phone browser...) I mean to add, it's not coincidental or meaningless that PayPal is holding on to VDARE's money for six months or more now. Recourse? Ha!

    They'll come for all of us eventually. And I don't mean PayPal.

    If there already weren’t enough reasons to use blockchain technology like bitcoin.

    Give them Bitcoin, ethereum, etc.

    Read More
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  34. Yak-15 says:

    This used to be a substantial threat – cutting off financial resources through the traditional banking system. But Bitcoin, ethereum and other blockchain crypto currencies are taking down the classic SWIFT based banking and settlement system. It’s a only a matter of time.

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone’s fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It’s very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone’s fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It’s very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.
     
    And then what?
    , @Romanian
    I do not think so. Any crypto currency of note will be muzzled by the promise of success. Already, corporate endorsements are a driver of price growth. And some of the new coins (ethereum, ripple and others) are vastly more centralized than bitcoin, with their respective company or foundations acting as central bankers. The ones that do not bend the knee never achieve the scale necessary to run a complex economic system with full supply chains in that currency. Without that, all you have is a speculative asset that will brand you a criminal for using it.
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  35. Thales says:

    “I sent him a note suggesting that it was nuts for the WSJ to campaign for banks in effect stealing their customers money by not letting them use it.

    My recollection was that he replied that he hadn’t thought of it that way.”

    And they said the IQs on Wall Street begin at 140. Turns out, not so much…

    Read More
    • Replies: @JudgeSmails
    Whoever said that about Wall Street IQs beginning at 140? Perhaps the "140 IQs" on Wall Street?
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  36. Wilkey says:

    Yes, but there are still like thousands of banking institutions. This movement will really take off when the government finally gets the number of banks down to a reasonable number, like two.

    There are reasons government doesn’t like to regulate monopolies and oligarchies anymore. That they can use them to restrict your freedom without officially restricting your freedom is one of them.

    The irony to banks being able to refuse to send *your* money to groups *they* oppose is that before they would be denying sending these funds to conservative groups (e.g., anti-gay marriage) they would be denying to send them to liberal groups (e.g., pro-sodomy groups 60 years ago).

    Read More
    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    liberal groups (e.g., pro-sodomy groups 60 years ago).
     
    Throughout history, sodomy's been reliably illiberal. I wouldn't take claims to "progress" on that front at face value. Likewise with gay "marriage."
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  37. This kind of restrictions have been applied in other areas too. Gun sellers often lost their merchant accounts during the Obama era. An international pharmacy that I buy from recently lost their merchant account as well. I just set up my biocoin account so that I can make payment that way.

    The alt-right guys such as Vox Day have been developing their own platforms for several years. I think this kind of political persecution will further drive the development of alternative platforms that will ultimately lead to a more decentralized internet and monetary system.

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  38. @Wilkey
    Yes, but there are still like thousands of banking institutions. This movement will really take off when the government finally gets the number of banks down to a reasonable number, like two.

    There are reasons government doesn't like to regulate monopolies and oligarchies anymore. That they can use them to restrict your freedom without officially restricting your freedom is one of them.

    The irony to banks being able to refuse to send *your* money to groups *they* oppose is that before they would be denying sending these funds to conservative groups (e.g., anti-gay marriage) they would be denying to send them to liberal groups (e.g., pro-sodomy groups 60 years ago).

    liberal groups (e.g., pro-sodomy groups 60 years ago).

    Throughout history, sodomy’s been reliably illiberal. I wouldn’t take claims to “progress” on that front at face value. Likewise with gay “marriage.”

    Read More
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  39. Mr. Anon says:
    @Lot
    "Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS"

    Both houses of Congress and the President?

    http://imgur.com/a/tyFzOIt


    "We are all Palestinians"

    Are you in an arranged marriage with your 14 year old first cousin?

    “Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS”

    Both houses of Congress and the President?

    And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?

    Read More
    • Replies: @FLgeezer
    >And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?

    Because of who supplies their campaign cash, publicity, and who they answer to. Read Phil Giraldi's recent article "Israel's Chorus Sings Again".
    , @snorlax
    They aren't. To quote myself:

    The bill is more or less meaningless; what it bans is boycotting Israel at the behest of a foreign government. So “I’m boycotting Israel” remains A-OK, but “I’m boycotting Israel because Saudi Arabia told me to” would be illegal.

    It’s extremely unlikely that anyone would ever be convicted or even charged under the law, because you’d almost need mind-reading powers to prove someone is boycotting Israel under orders from a foreign government rather than as an expression of their own personal beliefs. The only people who could even conceivably be prosecuted under the provision would be Muslims, which is probably why Glenn Greenwald is in hysterics about it.

    In fact, under the law that’s being amended, it’s already illegal, with the same penalty, to boycott any “friendly” country at the behest of a foreign government. So the bill quite literally does nothing at all — its sole raison d’être is for BREAKING NEWS CRITICAL ACTION ALERTS printed in 72-point font on AIPAC fundraising mailings sent to South Florida nursing homes.

    It is a stupid waste of Congress’s time, but the last time a Congress used their time wisely was probably Talleyrand and Metternich in Vienna.
     
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  40. @Kyle McKenna
    (Grrr...edit button no longer appearing on phone browser...) I mean to add, it's not coincidental or meaningless that PayPal is holding on to VDARE's money for six months or more now. Recourse? Ha!

    They'll come for all of us eventually. And I don't mean PayPal.

    All because Jason Kessler of Unite the Right contributed a couple of freelance articles.

    Read More
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  41. Mr. Anon says:
    @The Alarmist

    "n other words, a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress."
     
    That is a finding of fact that neither you nor I nor anyone else who professes to be anywhere right of center- left on the political spectrum have the right to make.

    We live in the era of thought-crime, and that Constitutional (not to mention moral) ban on ex post facto law and bills of attainder no longer applies. We are all guilty of the crimes of our forefathers, if we are not from a protected class, and we are guilty of crimes for thinking this is not right or just. We are criminal simply for existing.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    Just as they act as if blacks were the only people who were ever lynched. So much so that the noose is now considered a racist symbol. If it were purely a matter of finding a thing that was associated with black people being murdered, a tricked-out athletic shoe might do just as well, as plenty of blacks have been killed (by other blacks of course) for those.

    Read More
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  42. Elli says:
    @Achilles
    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    Your travels, purchases, interests, and associates can all be tracked, analyzed and commodified.

    Credit cards, internet, cell phone. License plate cameras on major roads, spreading to minor.

    I’ve drawn my own line at Facebook and the Internet of Things. Do I want a SmartBed connected to my Smartphone? Sex, bathroom trips, sleeplessness, nightmares, pillow talk potentially collected and collated?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Do your part for the resistance: Trade the smartphone for a flip phone or no phone, and pay for everything with cash. Don't worry about making the list, 'cos you're already on it.
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  43. Art Deco says:
    @Maj. Kong
    JPMorganChase was in on the Madoff pyramid scheme. And no one there was punished for it.

    Madoff had a business account at JP Morgan and antecdent banks. Who employed there do you fancy should be punished, and why?

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  44. Art Deco says:

    My recollection was that he replied that he hadn’t thought of it that way.

    Robert Kuttner once wrote a full-length magazine article contending the Journal was “America’s Best Newspaper”. So, you’re telling us that the editor of America’s Best Newspaper (was this Peter Kann?) is capable of being quite obtuse. Thomas Sowell reminds his readers now and again that articulate people are not necessarily intelligent people. Seems like exhibit A.

    Read More
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  45. @Randal

    In his interview with the US magazine, Mr Bannon was asked if there was a connection between the economic nationalism that he supports and the white nationalism seen in Charlottesville.

    "Ethno-nationalism - it's losers," he said. "It's a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more."

    "These guys are a collection of clowns," he added.

    Mr Bannon has distanced himself from "ethno-nationalism" before, telling the New York Times his interest in nationalism stems from wanting to curb the negative effects of globalisation.

     

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-40958329

    Looking forward to seeing how Bannon intends to "help crush....uh, help crush it more" the "ethno-nationalists".

    Like too many people on the right, he fails to understand (or refuses to understand) that in "crushing" the "racist" right he will be helping the left to create the tools, precedents, institutions and attitudes that will then be used against all other right-wing positions that are "on the wrong side of history".

    The left and establishment right don't distinguish between ethno-nationalist "haters" and homophobic, islamophobic, antisemitic etc etc "haters".

    “Ethno-nationalism – it’s losers,” he said. “It’s a fringe element. I think the media plays it up too much, and we gotta help crush it, you know, uh, help crush it more.”

    It’s not a fringe element. The war against Trump is entirely a matter of ethnonationalism. The only way to fight aggressive ethnonationalism is to respond with ethnonationalism.

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  46. @MEH 0910

    Here’s something I wrote back in the last century:
     
    RAMONES - Do You Remember Rock 'N Roll Radio

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=loFLdYM79gY

    Do you remember Hullabaloo,
    Upbeat, Shindig and Ed Sullivan too?.
    Do You Remember Rock'N'Roll radio?
    Do You Remember Rock'N'Roll radio?

    Do you remember Murray the K,
    Alan Freed, and high energy?
    It's the end, the end of the 70's.
    It's the end, the end of the century.

    Do you remember lying in bed with your covers
    Pulled up over your head? Radio playin' so no one can see.
    We need change, we need it fast before rock's just part
    Of the past. 'Cause lately it all sound the same to me.

    Oh-oh. Will you remember Jerry Lee,
    John Lennon, T. Rex and Ol' Moulty?
    It's the end, the end of the 70's.
    It's the end, the end of the century.
     

    Bear in mind that while left-wing Joey and right-wing Johnny frequently feuded (a situation not alleviated when Johnny stole and married Joey’s girlfriend), they did not let it interfere with their playing. After Joey’s death, Johnny (fighting tears), acknowledged that Joey understood that being a Ramone was more important. They adhered to their own chivalric code.
    In a late interview (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/johnnys-last-stand-20040916), Johnny coolly revealed that he didn’t go to Joey’s funeral and wouldn’t have wanted him at his own had he died first, then discussed suggestions he’d received of post-Joey tours:

    The band had been asked if it would perform with another singer taking Joey’s place. “I said, ‘No way. See us like we were, or don’t see us at all. Go buy the DVD,’” said Johnny. “I would never perform without Joey. He was our singer.”

    Can you imagine either the Kluxers or the antifas being capable of this kind of loyalty to a higher cause (in this case, the cause of perfect 2-minute songs)?

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    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    This is probably common knowledge, but the Ramones were not actually brothers
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  47. mobi says:
    @Lot
    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don't earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.

    If you want to so this, remember that while quoted spot gold prices are accurate for small private transactions, physical silver almost always trades for more than "spot." Also never keep it anywhere but your home or a safe deposit box. Off site storage companies often turn out to be scams.

    Here are fair prices for common silver coins:

    1oz American Silver Eagle, spot + $2.10
    1oz Mexican Libertad, spot + 2.50
    1oz Canada maple leaf, spot + 1.15
    1oz private mint (aka generic), spot + .80
    10oz private mint, spot + $5
    US silver dollars from 1878-1921, about $20
    Mercury dimes, about $1.50
    Ben Franklin and Walking Libery half dollars, $7.50
    Canadian silver dollars, 1920-1967, $10

    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don’t earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.

    Private possession of gold has already been outlawed, for extended periods.

    Banks and businesses, I believe, are already under no obligation to accept them if they don’t want to.

    I’m afraid it’s going to take more than this.

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  48. syonredux says:

    Morgan did close the asset-management account it maintained for the Pioneer Fund after the furor erupted over “The Bell Curve” in 1994, according to people familiar with the situation. The bank won’t give details on why it did so.

    That option is something banks should consider, says Thomas Donaldson, a business-ethics professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “Good bankers should have the words ‘Know thy client’ tattooed somewhere on their chests,” Mr. Donaldson says. “When the activities of the client or customer reach the point where they offend vital, deeply held values of the institution, you have to say no.” …

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  49. @Achilles
    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    Hence the war on cash by the usual suspects.

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  50. @Clark Westwood

    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.
     
    This is a real threat. The feds have been using the War on Terror as a cover for getting their tentacles deeper and deeper into what used to be considered a person's private business (such quaint ideas Americans used to have!).

    Something else the feds have been pushing for for years is to get states to refuse to allow people to form or maintain corporations or LLCs unless the corporation or LLC provides to the government the identities of actual human beings who own them directly or indirectly, no matter how far up the chain of ownership you may have to go before you reach the "ultimate" human owner.

    Very true on the registration of LLCs and corporations.

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  51. FLgeezer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    “Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS”

    Both houses of Congress and the President?
     
    And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?

    >And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?

    Because of who supplies their campaign cash, publicity, and who they answer to. Read Phil Giraldi’s recent article “Israel’s Chorus Sings Again”.

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  52. @The Alarmist

    "n other words, a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress."
     
    That is a finding of fact that neither you nor I nor anyone else who professes to be anywhere right of center- left on the political spectrum have the right to make.

    We live in the era of thought-crime, and that Constitutional (not to mention moral) ban on ex post facto law and bills of attainder no longer applies. We are all guilty of the crimes of our forefathers, if we are not from a protected class, and we are guilty of crimes for thinking this is not right or just. We are criminal simply for existing.

    What is simply rich about all this is that people are acting as if African are the only people in all of History to have ever been enslaved.

    I keep saying the logical end of all this is permanent Goy showers. There is no way this beast will ever be satiated.

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  53. @Elli
    Your travels, purchases, interests, and associates can all be tracked, analyzed and commodified.

    Credit cards, internet, cell phone. License plate cameras on major roads, spreading to minor.

    I've drawn my own line at Facebook and the Internet of Things. Do I want a SmartBed connected to my Smartphone? Sex, bathroom trips, sleeplessness, nightmares, pillow talk potentially collected and collated?

    Do your part for the resistance: Trade the smartphone for a flip phone or no phone, and pay for everything with cash. Don’t worry about making the list, ‘cos you’re already on it.

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  54. Sometimes a side-remark in an article provokes more fruitful thought than the article itself. Example: “Good bankers should have the words ‘Know thy client’ tattooed somewhere on their chests,” Mr. Donaldson says.

    Not centered in the middle of the chest but “somewhere” on the chest? Every part of the chest is hard to view by the chest’s owner, who can see a frontal skin slogan only by looking into a mirror bare-chested. This will create a market for mirror-reversed tattoos. And this Mr. Donaldson is careful enough to use a sex-neutral adjective to refer to good bankers’ chests as “their” chests. This brings up the possibility of a good lady banker who has tattooed on her chest a banking-related slogan such as REPEAL GLASS-STEAGALL.

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  55. @Achilles
    A big danger for freedom and civil rights is the ever increased government monitoring of financial transactions for purposes of identifying money laundering, sanctions compliance, terrorist funding, tax avoidance and so on, combined with bank consolidation.

    As this evolves into a government-bank industrial complex and cash transactions are eliminated over time, access to the electronic financial infrastructure of the government-bank industrial complex will be required for ordinary people to survive.

    Since there is no tool the SJWs will not use in order to crush dissent, expect in the future the ability to access the financial infrastructure to be denied to political opponents. Tucker Carlson discussed a little of this on his last show with Mark Steyn who informed him that Paypal has denied VDare access to its system.

    Very important stuff here, but I don’t seem to remember too many of the alt-right type conservatives giving a damn about the constitutionalists, preppers, and real libertarians (not the Reason.com imbecile version) in the recent past. In fact, I keep seeing the phrase “muh Constitution”, like liberty doesn’t matter to the alt-righters.

    Anyway, this is not to single anyone out, but I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: Conservatives have got a lot to learn from the Libertarians/Constitutionalists and vice-versa. Great replies too, to this comment.

    As far as the whole “Cashless Society” thing, besides hundreds of derogatory posts that have been published on Zerohedge on this mark-o-the-beast stuff, I have written about it in a series, here, here, and here.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    In fact, I keep seeing the phrase “muh Constitution”, like liberty doesn’t matter to the alt-righters.
     
    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).

    There’s been a lot of hand-wringing here about Richard Spencer and the ‘optics’ out of Charlottesville—but the big Constitutionalist story (#125) is Virginia’s (and other public venues) brinksmanship suppression of the First Amendment, which many seem to have missed while tripping over themselves to bemoan Unite The Right.

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  56. Sweden is the most advanced country in the elimination of cash from monetary transactions.

    Probably not a coincidence.

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    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    The Vikings stole the prettiest women from all over nothern and even central Europe. It goes a long way in explaining the hyper-feminization of modern-day Sweden.
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  57. bjdubbs says:

    It’s funny how by the time this is all over, every kooky 700 Club conspiracy theory will be vindicated. Cash is next, bitcoin won’t save you if the ISP has banned you.

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  58. Yep, that is a good start, anyway. The cash part SHOULD be easy for men anyway – women really seem to not WANT to think about money, even if they know better. They like to use the cards, so the amount in question for a purchase does not even need to be mentioned. In my opinion, it’s in women’s nature to HATE, HATE, HATE (TM and royalties to Whiskey) to have to think that they must keep track of spending – that is a low-status thing.

    Not only does spending cash prevent the big banks (what this post is related to) from getting their 2 % cut, but, more importantly, the ability to track that spending is inhibited.

    Ask for a cash discount ANYWHERE, except the chain big business outlets at which the empoyees’ discretions is completely limited. You’ll be surprised that you can get 5% to 10% very easily at a small business especially. Also, don’t get bluffed out “Oh, you can pay cash, but I can’t give you a discount”. “OK, who do I make the check out to?” You know the guy is going to save quite a bit by taking cash, so don’t let him be too cheap to let you in on the savings.

    Of course, this is just a blog comment. It’s not like A.E.Newman would ever, ever cheat the IRS and big business out their proper due, no, no, of course not!

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  59. @Lot
    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don't earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.

    If you want to so this, remember that while quoted spot gold prices are accurate for small private transactions, physical silver almost always trades for more than "spot." Also never keep it anywhere but your home or a safe deposit box. Off site storage companies often turn out to be scams.

    Here are fair prices for common silver coins:

    1oz American Silver Eagle, spot + $2.10
    1oz Mexican Libertad, spot + 2.50
    1oz Canada maple leaf, spot + 1.15
    1oz private mint (aka generic), spot + .80
    10oz private mint, spot + $5
    US silver dollars from 1878-1921, about $20
    Mercury dimes, about $1.50
    Ben Franklin and Walking Libery half dollars, $7.50
    Canadian silver dollars, 1920-1967, $10

    Lot, I agree except the “keep it in a safe deposit box” part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws for, you know, your motherland’s security and all.

    Most of the coins you write about are called “junk silver”, even though that name is pretty damn erroneous. The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value. One doesn’t have to do a lot of calculations, as 1 quarter has the same amount of silver as 2.5 dimes, a half-dollar has the same amount of silver as 2 quarters, etc. Maybe that is obvious to some, but just sayin …

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    • Replies: @Lot
    I agree that safe deposit boxes are not fully SHTF proof. However, it is likely that a social breakdown scenario would have at least a few advance signs that would give you time to empty your box out. This is also the most practical way to own for people who, for example, live with roommates in a rented apartment.

    The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value.
     
    Small correction: silver dollars have about 7% more silver in them than a dollar of silver change, .77 oz per $1 rather than .72.
    , @ben tillman

    Lot, I agree except the “keep it in a safe deposit box” part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws . . . .
     
    Or they will have confiscated it under no pretext at all.
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  60. a bank customer had his bank send $100,000 of his own money to a legal organization that used it for lobbying over an important legislative issue before Congress.

    Not only that, they were lobbying to keep the law the same as it was.

    I do have to say I was surprised to see the name Draper, but this was pre-Mad Men.

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  61. @Anatoly Karlin
    Sweden is the most advanced country in the elimination of cash from monetary transactions.

    https://assets.bwbx.io/images/users/iqjWHBFdfxIU/iPDSaPXpt._o/v0/-1x-1.jpg

    Probably not a coincidence.

    The Vikings stole the prettiest women from all over nothern and even central Europe. It goes a long way in explaining the hyper-feminization of modern-day Sweden.

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  62. @Rosamond Vincy
    Bear in mind that while left-wing Joey and right-wing Johnny frequently feuded (a situation not alleviated when Johnny stole and married Joey's girlfriend), they did not let it interfere with their playing. After Joey's death, Johnny (fighting tears), acknowledged that Joey understood that being a Ramone was more important. They adhered to their own chivalric code.
    In a late interview (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/johnnys-last-stand-20040916), Johnny coolly revealed that he didn't go to Joey's funeral and wouldn't have wanted him at his own had he died first, then discussed suggestions he'd received of post-Joey tours:

    The band had been asked if it would perform with another singer taking Joey's place. "I said, 'No way. See us like we were, or don't see us at all. Go buy the DVD,'" said Johnny. "I would never perform without Joey. He was our singer."
     
    Can you imagine either the Kluxers or the antifas being capable of this kind of loyalty to a higher cause (in this case, the cause of perfect 2-minute songs)?

    This is probably common knowledge, but the Ramones were not actually brothers

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Well-known, and that's what makes their loyalty so amazing.
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  63. Art Deco says:
    @AndrewR
    The constitution is just a piece of paper to 98% of Americans. Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now, and half of them are autistic or low-key SJWs who condone the most appalling actions as long as it's "private entities" doing it.

    Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now,

    They’re not. There’s an old-school or antiquarian section of libertarians who do (Ted Cruz, Wm. Voegli, Thomas Woods), but most soi-disant libertarians are only interested in the drug laws or the immigration laws or discrediting the police or discrediting the military.

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    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    Yes, or defending Bushian wars for globalism. Check out a thing called the Niskanen Center. If you have any inside baseball stuff on them, I'd like to read it.
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  64. @Thales
    "I sent him a note suggesting that it was nuts for the WSJ to campaign for banks in effect stealing their customers money by not letting them use it.

    My recollection was that he replied that he hadn’t thought of it that way."

    And they said the IQs on Wall Street begin at 140. Turns out, not so much...

    Whoever said that about Wall Street IQs beginning at 140? Perhaps the “140 IQs” on Wall Street?

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  65. Art Deco says:
    @German_reader
    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn't racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.
    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.

    Bannon has made it clear f

    Clear to you. I cannot show you what appears on our Facebook wall from the vociferous partisan Democrats in our circle of friends (abnormally studded with people who have post-baccalaureate degrees). These people think in talking points and memes. No exceptions.

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    I can imagine, even seen from the outside it's scary how unhinged many US liberals have become.
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  66. @Art Deco
    Bannon has made it clear f

    Clear to you. I cannot show you what appears on our Facebook wall from the vociferous partisan Democrats in our circle of friends (abnormally studded with people who have post-baccalaureate degrees). These people think in talking points and memes. No exceptions.

    I can imagine, even seen from the outside it’s scary how unhinged many US liberals have become.

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  67. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Lot
    If you want to opt out of the financial system, buy gold and silver coins. Unlike cash, they are inflation proof. While they don't earn interest, bank accounts pay very little anyway, but the supply of precious metals is actually slowly declining as mines are exhausted and industrial uses consume up existing stocks.

    If you want to so this, remember that while quoted spot gold prices are accurate for small private transactions, physical silver almost always trades for more than "spot." Also never keep it anywhere but your home or a safe deposit box. Off site storage companies often turn out to be scams.

    Here are fair prices for common silver coins:

    1oz American Silver Eagle, spot + $2.10
    1oz Mexican Libertad, spot + 2.50
    1oz Canada maple leaf, spot + 1.15
    1oz private mint (aka generic), spot + .80
    10oz private mint, spot + $5
    US silver dollars from 1878-1921, about $20
    Mercury dimes, about $1.50
    Ben Franklin and Walking Libery half dollars, $7.50
    Canadian silver dollars, 1920-1967, $10

    Gold is no longer a haven. The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed. Every time the market drops, the Fed sells billions of dollars’worth of paper gold contracts–in one single second-on the market to force the price down hard so investors will be shoved out of gold and back into stocks, thus propping up stocks. The size of the margin account you must constantly maintain with a broker just to trade paper gold in that quantity is in the hundreds of millions. Only a government entity with endless pockets can choose to deliberately lose billions of dollars’ worth of money on gold, because if you’re slamming gold down hard every time gold is trying to rise significantly, losing money is exactly what you’re doing, so you have to have an ulterior motive for it. Bitcoin has gone up by a factor of 7 in the past year, but gold is cheaper now than it was a year ago. That’s because the price of gold is being artificially forced down. Go look at their price charts in the past year. If gold were still operating like a traditional financial haven, its price should have risen parallel that of bitcoin, but it hasn’t.

    Gold investors are well aware of this practice of the Fed’s, and they have been complaining about it for a long time. Watch gold prices on a chart whenever the market drops big and you’ll figure it out. Gold is no longer a haven for financial safety because the Fed thinks gold is not a productive asset, and it hates it when investors put their money in gold. Because the Fed prints money–creates it out of thin air, basically– it can buy all the paper gold contracts it wants unto eternity to be used to manipulate gold prices.

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    • Replies: @res
    Sounds like a buying opportunity. That kind of price manipulation works great...until it doesn't. Which is exactly when you want to be holding gold.

    One tip from someone who was somewhat burned in 2008-2009. Don't believe the people who tell you gold producer stocks are a good proxy for gold. When it looked like the SHTF in 2008 gold stocks moved like stocks, not like gold.
    , @Lot
    I don't agree that the price of gold is heavily manipulated. It is a very efficient market with millions of buyers out there. For every person selling "paper gold" in speculation that it will fall, there is another one buying it, so the transactions cancel out in the end.

    They government, if it wants to manipulate gold prices, will have to buy or sell physical gold. Records of those sales are kept, but they tend to have little impact on market prices.

    Another sign there is not gold price manipulation is the marginal cost of mining an ounce of gold is pretty close to its spot price. That is what you see in a normal market.

    In the end, that is the point of precious metals. Manipulation of them cannot be sustained because ultimately there is a fixed supply of them, unlike paper financial instruments.
    , @Art Deco
    The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed.

    The Financial Times reported about 6 years ago that transactions for gold on the London market amount to about $15,200 bn per year. The Federal Reserve's gold stocks amount to $11 bn. They have $34 bn in miscellaneous assets which may consist of some futures and options on gold. The FT also reported that 90% of the transactions by value were on the spot market, not in futures, options, swaps, &c.

    https://www.ft.com/content/eb342ad4-daba-11e0-a58b-00144feabdc0
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  68. lavoisier says: • Website

    Steve, you were a prophet then, and continue to be a prophet now.

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  69. BaruchKogan says: • Website

    What makes this hilarious is that JP Morgan and Guaranty funded the Bolsheviks and the Nazis (and Pancho Villa).

    In October 1931, Warburg received a letter from Hitler which he passed on to Carter at
    Guaranty Trust Company, and subsequently another bankers’ meeting was called at the
    Guaranty Trust Company of-rices. Opinions at this meeting were divided. “Sidney
    Warburg” reported that Rockefeller, Carter, and McBean were for Hitler, while the other
    financiers were uncertain. Montague Norman of the Bank of England and Glean of Royal
    Dutch Shell argued that the $10 million already spent on Hitler was too much, that Hitler
    would never act. The meeting finally agreed in principle to assist Hitler further, and
    Warburg again undertook a courier assignment and went back to Germany.

    We have now gone beyond this evidence to establish a continuing working relationship
    between Bolshevik banker Olof Aschberg and the Morgan-controlled Guaranty Trust Company
    in New York before, during, and after the Russian Revolution. In tsarist times Aschberg was
    the Morgan agent in Russia and negotiator for Russian loans in the United States; during 1917
    Aschberg was financial intermediary for the revolutionaries; and after the revolution Aschberg
    became head of Ruskombank, the first Soviet international bank, while Max May, a vice
    president of the Morgan-controlled Guaranty Trust, became director and chief of the Ruskombank
    foreign department. We have presented documentary evidence of a continuing working
    relationship between the Guaranty Trust Company and the Bolsheviks

    Another case of revolution supported by New York financial institutions concerned that of
    Mexico in 1915-16. Von Rintelen, a German espionage agent in the United States,6 was
    accused during his May 1917 trial in New York City of attempting to “embroil” the U.S. with
    Mexico and Japan in order to divert ammunition then flowing to the Allies in Europe.7
    Payment for the ammunition that was shipped from the United States to the Mexican
    revolutionary Pancho Villa, was made through Guaranty Trust Company. Von Rintelen’s
    adviser, Sommerfeld, paid $380,000 via Guaranty Trust and Mississippi Valley Trust Company
    to the Western Cartridge Company of Alton, Illinois, for ammunition shipped to El Paso, for
    forwarding to Villa. This was in mid-1915. On January 10, 1916, Villa murdered seventeen
    American miners at Santa Isabel and on March 9, 1916, Villa raided Columbus, New Mexico,
    and killed eighteen more Americans.

    https://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/pdf/Sutton_Wall_Street_and_Hitler.pdf

    https://www.voltairenet.org/IMG/pdf/Sutton_Wall_Street_and_the_bolshevik_revolution-5.pdf

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  70. ogunsiron says:

    So this kind of stuff has been argued.

    I was mulling asking on twitter is anyone had heard of serious proposals to simpluy seize the savings of “racists.

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  71. Pay Pal helped convicted terrorist Mohamed Elshinawy in 2015 according to the DOJ.

    Also, how many banks cooperate with Nigerian fraudsters?

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  72. @German_reader
    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn't racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.
    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.

    Bannon has made it clear for some time that his American nationalism isn’t racially exclusive, but rather based on economic populism, with elements of Catholic social teaching. In a way class is more important for him than ethnicity, if I understand correctly.

    Maybe it actually is the right position in the US context.

    Class is a social construct. It’s never the right answer.

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  73. res says:
    @Anon
    Gold is no longer a haven. The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed. Every time the market drops, the Fed sells billions of dollars'worth of paper gold contracts--in one single second-on the market to force the price down hard so investors will be shoved out of gold and back into stocks, thus propping up stocks. The size of the margin account you must constantly maintain with a broker just to trade paper gold in that quantity is in the hundreds of millions. Only a government entity with endless pockets can choose to deliberately lose billions of dollars' worth of money on gold, because if you're slamming gold down hard every time gold is trying to rise significantly, losing money is exactly what you're doing, so you have to have an ulterior motive for it. Bitcoin has gone up by a factor of 7 in the past year, but gold is cheaper now than it was a year ago. That's because the price of gold is being artificially forced down. Go look at their price charts in the past year. If gold were still operating like a traditional financial haven, its price should have risen parallel that of bitcoin, but it hasn't.

    Gold investors are well aware of this practice of the Fed's, and they have been complaining about it for a long time. Watch gold prices on a chart whenever the market drops big and you'll figure it out. Gold is no longer a haven for financial safety because the Fed thinks gold is not a productive asset, and it hates it when investors put their money in gold. Because the Fed prints money--creates it out of thin air, basically-- it can buy all the paper gold contracts it wants unto eternity to be used to manipulate gold prices.

    Sounds like a buying opportunity. That kind of price manipulation works great…until it doesn’t. Which is exactly when you want to be holding gold.

    One tip from someone who was somewhat burned in 2008-2009. Don’t believe the people who tell you gold producer stocks are a good proxy for gold. When it looked like the SHTF in 2008 gold stocks moved like stocks, not like gold.

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  74. @Yak-15
    This used to be a substantial threat - cutting off financial resources through the traditional banking system. But Bitcoin, ethereum and other blockchain crypto currencies are taking down the classic SWIFT based banking and settlement system. It's a only a matter of time.

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone's fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It's very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone’s fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It’s very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.

    And then what?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    That is the interesting question. Perhaps everyone will move on to the next crypto. The amount of computing power necessary to take down one of these networks is increasing as these currencies expand.
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  75. Wilkey says:

    A few years ago there was bill called AB 624 in California. Proposed by a group called the Greenlining Institute (get it?), it wold have required that private charitable foundations gather and disclose “diversity data” about the recipients of their charitable contributions. I can only suspect that the bill was pulled because the data gathered would not have furthered the narrative. But what’s there to do after the government starts gathering data, other than force private foundations to give to groups the government favors? Nevermind that so long as it’s genuine charity it’s nobodies business who they give money to.

    The “civil rights era” led to a lot of rights that would have been considered inviolate 100 years ago – Constitutional rights – being consigned to the dustbin of history. There was a real estate developer in my state a few years ago who caught hell because he advertised that the town in which he had built had one of the lowest percentage of minorities in the state. There is no longer a first amendment right to tell people that kind of information, because a statutory law (non-discrimination) has supplanted your God-given right to freedom of speech. Soon it will supplant your right to give away your money as you please.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    The “civil rights era” led to a lot of rights that would have been considered inviolate 100 years ago – Constitutional rights – being consigned to the dustbin of history. There was a real estate developer in my state a few years ago who caught hell because he advertised that the town in which he had built had one of the lowest percentage of minorities in the state. There is no longer a first amendment right to tell people that kind of information, because a statutory law (non-discrimination) has supplanted your God-given right to freedom of speech. Soon it will supplant your right to give away your money as you please.
     
    Soon? This happened decades ago. What happened to Mr. Rice's last will? Voided in 1964.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1964/03/10/rice-u-is-given-right-to-admit-negroes-and-charge-tuition.html
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  76. Maus says:
    @Autochthon
    Actually, it is indeed stealing. Just as we no longer require specific forms of pleading, whereby if one doesn't use precisely the magic words in one's complaint, it is summarily rejected, we also no longer much distinguish among theft, embezzlement, etc. (we do distinguish burglary and robbery, because of the heightened danger those methods of theft present for interpersonal violence and confrontation...).

    Conversion is not merely absconding with another's property absolutely. It is depriving another of the use of that property without permission. This prevents the classic scenario of the thief caught in posession of your car or your lawnmower from claiming he was merely borrowing it and intended to return it in an hour, thus committing some kind of trepass rather than theft. Nope: by depriving you of its use, he committed theft (or conversion, if tou wish to stick to the old, stricter taxonomy in use at common law).

    The behaviour of the banks Steve described is indeed theft, because it deprives the rightful owners of the funds their full use and enjoyment in any lawful way they deem fit.

    An excellent recap of the current law of theft (at least as reflected in the CA Penal Code). As a former prosecutor, one of my pet bugaboos is explaining the distinction between robbery (taking property from a person by force) and burglary (entering a building with the intent to commit a felony). The former is generally more violent, and hence more heinous, than the latter. But most lay people continue to speak of being “robbed” when relating that their unoccupied residence was entered and property was stolen, which is actually burglary.

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  77. @ScarletNumber
    This is probably common knowledge, but the Ramones were not actually brothers

    Well-known, and that’s what makes their loyalty so amazing.

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  78. Lot says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Lot, I agree except the "keep it in a safe deposit box" part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws for, you know, your motherland's security and all.

    Most of the coins you write about are called "junk silver", even though that name is pretty damn erroneous. The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value. One doesn't have to do a lot of calculations, as 1 quarter has the same amount of silver as 2.5 dimes, a half-dollar has the same amount of silver as 2 quarters, etc. Maybe that is obvious to some, but just sayin ...

    I agree that safe deposit boxes are not fully SHTF proof. However, it is likely that a social breakdown scenario would have at least a few advance signs that would give you time to empty your box out. This is also the most practical way to own for people who, for example, live with roommates in a rented apartment.

    The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value.

    Small correction: silver dollars have about 7% more silver in them than a dollar of silver change, .77 oz per $1 rather than .72.

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  79. Lot says:
    @Anon
    Gold is no longer a haven. The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed. Every time the market drops, the Fed sells billions of dollars'worth of paper gold contracts--in one single second-on the market to force the price down hard so investors will be shoved out of gold and back into stocks, thus propping up stocks. The size of the margin account you must constantly maintain with a broker just to trade paper gold in that quantity is in the hundreds of millions. Only a government entity with endless pockets can choose to deliberately lose billions of dollars' worth of money on gold, because if you're slamming gold down hard every time gold is trying to rise significantly, losing money is exactly what you're doing, so you have to have an ulterior motive for it. Bitcoin has gone up by a factor of 7 in the past year, but gold is cheaper now than it was a year ago. That's because the price of gold is being artificially forced down. Go look at their price charts in the past year. If gold were still operating like a traditional financial haven, its price should have risen parallel that of bitcoin, but it hasn't.

    Gold investors are well aware of this practice of the Fed's, and they have been complaining about it for a long time. Watch gold prices on a chart whenever the market drops big and you'll figure it out. Gold is no longer a haven for financial safety because the Fed thinks gold is not a productive asset, and it hates it when investors put their money in gold. Because the Fed prints money--creates it out of thin air, basically-- it can buy all the paper gold contracts it wants unto eternity to be used to manipulate gold prices.

    I don’t agree that the price of gold is heavily manipulated. It is a very efficient market with millions of buyers out there. For every person selling “paper gold” in speculation that it will fall, there is another one buying it, so the transactions cancel out in the end.

    They government, if it wants to manipulate gold prices, will have to buy or sell physical gold. Records of those sales are kept, but they tend to have little impact on market prices.

    Another sign there is not gold price manipulation is the marginal cost of mining an ounce of gold is pretty close to its spot price. That is what you see in a normal market.

    In the end, that is the point of precious metals. Manipulation of them cannot be sustained because ultimately there is a fixed supply of them, unlike paper financial instruments.

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  80. LOL. Look what they got away with in the good old days.

    “Payment for the ammunition that was shipped from the United States to the Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa was made through Guaranty Trust Company. Von Rintelen’s advisor, Sommerfeld, paid $380,000 via Guaranty Trust and Mississippi Valley Trust Company to the Western Cartridge Company of Alton, Illinois, for ammunition shipped to El Paso, for forwarding to Villa.” (Chapter 4, Wall Street and World Revolution. In: Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution, by Antony Sutton.)

    One of the founding directors of the Mississippi Valley Trust Co., John Dietz Perry, was the father-in-law of David Rowland Francis, the US Ambassador to Russia when Kerensky deposed the Czar, and also when the Bolsheviks seized power from them. In 1917, the Guaranty Trust financially backed the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia.

    Thomas W. Lamont was an advisor to Mussolini and secured a $100 million loan for him in 1926. And Grayson Mallet-Prevost Murphy, a director of the Guaranty Trust from 1915 to 1935, was active as early as 1903 in planning military interventions in the Americas. After World War I, he headed the Red Cross in Europe, was involved in Morgan loans to Mussolini, and made fact-finding trips with William J. Donovan, later head of the O.S.S.

    http://tinyurl.com/y9twu2y8

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  81. Art Deco says:
    @Anon
    Gold is no longer a haven. The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed. Every time the market drops, the Fed sells billions of dollars'worth of paper gold contracts--in one single second-on the market to force the price down hard so investors will be shoved out of gold and back into stocks, thus propping up stocks. The size of the margin account you must constantly maintain with a broker just to trade paper gold in that quantity is in the hundreds of millions. Only a government entity with endless pockets can choose to deliberately lose billions of dollars' worth of money on gold, because if you're slamming gold down hard every time gold is trying to rise significantly, losing money is exactly what you're doing, so you have to have an ulterior motive for it. Bitcoin has gone up by a factor of 7 in the past year, but gold is cheaper now than it was a year ago. That's because the price of gold is being artificially forced down. Go look at their price charts in the past year. If gold were still operating like a traditional financial haven, its price should have risen parallel that of bitcoin, but it hasn't.

    Gold investors are well aware of this practice of the Fed's, and they have been complaining about it for a long time. Watch gold prices on a chart whenever the market drops big and you'll figure it out. Gold is no longer a haven for financial safety because the Fed thinks gold is not a productive asset, and it hates it when investors put their money in gold. Because the Fed prints money--creates it out of thin air, basically-- it can buy all the paper gold contracts it wants unto eternity to be used to manipulate gold prices.

    The price of gold is being manipulated like crazy by the Fed.

    The Financial Times reported about 6 years ago that transactions for gold on the London market amount to about $15,200 bn per year. The Federal Reserve’s gold stocks amount to $11 bn. They have $34 bn in miscellaneous assets which may consist of some futures and options on gold. The FT also reported that 90% of the transactions by value were on the spot market, not in futures, options, swaps, &c.

    https://www.ft.com/content/eb342ad4-daba-11e0-a58b-00144feabdc0

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  82. @Achmed E. Newman
    Lot, I agree except the "keep it in a safe deposit box" part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws for, you know, your motherland's security and all.

    Most of the coins you write about are called "junk silver", even though that name is pretty damn erroneous. The cool thing (maybe not anything briliant at the time) was that the dimes, quarters, 1/2 dollars, and dollars (pre-1965) all have the same ratio of silver to face value. One doesn't have to do a lot of calculations, as 1 quarter has the same amount of silver as 2.5 dimes, a half-dollar has the same amount of silver as 2 quarters, etc. Maybe that is obvious to some, but just sayin ...

    Lot, I agree except the “keep it in a safe deposit box” part. Do you think that you will be able to go into your bank and get the stuff out when the economic crash happens? The bank will be closed, and they will have already confiscated your precious metals under some pretext that is pefectly legal under anti-drug and/or anti-terrorism laws . . . .

    Or they will have confiscated it under no pretext at all.

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  83. @Wilkey
    A few years ago there was bill called AB 624 in California. Proposed by a group called the Greenlining Institute (get it?), it wold have required that private charitable foundations gather and disclose "diversity data" about the recipients of their charitable contributions. I can only suspect that the bill was pulled because the data gathered would not have furthered the narrative. But what's there to do after the government starts gathering data, other than force private foundations to give to groups the government favors? Nevermind that so long as it's genuine charity it's nobodies business who they give money to.

    The "civil rights era" led to a lot of rights that would have been considered inviolate 100 years ago - Constitutional rights - being consigned to the dustbin of history. There was a real estate developer in my state a few years ago who caught hell because he advertised that the town in which he had built had one of the lowest percentage of minorities in the state. There is no longer a first amendment right to tell people that kind of information, because a statutory law (non-discrimination) has supplanted your God-given right to freedom of speech. Soon it will supplant your right to give away your money as you please.

    The “civil rights era” led to a lot of rights that would have been considered inviolate 100 years ago – Constitutional rights – being consigned to the dustbin of history. There was a real estate developer in my state a few years ago who caught hell because he advertised that the town in which he had built had one of the lowest percentage of minorities in the state. There is no longer a first amendment right to tell people that kind of information, because a statutory law (non-discrimination) has supplanted your God-given right to freedom of speech. Soon it will supplant your right to give away your money as you please.

    Soon? This happened decades ago. What happened to Mr. Rice’s last will? Voided in 1964.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1964/03/10/rice-u-is-given-right-to-admit-negroes-and-charge-tuition.html

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  84. Yak-15 says:
    @ben tillman

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone’s fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It’s very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.
     
    And then what?

    That is the interesting question. Perhaps everyone will move on to the next crypto. The amount of computing power necessary to take down one of these networks is increasing as these currencies expand.

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  85. Kirt says:
    @Kirt
    Slightly OT but maybe relevant, I find it impossible to access Andy and Colin's Alt-right blogspot this morning and had some difficulty yesterday. Anyone else having this problem? I don't doubt the SJW/Antifa hackers will soon come for this site - and many others.

    The referenced blog has been removed.

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  86. Stalin figured this out a long time ago. Money was meaningless – you needed ration cards to buy food in the 30s and during the War. No ration card, no food. So keep all the rubles you want comrade, if you want food, you must produce the ration card. Now let’s see if you are a party member and what is written in that little book about you. Ah You want medical care – your money is no good (literally) you must produce your Obama Care card. You want to attend a university? Produce your Diversity Card showing your attendance at Diversity training. And then your Google card showing your internet viewing history.

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  87. snorlax says:
    @Mr. Anon

    “Guess who’s trying to criminalize BDS”

    Both houses of Congress and the President?
     
    And why would they do that? Why would they try to criminalize what is now perfectly legal peaceful political expression?

    They aren’t. To quote myself:

    The bill is more or less meaningless; what it bans is boycotting Israel at the behest of a foreign government. So “I’m boycotting Israel” remains A-OK, but “I’m boycotting Israel because Saudi Arabia told me to” would be illegal.

    It’s extremely unlikely that anyone would ever be convicted or even charged under the law, because you’d almost need mind-reading powers to prove someone is boycotting Israel under orders from a foreign government rather than as an expression of their own personal beliefs. The only people who could even conceivably be prosecuted under the provision would be Muslims, which is probably why Glenn Greenwald is in hysterics about it.

    In fact, under the law that’s being amended, it’s already illegal, with the same penalty, to boycott any “friendly” country at the behest of a foreign government. So the bill quite literally does nothing at all — its sole raison d’être is for BREAKING NEWS CRITICAL ACTION ALERTS printed in 72-point font on AIPAC fundraising mailings sent to South Florida nursing homes.

    It is a stupid waste of Congress’s time, but the last time a Congress used their time wisely was probably Talleyrand and Metternich in Vienna.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    You would appear to be lying. According to the ACLU:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/this-piece-of-pro-israel-legislation-is-a-serious-threat-to-free-speech/2017/07/24/0752d408-7093-11e7-8f39-eeb7d3a2d304_story.html?utm_term=.01c6d7c1773e

    "The Israel Anti-Boycott Act, legislation introduced in the Senate by Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.) and in the House by Peter J. Roskam (R-Ill.), would make it a crime to support or even furnish information about a boycott directed at Israel or its businesses called by the United Nations, the European Union or any other “international governmental organization.” Violations would be punishable by civil and criminal penalties of up to $1 million and 20 years in prison. The American Civil Liberties Union, where we both work, takes no position for or against campaigns to boycott Israel or any other foreign country. But since our organization’s founding in 1920, the ACLU has defended the right to collective action. This bill threatens that right."

    I.e., it applies to domestic U.S. action on any boycott called by a foreign or international entity, including one which the U.S. is a party to. So if the U.N. calls for a boycott, you (well, not you, but someone else) as a U.S. citizen could be prosecuted for supporting it. Funny, they don't want to make it a crime to support Agenda 21, or the Paris Accords, or the policy of any other intergovernmental organization.

    Nice try. Next time, lie harder.
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  88. @Achmed E. Newman
    Very important stuff here, but I don't seem to remember too many of the alt-right type conservatives giving a damn about the constitutionalists, preppers, and real libertarians (not the Reason.com imbecile version) in the recent past. In fact, I keep seeing the phrase "muh Constitution", like liberty doesn't matter to the alt-righters.

    Anyway, this is not to single anyone out, but I've said it before, and I'll say it again: Conservatives have got a lot to learn from the Libertarians/Constitutionalists and vice-versa. Great replies too, to this comment.

    As far as the whole "Cashless Society" thing, besides hundreds of derogatory posts that have been published on Zerohedge on this mark-o-the-beast stuff, I have written about it in a series, here, here, and here.

    In fact, I keep seeing the phrase “muh Constitution”, like liberty doesn’t matter to the alt-righters.

    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).

    There’s been a lot of hand-wringing here about Richard Spencer and the ‘optics’ out of Charlottesville—but the big Constitutionalist story (#125) is Virginia’s (and other public venues) brinksmanship suppression of the First Amendment, which many seem to have missed while tripping over themselves to bemoan Unite The Right.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).
     
    All very true, Mr. Errican, but you see, that is one side out of two. Did you see where I wrote "vice versa"? What you wrote was the versa.

    No, the alt-right and most conservatives don't normally give a damn about search-and-seizure violations, including confiscation of currency from travellers due to "muh money laundering" and "muh drug war", stop-and-frist in NYC, no-knock raids on houses (one cop threw a flash-bang grenade into a baby's crib and burned him good), the Waco Massacre, Ruby Ridge, and other daily occurences like DUI traffic stops. Some of the money laundering laws or anti-terrorism laws sound good to these conservatives, and the alt-right, one could say, at best, doesn't give a damn about this stuff.

    Who on here thinks Ed Snowden is a hero? I do. There may be more, but I don't know if it'd even be a majority, as the most common answer might be "who cares?"

    Almost every part of the Bill of Rights gets violated daily, and the most egregious one is not personal, it's just on a large scale, which is the violation of Amendment X on the limits of the Feral Government. It has been sunk like a wooden sloop by an Exocet missile long ago, and most conservatives couldn't care less.

    Now, that it's being used against them there is a big hue and cry. The stuff you people blew off is coming back to get you now! Don't say you weren't warned, and no, it wasn't on iSteve.
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  89. Romanian says: • Website
    @Yak-15
    This used to be a substantial threat - cutting off financial resources through the traditional banking system. But Bitcoin, ethereum and other blockchain crypto currencies are taking down the classic SWIFT based banking and settlement system. It's a only a matter of time.

    The US dollar may be pegged to the deep state or grabs state whatever else everyone's fear is, but these block chain systems are not.

    It's very possible, though, that a state actor at some point tries to take down one of these currencies. But the resources necessary to do that will point to the source.

    I do not think so. Any crypto currency of note will be muzzled by the promise of success. Already, corporate endorsements are a driver of price growth. And some of the new coins (ethereum, ripple and others) are vastly more centralized than bitcoin, with their respective company or foundations acting as central bankers. The ones that do not bend the knee never achieve the scale necessary to run a complex economic system with full supply chains in that currency. Without that, all you have is a speculative asset that will brand you a criminal for using it.

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  90. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    In fact, I keep seeing the phrase “muh Constitution”, like liberty doesn’t matter to the alt-righters.
     
    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).

    There’s been a lot of hand-wringing here about Richard Spencer and the ‘optics’ out of Charlottesville—but the big Constitutionalist story (#125) is Virginia’s (and other public venues) brinksmanship suppression of the First Amendment, which many seem to have missed while tripping over themselves to bemoan Unite The Right.

    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).

    All very true, Mr. Errican, but you see, that is one side out of two. Did you see where I wrote “vice versa”? What you wrote was the versa.

    No, the alt-right and most conservatives don’t normally give a damn about search-and-seizure violations, including confiscation of currency from travellers due to “muh money laundering” and “muh drug war”, stop-and-frist in NYC, no-knock raids on houses (one cop threw a flash-bang grenade into a baby’s crib and burned him good), the Waco Massacre, Ruby Ridge, and other daily occurences like DUI traffic stops. Some of the money laundering laws or anti-terrorism laws sound good to these conservatives, and the alt-right, one could say, at best, doesn’t give a damn about this stuff.

    Who on here thinks Ed Snowden is a hero? I do. There may be more, but I don’t know if it’d even be a majority, as the most common answer might be “who cares?”

    Almost every part of the Bill of Rights gets violated daily, and the most egregious one is not personal, it’s just on a large scale, which is the violation of Amendment X on the limits of the Feral Government. It has been sunk like a wooden sloop by an Exocet missile long ago, and most conservatives couldn’t care less.

    Now, that it’s being used against them there is a big hue and cry. The stuff you people blew off is coming back to get you now! Don’t say you weren’t warned, and no, it wasn’t on iSteve.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    To be clear, I agree with you on most of the stuff you listed, and I’ve also mentioned my concerns about gun control (#72) and a cashless society (search “cashless” in my comment history).

    You’re right that some folks with specific views can have blindspots. There is a lot of overlap with all these subjects. Steve’s blog doesn’t focus on all of it. He’s generous enough in his modding that almost any issue can be mentioned, though. If nobody takes you up on something, eh. It's worth a shot.

    , @The True and Original David
    "the alt-right and most conservatives"

    The alt-right ain't Bushies.

    Small examples: they oppose military adventurism (want out of Afghanistan yesterday), and are mad as hell at Sessions for planning to reimpose asset forfeiture.

    "Alt" means "alternative to" for these people. Alt to neoliberalism. Alt to neoconsevatism. Alt to the whole f'ing thing.

    Get hip.
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  91. @International Jew
    For an article from 1999 (and even moreso, a WSJ article) it's remarkably 2017-ish in its totalitarian tone.

    Also remarkably 1917-ish. The West is still “in the hands of the perpetrators,” as Solzhenitsyn said.

    Theft as well as murder, is the eternal feature of the so-called banksters.

    Hang on to your wallets, and keep your kids out of their schools. Also stockpile weapons and ammunition. Lots of them.

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  92. @Art Deco
    Pretty much only the libertarians are seriously defending it now,

    They're not. There's an old-school or antiquarian section of libertarians who do (Ted Cruz, Wm. Voegli, Thomas Woods), but most soi-disant libertarians are only interested in the drug laws or the immigration laws or discrediting the police or discrediting the military.

    Yes, or defending Bushian wars for globalism. Check out a thing called the Niskanen Center. If you have any inside baseball stuff on them, I’d like to read it.

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  93. @Achmed E. Newman

    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).
     
    All very true, Mr. Errican, but you see, that is one side out of two. Did you see where I wrote "vice versa"? What you wrote was the versa.

    No, the alt-right and most conservatives don't normally give a damn about search-and-seizure violations, including confiscation of currency from travellers due to "muh money laundering" and "muh drug war", stop-and-frist in NYC, no-knock raids on houses (one cop threw a flash-bang grenade into a baby's crib and burned him good), the Waco Massacre, Ruby Ridge, and other daily occurences like DUI traffic stops. Some of the money laundering laws or anti-terrorism laws sound good to these conservatives, and the alt-right, one could say, at best, doesn't give a damn about this stuff.

    Who on here thinks Ed Snowden is a hero? I do. There may be more, but I don't know if it'd even be a majority, as the most common answer might be "who cares?"

    Almost every part of the Bill of Rights gets violated daily, and the most egregious one is not personal, it's just on a large scale, which is the violation of Amendment X on the limits of the Feral Government. It has been sunk like a wooden sloop by an Exocet missile long ago, and most conservatives couldn't care less.

    Now, that it's being used against them there is a big hue and cry. The stuff you people blew off is coming back to get you now! Don't say you weren't warned, and no, it wasn't on iSteve.

    To be clear, I agree with you on most of the stuff you listed, and I’ve also mentioned my concerns about gun control (#72) and a cashless society (search “cashless” in my comment history).

    You’re right that some folks with specific views can have blindspots. There is a lot of overlap with all these subjects. Steve’s blog doesn’t focus on all of it. He’s generous enough in his modding that almost any issue can be mentioned, though. If nobody takes you up on something, eh. It’s worth a shot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Good to hear all that. No, I'd be last to tell Steve what to write about - we've got at least one guy like that here. As a libertarian, I say "go write your own damn blog", and I did. Nobody forces me to read stuff about golf courses, or new movies.

    Yeah, I just think that both alt-right types and constitutionalists don't see each other's views, but both are needed to understand how this country has strayed so far, or how it could possibly get to be a decent place again.

    I told Ron Paul in person in 2012 that he needed to talk about illegal immigration in order to win the state primary. He heard it too, and imagine if he had taken heed. A really smart constitutionalist in the Presidency would have been something else.
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  94. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    To be clear, I agree with you on most of the stuff you listed, and I’ve also mentioned my concerns about gun control (#72) and a cashless society (search “cashless” in my comment history).

    You’re right that some folks with specific views can have blindspots. There is a lot of overlap with all these subjects. Steve’s blog doesn’t focus on all of it. He’s generous enough in his modding that almost any issue can be mentioned, though. If nobody takes you up on something, eh. It's worth a shot.

    Good to hear all that. No, I’d be last to tell Steve what to write about – we’ve got at least one guy like that here. As a libertarian, I say “go write your own damn blog”, and I did. Nobody forces me to read stuff about golf courses, or new movies.

    Yeah, I just think that both alt-right types and constitutionalists don’t see each other’s views, but both are needed to understand how this country has strayed so far, or how it could possibly get to be a decent place again.

    I told Ron Paul in person in 2012 that he needed to talk about illegal immigration in order to win the state primary. He heard it too, and imagine if he had taken heed. A really smart constitutionalist in the Presidency would have been something else.

    Read More
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  95. @Achmed E. Newman

    The full phrase is “At least I still have the Constituiton,” usually superimposed on a photo showing a lone white surrounded by baleful/hostile nonwhites. The message isn’t anti-Constitution. It specifically mocks Libertarians/Constitutionalists who are allergic to white nationalism. Whites are being proportionately overrun by non-whites who can vote and influence policy. Bye bye Constitution, hello totalitarian state (#35).
     
    All very true, Mr. Errican, but you see, that is one side out of two. Did you see where I wrote "vice versa"? What you wrote was the versa.

    No, the alt-right and most conservatives don't normally give a damn about search-and-seizure violations, including confiscation of currency from travellers due to "muh money laundering" and "muh drug war", stop-and-frist in NYC, no-knock raids on houses (one cop threw a flash-bang grenade into a baby's crib and burned him good), the Waco Massacre, Ruby Ridge, and other daily occurences like DUI traffic stops. Some of the money laundering laws or anti-terrorism laws sound good to these conservatives, and the alt-right, one could say, at best, doesn't give a damn about this stuff.

    Who on here thinks Ed Snowden is a hero? I do. There may be more, but I don't know if it'd even be a majority, as the most common answer might be "who cares?"

    Almost every part of the Bill of Rights gets violated daily, and the most egregious one is not personal, it's just on a large scale, which is the violation of Amendment X on the limits of the Feral Government. It has been sunk like a wooden sloop by an Exocet missile long ago, and most conservatives couldn't care less.

    Now, that it's being used against them there is a big hue and cry. The stuff you people blew off is coming back to get you now! Don't say you weren't warned, and no, it wasn't on iSteve.

    “the alt-right and most conservatives”

    The alt-right ain’t Bushies.

    Small examples: they oppose military adventurism (want out of Afghanistan yesterday), and are mad as hell at Sessions for planning to reimpose asset forfeiture.

    “Alt” means “alternative to” for these people. Alt to neoliberalism. Alt to neoconsevatism. Alt to the whole f’ing thing.

    Get hip.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E.Newman
    TT and OD, that's why I put the "and" in between, though. I am not that hip, but hip enough to know some of what the alt-right is about. Alt to all that is good, but not when they become "hip" to the Socialism, which is what I've read some of, even on here. Does the alt-right support government-run health care? If so, the ones that do are deluded fools, and I'd have no reason to heed another word out of their mouths (or keyboards).
    , @The True and Original David
    No worries. I'm not the hippest cat either. Hate this blurring of everyone not left into the Repub category that we see everywhere. I reject Bush & embrace Trump(ism)!

    No idea about h/c but my position is end non-catastrophic health insurance. It's a lonely position.
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  96. @The True and Original David
    "the alt-right and most conservatives"

    The alt-right ain't Bushies.

    Small examples: they oppose military adventurism (want out of Afghanistan yesterday), and are mad as hell at Sessions for planning to reimpose asset forfeiture.

    "Alt" means "alternative to" for these people. Alt to neoliberalism. Alt to neoconsevatism. Alt to the whole f'ing thing.

    Get hip.

    TT and OD, that’s why I put the “and” in between, though. I am not that hip, but hip enough to know some of what the alt-right is about. Alt to all that is good, but not when they become “hip” to the Socialism, which is what I’ve read some of, even on here. Does the alt-right support government-run health care? If so, the ones that do are deluded fools, and I’d have no reason to heed another word out of their mouths (or keyboards).

    Read More
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  97. Mr. Anon says:
    @snorlax
    They aren't. To quote myself:

    The bill is more or less meaningless; what it bans is boycotting Israel at the behest of a foreign government. So “I’m boycotting Israel” remains A-OK, but “I’m boycotting Israel because Saudi Arabia told me to” would be illegal.

    It’s extremely unlikely that anyone would ever be convicted or even charged under the law, because you’d almost need mind-reading powers to prove someone is boycotting Israel under orders from a foreign government rather than as an expression of their own personal beliefs. The only people who could even conceivably be prosecuted under the provision would be Muslims, which is probably why Glenn Greenwald is in hysterics about it.

    In fact, under the law that’s being amended, it’s already illegal, with the same penalty, to boycott any “friendly” country at the behest of a foreign government. So the bill quite literally does nothing at all — its sole raison d’être is for BREAKING NEWS CRITICAL ACTION ALERTS printed in 72-point font on AIPAC fundraising mailings sent to South Florida nursing homes.

    It is a stupid waste of Congress’s time, but the last time a Congress used their time wisely was probably Talleyrand and Metternich in Vienna.
     

    You would appear to be lying. According to the ACLU:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/this-piece-of-pro-israel-legislation-is-a-serious-threat-to-free-speech/2017/07/24/0752d408-7093-11e7-8f39-eeb7d3a2d304_story.html?utm_term=.01c6d7c1773e

    “The Israel Anti-Boycott Act, legislation introduced in the Senate by Benjamin L. Cardin (D-Md.) and in the House by Peter J. Roskam (R-Ill.), would make it a crime to support or even furnish information about a boycott directed at Israel or its businesses called by the United Nations, the European Union or any other “international governmental organization.” Violations would be punishable by civil and criminal penalties of up to $1 million and 20 years in prison. The American Civil Liberties Union, where we both work, takes no position for or against campaigns to boycott Israel or any other foreign country. But since our organization’s founding in 1920, the ACLU has defended the right to collective action. This bill threatens that right.”

    I.e., it applies to domestic U.S. action on any boycott called by a foreign or international entity, including one which the U.S. is a party to. So if the U.N. calls for a boycott, you (well, not you, but someone else) as a U.S. citizen could be prosecuted for supporting it. Funny, they don’t want to make it a crime to support Agenda 21, or the Paris Accords, or the policy of any other intergovernmental organization.

    Nice try. Next time, lie harder.

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  98. The DOJ did drop operation Choke Point.

    http://freebeacon.com/issues/doj-ends-operation-choke-point/

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  99. @The True and Original David
    "the alt-right and most conservatives"

    The alt-right ain't Bushies.

    Small examples: they oppose military adventurism (want out of Afghanistan yesterday), and are mad as hell at Sessions for planning to reimpose asset forfeiture.

    "Alt" means "alternative to" for these people. Alt to neoliberalism. Alt to neoconsevatism. Alt to the whole f'ing thing.

    Get hip.

    No worries. I’m not the hippest cat either. Hate this blurring of everyone not left into the Repub category that we see everywhere. I reject Bush & embrace Trump(ism)!

    No idea about h/c but my position is end non-catastrophic health insurance. It’s a lonely position.

    Read More
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