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The Chinese Rambo-style movie Wolf Warrior 2 about a Chinese loose cannon one-man army fighting evil American mercenaries who are trying to overthrow a Beijing-friendly African state earned over $854 million in China in 2017, which might make it the biggest one-country box office haul in history. (The 2015 Star Wars movie The Force Awakens earned $937 million in North America, but that includes Canada, so it’s unclear whether it earned more just in the U.S.)

Also, the Chinese have a history of cheating so that their films win at the Chinese box office versus American films, so who knows if this is number is accurate, although it undoubtedly was a vast hit in China.

Practically nobody outside of China watched it (it made $2.7 million in the U.S.), which might have something to do with Wolf Warrior 2 being a little jingoistic even for my tastes:

A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”

(Don’t ask me if this is a fair translation.)

Update: Commenter James Smith explains the movie and its politics here.

One interesting question is why Chinese-language movies, which seemed poised to explode in America after Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon earned $128 million at the American box office in 2000-2001 and Zhang Yimou’s extraordinarily lavish-looking Hero earned $53 million in 2004, have largely disappeared from American consciousness in this decade.

One possibility is merely that Hollywood got better at sequels, reboots, and other ways to exploit familiar intellectual property since then. For example, in 2000 when Crouching Tiger was the #12 movie in America released that year, only two of the top 25 movies in America were sequels (Mission Impossible II and The Nutty Professor II) and two were reboots of earlier properties (How the Grinch Stole Christmas from the famous Chuck Jones TV special cartoon and Gone in 60 Seconds).

In 2017, however, the majority of top 25 movies are part of franchises (for example, Jumanji is currently #9 but headed higher because audiences absolutely love this reboot/sequel of the 1995 Robin Williams movie). Original movies in the top 25 include the horror movie It [oops, that's a remake too], Pixar’s fine Coco, Nolan’s great Dunkirk, Peele’s well-crafted Get Out, the surprisingly good cartoon The Boss Baby, Shyamalan’s comeback Split, Wonder, and Girls Trip.

 
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  1. All right, I’ll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ali Choudhury
    I understand that. The lack of backstory it character details meant you weren't particularly invested in any of the characters.
    , @Kirt
    I couldn't agree more on Dunkirk; it was putting me to sleep. But it was a masterpiece compared to the recently released Hostiles, easily the worst western ever made. Avoid that one at all costs.

    As far as WW2 is concerned, I saw the first one and was amused to see the Chinese/American role reversal in as silly and over-the-top action movie as any made in America. WW2, set in Africa, should be even more of a laugh fest. I just wish the Turkish metal storm movies were available in the US.
    , @El Dato
    It's hard to get inspired by a good ass-whup.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Yes, Dunkirk was dull. It was also made in a way that kept the scale of the evacuation from being seen. I suffered through it, and then wished I hadn't.
    , @Anon
    I thought Dunkirk was dull and stupid as well although aerial fighter scenes were good. "Rolls Royce Merlin greatest engine ever built yada yada" speech was utterly cringeworthy and totally ruined Spitfire flyby. Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a "303"??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was. But wait, he's an officer and wouldn't carry a rifle anyway. List of stupidities in this film is endless. By the time I got to the end I was snoring loudly. Greatest war film ever made? Try 'Stalingrad' for realism instead of this sad pile of adolescent Pommy jingoism.
    , @L Woods
    I have to agree.
    , @guest
    Yes, you are the only. I was primed to dislike it, which is why I only went to see it like 13 weeks after its release. The Dunkirk Myth irks me, and I find the idea of WWII as a nationalistic cause for Britain pernicious. Also, Hans Zimmer and his "Bwaa!"s are ruining my musical experience of movies.

    That being said, I had to see it to understand. The context doesn't really matter. If Hitler had no intention of invading Britain and Churchill's speech made no sense except as a plea to have the Americans come bail him out, still, the spontaneous levee on masse of regular folk going to save their boys is inspiring. And the soldiers who think they're coming home in disgrace only to discover themselves as heroes is well done.

    Yay, propaganda!
    , @James Highland
    I didn't find it dull - enough military action, especially the Spitfire scenes, to keep things hopping for me.

    Uninspiring yes, but that was the whole point for dissidents: a Spit-for-t'eye at the Hollywood version of WW2 - no #BadGermans. Britons could (barely, and with backs to wall) get inspired to fight for King and Country in the early 1940's. No self-respecting man in any Western country could do that for the current political dispensation. The only good reason to join now is for masculine challenge, and that is increasingly untenable.
    , @Mr. Anon

    All right, I’ll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.
     
    I thought it was great - best new movie I've seen in a while.
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  2. jim jones says:

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

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    • Replies: @Logan
    As they did in the Korean War.
    , @reiner Tor
    So they must be eager for revenge. On the other hand, whites have grown complacent and multicultural.
    , @B.

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

     

    Man, they rolled over really hard in the Korean war. So hard the US was pushed all the way from Chinese border to the 38th parallel.
    , @Mr. Anon

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:
     
    Yes, I'm sure that the actions of a backward, decadent empire in 1842 are readily exptrapolatable to modern China, a nation with a well equipped 2 million man army, nuclear weapons, and what will soon be (if it isn't already) the largest economy int he world - moreover a nation that still is, and considers itself to be, a nation.

    Just as Russia's humiliating defeat in the Russo-Japanese war presaged their complete military up to this very day.
    , @Frank the Prof
    I had neighbor who fought in the Korean War. He still had nightmares about the Chinese well into the late 70's.
    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/chinese-counterattacks-in-korea-change-nature-of-war
    , @Difference Maker
    The Korean War turned into a war of China vs USA. Yes, Americans have already fought a hot war with China in relatively modern times
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  3. neutral says:

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In the context of the movie ending it was directed at the bad guys. The Western mercenaries who acted very villainy got what they deserved.

    The Western mercenaries plotline isn't that far fetched. In 2004, Margaret Thatcher's son actually tried to hire 100 African mercenaries to take out a small oil rich state's government and install the "democratic opposition" to get oil concessions.
    , @Difference maker
    The quote is itself a quote of the Han dynasty. Following Chen Tang's expedition to Central Asia to hunt down a Hunnic renegade: "Anyone who offends the mighty Han empire, no matter how far away they may be, will be killed."

    This is also the expedition which described an enemy fishscale formation. The wiki is woeful. The ultimate battle saw the Chinese advance with pavises and fire, cheer when the walls were taken, and recover POWs

    , @Expletive Deleted
    That's just their little way. They've always been like that, and I mean always.
    Bluster and toad-swelling. It's mostly directed inwards to the lower classes of the Middle Kingdom, as are triumphs over any apparent victories over foreigners. A constant need to overawe those shut out of the kleptocratic upper families' circle.
    When it comes to getting into the meatgrinder and slugging it out, they're Xerxes and the Persians to Europe's Spartans. Even tiny Vietnam kicked their backsides quite recently, never mind Japan.
    , @Foreign Expert
    I watch Chinese tv several nights a week. They often have 30 to 60 minute military analysis shows about American air planes or Indian aircraft carriers. The Chinese are preparing for war.
    , @Mr. Anon

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.
     
    Is it that different from our government's policy? There are probably a lot fewer people around the World who hate China than who hate America.
    , @Jack D
    No the translation is OK although you can easily put a different spin on it. Instead of offend, you could translate the same character as violate or invade. And the character that is translated "exterminated" (really executed) could also be translated as "punished". Translation between 2 languages is never perfect, especially 2 languages as remote as classical Chinese and English, so there is a lot of room for spin.
    , @Johann Ricke

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.
     
    Why would it be disturbing, unless you've bought into the idea propagated by liberals (and paleos parroting liberals) that the United States is the source of all evil in the modern world? The peace of our era is underpinned by Uncle Sam being ready to put his thumb on the scale if a territorially-acquisitive power decides to annex its neighbor. Without American action in 1991, all of the Arab territory from Turkey's southern border all the way to Yemen might have become part of Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    China, despite being an economic, military and political basket case for the past two centuries, managed to acquire East Turkistan and Tibet, which in combination are close to half of China's existing land area. We will soon find out what a China that's gotten its game together even halfway in all three respects is capable of. This is a country whose leadership has, through the ages, been motivated by the quest for glory in the history books, where a place of honor is reserved for those who successfully expand the realm.

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  4. BB753 says:

    Why don’t we get to see more North Korean films? They must be amazing.

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  5. Bob23454 says:

    Maybe if you didn’t see Wolf Warrior 1, you can’t follow…

    The Chinese are really nationalistic and have a funny combination of arrogance and an inferiority complex. My sister in law’s Chinese state owned company required the entire staff to go watch it multiple times and My kid’s old school required parents to take their 8 year olds to watch. So the patriotism and box office may not be entirely organic. Though I’m sure they are legitimately proud that their nationalistic nonsence earns more than ours.

    And as to Star Wars, I enjoyed the reminders of what I loved when I was 10, but it was kind of a dumb movie. If you didn’t have a bit of nostalgia to smooth out all the rough edges, I could see telling all my friends not to bother. Those effects were shocking 35 years ago, today you barely notice.

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  6. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    There used to be over 1 million Chinese in Africa but as fast as it grew the population has now declined below one million. China is no longer a poor country but middle income one so a lot of people couldn’t find the economic opportunities to make Africa worth their while.

    https://www.ft.com/content/7106ab42-80d1-11e7-a4ce-15b2513cb3ff

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  7. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    In the context of the movie ending it was directed at the bad guys. The Western mercenaries who acted very villainy got what they deserved.

    The Western mercenaries plotline isn’t that far fetched. In 2004, Margaret Thatcher’s son actually tried to hire 100 African mercenaries to take out a small oil rich state’s government and install the “democratic opposition” to get oil concessions.

    Read More
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  8. @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I understand that. The lack of backstory it character details meant you weren’t particularly invested in any of the characters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I understand that. The lack of backstory it character details meant you weren’t particularly invested in any of the characters.
     
    Isn't the fact that they're people enough? I often find back story to be shallow, perfunctory, and manipulative. Black Hawk Down had hardly any - just a few establishing scenes at the base - and I thought it to be one of the best war movies ever made.
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  9. I feel like this is bait for pedants (or just to check who’s paying attention) but Stephen King’s “It” wasn’t original. It was based on a novel and a TV movie with Tim Curry.

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  10. Logan says:
    @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    As they did in the Korean War.

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  11. Could the movie possibly be as stupid as the trailer? When oh when will people tire of explosions and gunfire and absurd machismo.

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  12. @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    The quote is itself a quote of the Han dynasty. Following Chen Tang’s expedition to Central Asia to hunt down a Hunnic renegade: “Anyone who offends the mighty Han empire, no matter how far away they may be, will be killed.”

    This is also the expedition which described an enemy fishscale formation. The wiki is woeful. The ultimate battle saw the Chinese advance with pavises and fire, cheer when the walls were taken, and recover POWs

    Read More
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  13. @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    So they must be eager for revenge. On the other hand, whites have grown complacent and multicultural.

    Read More
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  14. Really liked that terrorist drone thing at the beginning of the trailer. I speculated about such a contraption here.

    Now TrackingPoint’s products aren’t really the sort of weapons you can do a productive rampage with – crucially, it is single shot, and extremely expensive ($20,000) to boot. But it should soon be possible to create far more effective solutions. For instance, a standalone mod that contains a database of common gun models (and maybe the option to input custom data) that you can strap onto any old AK. An accomplice can tag targets remotely through a connected smartphone, or even automate the process entirely on the basis of face recognition. Think of the kind of head shot percentages you can achieve.
    Even more creative solutions can be thought up. Just the sort of stuff you can do by coupling this with drones can provide material for countless cyberpunk stories.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Big Bill
    The gun can be extremely light, too. Strapped to a drone there's no need for a stock. No need for a gun barrel longer than about 10 cm, if that. Someone's going to deploy one in the next few years.
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  15. Kirt says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I couldn’t agree more on Dunkirk; it was putting me to sleep. But it was a masterpiece compared to the recently released Hostiles, easily the worst western ever made. Avoid that one at all costs.

    As far as WW2 is concerned, I saw the first one and was amused to see the Chinese/American role reversal in as silly and over-the-top action movie as any made in America. WW2, set in Africa, should be even more of a laugh fest. I just wish the Turkish metal storm movies were available in the US.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    But it was a masterpiece compared to the recently released Hostiles, easily the worst western ever made.
     
    How bad was the Hostiles? I love Christian Bale, but the fact they have been running beaucoup commercials about what a masterpiece it is is usually a bad sign. Looks very PC too.
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  16. poolside says:

    How is Haiti’s film industry performing these days?

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  17. Jack D says:

    I think the poster in question is here:

    犯我中华者, 虽远必诛

    Roughly, anyone who offends China will be punished/executed no matter how far away he is.

    I think it is a quote from a poem by the classical (35 BC) Chinese poet/historian Ban Gu regarding the some barbarian (non-Chinese) who offended the Han, but my Chinese is not that good.

    https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E7%8A%AF%E6%88%91%E4%B8%AD%E5%8D%8E%E8%80%85%EF%BC%8C%E8%99%BD%E8%BF%9C%E5%BF%85%E8%AF%9B

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    • Replies: @Sean
    A hefty gun is standing in for something else on box covers, posters ect.
    , @1661er
    She wrote it down, but it's not her own words.(She was part of the brother/sister chronicler team) She wrote down this guy's justification for an unauthorized expedition against Xiongnu/Hun in modern day Kazakhstan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Tang

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Zhizhi

    Also, I think violate/invade may be a better way translate that character than offend, in this context.

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  18. Really drives home who the Chinese think their enemies are. Trump should make a bid deal of having a viewing at the White House.

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  19. There was a made for TV version of It the 90′s so I guess it technically qualifies as a reboot.

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  20. “Original movies in the top 25 include the horror movie It”

    This had been a good miniseries in 1990: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_(miniseries).

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks to everybody who pointed out my mistake about "It."
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  21. El Dato says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    It’s hard to get inspired by a good ass-whup.

    Read More
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  22. @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    Yes, Dunkirk was dull. It was also made in a way that kept the scale of the evacuation from being seen. I suffered through it, and then wished I hadn’t.

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  23. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I thought Dunkirk was dull and stupid as well although aerial fighter scenes were good. “Rolls Royce Merlin greatest engine ever built yada yada” speech was utterly cringeworthy and totally ruined Spitfire flyby. Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a “303″??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was. But wait, he’s an officer and wouldn’t carry a rifle anyway. List of stupidities in this film is endless. By the time I got to the end I was snoring loudly. Greatest war film ever made? Try ‘Stalingrad’ for realism instead of this sad pile of adolescent Pommy jingoism.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a “303″??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was.
     
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/31/a7726331.shtml

    I joined the army on the 6th April 1944 and started six weeks primary training (.......) We were stationed in a hotel in Cromer on the East Coast. I came back to the hotel after a manoeuvre and while walking up the stairs to our room I noticed my .303 rifle was cocked.

    But wait, he’s an officer and wouldn’t carry a rifle anyway.
     
    American officers very often carried shoulder weapons in WWII. Did British officers never or almost never do so? I don't know.
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  24. B. says:
    @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    Man, they rolled over really hard in the Korean war. So hard the US was pushed all the way from Chinese border to the 38th parallel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The late Jerry Pournelle's experience in late 1950-1951, starting up near the Chinese border in North Korea, was that the Chinese "volunteers" were rolling over the Americans. It took a long fight after that just to get back up to the 38th parallel.
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  25. @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    That’s just their little way. They’ve always been like that, and I mean always.
    Bluster and toad-swelling. It’s mostly directed inwards to the lower classes of the Middle Kingdom, as are triumphs over any apparent victories over foreigners. A constant need to overawe those shut out of the kleptocratic upper families’ circle.
    When it comes to getting into the meatgrinder and slugging it out, they’re Xerxes and the Persians to Europe’s Spartans. Even tiny Vietnam kicked their backsides quite recently, never mind Japan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    The thing with the Persians vs the Greeks is that the Greeks have to win every time and the Persians have to win just once in an all out war.
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  26. @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    I watch Chinese tv several nights a week. They often have 30 to 60 minute military analysis shows about American air planes or Indian aircraft carriers. The Chinese are preparing for war.

    Read More
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  27. Based on John Derbysire’s article on the unknown state of the reliability of the US themonuclear arsenal, I most certainly believe that we need to withdraw from the current ban on nuclear weapons testing and begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.

    ASAP.

    I want a known deterrent against “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”

    I think people on Hawaii would agree. Wonder when their governor will start demanding an ABM Island defense from POTUS? Chicago used to have a Nike-Hercules AD system; we could use one too.

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    • Replies: @El Dato

    begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.
     
    Sadly, the cleanup from the earlier batch is still ongoing and where will the money come from? I think that Obama 1 trillion dollar aicraft-carried small nuke program is on schedule, right? Now Trump wants more small nukes. This Earth is going places!

    I think people on Hawaii would agree.
     
    It's as if this was not really an accident....
    , @Mr. Anon

    Based on John Derbysire’s article on the unknown state of the reliability of the US themonuclear arsenal, I most certainly believe that we need to withdraw from the current ban on nuclear weapons testing and begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.
     
    Indeed. Nuclear weapons need to work and need to be seen to work in order to provide an effective deterrent. Maybe we should bring back above-ground testing too. Think of all the great video we could get of blast effects now with relatively cheap cameras. Perhaps people (on all sides) need to see what a nuclear blast really entails to instill some prudence in them.
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  28. Yee says:

    “犯强汉者,虽远必诛”

    It’s a very famous line said by a general when he set off to war with the Hun 2000 years ago in Han dynasty. Sadly, plenty of invaders offended China since then, Turks, Mongols, Manchus, Europeans, Japs…

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  29. Sean says:
    @Jack D
    I think the poster in question is here:


    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/robcain/files/2017/08/WWII-poster.jpg?width=960

    犯我中华者, 虽远必诛

    Roughly, anyone who offends China will be punished/executed no matter how far away he is.


    I think it is a quote from a poem by the classical (35 BC) Chinese poet/historian Ban Gu regarding the some barbarian (non-Chinese) who offended the Han, but my Chinese is not that good.

    https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E7%8A%AF%E6%88%91%E4%B8%AD%E5%8D%8E%E8%80%85%EF%BC%8C%E8%99%BD%E8%BF%9C%E5%BF%85%E8%AF%9B

    A hefty gun is standing in for something else on box covers, posters ect.

    Read More
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  30. Sean says:

    No Chinese leading man since Bruce Lee had the necessary charisma, he was part German of course.

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  31. The quote is itself a quote of the Han dynasty. Following Chen Tang’s expedition to Central Asia to hunt down a Hunnic renegade:

    “Anyone who offends the mighty Han empire, no matter how far away they may be, will be killed.”

    This is also the expedition which described an enemy fishscale formation. The wiki is woeful. The ultimate battle saw the Chinese advance with pavises and fire, cheer when the walls were taken, and recover POWs

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  32. L Woods says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I have to agree.

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  33. L Woods says:

    I’ve seen some polling data indicating that nationalist fervor amongst Chinese youth is declining, and at the very least not all it’s cracked up to be. With ‘qualitative evidence’ like this though, one can’t help but think the original consensus had some veracity.

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  34. utu says:

    One interesting question is why Chinese-language movies, which seemed poised to explode in America after Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon [...] have largely disappeared from American consciousness in this decade.

    Good question. What about the hidden hand of the master switchman at work?

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  35. Carl says:

    “It” is a remake

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    “It” is a remake
     
    Nah. It's a new adaptation of a novel. It would only count as as a remake if they simply re-did the earlier adaptation (cf the recent remake of Verhoeven's version of Total Recall ; that was clearly not another adaptation of the Dick short story).
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  36. guest says:

    I don’t know why you call It original and How the Grinch Stole Christmas a reboot. It quite obviously tried to milk nostalgia from the Tim Curry t.v. miniseries. Which was a piece of crap, but is remembered fondly by some because of Tim Curry.

    The majority of the audience was there for jump scares, admittedly. (Plus, maybe there are fans of the creepy clown subgenre. If that is a subgenre. Right up there with swamp things.)

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  37. guest says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    Yes, you are the only. I was primed to dislike it, which is why I only went to see it like 13 weeks after its release. The Dunkirk Myth irks me, and I find the idea of WWII as a nationalistic cause for Britain pernicious. Also, Hans Zimmer and his “Bwaa!”s are ruining my musical experience of movies.

    That being said, I had to see it to understand. The context doesn’t really matter. If Hitler had no intention of invading Britain and Churchill’s speech made no sense except as a plea to have the Americans come bail him out, still, the spontaneous levee on masse of regular folk going to save their boys is inspiring. And the soldiers who think they’re coming home in disgrace only to discover themselves as heroes is well done.

    Yay, propaganda!

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    "Their Finest" was 2017 movie about making a propaganda movie to influence the USA.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMh1EvAQOQ8
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  38. One the flight across the Atlantic, I realised I had seen every film on offer, including the Bollywood, China, Japan, etc. If they add this to the list, I’m sure I will enjoy it; otherwise, like nearly every other movie I have seen over the past two decades, I will catch it on the plane or TV or any way where I don’t have to lay out cash to see it.

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  39. guest says:

    It probably didn’t make any money here because no one heard about it. I never heard of it until today.

    Also, it’s got a “2″ in its title. People will think they missed out on the first one and not bother.

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  40. @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I didn’t find it dull – enough military action, especially the Spitfire scenes, to keep things hopping for me.

    Uninspiring yes, but that was the whole point for dissidents: a Spit-for-t’eye at the Hollywood version of WW2 – no #BadGermans. Britons could (barely, and with backs to wall) get inspired to fight for King and Country in the early 1940′s. No self-respecting man in any Western country could do that for the current political dispensation. The only good reason to join now is for masculine challenge, and that is increasingly untenable.

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  41. Mr. Anon says:
    @james wilson
    All right, I'll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    All right, I’ll just be the first (and only?) to say it. Dunkirk was dull, and even managed to be uninspiring.

    I thought it was great – best new movie I’ve seen in a while.

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  42. Mr. Anon says:
    @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Is it that different from our government’s policy? There are probably a lot fewer people around the World who hate China than who hate America.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Is it that different from our government’s policy?
     
    It's quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.
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  43. Saw it. For US audieances, the jingoism might be distasteful, but after all, it is THEIR movie so they get to jingo-bell the night away. Technically it’s easily the equal of current state-of-art American crazed thrillers, maybe even an explosion or two better. At least its hero is an adult male, not a boy with mousse in his hair and a homeless-quality plaid shirt. You could do a lot worse with a six-pack and a nght to kill than to make this investment.

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  44. Mr. Anon says:
    @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    Yes, I’m sure that the actions of a backward, decadent empire in 1842 are readily exptrapolatable to modern China, a nation with a well equipped 2 million man army, nuclear weapons, and what will soon be (if it isn’t already) the largest economy int he world – moreover a nation that still is, and considers itself to be, a nation.

    Just as Russia’s humiliating defeat in the Russo-Japanese war presaged their complete military up to this very day.

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  45. Romanian says: • Website

    I just wanted to put this report out there, via isegoria. Keep in mind that this is an actual government study. I would love to hear Mr Derbyshire’s opinion on this.

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/genetics/selection/2013-anonymous-strategicconsequencesofchineseracism.pdf

    The Strategic Consequences of Chinese Racism

    First, virulent racism and eugenics heavily inform Chinese perceptions of the world. United States decision-makers must recognize that China is a racist state, much closer to Nazi Germany than to the values upheld in the West. Most often, the Chinese do not even recognize their racism as a problem. They believe that racism is a Western phenomenon and that Westerners are obsessed with race. This obsession is seen by the Chinese to be a strategic vulnerability of the West, whereas China is not affected by racism.

    Second, racism informs their view of the United States. From the Chinese perspective, the United States used to be a strong society that the Chinese respected when it was unicultural, defined by the centrality of Anglo-Protestant culture at the core of American national identity aligned with the political ideology of liberalism, the rule of law, and free market capitalism. The Chinese see multiculturalism as a sickness that has overtaken the United States, and a component of U.S. decline.

    Third, racism informs their view of international politics in three ways. First, states are stable, and thus good for the Chinese, to the degree that they are unicultural. Second, Chinese ethnocentrism and racism drive their outlook to the rest of the world. Their expectation is of a tribute system where barbarians know that the Chinese are superior. Third, there is a strong, implicit, racialist view of international politics that is alien and anathema to Western policy-makers and analysts. The Chinese are comfortable using race to explain events and appealing to racist stereotypes to advance their interests. Most insidious is the Chinese belief that Africans in particular need Chinese leadership.

    Fourth, the Chinese will make appeals to Third World states based on “racial solidarity,” that is, the need of non-white peoples to unite against Western imperialism and racism. Racial solidarity claims are easy for Chinese to accomplish since the Chinese can make strategic racist claims. For example, they can frame international politics in terms of a “racial balance of power,” and cast appeals to the Third World along the line of: now is the time for non-whites to dominate international politics.
    Fifth, Chinese racism retards their relations with the Third World. Chinese racism makes it difficult for China to advance a positive message in the Third World, especially Africa, but also in Latin America and the Middle East. The Chinese have a hierarchical representation of looking at other groups, darker skin is lower class, and race matters. In this sense, the racial stereotypes of the Africans commonly found within Chinese society suggest that this population is backward and dirty, and prone to crime, particularly violent crime. These beliefs surface regularly in China’s relations with the Third World and these beliefs, coupled with clannish and ruthless Chinese business practices, generate enormous resentment in the Third World.

    Sixth, Chinese racism, and the degree to which the Chinese permit their view of the United States to be informed by racism, has the potential to hinder China in its competition with the United States because it contributes to their overconfidence. This overconfidence is a result of ethnocentrism and a sense of superiority rooted in racism. The Chinese commonly believe that they are cleverer than others, and so may shape events in an oblique manner or through shi, the strategic manipulation of events. This conceit among the Chinese that they can manipulate others is supremely dangerous for Asian stability. At the same time, it is a great advantage for the United States to play upon that overconfidence. An overconfident China will continue to make the mistakes it is presently in the South China or East China Sea disputes. That is, making threats, issuing demands, heavy-handed shows of force, are generated by China’s overconfidence.

    Seventh, as lamentable as it is, Chinese racism helps to make the Chinese a formidable adversary. There are three critical consequences that result from this. The first is the sense of unity the Chinese possess. Second, it allows the Chinese to have a strong sense of identity, which in turn permits them to weather adversity, and to be focused and secure confidence that the rest of the nation is with them. Third, China is not plagued by self-doubt or guilt about its past.

    Eight, the Chinese are never going to go through a civil rights movement like the United States. This is because, first, they have no freedom of the press, freedom to petition their government, freedom to assemble, all of which are necessary to support a civil rights movement. Second, there is no political drive or consciousness for equality in Chinese thought. Equality is associated with Maoism and rejected in today’s China, where inequality is accepted and celebrated. In addition, there is no notion of civil rights in Chinese political thought or, practically, in jurisprudence.

    Ninth, China’s treatment of Christians and ethnic minorities is poor. The government recognizes that religion is able to do many positive acts in a society, and they do see the need for people to have a moral, religious grounding provided by religion since a moral framework may be lost in the demands of a market economy. The current debate is an echo of the one they had in the 1800s, how do they preserve the essence of what is Chinese in an era dominated by Western ideas. Yet, the government is fearful of religion in the sense that uncontrolled religion may be a threat; a challenge to Beijing’s authority. Not surprisingly, the treatment of ethnic minorities is equally bad.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    Thanks for posting that. It's worthy of more comment. It appears correct in most of what it states, although the Western anti-white attitude (let's not call it anti-racism, because it's not) is not a strength.

    Most correctly, China's government is like a Chinese version of Nazi Germany in a lot of ways. If the Reich had possessed nukes from the beginning and had been a little more slow and gradual about the annexing, maybe it could have lasted 1000 years. Eventually the West will learn something from China. Certainly, having a Pakistani mayor of London telling us that terrorism is just part and parcel of living in a big city just serves to underline that the British victory over the Germans was very much a Pyrrhic victory. Our slavish devotion to be everything the Nazis were not is just retardation on a grand scale.
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  46. Mr. Anon says:

    The Soviets made their own Tom Clancy like movie in the mid 80s, about plucky, heroic soviet marines battling an evil imperialist CIA plot:

    The Detached Mission

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  47. Baizuo says:

    Jack D already translated correctly, I guess they used a screenshot from the film where he is showing both middlefingers to the bad guy with this text for a humorous poster.
    What a coincidence, I just watched the film a day before Steve wrote this one.
    The movie is like Commando, Rambo, James Bond and I guess Bruce Lee were combined to create the main character. The bodycount of the film exceeds Commando’s, and the violence is easily R-rated. So is it the second most succesful R-rated film after Passion of the Christ?
    With lines like “China and Africa are friends”, and “Didn’t your mother tell you not to fuck with spoiled brats?” it’s easily one of the most memorable films of the past year.
    Kind of makes the viewer dismiss the blatant jingoism, when there’s a 5 minute underwater fight in the beginning, and the main guy catches a rocket from a bazooka with some iron net, and throws it to the bad guys car blowing them up.
    More golden dialogue: “If the American Marines are so good, where are they now?”, as said by the Chinese main guy, and “People like you will always be inferior to people like me”, spoken by the white evil guy.
    Need I mention the mom of the key African boy, basically Mammy from Gone with the wind.

    A true spectacle, would watch again.

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  48. Does he succeed in taking down the Death Star?

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  49. Aylok says:

    It’s classical Chinese – according Victor Mair the sinologist the original meaning of the poet was maybe a bit softer but I took it to be “exterminate” when I first saw the posters and did all the Chinese who made it a hit apparently. http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34088

    “Original movies in the top 25 include the horror movie It,” Actually it’s a remake too (of the 1990 TV version of the novel).

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  50. Thea says:

    You’ve written before that Hispanics are the largest box office customers. They seem to prefer white superheroes to East Asian supernatural martial artists. As they become a larger share of the public, Chinese movies would have a harder time I guess.

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  51. 1661er says:
    @Jack D
    I think the poster in question is here:


    https://blogs-images.forbes.com/robcain/files/2017/08/WWII-poster.jpg?width=960

    犯我中华者, 虽远必诛

    Roughly, anyone who offends China will be punished/executed no matter how far away he is.


    I think it is a quote from a poem by the classical (35 BC) Chinese poet/historian Ban Gu regarding the some barbarian (non-Chinese) who offended the Han, but my Chinese is not that good.

    https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E7%8A%AF%E6%88%91%E4%B8%AD%E5%8D%8E%E8%80%85%EF%BC%8C%E8%99%BD%E8%BF%9C%E5%BF%85%E8%AF%9B

    She wrote it down, but it’s not her own words.(She was part of the brother/sister chronicler team) She wrote down this guy’s justification for an unauthorized expedition against Xiongnu/Hun in modern day Kazakhstan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Tang

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Zhizhi

    Also, I think violate/invade may be a better way translate that character than offend, in this context.

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    • Replies: @dwb
    I am many years removed from living overseas, and actually learnt the original form characters and not the modern simplifications, but Jack is more or less correct.

    The paraphrase comes from a poem written at the Eastern Han Dynasty:

    "犯强汉者,虽远必诛"

    It's not "offend," in the sense that someone is "offended" by some microagression. It has a meaning like "attacks" or "violates."

    And also it says that the person or entities will be punished, not "exterminated," no matter how far away or removed.

    Basically, it's a poem that puffed up the powers of the new Han rulers (the dynasty was established right around the time of Jesus Christ; the poem is noted as being circa 35 CE), that they would defend their empire/subjects no matter how far removed.

    Have not seen this movie, so cannot comment on how it applies here.
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  52. Spandrell says: • Website

    As mentioned, the slogan is an old one, from when the Han dynasty defeated the Huns. The Chinese could fight back then and their descendants are understandably proud of that feat.

    And they are also understandably proud of their recent ability to make themselves noticed abroad as a great power, after 200 years of bring pushed around. Having money feels good, and Chinese people today are really enjoying the feeling. I say good for them.

    The movie is awful though.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
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  53. I just watched this movie and I wouldn’t say it’s really ‘patriotic’ or ‘jingoistic’. It’s more interesting than that. It’s about a disgraced soldier working alone to rescue Chinese in Africa. It doesn’t actually depict Chinese particularly well. He is disgraced because he kicked a property developer who was destroying a village in China into a car window. He goes to Africa to work and then a civil war breaks out. The Chinese navy arrives in Africa only to evacuate the Chinese and (he has to lie and say an African boy is his son in an attempt to get him on one of the ships). He volunteers to rescue some Chinese staff from the local “Chinese-invested” hospital (he fails). He ends up helping to save the staff of a Chinese factory, who are a mix of Chinese and African. At first, they’re only going to evacuate the Chinese from the factory because there’s only one helicopter, but he proposes evacuating the women and children by helicopter while he takes the men by foot (during this scene it’s established that many of the Chinese and Africans at the factory are in relationships). This doesn’t go to plan either, but the rest of the movie involves only these Chinese and African factory workers. I saw one article say it’s the Chinese version of the “white savior”, but that’s nonsense; at no point does he try to help the natives save themselves. The mercenary group is not American, but multinational and multiracial; it’s merely led by a white American man.

    The pivotal scene comes when the hero is trapped under some debris surrounded by tanks while trying to save the factory workers. He uses his phone to send images of the scene to the captain of a Chinese warship he has been communicating with. The question is, “Will China intervene?” Eventually they get authorisation to take out the tanks with missiles. This scene is pretty clearly set up as the question of whether China should play a greater role in the world, but given the context it’s not exactly ‘patriotic’ or ‘jingoistic’, but rather interventionist. It’s done as part of a multinational, UN-led effort to evacuate people from a war zone. Now, no doubt being able to participate in international efforts and protect Chinese abroad is something new to Chinese and the effectiveness of this scene had something to do with the movie’s popularity, but it’s not simple ‘patriotism’ as has been claimed. It’s essentially about how China can no longer be isolationist. An earlier much discussed scene, where he mocks the (half-Chinese) American doctor for expecting the US marines to come (he’d seen the American ships leave along with all the other ships), can be read as either meaning that the US is retreating or simply that the US can’t be expected to be everywhere (the actor/director has said it was just intended as a joke).

    There’s one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says “people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it” and the hero kills him and says “that’s fucking history”. There’s a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it’s easy to read it as the symbolic end of China’s “century of humiliation”.

    It’s actually a pretty decent movie, save some bad CGI, and I can see why it was popular, but if it reveals China’s motives it reveals a country that has a set quite a low bar for itself: to be an ordinary country with an ordinary military, capable of evacuating its people from a war zone and maybe extending that courtesy to non-Chinese employees.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
    , @syonredux

    There’s one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says “people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it” and the hero kills him and says “that’s fucking history”. There’s a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it’s easy to read it as the symbolic end of China’s “century of humiliation”.
     
    Disturbing.
    , @J.Ross
    I observe that, as in GITS:SAC, Black Lagoon, and elsewhere, East Asians are very happy to refurbish this straw man of the in-your-face white supremacist because it lends righteousness to economic competition. You will never find worse yellow fever than among so-called white racists, or a worse lost historical opportunity than East Asians deciding to oppose whites and deal with blacks on their own.
    Also, unscrupulous developers were the bete noir of the Chinese news cycle for years, and Chinese elites are always sensitive to the complaints of the street (if never really willing to properly fix things). At one point an elderly war hero who had fought the Japanese had his house destroyed after raising a crowd of outraged protesters. Interesting that the plot is so much more real and honest than anything Hollywood would ever attempt, although I find that the Chinese are happy to let you gripe about some things so long as there's no real threat, and certain other people conflate griping and threatening.
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  54. My mother was (and still is) a huge movie buff, so I grew up watching all kinds of weird flicks. When I was in high school in the late ’90s, she had a VCD player – VCD then being a popular format in Asia – and a roomful of NTSC/PAL-compatible equipment, including such goodies as laserdisc players and Betamax VCRs. (She had another room devoted to stereo equipment. Mixing music was her semi-professional hobby.) She imported foreign films by the hundreds*.

    (When I was a kid, she befriended a video-store owner. When he retired, he ended up selling her the bulk of his collection – thousands of movies – for a dollar a tape. They were all used, but she didn’t mind.)

    My favorite Asian movie (with Western actors in two of the main roles) is a gloriously-sleazy Indonesian curiosity called Lady Terminator (1989) – a direct ripoff of the Schwarzenegger classic. (The hilariously-bad dubbing, done in Los Angeles, only adds to the fun.)

    The full English version was on YouTube, but it’s been taken down. This trailer is a good overview:

    *Our house was like something you would see on Hoarders, with books, magazines, VHS tapes, CDs, cassette tapes, and vinyl records lying all over the place. My mother’s housekeeping habits were lackadaisical at best.

    (Eventually she settled on banana boxes – the sturdy cardboard ones – as her preferred storage medium. Every time we went to the grocery store, she would sweet-talk the produce guys into giving her another carload of such boxes. She ended up with hundreds of them.)

    Her entire living room was dominated by two custom-built shelves that ran along two full sides of the room. The larger of the two, devoted to books, was at least 20 feet high. The smaller, devoted to movies, was maybe 12 feet high. Neither held more than a tiny fraction of her collection.

    Her place was small in terms of square footage – two bedrooms, one-and-a-half bathrooms – but the entire living/dining/kitchen area was an unbroken open space, with a high vaulted ceiling that ran the whole length of the house. My grandparents’ ranch-style house was larger – four bedrooms, three bathrooms – but had very low ceilings, so it seemed claustrophobic by comparison.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    My favorite Asian movie (with Western actors in two of the main roles) is a gloriously-sleazy Indonesian curiosity called Lady Terminator (1989) – a direct ripoff of the Schwarzenegger classic.
     
    Lady Terminator is all kinds o0f awesome. Love the tagline. "First she mates, then she terminates."

    80s Indonesian movies are well worth checking out. Lots of terrific horror/fantasy movies. Loads of fun.
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  55. Twinkie says:

    That trailer looks like something out of the ‘80’s. It’s not exactly John Wick.

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  56. syonredux says:

    Off-topic,

    They’re coming for Aziz Ansari:

    According to a report from Babe.net (via Uproxx), a Brooklyn-based photographer identified only as “Grace” has accused Aziz Ansari of forcing himself on her after the two of them went on a date last year. Grace says she met Ansari at the 2017 Emmys, when she noticed that both of them were taking photos with same ’80s camera. They exchanged numbers, and Ansari asked her out on a date near the end of September. She says she had been “excited” at the time, but she told Babe that it ended up being “the worst night of my life.”

    https://www.avclub.com/aziz-ansari-is-now-facing-allegations-of-sexual-miscond-1822070857

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    That's strange because when she texted him the next day she didn't say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote "Hey Aziz nice meeting you too". She did go on to say that the guy was a little aggressive but she sounded like she was just giving him pointers, not that she was deeply angry with him.

    As has been discussed many times before, men are programmed to immediately screw every fertile female in sight, whereas women are biologically programmed to be a little more picky about who they will admit to their loins. Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little. No harm in trying, he figured. If she doesn't bite (oops, bad word choice) on the 1st try, I'll give her another glass of wine (or 2) and try again (and again) so that the evening doesn't turn out to be a washout. He's paid for a nice dinner and chatted with her and now it's time to cap off the evening with a roll in the hay with the well known TV star. Maybe at some point in the evening she will relax and get over her objections and we'll both have a rollicking good time. She OTOH, probably wanted to wait to the 2nd or 3rd or Nth date to show that the guy had some interest in an ongoing relationship and not just a 1 night stand and THEN she would have dropped her knickers and gladly done the deed with her new "boyfriend" the well known TV star. This is nothing that hasn't happened a million times before, especially in the Pill era of sexual liberation but suddenly this style of dating is a war crime.

    OTOH, Ansari wearing the "Times Up" pin was a little hypocritical given his dating style.
    , @El Dato
    Alternate ending for Blade Runner:

    Rachel texts a #MeToo after the night at the conapt. Deckard is relieved of all functions.

    THE END!
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  57. >>One interesting question is why Chinese-language movies<<

    How about The Great Wall? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Wall_(film)
    Very Chino-Merican film, clearly not just a Hollywood movie set in China. I saw it in the cinema and mostly enjoyed it.

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  58. Say what you will about the Chinese…they don’t have an elite filled with fanatical loathing of its own nation’s founding stock, culture, and history.

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  59. FDS says:

    Zhang Yimou’s extraordinarily lavish-looking Hero…[has]…largely disappeared from American consciousness in this decade.

    Your mention of Hero made me recall that I’d seen this flick long ago. I checked my diary and here’s the relevant excerpt:

    [Attended] a film at a theater for the first time in about ten months – “Hero”, at the xxxxxxxx. Passed over my hunskie, walked in behind a couple of cool black guys, and sat in the squeaky seat. Good film, “Hero”. Not great, but good. Looked beautiful, absolutely stunning. Decent story too. However, a little too much swordplay for me, a little too much Taoist flying and water running, and a little too much “Western” (rotten) influence. The latter included overt sex stuff and an inflated role of women in martial prowess (though it’s always been an element in these films, it just seemed a bit too much last night, but maybe I’m griping).

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate – Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many. Then there’s the talk of the Qin emperor, who’s trying to unite China. He says that even his own court thinks him a tyrant, does not understand what’s in his heart, that blood must be spilled so that blood will no longer be spilled. You can easily throw Hitler or Napoleon into this role, and it’s the same thing. Oh, and of course there are displays of minor things like honor, sacrifice, and a tiny little ideology called “blood and soil”, that the halfwits in America think is called communism. China is a race-based superstate, poised to rule the world. And there’s nothing the fucking drones here can do except wait.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate – Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many.
     
    Um, you do realize that that notion ("in a war, there are heroes on both sides") was the dominant mode for films about the American Civil War? You know, until the SJWs took over.
    , @Brutusale
    Yeah, the movie Patton portrayed Capt. Steiger and Field Marshal Rommel as irredeemable and implacable enemies. And that's just the first American war film that sprang to mind.

    I'd suggest that you re-watch some of these movies you disparage.

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  60. There is a lot of Chinese in Toronto. I have seen just few guys worth noticing physically fitness wise. I am not a fan of Chinese movies. They have little connection to reality. Maybe even less than American one. During damansky crisis in 1969 Chinese hand combat did not help much and so far here is no Chinese among mma stars. Chinese are also extremely racist.

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  61. wren says:

    Well here is an iSteve Chinese movie: “Finding Mr. Right,” about birth tourism.

    It grossed $82 million in China. There also may be a “Finding Mr. Right 2.”

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    • Replies: @wren
    Finding Mr. Right 2. More birth tourism rom-com.

    These actually look good from the trailers. I wonder how many anchor babies they helped conceive?

    https://youtu.be/AhguPTEaeoc

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  62. wren says:
    @wren
    Well here is an iSteve Chinese movie: "Finding Mr. Right," about birth tourism.

    It grossed $82 million in China. There also may be a "Finding Mr. Right 2."

    https://youtu.be/CiwmN_2rIT0

    Finding Mr. Right 2. More birth tourism rom-com.

    These actually look good from the trailers. I wonder how many anchor babies they helped conceive?

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  63. Jack D says:
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    They're coming for Aziz Ansari:

    According to a report from Babe.net (via Uproxx), a Brooklyn-based photographer identified only as “Grace” has accused Aziz Ansari of forcing himself on her after the two of them went on a date last year. Grace says she met Ansari at the 2017 Emmys, when she noticed that both of them were taking photos with same ’80s camera. They exchanged numbers, and Ansari asked her out on a date near the end of September. She says she had been “excited” at the time, but she told Babe that it ended up being “the worst night of my life.”
     
    https://www.avclub.com/aziz-ansari-is-now-facing-allegations-of-sexual-miscond-1822070857

    That’s strange because when she texted him the next day she didn’t say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote “Hey Aziz nice meeting you too”. She did go on to say that the guy was a little aggressive but she sounded like she was just giving him pointers, not that she was deeply angry with him.

    As has been discussed many times before, men are programmed to immediately screw every fertile female in sight, whereas women are biologically programmed to be a little more picky about who they will admit to their loins. Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little. No harm in trying, he figured. If she doesn’t bite (oops, bad word choice) on the 1st try, I’ll give her another glass of wine (or 2) and try again (and again) so that the evening doesn’t turn out to be a washout. He’s paid for a nice dinner and chatted with her and now it’s time to cap off the evening with a roll in the hay with the well known TV star. Maybe at some point in the evening she will relax and get over her objections and we’ll both have a rollicking good time. She OTOH, probably wanted to wait to the 2nd or 3rd or Nth date to show that the guy had some interest in an ongoing relationship and not just a 1 night stand and THEN she would have dropped her knickers and gladly done the deed with her new “boyfriend” the well known TV star. This is nothing that hasn’t happened a million times before, especially in the Pill era of sexual liberation but suddenly this style of dating is a war crime.

    OTOH, Ansari wearing the “Times Up” pin was a little hypocritical given his dating style.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little.
     
    I thought he was ethnically Indian, not Middle Eastern.
    , @Chrisnonymous

    That’s strange because when she texted him the next day she didn’t say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote “Hey Aziz nice meeting you too”.
     
    Seriously? She immediately followed that by writing "Last night might have been fun for you but it wasn't for me." That's not a subsequent message, it's just the next paragraph. "Nice meeting you too" was just a civility.

    This is one of the rare cases in which I have to side with the woman. Her description of events has the ring of truth. Ansari's problem was not that he was trying to make a woman put out on a man's timeline, his problem is that he is a small, goofy-looking guy who lacks any skill with women. It's pretty clear from her description that she wanted to be seduced, and he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough.
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  64. Do we have any data on what happens if white people adopt Chinese culture en masse? Are there any examples of this – perhaps in Hong Kong?

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    • Replies: @Escher
    IMO it was the other way in Hong Kong and Singapore (both ex-colonies), where the locals adopted British language and culture (to varying degrees depending on socio-economic class).
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  65. Twinkie says:
    @Jack D
    That's strange because when she texted him the next day she didn't say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote "Hey Aziz nice meeting you too". She did go on to say that the guy was a little aggressive but she sounded like she was just giving him pointers, not that she was deeply angry with him.

    As has been discussed many times before, men are programmed to immediately screw every fertile female in sight, whereas women are biologically programmed to be a little more picky about who they will admit to their loins. Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little. No harm in trying, he figured. If she doesn't bite (oops, bad word choice) on the 1st try, I'll give her another glass of wine (or 2) and try again (and again) so that the evening doesn't turn out to be a washout. He's paid for a nice dinner and chatted with her and now it's time to cap off the evening with a roll in the hay with the well known TV star. Maybe at some point in the evening she will relax and get over her objections and we'll both have a rollicking good time. She OTOH, probably wanted to wait to the 2nd or 3rd or Nth date to show that the guy had some interest in an ongoing relationship and not just a 1 night stand and THEN she would have dropped her knickers and gladly done the deed with her new "boyfriend" the well known TV star. This is nothing that hasn't happened a million times before, especially in the Pill era of sexual liberation but suddenly this style of dating is a war crime.

    OTOH, Ansari wearing the "Times Up" pin was a little hypocritical given his dating style.

    Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little.

    I thought he was ethnically Indian, not Middle Eastern.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    He's from a Indian Muslim family. I think that Indian Muslims must have at least a little bit of Middle Eastern conqueror blood in them.

    Anyway if you read the whole account in Babe, she does take off all of her clothes and engage in oral sex with him so the evening was not a total waste from his POV.

    This quote from the article was hilarious:


    Before meeting Ansari, Grace told friends and coworkers about the date and consulted her go-to group chat about what she should wear to fit the “cocktail chic” dress-code he gave her. She settled on “a tank-top dress and jeans.” She showed me a picture, it was a good outfit.
     
    Well thank God for that. The woman is alleging that she has been all but raped, but she is still looking for confirmation that she wore a nice outfit.

    https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355

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  66. @James Smith
    I just watched this movie and I wouldn't say it's really 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic'. It's more interesting than that. It's about a disgraced soldier working alone to rescue Chinese in Africa. It doesn't actually depict Chinese particularly well. He is disgraced because he kicked a property developer who was destroying a village in China into a car window. He goes to Africa to work and then a civil war breaks out. The Chinese navy arrives in Africa only to evacuate the Chinese and (he has to lie and say an African boy is his son in an attempt to get him on one of the ships). He volunteers to rescue some Chinese staff from the local "Chinese-invested" hospital (he fails). He ends up helping to save the staff of a Chinese factory, who are a mix of Chinese and African. At first, they're only going to evacuate the Chinese from the factory because there's only one helicopter, but he proposes evacuating the women and children by helicopter while he takes the men by foot (during this scene it's established that many of the Chinese and Africans at the factory are in relationships). This doesn't go to plan either, but the rest of the movie involves only these Chinese and African factory workers. I saw one article say it's the Chinese version of the "white savior", but that's nonsense; at no point does he try to help the natives save themselves. The mercenary group is not American, but multinational and multiracial; it's merely led by a white American man.

    The pivotal scene comes when the hero is trapped under some debris surrounded by tanks while trying to save the factory workers. He uses his phone to send images of the scene to the captain of a Chinese warship he has been communicating with. The question is, "Will China intervene?" Eventually they get authorisation to take out the tanks with missiles. This scene is pretty clearly set up as the question of whether China should play a greater role in the world, but given the context it's not exactly 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic', but rather interventionist. It's done as part of a multinational, UN-led effort to evacuate people from a war zone. Now, no doubt being able to participate in international efforts and protect Chinese abroad is something new to Chinese and the effectiveness of this scene had something to do with the movie's popularity, but it's not simple 'patriotism' as has been claimed. It's essentially about how China can no longer be isolationist. An earlier much discussed scene, where he mocks the (half-Chinese) American doctor for expecting the US marines to come (he'd seen the American ships leave along with all the other ships), can be read as either meaning that the US is retreating or simply that the US can't be expected to be everywhere (the actor/director has said it was just intended as a joke).

    There's one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says "people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it" and the hero kills him and says "that's fucking history". There's a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it's easy to read it as the symbolic end of China's "century of humiliation".

    It's actually a pretty decent movie, save some bad CGI, and I can see why it was popular, but if it reveals China's motives it reveals a country that has a set quite a low bar for itself: to be an ordinary country with an ordinary military, capable of evacuating its people from a war zone and maybe extending that courtesy to non-Chinese employees.

    Thanks.

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  67. Jack D says:
    @Twinkie

    Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little.
     
    I thought he was ethnically Indian, not Middle Eastern.

    He’s from a Indian Muslim family. I think that Indian Muslims must have at least a little bit of Middle Eastern conqueror blood in them.

    Anyway if you read the whole account in Babe, she does take off all of her clothes and engage in oral sex with him so the evening was not a total waste from his POV.

    This quote from the article was hilarious:

    Before meeting Ansari, Grace told friends and coworkers about the date and consulted her go-to group chat about what she should wear to fit the “cocktail chic” dress-code he gave her. She settled on “a tank-top dress and jeans.” She showed me a picture, it was a good outfit.

    Well thank God for that. The woman is alleging that she has been all but raped, but she is still looking for confirmation that she wore a nice outfit.

    https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Tamil Muslims? Very unlikely. The guy could be a poster boy for the LTTE he's so stereotypically Tamil.
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  68. @Spandrell
    As mentioned, the slogan is an old one, from when the Han dynasty defeated the Huns. The Chinese could fight back then and their descendants are understandably proud of that feat.

    And they are also understandably proud of their recent ability to make themselves noticed abroad as a great power, after 200 years of bring pushed around. Having money feels good, and Chinese people today are really enjoying the feeling. I say good for them.

    The movie is awful though.

    Thanks.

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  69. syonredux says:
    @Mr. Anon

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.
     
    Is it that different from our government's policy? There are probably a lot fewer people around the World who hate China than who hate America.

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Is it that different from our government’s policy?

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.
     
    That's true. And we don't necessarily exterminate them if they offend us. We just support NGO's that undermine their morals and society.
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  70. syonredux says:
    @James Smith
    I just watched this movie and I wouldn't say it's really 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic'. It's more interesting than that. It's about a disgraced soldier working alone to rescue Chinese in Africa. It doesn't actually depict Chinese particularly well. He is disgraced because he kicked a property developer who was destroying a village in China into a car window. He goes to Africa to work and then a civil war breaks out. The Chinese navy arrives in Africa only to evacuate the Chinese and (he has to lie and say an African boy is his son in an attempt to get him on one of the ships). He volunteers to rescue some Chinese staff from the local "Chinese-invested" hospital (he fails). He ends up helping to save the staff of a Chinese factory, who are a mix of Chinese and African. At first, they're only going to evacuate the Chinese from the factory because there's only one helicopter, but he proposes evacuating the women and children by helicopter while he takes the men by foot (during this scene it's established that many of the Chinese and Africans at the factory are in relationships). This doesn't go to plan either, but the rest of the movie involves only these Chinese and African factory workers. I saw one article say it's the Chinese version of the "white savior", but that's nonsense; at no point does he try to help the natives save themselves. The mercenary group is not American, but multinational and multiracial; it's merely led by a white American man.

    The pivotal scene comes when the hero is trapped under some debris surrounded by tanks while trying to save the factory workers. He uses his phone to send images of the scene to the captain of a Chinese warship he has been communicating with. The question is, "Will China intervene?" Eventually they get authorisation to take out the tanks with missiles. This scene is pretty clearly set up as the question of whether China should play a greater role in the world, but given the context it's not exactly 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic', but rather interventionist. It's done as part of a multinational, UN-led effort to evacuate people from a war zone. Now, no doubt being able to participate in international efforts and protect Chinese abroad is something new to Chinese and the effectiveness of this scene had something to do with the movie's popularity, but it's not simple 'patriotism' as has been claimed. It's essentially about how China can no longer be isolationist. An earlier much discussed scene, where he mocks the (half-Chinese) American doctor for expecting the US marines to come (he'd seen the American ships leave along with all the other ships), can be read as either meaning that the US is retreating or simply that the US can't be expected to be everywhere (the actor/director has said it was just intended as a joke).

    There's one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says "people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it" and the hero kills him and says "that's fucking history". There's a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it's easy to read it as the symbolic end of China's "century of humiliation".

    It's actually a pretty decent movie, save some bad CGI, and I can see why it was popular, but if it reveals China's motives it reveals a country that has a set quite a low bar for itself: to be an ordinary country with an ordinary military, capable of evacuating its people from a war zone and maybe extending that courtesy to non-Chinese employees.

    There’s one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says “people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it” and the hero kills him and says “that’s fucking history”. There’s a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it’s easy to read it as the symbolic end of China’s “century of humiliation”.

    Disturbing.

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  71. El Dato says:
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    They're coming for Aziz Ansari:

    According to a report from Babe.net (via Uproxx), a Brooklyn-based photographer identified only as “Grace” has accused Aziz Ansari of forcing himself on her after the two of them went on a date last year. Grace says she met Ansari at the 2017 Emmys, when she noticed that both of them were taking photos with same ’80s camera. They exchanged numbers, and Ansari asked her out on a date near the end of September. She says she had been “excited” at the time, but she told Babe that it ended up being “the worst night of my life.”
     
    https://www.avclub.com/aziz-ansari-is-now-facing-allegations-of-sexual-miscond-1822070857

    Alternate ending for Blade Runner:

    Rachel texts a #MeToo after the night at the conapt. Deckard is relieved of all functions.

    THE END!

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  72. syonredux says:
    @Carl
    "It" is a remake

    “It” is a remake

    Nah. It’s a new adaptation of a novel. It would only count as as a remake if they simply re-did the earlier adaptation (cf the recent remake of Verhoeven’s version of Total Recall ; that was clearly not another adaptation of the Dick short story).

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    • Replies: @Carl
    Sure, whatever
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  73. @B.

    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

     

    Man, they rolled over really hard in the Korean war. So hard the US was pushed all the way from Chinese border to the 38th parallel.

    The late Jerry Pournelle’s experience in late 1950-1951, starting up near the Chinese border in North Korea, was that the Chinese “volunteers” were rolling over the Americans. It took a long fight after that just to get back up to the 38th parallel.

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  74. @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    I had neighbor who fought in the Korean War. He still had nightmares about the Chinese well into the late 70′s.

    http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/chinese-counterattacks-in-korea-change-nature-of-war

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  75. @Uilleam Yr Alban
    "Original movies in the top 25 include the horror movie It"

    This had been a good miniseries in 1990: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It_(miniseries).

    Thanks to everybody who pointed out my mistake about “It.”

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Thanks to everybody who pointed out my mistake about “It.”
     
    I don't think that it was a mistake, Steve. It was a new adaptation of the novel; it wasn't a re-make of the TV mini-series adaptation.
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  76. El Dato says:
    @Joe Stalin
    Based on John Derbysire's article on the unknown state of the reliability of the US themonuclear arsenal, I most certainly believe that we need to withdraw from the current ban on nuclear weapons testing and begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.

    ASAP.

    I want a known deterrent against “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”

    I think people on Hawaii would agree. Wonder when their governor will start demanding an ABM Island defense from POTUS? Chicago used to have a Nike-Hercules AD system; we could use one too.

    begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.

    Sadly, the cleanup from the earlier batch is still ongoing and where will the money come from? I think that Obama 1 trillion dollar aicraft-carried small nuke program is on schedule, right? Now Trump wants more small nukes. This Earth is going places!

    I think people on Hawaii would agree.

    It’s as if this was not really an accident….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    Are strategic nuclear weapons a key component of the US arsenal? If so, then we need to spend the money. Could we use new ones? I'm not adverse to that. PRC has threatened the annihilation of LA.
    What happens if Russia or PRC hand off a nuke to North Korea for testing and they find out it DOESN'T work? That would mean there might be a very good chance our nukes are "paper tigers" and then it's off to the races.

    At a minimum, we need to find out if ANY of them work at all. Do the explosives lenses deteriorate with age? Do they crack with age? I don't know and no computer simulation on the aging of components is going to convince me. The least we can do is recycle the Oralloy pits into new weapons.

    https://www.okieboat.com/Talos%20W30.html
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  77. @guest
    Yes, you are the only. I was primed to dislike it, which is why I only went to see it like 13 weeks after its release. The Dunkirk Myth irks me, and I find the idea of WWII as a nationalistic cause for Britain pernicious. Also, Hans Zimmer and his "Bwaa!"s are ruining my musical experience of movies.

    That being said, I had to see it to understand. The context doesn't really matter. If Hitler had no intention of invading Britain and Churchill's speech made no sense except as a plea to have the Americans come bail him out, still, the spontaneous levee on masse of regular folk going to save their boys is inspiring. And the soldiers who think they're coming home in disgrace only to discover themselves as heroes is well done.

    Yay, propaganda!

    “Their Finest” was 2017 movie about making a propaganda movie to influence the USA.

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  78. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Thanks to everybody who pointed out my mistake about "It."

    Thanks to everybody who pointed out my mistake about “It.”

    I don’t think that it was a mistake, Steve. It was a new adaptation of the novel; it wasn’t a re-make of the TV mini-series adaptation.

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  79. Big Bill says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Really liked that terrorist drone thing at the beginning of the trailer. I speculated about such a contraption here.

    Now TrackingPoint’s products aren’t really the sort of weapons you can do a productive rampage with – crucially, it is single shot, and extremely expensive ($20,000) to boot. But it should soon be possible to create far more effective solutions. For instance, a standalone mod that contains a database of common gun models (and maybe the option to input custom data) that you can strap onto any old AK. An accomplice can tag targets remotely through a connected smartphone, or even automate the process entirely on the basis of face recognition. Think of the kind of head shot percentages you can achieve.
    Even more creative solutions can be thought up. Just the sort of stuff you can do by coupling this with drones can provide material for countless cyberpunk stories.

    The gun can be extremely light, too. Strapped to a drone there’s no need for a stock. No need for a gun barrel longer than about 10 cm, if that. Someone’s going to deploy one in the next few years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    A few years ago I saw on the news an engineering student who put a semiauto pistol on a drone. Each shot pushed the drone a few inches backward. Kind of like a burst of cannon fire on an A-10 will decelerate it. If you are activating it via a solenoid, multiple pulses will give you illegal, in the eyes of the BATF, full auto fire.
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  80. @El Dato

    begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.
     
    Sadly, the cleanup from the earlier batch is still ongoing and where will the money come from? I think that Obama 1 trillion dollar aicraft-carried small nuke program is on schedule, right? Now Trump wants more small nukes. This Earth is going places!

    I think people on Hawaii would agree.
     
    It's as if this was not really an accident....

    Are strategic nuclear weapons a key component of the US arsenal? If so, then we need to spend the money. Could we use new ones? I’m not adverse to that. PRC has threatened the annihilation of LA.
    What happens if Russia or PRC hand off a nuke to North Korea for testing and they find out it DOESN’T work? That would mean there might be a very good chance our nukes are “paper tigers” and then it’s off to the races.

    At a minimum, we need to find out if ANY of them work at all. Do the explosives lenses deteriorate with age? Do they crack with age? I don’t know and no computer simulation on the aging of components is going to convince me. The least we can do is recycle the Oralloy pits into new weapons.

    https://www.okieboat.com/Talos%20W30.html

    Read More
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  81. @jim jones
    The Chinese are notoriously racist but whenever they have had to fight Europeans they simply roll over:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Nanking

    The Korean War turned into a war of China vs USA. Yes, Americans have already fought a hot war with China in relatively modern times

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It was not fun.
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  82. syonredux says:
    @FDS
    Zhang Yimou’s extraordinarily lavish-looking Hero...[has]...largely disappeared from American consciousness in this decade.

    Your mention of Hero made me recall that I'd seen this flick long ago. I checked my diary and here's the relevant excerpt:


    [Attended] a film at a theater for the first time in about ten months – “Hero”, at the xxxxxxxx. Passed over my hunskie, walked in behind a couple of cool black guys, and sat in the squeaky seat. Good film, “Hero”. Not great, but good. Looked beautiful, absolutely stunning. Decent story too. However, a little too much swordplay for me, a little too much Taoist flying and water running, and a little too much “Western” (rotten) influence. The latter included overt sex stuff and an inflated role of women in martial prowess (though it’s always been an element in these films, it just seemed a bit too much last night, but maybe I’m griping).

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate - Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many. Then there’s the talk of the Qin emperor, who’s trying to unite China. He says that even his own court thinks him a tyrant, does not understand what’s in his heart, that blood must be spilled so that blood will no longer be spilled. You can easily throw Hitler or Napoleon into this role, and it’s the same thing. Oh, and of course there are displays of minor things like honor, sacrifice, and a tiny little ideology called “blood and soil”, that the halfwits in America think is called communism. China is a race-based superstate, poised to rule the world. And there’s nothing the fucking drones here can do except wait.

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate – Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many.

    Um, you do realize that that notion (“in a war, there are heroes on both sides”) was the dominant mode for films about the American Civil War? You know, until the SJWs took over.

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    I was surprised to see the 1926 Buster Keaton silent film "The General" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017925/) actually featured the Confederates as being the people to cheer for.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V0IRnPIsVM
    , @Anonymous
    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I've seen yet, regrettably, but it's my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal. Also, when I watched the Mel Gibson Vietnam flick We Were Soldiers I was surprised at how much effort it put into attempting to humanize the NVA, in particular a few scenes focusing on a young NVA soldier who keeps a picture of his pretty wife on his person during the battle. Also worthy of note is Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima, which was very well received by American critics (I believe even better received than its US-focused companion piece, Flags of our Fathers).
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  83. @Difference Maker
    The Korean War turned into a war of China vs USA. Yes, Americans have already fought a hot war with China in relatively modern times

    It was not fun.

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    A relative's college instructor told them of how, on a B-29 over Korea, he bent over to pick up a dropped pen, whereupon a cannon shell went through the plane where his head would have been.
    , @Anon87
    Vietnam gets all the attention, but the Korean War had almost as many US deaths in a much shorter time. I am too young, but was it the Iraq/Afghanistan of its time?
    , @Desiderius
    The Ice Bowl of wars.

    Lombardi was convinced that his new heated field would make conditions playable.

    He was wrong.
    , @Mr. Anon

    It was not fun.
     
    The offensives in the Korean War didn't have nice anodyne names like "Iraqi Freedom" or "Desert Storm". They had names like:

    Operation Rat Killer

    Operation Killer

    Operation Ripper
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  84. @Jack D
    That's strange because when she texted him the next day she didn't say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote "Hey Aziz nice meeting you too". She did go on to say that the guy was a little aggressive but she sounded like she was just giving him pointers, not that she was deeply angry with him.

    As has been discussed many times before, men are programmed to immediately screw every fertile female in sight, whereas women are biologically programmed to be a little more picky about who they will admit to their loins. Ansari was just trying (in typical Middle Eastern male fashion) to rush the sale a little. No harm in trying, he figured. If she doesn't bite (oops, bad word choice) on the 1st try, I'll give her another glass of wine (or 2) and try again (and again) so that the evening doesn't turn out to be a washout. He's paid for a nice dinner and chatted with her and now it's time to cap off the evening with a roll in the hay with the well known TV star. Maybe at some point in the evening she will relax and get over her objections and we'll both have a rollicking good time. She OTOH, probably wanted to wait to the 2nd or 3rd or Nth date to show that the guy had some interest in an ongoing relationship and not just a 1 night stand and THEN she would have dropped her knickers and gladly done the deed with her new "boyfriend" the well known TV star. This is nothing that hasn't happened a million times before, especially in the Pill era of sexual liberation but suddenly this style of dating is a war crime.

    OTOH, Ansari wearing the "Times Up" pin was a little hypocritical given his dating style.

    That’s strange because when she texted him the next day she didn’t say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote “Hey Aziz nice meeting you too”.

    Seriously? She immediately followed that by writing “Last night might have been fun for you but it wasn’t for me.” That’s not a subsequent message, it’s just the next paragraph. “Nice meeting you too” was just a civility.

    This is one of the rare cases in which I have to side with the woman. Her description of events has the ring of truth. Ansari’s problem was not that he was trying to make a woman put out on a man’s timeline, his problem is that he is a small, goofy-looking guy who lacks any skill with women. It’s pretty clear from her description that she wanted to be seduced, and he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough.

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough

     

    It was, actually, enough...


    He sat back and pointed to his penis and motioned for me to go down on him. And I did.

     

    It's good to be the King (or a TV actor).

    She seems like a groupie who got what she came for. Bad choice of words?
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  85. @Big Bill
    The gun can be extremely light, too. Strapped to a drone there's no need for a stock. No need for a gun barrel longer than about 10 cm, if that. Someone's going to deploy one in the next few years.

    A few years ago I saw on the news an engineering student who put a semiauto pistol on a drone. Each shot pushed the drone a few inches backward. Kind of like a burst of cannon fire on an A-10 will decelerate it. If you are activating it via a solenoid, multiple pulses will give you illegal, in the eyes of the BATF, full auto fire.

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  86. @syonredux

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate – Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many.
     
    Um, you do realize that that notion ("in a war, there are heroes on both sides") was the dominant mode for films about the American Civil War? You know, until the SJWs took over.

    I was surprised to see the 1926 Buster Keaton silent film “The General” (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017925/) actually featured the Confederates as being the people to cheer for.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I was surprised to see the 1926 Buster Keaton silent film “The General” (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017925/) actually featured the Confederates as being the people to cheer for.
     
    Up until the '60s, that was quite common. Confederates were rarely depicted as bad guys. Instead, they were usually depicted as valiant losers.

    The General is a great film, by the way, perhaps the greatest silent film comedy. My personal favorite Buster Keaton film, though, is the strikingly surreal Sherlock,jr. It was a major influence on Woody Allen's Purple Rose of Cairo.
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  87. @Steve Sailer
    It was not fun.

    A relative’s college instructor told them of how, on a B-29 over Korea, he bent over to pick up a dropped pen, whereupon a cannon shell went through the plane where his head would have been.

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  88. Anonym says:
    @Romanian
    I just wanted to put this report out there, via isegoria. Keep in mind that this is an actual government study. I would love to hear Mr Derbyshire's opinion on this.

    https://www.gwern.net/docs/genetics/selection/2013-anonymous-strategicconsequencesofchineseracism.pdf

    The Strategic Consequences of Chinese Racism

    First, virulent racism and eugenics heavily inform Chinese perceptions of the world. United States decision-makers must recognize that China is a racist state, much closer to Nazi Germany than to the values upheld in the West. Most often, the Chinese do not even recognize their racism as a problem. They believe that racism is a Western phenomenon and that Westerners are obsessed with race. This obsession is seen by the Chinese to be a strategic vulnerability of the West, whereas China is not affected by racism.

    Second, racism informs their view of the United States. From the Chinese perspective, the United States used to be a strong society that the Chinese respected when it was unicultural, defined by the centrality of Anglo-Protestant culture at the core of American national identity aligned with the political ideology of liberalism, the rule of law, and free market capitalism. The Chinese see multiculturalism as a sickness that has overtaken the United States, and a component of U.S. decline.

    Third, racism informs their view of international politics in three ways. First, states are stable, and thus good for the Chinese, to the degree that they are unicultural. Second, Chinese ethnocentrism and racism drive their outlook to the rest of the world. Their expectation is of a tribute system where barbarians know that the Chinese are superior. Third, there is a strong, implicit, racialist view of international politics that is alien and anathema to Western policy-makers and analysts. The Chinese are comfortable using race to explain events and appealing to racist stereotypes to advance their interests. Most insidious is the Chinese belief that Africans in particular need Chinese leadership.

    Fourth, the Chinese will make appeals to Third World states based on “racial solidarity,” that is, the need of non-white peoples to unite against Western imperialism and racism. Racial solidarity claims are easy for Chinese to accomplish since the Chinese can make strategic racist claims. For example, they can frame international politics in terms of a “racial balance of power,” and cast appeals to the Third World along the line of: now is the time for non-whites to dominate international politics.
    Fifth, Chinese racism retards their relations with the Third World. Chinese racism makes it difficult for China to advance a positive message in the Third World, especially Africa, but also in Latin America and the Middle East. The Chinese have a hierarchical representation of looking at other groups, darker skin is lower class, and race matters. In this sense, the racial stereotypes of the Africans commonly found within Chinese society suggest that this population is backward and dirty, and prone to crime, particularly violent crime. These beliefs surface regularly in China’s relations with the Third World and these beliefs, coupled with clannish and ruthless Chinese business practices, generate enormous resentment in the Third World.

    Sixth, Chinese racism, and the degree to which the Chinese permit their view of the United States to be informed by racism, has the potential to hinder China in its competition with the United States because it contributes to their overconfidence. This overconfidence is a result of ethnocentrism and a sense of superiority rooted in racism. The Chinese commonly believe that they are cleverer than others, and so may shape events in an oblique manner or through shi, the strategic manipulation of events. This conceit among the Chinese that they can manipulate others is supremely dangerous for Asian stability. At the same time, it is a great advantage for the United States to play upon that overconfidence. An overconfident China will continue to make the mistakes it is presently in the South China or East China Sea disputes. That is, making threats, issuing demands, heavy-handed shows of force, are generated by China’s overconfidence.

    Seventh, as lamentable as it is, Chinese racism helps to make the Chinese a formidable adversary. There are three critical consequences that result from this. The first is the sense of unity the Chinese possess. Second, it allows the Chinese to have a strong sense of identity, which in turn permits them to weather adversity, and to be focused and secure confidence that the rest of the nation is with them. Third, China is not plagued by self-doubt or guilt about its past.

    Eight, the Chinese are never going to go through a civil rights movement like the United States. This is because, first, they have no freedom of the press, freedom to petition their government, freedom to assemble, all of which are necessary to support a civil rights movement. Second, there is no political drive or consciousness for equality in Chinese thought. Equality is associated with Maoism and rejected in today’s China, where inequality is accepted and celebrated. In addition, there is no notion of civil rights in Chinese political thought or, practically, in jurisprudence.

    Ninth, China’s treatment of Christians and ethnic minorities is poor. The government recognizes that religion is able to do many positive acts in a society, and they do see the need for people to have a moral, religious grounding provided by religion since a moral framework may be lost in the demands of a market economy. The current debate is an echo of the one they had in the 1800s, how do they preserve the essence of what is Chinese in an era dominated by Western ideas. Yet, the government is fearful of religion in the sense that uncontrolled religion may be a threat; a challenge to Beijing’s authority. Not surprisingly, the treatment of ethnic minorities is equally bad.
     

    Thanks for posting that. It’s worthy of more comment. It appears correct in most of what it states, although the Western anti-white attitude (let’s not call it anti-racism, because it’s not) is not a strength.

    Most correctly, China’s government is like a Chinese version of Nazi Germany in a lot of ways. If the Reich had possessed nukes from the beginning and had been a little more slow and gradual about the annexing, maybe it could have lasted 1000 years. Eventually the West will learn something from China. Certainly, having a Pakistani mayor of London telling us that terrorism is just part and parcel of living in a big city just serves to underline that the British victory over the Germans was very much a Pyrrhic victory. Our slavish devotion to be everything the Nazis were not is just retardation on a grand scale.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Our slavish devotion to be everything the Nazis were not is just retardation on a grand scale.
     
    Hitler functions thus as exactly an anti-Christ.

    http://kempis-imitationofchrist.com/online-text/
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  89. Jack D says:
    @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    No the translation is OK although you can easily put a different spin on it. Instead of offend, you could translate the same character as violate or invade. And the character that is translated “exterminated” (really executed) could also be translated as “punished”. Translation between 2 languages is never perfect, especially 2 languages as remote as classical Chinese and English, so there is a lot of room for spin.

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  90. Anon87 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It was not fun.

    Vietnam gets all the attention, but the Korean War had almost as many US deaths in a much shorter time. I am too young, but was it the Iraq/Afghanistan of its time?

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    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
    The Korean War was essentially a mini-replay of World War I on the Western Front. The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War; large attacks with significant territorial gains/losses as it looked liked one side would get the upper had and win, only for the other side to attack and reverse the momentum (NORKs surprise attack in July 1950 and push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase; they panic and flee north as the US/UN attack into NK and press them to the Chinese border; the Chinese intervene and push the widely spaced and stretched US/UN forces back south past the initial partition line - 38th parallel; US/UN counterattack and reestablish the 38th as the hold line). This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties (its what happens when you attack a fortress during the era of modern weaponry). End result for the US: ~37K dead, ~103K wounded, ~8K MIA, ~4700 POW. And technically a state of war still exists between the signatories of the Armistice (Ceasefire).

    Its surreal to visit the Truce Table in Panmunjom while the NORK guards stare at you through the windows; I was stationed in the ROK for year when I was on active duty and had a chance to go there:

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/afs:Medium:1128060017/800.png

    https://www.stripes.com/polopoly_fs/1.111786.1279719471!/image/560069446.JPG_gen/derivatives/landscape_900/560069446.JPG
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  91. Mouren says:

    I saw Wolf Warrior 2 in a cinema in Beijing last year. It’s a decent action movie and I enjoyed it but the very last scene is so over the top ridiculous it might be better to just turn the movie off after the last fight.

    Our hero takes a convoy of Chinese and African factory workers to safety after having defeated the mercenary bad guys, there is a village the convoy has to pass through, where government and rebel troops are fighting a full-on battle.
    What our hero does is take a Chinese flag, climb on the roof of the lead truck and raise the flag by putting his arm into it, kind of like a human flagpole. The convoy then proceeds to the village.

    As soon as the rebel and government troops see the Chinese flag, they just stop fighting in the middle of their battle and the convoy passes straight between the front lines.
    That was too much even for the audience in Beijing, who was audibly groaning during the scene.

    Another thing was that all the scenes showing Chinese battleships at sea were obviously taken from 10+ year old archive material. The difference in picture quality is pretty jarring, I guess the PLA doesn’t yet cooperate with filmmakers the way the Pentagon cooperates with Hollywood.

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  92. wren says:

    According to these articles, the Chinese are stealing all of some African country’s fish, forcing many Africans to have to flee to Europe to survive.

    https://nyti.ms/2qkQcTH

    https://nyti.ms/2p7rDI7

    Seems like documentary fodder for someone.

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  93. @neutral

    A promotional poster showed Leng Feng giving the middle finger with the slogan “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”
     
    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Why would it be disturbing, unless you’ve bought into the idea propagated by liberals (and paleos parroting liberals) that the United States is the source of all evil in the modern world? The peace of our era is underpinned by Uncle Sam being ready to put his thumb on the scale if a territorially-acquisitive power decides to annex its neighbor. Without American action in 1991, all of the Arab territory from Turkey’s southern border all the way to Yemen might have become part of Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

    China, despite being an economic, military and political basket case for the past two centuries, managed to acquire East Turkistan and Tibet, which in combination are close to half of China’s existing land area. We will soon find out what a China that’s gotten its game together even halfway in all three respects is capable of. This is a country whose leadership has, through the ages, been motivated by the quest for glory in the history books, where a place of honor is reserved for those who successfully expand the realm.

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  94. @Steve Sailer
    It was not fun.

    The Ice Bowl of wars.

    Lombardi was convinced that his new heated field would make conditions playable.

    He was wrong.

    Read More
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  95. @Anonym
    Thanks for posting that. It's worthy of more comment. It appears correct in most of what it states, although the Western anti-white attitude (let's not call it anti-racism, because it's not) is not a strength.

    Most correctly, China's government is like a Chinese version of Nazi Germany in a lot of ways. If the Reich had possessed nukes from the beginning and had been a little more slow and gradual about the annexing, maybe it could have lasted 1000 years. Eventually the West will learn something from China. Certainly, having a Pakistani mayor of London telling us that terrorism is just part and parcel of living in a big city just serves to underline that the British victory over the Germans was very much a Pyrrhic victory. Our slavish devotion to be everything the Nazis were not is just retardation on a grand scale.

    Our slavish devotion to be everything the Nazis were not is just retardation on a grand scale.

    Hitler functions thus as exactly an anti-Christ.

    http://kempis-imitationofchrist.com/online-text/

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  96. Whiskey says: • Website

    I agree with the Z Man that the smart money has mostly left Hollywood. After all, they had to rely on both Chinese markets and investors to continue to make money. Weinstein flourished as mostly a money man finding investors. If Hollywood was a way to make money there would be no need for such a middle man.

    People still like stories. They like movies and TV shows. Its just that Hollywood is incapable of making them. It starts as a dependence on young, poorly paid, easily exploited, young female interns and assistants who make up the core of the script readers at agencies just as in publishing. No script can get through unless it tingles up the pozzed feelings of your average 23 year old assistant script reader for an Agency with a dreamy crush on some big shot actor or rapper or what not. So right there, you won’t get another John Milius or Paul Schrader or anything like a shot of testosterone. In any script.

    Next up, the casting directors. All aging cat ladies or gay gay gay now! Any actor with a hint of masculine presence is exiled to the point that Australian or British men are required to play actual straight White males. Meanwhile you get an extra heaping helping of the fugly in female roles, and men who make Lindsey Graham look like the late Lee Marvin in terms of machismo and assertiveness.

    Now we are moving up the food chain — you have a group of nepotistic hacks, old Harvard Lampoon buddies (99.9999% of the writers for the Simpsons and Family Guy it would seem), and such forming a pozzed up writing staff that understands female self-image and the gamut of masculine desires from soy-boys at Pride Parade to real earnest male feminists just eager to help out a hot young on the move actress!

    Finally you got the A-Listers. Who seem to all belong to Scientology or some other weird cult, suck up all the pay in a movie, and don’t deliver butts in seats. Most of them can’t stand their audience and miss no opportunity to miss it.

    Hollywood has had no real competition since it was created. I think a streaming service, creating English language limited series filmed not in the US with non-US actors mostly could be a success. If it just made stuff for non-pozzed audiences.

    Certainly Chinese money has collapsed in terms of investment. Part of that is Trump’s people taking a harder look at proposed deals, much of it comes from President Xi Xinping clamping down on money laundering er deals pushing cash outside his control. President Xi is certainly not turning over Chinese audiences to Hollywood poz. And he wants patriotic stuff like Wolf Warrior 2 not arty things that appeal to critics and a few foreigners. He’s got a country to run and propaganda to push.

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  97. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate – Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many.
     
    Um, you do realize that that notion ("in a war, there are heroes on both sides") was the dominant mode for films about the American Civil War? You know, until the SJWs took over.

    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I’ve seen yet, regrettably, but it’s my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal. Also, when I watched the Mel Gibson Vietnam flick We Were Soldiers I was surprised at how much effort it put into attempting to humanize the NVA, in particular a few scenes focusing on a young NVA soldier who keeps a picture of his pretty wife on his person during the battle. Also worthy of note is Clint Eastwood’s Letters from Iwo Jima, which was very well received by American critics (I believe even better received than its US-focused companion piece, Flags of our Fathers).

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I’ve seen yet, regrettably, but it’s my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal.
     
    Tora! Tora! Tora! is very fair to the Japanese. It's also, by Hollywood standards, pretty historically accurate:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PfdQod8HTw
    , @J.Ross
    I have watched a lot of foreign films and I cannot think of a good example of nonwhites, or even Europeans, worrying this much about fairly depicting an enemy after the post-WWI period, which doesn't really count because it was not about a truly foreign enemy and was nostalgia for the prewar sense of European brotherhood. Soviets had exactly the same pseudo-psychological style of more verbose bigotry as Israelis -- there is self-serving fake depth, but only to more clearly demonize and "other" the other side. This style is on display in Nanking City Of Life And Death -- there is one sympathetic Japanese, but he is there to condemn his own people, and there's nothing about the far worse concurrent crimes of Chinese warlords. It also has to be recalled that, as soon as WWII was over, we were looking at the Japanese as allies against communism. Koreans have made several must-see films about their conflict (again, not really a foreign enemy), mainly Brotherhood of War and the DMZ.
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  98. syonredux says:
    @Joe Stalin
    I was surprised to see the 1926 Buster Keaton silent film "The General" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017925/) actually featured the Confederates as being the people to cheer for.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V0IRnPIsVM

    I was surprised to see the 1926 Buster Keaton silent film “The General” (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017925/) actually featured the Confederates as being the people to cheer for.

    Up until the ’60s, that was quite common. Confederates were rarely depicted as bad guys. Instead, they were usually depicted as valiant losers.

    The General is a great film, by the way, perhaps the greatest silent film comedy. My personal favorite Buster Keaton film, though, is the strikingly surreal Sherlock,jr. It was a major influence on Woody Allen’s Purple Rose of Cairo.

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  99. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Stan Adams
    My mother was (and still is) a huge movie buff, so I grew up watching all kinds of weird flicks. When I was in high school in the late '90s, she had a VCD player - VCD then being a popular format in Asia - and a roomful of NTSC/PAL-compatible equipment, including such goodies as laserdisc players and Betamax VCRs. (She had another room devoted to stereo equipment. Mixing music was her semi-professional hobby.) She imported foreign films by the hundreds*.

    (When I was a kid, she befriended a video-store owner. When he retired, he ended up selling her the bulk of his collection - thousands of movies - for a dollar a tape. They were all used, but she didn't mind.)

    My favorite Asian movie (with Western actors in two of the main roles) is a gloriously-sleazy Indonesian curiosity called Lady Terminator (1989) - a direct ripoff of the Schwarzenegger classic. (The hilariously-bad dubbing, done in Los Angeles, only adds to the fun.)

    The full English version was on YouTube, but it's been taken down. This trailer is a good overview:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GoHzmS1jNo

    *Our house was like something you would see on Hoarders, with books, magazines, VHS tapes, CDs, cassette tapes, and vinyl records lying all over the place. My mother's housekeeping habits were lackadaisical at best.

    (Eventually she settled on banana boxes - the sturdy cardboard ones - as her preferred storage medium. Every time we went to the grocery store, she would sweet-talk the produce guys into giving her another carload of such boxes. She ended up with hundreds of them.)

    Her entire living room was dominated by two custom-built shelves that ran along two full sides of the room. The larger of the two, devoted to books, was at least 20 feet high. The smaller, devoted to movies, was maybe 12 feet high. Neither held more than a tiny fraction of her collection.

    Her place was small in terms of square footage - two bedrooms, one-and-a-half bathrooms - but the entire living/dining/kitchen area was an unbroken open space, with a high vaulted ceiling that ran the whole length of the house. My grandparents' ranch-style house was larger - four bedrooms, three bathrooms - but had very low ceilings, so it seemed claustrophobic by comparison.

    My favorite Asian movie (with Western actors in two of the main roles) is a gloriously-sleazy Indonesian curiosity called Lady Terminator (1989) – a direct ripoff of the Schwarzenegger classic.

    Lady Terminator is all kinds o0f awesome. Love the tagline. “First she mates, then she terminates.”

    80s Indonesian movies are well worth checking out. Lots of terrific horror/fantasy movies. Loads of fun.

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  100. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “The late Jerry Pournelle’s experience in late 1950-1951, starting up near the Chinese border in North Korea, was that the Chinese “volunteers” were rolling over the Americans. It took a long fight after that just to get back up to the 38th parallel.”

    The Korean war was the fought by the UN against Communist China (which had not-so-covert Soviet help, in particular from the Soviet airforce, even though the USSR was in the UN) and, of course North Korea (which were not that significant a factor by the end of the war). The Korean War was really the hot Cold War, with Chinese, US, British Commonwealth, UN (Turkey, India, etc.), and Soviets all engaged.

    One often overlooked side effect is that the Korean war enabled the survival of an independent Taiwan. The Chinese Communists had been about to try to invade Taiwan when the Korean War broke out. They re-purposed the army earmarked for the invasion of Taiwan to take over Korea. They honestly expected the entire campaign to be over in months due to the size of their invasion force and were shocked when it wasn’t. Their current military build-up may still reflect the shock of that set-back.

    Korean War:

    “…On 4 August 1950, with a planned invasion of Taiwan aborted due to the heavy U.S. naval presence, Mao Zedong reported to the Politburo that he would intervene in Korea when the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) Taiwan invasion force was reorganized into the PLA North East Frontier Force. On 8 October 1950, Mao Zedong redesignated the PLA North East Frontier Force as the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army (PVA).”

    Instead of rapidly overrunning Korea, the Chinese suffered:

    “……a rate of Chinese casualties that was far greater than the casualties suffered by UN troops. …”

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    • Replies: @Anon

    Instead of rapidly overrunning Korea, the Chinese suffered
     
    Indeed. The battle of Kapyong (where several hundred Canadian and Australian soldiers with some American armoured support defeated an entire Chinese division) seems representative, if not typical of the kind of fighting that was going on.
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  101. One interesting question is why Chinese-language movies, which seemed poised to explode in America after Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon earned $128 million at the American box office in 2000-2001

    Crouching Tiger was a Chinese language feature, but my impression is that it was a thoroughly American production. Ang Lee, a Westchester County resident married to a Chinese American, and his American sidekick, James Schamus, were the prime movers behind the movie. Everyone else was just a hired hand. I thought the movie was far superior to others in the genre, but my Chinese acquaintances were not particularly impressed. I’d venture to say that, despite the subtitles, it was a period martial arts movie made from an American perspective, which is why it did well (for its genre) stateside and in Europe, but disappeared without a trace in China.

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    • Replies: @SOL
    CTHD was an Ang Lee, too slow (and long?) as a wuxia movie for modern Chinese audiences, and probably too slow for Chinese audiences of the 70s.
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  102. Escher says:
    @Mitchell Porter
    Do we have any data on what happens if white people adopt Chinese culture en masse? Are there any examples of this - perhaps in Hong Kong?

    IMO it was the other way in Hong Kong and Singapore (both ex-colonies), where the locals adopted British language and culture (to varying degrees depending on socio-economic class).

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  103. syonredux says:
    @Anonymous
    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I've seen yet, regrettably, but it's my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal. Also, when I watched the Mel Gibson Vietnam flick We Were Soldiers I was surprised at how much effort it put into attempting to humanize the NVA, in particular a few scenes focusing on a young NVA soldier who keeps a picture of his pretty wife on his person during the battle. Also worthy of note is Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima, which was very well received by American critics (I believe even better received than its US-focused companion piece, Flags of our Fathers).

    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I’ve seen yet, regrettably, but it’s my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal.

    Tora! Tora! Tora! is very fair to the Japanese. It’s also, by Hollywood standards, pretty historically accurate:

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  104. Mr. Anon says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    I understand that. The lack of backstory it character details meant you weren't particularly invested in any of the characters.

    I understand that. The lack of backstory it character details meant you weren’t particularly invested in any of the characters.

    Isn’t the fact that they’re people enough? I often find back story to be shallow, perfunctory, and manipulative. Black Hawk Down had hardly any – just a few establishing scenes at the base – and I thought it to be one of the best war movies ever made.

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  105. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anon
    I thought Dunkirk was dull and stupid as well although aerial fighter scenes were good. "Rolls Royce Merlin greatest engine ever built yada yada" speech was utterly cringeworthy and totally ruined Spitfire flyby. Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a "303"??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was. But wait, he's an officer and wouldn't carry a rifle anyway. List of stupidities in this film is endless. By the time I got to the end I was snoring loudly. Greatest war film ever made? Try 'Stalingrad' for realism instead of this sad pile of adolescent Pommy jingoism.

    Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a “303″??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/31/a7726331.shtml

    I joined the army on the 6th April 1944 and started six weeks primary training (…….) We were stationed in a hotel in Cromer on the East Coast. I came back to the hotel after a manoeuvre and while walking up the stairs to our room I noticed my .303 rifle was cocked.

    But wait, he’s an officer and wouldn’t carry a rifle anyway.

    American officers very often carried shoulder weapons in WWII. Did British officers never or almost never do so? I don’t know.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    You can't catch out a Walt with this sort of detective trick because of the diversity of people in any sizeable military. I once knew a Navy headshrinker who referred to the issue weapon as "his sixteen" or "your sixteen." I remember thinking this was painfully naff and how I had never heard of anyone else using that term. But his service is not in doubt.
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  106. Mr. Anon says:
    @syonredux

    I certainly hope that is a translation error, if not then this is a really disturbing idea they are trying to propagandize there.

    Is it that different from our government’s policy?
     
    It's quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.

    That’s true. And we don’t necessarily exterminate them if they offend us. We just support NGO’s that undermine their morals and society.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.

    That’s true. And we don’t necessarily exterminate them if they offend us. We just support NGO’s that undermine their morals and society.
     

    A small price to pay if it means that Arabs get to live in California.
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  107. Mr. Anon says:
    @Joe Stalin
    Based on John Derbysire's article on the unknown state of the reliability of the US themonuclear arsenal, I most certainly believe that we need to withdraw from the current ban on nuclear weapons testing and begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.

    ASAP.

    I want a known deterrent against “Anyone who offends China, no matter how remote, must be exterminated.”

    I think people on Hawaii would agree. Wonder when their governor will start demanding an ABM Island defense from POTUS? Chicago used to have a Nike-Hercules AD system; we could use one too.

    Based on John Derbysire’s article on the unknown state of the reliability of the US themonuclear arsenal, I most certainly believe that we need to withdraw from the current ban on nuclear weapons testing and begin manufacture of new weapons of proven reliability.

    Indeed. Nuclear weapons need to work and need to be seen to work in order to provide an effective deterrent. Maybe we should bring back above-ground testing too. Think of all the great video we could get of blast effects now with relatively cheap cameras. Perhaps people (on all sides) need to see what a nuclear blast really entails to instill some prudence in them.

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  108. syonredux says:
    @Mr. Anon

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.
     
    That's true. And we don't necessarily exterminate them if they offend us. We just support NGO's that undermine their morals and society.

    It’s quite different. The USA allows people who hate America to immigrate to America.

    That’s true. And we don’t necessarily exterminate them if they offend us. We just support NGO’s that undermine their morals and society.

    A small price to pay if it means that Arabs get to live in California.

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  109. Mr. Anon says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It was not fun.

    It was not fun.

    The offensives in the Korean War didn’t have nice anodyne names like “Iraqi Freedom” or “Desert Storm”. They had names like:

    Operation Rat Killer

    Operation Killer

    Operation Ripper

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  110. Romanian says: • Website
    @Expletive Deleted
    That's just their little way. They've always been like that, and I mean always.
    Bluster and toad-swelling. It's mostly directed inwards to the lower classes of the Middle Kingdom, as are triumphs over any apparent victories over foreigners. A constant need to overawe those shut out of the kleptocratic upper families' circle.
    When it comes to getting into the meatgrinder and slugging it out, they're Xerxes and the Persians to Europe's Spartans. Even tiny Vietnam kicked their backsides quite recently, never mind Japan.

    The thing with the Persians vs the Greeks is that the Greeks have to win every time and the Persians have to win just once in an all out war.

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    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    I'm going to torture the analogy to death and say "not if winning even once cost so many soldiers that say, the Medes, Gauls and even Dacians saw an opportunity for a bit of "sneak-in-while-they're-busy-and-fielding-an-understrength-team" plunder, massacre and land-grabbing".

    And Ahura Mazda help them if the Steppe nomads ever sniffed weakness, as well as the comparatively feeble desert tribes to the south.
    M.A.D. has a long history. That's how separate countries came about, the limits of force projection.
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  111. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    “I am too young, but was it the Iraq/Afghanistan of its time?”

    The Korean War was an intense 3-year war between conventional military forces. Unlike many of today’s wars it had little aspect of asymmetric guerrilla warfare. The Korean War was UN sanctioned (in effect, fought against the Communists block). Chinese troops significantly outnumbered UN troops. In some cases, such as when Mig-15s were first encountered or at the very start of the war when the first US troops to arrive faced T-34 tanks without adequate anti-tanks weapons, the Communist forces had superior Soviet technology, at least temporarily.

    Casualty rates were high, about the same for the US as in Vietnam, but in only 3 years. Because the war included the UN, US, the Soviets, and China, the war had a real danger of escalating, with a real possibility of nuclear world war.

    Korean War, Casualties:

    “…Recent scholarship puts the full battle death toll on all sides at just over 1.2 million”

    US, Soviet, and Chinese Communist forces all fought in the Korean War. In this respect it was the “hotest” war of the Cold War.

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  112. @Kirt
    I couldn't agree more on Dunkirk; it was putting me to sleep. But it was a masterpiece compared to the recently released Hostiles, easily the worst western ever made. Avoid that one at all costs.

    As far as WW2 is concerned, I saw the first one and was amused to see the Chinese/American role reversal in as silly and over-the-top action movie as any made in America. WW2, set in Africa, should be even more of a laugh fest. I just wish the Turkish metal storm movies were available in the US.

    But it was a masterpiece compared to the recently released Hostiles, easily the worst western ever made.

    How bad was the Hostiles? I love Christian Bale, but the fact they have been running beaucoup commercials about what a masterpiece it is is usually a bad sign. Looks very PC too.

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  113. J.Ross says: • Website
    @James Smith
    I just watched this movie and I wouldn't say it's really 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic'. It's more interesting than that. It's about a disgraced soldier working alone to rescue Chinese in Africa. It doesn't actually depict Chinese particularly well. He is disgraced because he kicked a property developer who was destroying a village in China into a car window. He goes to Africa to work and then a civil war breaks out. The Chinese navy arrives in Africa only to evacuate the Chinese and (he has to lie and say an African boy is his son in an attempt to get him on one of the ships). He volunteers to rescue some Chinese staff from the local "Chinese-invested" hospital (he fails). He ends up helping to save the staff of a Chinese factory, who are a mix of Chinese and African. At first, they're only going to evacuate the Chinese from the factory because there's only one helicopter, but he proposes evacuating the women and children by helicopter while he takes the men by foot (during this scene it's established that many of the Chinese and Africans at the factory are in relationships). This doesn't go to plan either, but the rest of the movie involves only these Chinese and African factory workers. I saw one article say it's the Chinese version of the "white savior", but that's nonsense; at no point does he try to help the natives save themselves. The mercenary group is not American, but multinational and multiracial; it's merely led by a white American man.

    The pivotal scene comes when the hero is trapped under some debris surrounded by tanks while trying to save the factory workers. He uses his phone to send images of the scene to the captain of a Chinese warship he has been communicating with. The question is, "Will China intervene?" Eventually they get authorisation to take out the tanks with missiles. This scene is pretty clearly set up as the question of whether China should play a greater role in the world, but given the context it's not exactly 'patriotic' or 'jingoistic', but rather interventionist. It's done as part of a multinational, UN-led effort to evacuate people from a war zone. Now, no doubt being able to participate in international efforts and protect Chinese abroad is something new to Chinese and the effectiveness of this scene had something to do with the movie's popularity, but it's not simple 'patriotism' as has been claimed. It's essentially about how China can no longer be isolationist. An earlier much discussed scene, where he mocks the (half-Chinese) American doctor for expecting the US marines to come (he'd seen the American ships leave along with all the other ships), can be read as either meaning that the US is retreating or simply that the US can't be expected to be everywhere (the actor/director has said it was just intended as a joke).

    There's one scene right at the end where the white American leader of the mercenaries says "people like you will always be inferior to people like me, get used to it" and the hero kills him and says "that's fucking history". There's a cut away between the statement and the comeback that focuses on the mix of Chinese and African faces watching, establishing what this means (Western vs. non-Western), although it's easy to read it as the symbolic end of China's "century of humiliation".

    It's actually a pretty decent movie, save some bad CGI, and I can see why it was popular, but if it reveals China's motives it reveals a country that has a set quite a low bar for itself: to be an ordinary country with an ordinary military, capable of evacuating its people from a war zone and maybe extending that courtesy to non-Chinese employees.

    I observe that, as in GITS:SAC, Black Lagoon, and elsewhere, East Asians are very happy to refurbish this straw man of the in-your-face white supremacist because it lends righteousness to economic competition. You will never find worse yellow fever than among so-called white racists, or a worse lost historical opportunity than East Asians deciding to oppose whites and deal with blacks on their own.
    Also, unscrupulous developers were the bete noir of the Chinese news cycle for years, and Chinese elites are always sensitive to the complaints of the street (if never really willing to properly fix things). At one point an elderly war hero who had fought the Japanese had his house destroyed after raising a crowd of outraged protesters. Interesting that the plot is so much more real and honest than anything Hollywood would ever attempt, although I find that the Chinese are happy to let you gripe about some things so long as there’s no real threat, and certain other people conflate griping and threatening.

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  114. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    Not to mention films like Tora! Tora! Tora! and its semi-sequel Midway, neither of which I've seen yet, regrettably, but it's my understanding that they give the Japanese quite a fair portrayal. Also, when I watched the Mel Gibson Vietnam flick We Were Soldiers I was surprised at how much effort it put into attempting to humanize the NVA, in particular a few scenes focusing on a young NVA soldier who keeps a picture of his pretty wife on his person during the battle. Also worthy of note is Clint Eastwood's Letters from Iwo Jima, which was very well received by American critics (I believe even better received than its US-focused companion piece, Flags of our Fathers).

    I have watched a lot of foreign films and I cannot think of a good example of nonwhites, or even Europeans, worrying this much about fairly depicting an enemy after the post-WWI period, which doesn’t really count because it was not about a truly foreign enemy and was nostalgia for the prewar sense of European brotherhood. Soviets had exactly the same pseudo-psychological style of more verbose bigotry as Israelis — there is self-serving fake depth, but only to more clearly demonize and “other” the other side. This style is on display in Nanking City Of Life And Death — there is one sympathetic Japanese, but he is there to condemn his own people, and there’s nothing about the far worse concurrent crimes of Chinese warlords. It also has to be recalled that, as soon as WWII was over, we were looking at the Japanese as allies against communism. Koreans have made several must-see films about their conflict (again, not really a foreign enemy), mainly Brotherhood of War and the DMZ.

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  115. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    Why does the shell shocked officer rescued off the sinking boat say that his rifle is a “303″??? More cringe since everybody in England at that time, including the charladies, would know what caliber his rifle was.
     
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/31/a7726331.shtml

    I joined the army on the 6th April 1944 and started six weeks primary training (.......) We were stationed in a hotel in Cromer on the East Coast. I came back to the hotel after a manoeuvre and while walking up the stairs to our room I noticed my .303 rifle was cocked.

    But wait, he’s an officer and wouldn’t carry a rifle anyway.
     
    American officers very often carried shoulder weapons in WWII. Did British officers never or almost never do so? I don't know.

    You can’t catch out a Walt with this sort of detective trick because of the diversity of people in any sizeable military. I once knew a Navy headshrinker who referred to the issue weapon as “his sixteen” or “your sixteen.” I remember thinking this was painfully naff and how I had never heard of anyone else using that term. But his service is not in doubt.

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  116. Brutusale says:
    @FDS
    Zhang Yimou’s extraordinarily lavish-looking Hero...[has]...largely disappeared from American consciousness in this decade.

    Your mention of Hero made me recall that I'd seen this flick long ago. I checked my diary and here's the relevant excerpt:


    [Attended] a film at a theater for the first time in about ten months – “Hero”, at the xxxxxxxx. Passed over my hunskie, walked in behind a couple of cool black guys, and sat in the squeaky seat. Good film, “Hero”. Not great, but good. Looked beautiful, absolutely stunning. Decent story too. However, a little too much swordplay for me, a little too much Taoist flying and water running, and a little too much “Western” (rotten) influence. The latter included overt sex stuff and an inflated role of women in martial prowess (though it’s always been an element in these films, it just seemed a bit too much last night, but maybe I’m griping).

    There were several key elements that you’d never find in an American flick. Openly stated is that “in a war, there are heroes on both sides”. No need to elaborate - Americans are children, and lack the adult capacity to realize that their government’s opponents can easily be construed as heroes by many. Then there’s the talk of the Qin emperor, who’s trying to unite China. He says that even his own court thinks him a tyrant, does not understand what’s in his heart, that blood must be spilled so that blood will no longer be spilled. You can easily throw Hitler or Napoleon into this role, and it’s the same thing. Oh, and of course there are displays of minor things like honor, sacrifice, and a tiny little ideology called “blood and soil”, that the halfwits in America think is called communism. China is a race-based superstate, poised to rule the world. And there’s nothing the fucking drones here can do except wait.

    Yeah, the movie Patton portrayed Capt. Steiger and Field Marshal Rommel as irredeemable and implacable enemies. And that’s just the first American war film that sprang to mind.

    I’d suggest that you re-watch some of these movies you disparage.

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  117. @Anon87
    Vietnam gets all the attention, but the Korean War had almost as many US deaths in a much shorter time. I am too young, but was it the Iraq/Afghanistan of its time?

    The Korean War was essentially a mini-replay of World War I on the Western Front. The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War; large attacks with significant territorial gains/losses as it looked liked one side would get the upper had and win, only for the other side to attack and reverse the momentum (NORKs surprise attack in July 1950 and push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase; they panic and flee north as the US/UN attack into NK and press them to the Chinese border; the Chinese intervene and push the widely spaced and stretched US/UN forces back south past the initial partition line – 38th parallel; US/UN counterattack and reestablish the 38th as the hold line). This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties (its what happens when you attack a fortress during the era of modern weaponry). End result for the US: ~37K dead, ~103K wounded, ~8K MIA, ~4700 POW. And technically a state of war still exists between the signatories of the Armistice (Ceasefire).

    Its surreal to visit the Truce Table in Panmunjom while the NORK guards stare at you through the windows; I was stationed in the ROK for year when I was on active duty and had a chance to go there:

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    • Replies: @Twinkie
    Pretty good overall, but some minor corrections:

    The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War
     
    More like World War II. North Korea launched a veritable blitzkrieg with its Soviet-equipped, Chinese-trained (ethnic Koreans from the Chinese Civil War) army on poorly trained South Korean army, which was equipped and trained as a constabulary force for putting down insurrections (by communist agitators).

    push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase
     
    MacArthur's master stroke was at Inchon, not Pusan. It was pure genius, because Inchon has a very large tide and is unsuitable for a large scale hostile landing, so the attack was unexpected.

    reestablish the 38th as the hold line
     
    North and South Korea were initially divided by the 38th Parallel, but the DMZ does not follow it.

    This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties
     
    It wasn't so much trench warfare as the battle of little hills. Since major offensives were curtailed for political reasons, many series of small-scale attacks and repulses were conducted to seize hills on the frontlines... for two full years, yes. A series of seemingly never-ending battle for hills, back and forth, switching hands, multiple times.

    the NORK guards stare at you through the windows
     
    But the guards in your photographs inside the building are South Koreans, not North Koreans. Even if someone didn't know the uniforms, their height should clue in the casual observers. The solider outside (seen through the window) in the second picture IS a North Korean though.
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  118. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    "The late Jerry Pournelle’s experience in late 1950-1951, starting up near the Chinese border in North Korea, was that the Chinese “volunteers” were rolling over the Americans. It took a long fight after that just to get back up to the 38th parallel."

    The Korean war was the fought by the UN against Communist China (which had not-so-covert Soviet help, in particular from the Soviet airforce, even though the USSR was in the UN) and, of course North Korea (which were not that significant a factor by the end of the war). The Korean War was really the hot Cold War, with Chinese, US, British Commonwealth, UN (Turkey, India, etc.), and Soviets all engaged.

    One often overlooked side effect is that the Korean war enabled the survival of an independent Taiwan. The Chinese Communists had been about to try to invade Taiwan when the Korean War broke out. They re-purposed the army earmarked for the invasion of Taiwan to take over Korea. They honestly expected the entire campaign to be over in months due to the size of their invasion force and were shocked when it wasn't. Their current military build-up may still reflect the shock of that set-back.

    Korean War:


    "...On 4 August 1950, with a planned invasion of Taiwan aborted due to the heavy U.S. naval presence, Mao Zedong reported to the Politburo that he would intervene in Korea when the People's Liberation Army's (PLA) Taiwan invasion force was reorganized into the PLA North East Frontier Force. On 8 October 1950, Mao Zedong redesignated the PLA North East Frontier Force as the Chinese People's Volunteer Army (PVA)."

     

    Instead of rapidly overrunning Korea, the Chinese suffered:


    "......a rate of Chinese casualties that was far greater than the casualties suffered by UN troops. ..."

     

    Instead of rapidly overrunning Korea, the Chinese suffered

    Indeed. The battle of Kapyong (where several hundred Canadian and Australian soldiers with some American armoured support defeated an entire Chinese division) seems representative, if not typical of the kind of fighting that was going on.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    The battle of Kapyong (where several hundred Canadian and Australian soldiers with some American armoured support defeated an entire Chinese division) seems representative, if not typical of the kind of fighting that was going on.
     
    A Chinese division was not the same size as an American or Commonwealth division of the time. In American parlance, it was a regiment-sized force (one that was also devoid of any air, armor, or artillery support except man-portable mortars).

    It was still very gallant of the Canadians and the Australians, of course.

    The Chinese military doctrine of the time emphasized maneuver, infiltration, and surprise attacks, but the very rugged terrain often precluded this and led to human wave attacks in narrow confines.
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  119. @Chrisnonymous

    That’s strange because when she texted him the next day she didn’t say it was the worst night of her life, she wrote “Hey Aziz nice meeting you too”.
     
    Seriously? She immediately followed that by writing "Last night might have been fun for you but it wasn't for me." That's not a subsequent message, it's just the next paragraph. "Nice meeting you too" was just a civility.

    This is one of the rare cases in which I have to side with the woman. Her description of events has the ring of truth. Ansari's problem was not that he was trying to make a woman put out on a man's timeline, his problem is that he is a small, goofy-looking guy who lacks any skill with women. It's pretty clear from her description that she wanted to be seduced, and he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough.

    he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough

    It was, actually, enough…

    He sat back and pointed to his penis and motioned for me to go down on him. And I did.

    It’s good to be the King (or a TV actor).

    She seems like a groupie who got what she came for. Bad choice of words?

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    She seems like a groupie who got what she came for. Bad choice of words?
     
    Indeed. I doubt she came at all. Who knows why she blew him? Perhaps because he went down on her and he was pressuring her for penetration and she wanted to avoid it while feeling guilty for receiving "the lash"?
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  120. dwb says:
    @1661er
    She wrote it down, but it's not her own words.(She was part of the brother/sister chronicler team) She wrote down this guy's justification for an unauthorized expedition against Xiongnu/Hun in modern day Kazakhstan.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Tang

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Zhizhi

    Also, I think violate/invade may be a better way translate that character than offend, in this context.

    I am many years removed from living overseas, and actually learnt the original form characters and not the modern simplifications, but Jack is more or less correct.

    The paraphrase comes from a poem written at the Eastern Han Dynasty:

    “犯强汉者,虽远必诛”

    It’s not “offend,” in the sense that someone is “offended” by some microagression. It has a meaning like “attacks” or “violates.”

    And also it says that the person or entities will be punished, not “exterminated,” no matter how far away or removed.

    Basically, it’s a poem that puffed up the powers of the new Han rulers (the dynasty was established right around the time of Jesus Christ; the poem is noted as being circa 35 CE), that they would defend their empire/subjects no matter how far removed.

    Have not seen this movie, so cannot comment on how it applies here.

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  121. Given the discussion on Chinese (Han) racism, it’s worth noting that the actor/director of this movie is a Manchu, and the character he’s playing also appears to be Manchu.

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  122. @Romanian
    The thing with the Persians vs the Greeks is that the Greeks have to win every time and the Persians have to win just once in an all out war.

    I’m going to torture the analogy to death and say “not if winning even once cost so many soldiers that say, the Medes, Gauls and even Dacians saw an opportunity for a bit of “sneak-in-while-they’re-busy-and-fielding-an-understrength-team” plunder, massacre and land-grabbing”.

    And Ahura Mazda help them if the Steppe nomads ever sniffed weakness, as well as the comparatively feeble desert tribes to the south.
    M.A.D. has a long history. That’s how separate countries came about, the limits of force projection.

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    Interesting angle, but how aware would the Greeks be of it... or the Persians themselves?
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  123. Romanian says: • Website
    @Expletive Deleted
    I'm going to torture the analogy to death and say "not if winning even once cost so many soldiers that say, the Medes, Gauls and even Dacians saw an opportunity for a bit of "sneak-in-while-they're-busy-and-fielding-an-understrength-team" plunder, massacre and land-grabbing".

    And Ahura Mazda help them if the Steppe nomads ever sniffed weakness, as well as the comparatively feeble desert tribes to the south.
    M.A.D. has a long history. That's how separate countries came about, the limits of force projection.

    Interesting angle, but how aware would the Greeks be of it… or the Persians themselves?

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    Hadn't the Greekiest (civilized) Greeks thrown in the towel by then, and kowtowed to satrapy? Only the Spartans (who, let's face it, were more than a bit .. mental?) and their mincing and totally faa-a-bulous allies the brave Thespians (God bless 'em) were too "stupid" to cry uncle?

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians. Probably just the surviving warriors. Who wandered off in the usual manner and made everyone's life a rampant gaylord misery until they latched onto the hapless Laconians and Messenians. They were probably ready to decamp and head back north if need be, and the Persians would never dare follow (c.f. wild Dacians, innumerable Thracians, brutish and gigantic Illyrians et multi alii)
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  124. Carl says:
    @syonredux

    “It” is a remake
     
    Nah. It's a new adaptation of a novel. It would only count as as a remake if they simply re-did the earlier adaptation (cf the recent remake of Verhoeven's version of Total Recall ; that was clearly not another adaptation of the Dick short story).

    Sure, whatever

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  125. @Romanian
    Interesting angle, but how aware would the Greeks be of it... or the Persians themselves?

    Hadn’t the Greekiest (civilized) Greeks thrown in the towel by then, and kowtowed to satrapy? Only the Spartans (who, let’s face it, were more than a bit .. mental?) and their mincing and totally faa-a-bulous allies the brave Thespians (God bless ‘em) were too “stupid” to cry uncle?

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians. Probably just the surviving warriors. Who wandered off in the usual manner and made everyone’s life a rampant gaylord misery until they latched onto the hapless Laconians and Messenians. They were probably ready to decamp and head back north if need be, and the Persians would never dare follow (c.f. wild Dacians, innumerable Thracians, brutish and gigantic Illyrians et multi alii)

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    • Replies: @Romanian
    Well, you are right in a way, but the Greeks did consider themselves a sort of nation and every nation has its internal variance. Even the most warlike nation today has its doves who can and do form political factions or even social classes. They just sorted themselves out even better because of the fractured political scene.

    wild Dacians
     
    We wuz Barbarians! The Dacians could fight, but Herodotus also states that they would retreat to their mountain strongholds (with the murus dacicus type walls) to weather the worst storms - Dacii inhaerent montibus - the Dacians cling to the mountains.
    , @Anon
    You missed Athens.
    , @Twinkie

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians.
     
    No. Don't buy into a cartoonish mythology.

    It's very simple. The Spartans were better warriors than other Greeks, because the citizens (peers) trained since birth as warriors (leaving their very large slave population to tend to economic needs, i.e. farming). Theirs was a highly repressive and militarized state, dedicated to nothing but war. And even without war, they were on constant rebellion watch. The price of all this was their exceptionally low fertility (they essentially died out) and extreme sensitivity to casualties among peers (although they were often very courageous in battle, their government was always hyper-concerned even when a few of them were killed or captured, precisely because they were so few in number and had so few children).

    Meanwhile, men of other ancient Greek city states were part-time soldiers at best, with all that entails about competence. The fact that, as warfare became more endemic, large-scale, and brutal, the use of professional mercenaries (especially those that could skirmish AND fight in melee) grew greatly should tell you about the relative utility of ordinary part-time Greek hoplites.
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  126. Twinkie says:
    @Captain Tripps
    The Korean War was essentially a mini-replay of World War I on the Western Front. The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War; large attacks with significant territorial gains/losses as it looked liked one side would get the upper had and win, only for the other side to attack and reverse the momentum (NORKs surprise attack in July 1950 and push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase; they panic and flee north as the US/UN attack into NK and press them to the Chinese border; the Chinese intervene and push the widely spaced and stretched US/UN forces back south past the initial partition line - 38th parallel; US/UN counterattack and reestablish the 38th as the hold line). This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties (its what happens when you attack a fortress during the era of modern weaponry). End result for the US: ~37K dead, ~103K wounded, ~8K MIA, ~4700 POW. And technically a state of war still exists between the signatories of the Armistice (Ceasefire).

    Its surreal to visit the Truce Table in Panmunjom while the NORK guards stare at you through the windows; I was stationed in the ROK for year when I was on active duty and had a chance to go there:

    https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/afs:Medium:1128060017/800.png

    https://www.stripes.com/polopoly_fs/1.111786.1279719471!/image/560069446.JPG_gen/derivatives/landscape_900/560069446.JPG

    Pretty good overall, but some minor corrections:

    The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War

    More like World War II. North Korea launched a veritable blitzkrieg with its Soviet-equipped, Chinese-trained (ethnic Koreans from the Chinese Civil War) army on poorly trained South Korean army, which was equipped and trained as a constabulary force for putting down insurrections (by communist agitators).

    push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase

    MacArthur’s master stroke was at Inchon, not Pusan. It was pure genius, because Inchon has a very large tide and is unsuitable for a large scale hostile landing, so the attack was unexpected.

    reestablish the 38th as the hold line

    North and South Korea were initially divided by the 38th Parallel, but the DMZ does not follow it.

    This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties

    It wasn’t so much trench warfare as the battle of little hills. Since major offensives were curtailed for political reasons, many series of small-scale attacks and repulses were conducted to seize hills on the frontlines… for two full years, yes. A series of seemingly never-ending battle for hills, back and forth, switching hands, multiple times.

    the NORK guards stare at you through the windows

    But the guards in your photographs inside the building are South Koreans, not North Koreans. Even if someone didn’t know the uniforms, their height should clue in the casual observers. The solider outside (seen through the window) in the second picture IS a North Korean though.

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    Right; thanks. Didn't catch the Inchon-Pusan mistake in my hasty pre-post review. I grant your WWII vs WWI comparison as the 1950 ROK Army was not a peer force with the 1950 NORK Army a la the Imperial German Army vs the French Army in 1914. Still, the opening 12 months was sweeping mobile warfare with a not insignificant chance for one side or the other to end it quickly. The 1951-1953 phase saw both sides construct essentially a carbon copy of the Western Front across the peninsula from coast to coast, a fortified defense-in-depth. Not any Verdun- or Somme-like attacks over that period, but attacks/counterattacks for strategic hill positions with the heavy casualties. Conclusion: both of our comparisons are apt to a degree.
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  127. Twinkie says:
    @Anon

    Instead of rapidly overrunning Korea, the Chinese suffered
     
    Indeed. The battle of Kapyong (where several hundred Canadian and Australian soldiers with some American armoured support defeated an entire Chinese division) seems representative, if not typical of the kind of fighting that was going on.

    The battle of Kapyong (where several hundred Canadian and Australian soldiers with some American armoured support defeated an entire Chinese division) seems representative, if not typical of the kind of fighting that was going on.

    A Chinese division was not the same size as an American or Commonwealth division of the time. In American parlance, it was a regiment-sized force (one that was also devoid of any air, armor, or artillery support except man-portable mortars).

    It was still very gallant of the Canadians and the Australians, of course.

    The Chinese military doctrine of the time emphasized maneuver, infiltration, and surprise attacks, but the very rugged terrain often precluded this and led to human wave attacks in narrow confines.

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  128. SOL says:
    @Johann Ricke

    One interesting question is why Chinese-language movies, which seemed poised to explode in America after Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon earned $128 million at the American box office in 2000-2001
     
    Crouching Tiger was a Chinese language feature, but my impression is that it was a thoroughly American production. Ang Lee, a Westchester County resident married to a Chinese American, and his American sidekick, James Schamus, were the prime movers behind the movie. Everyone else was just a hired hand. I thought the movie was far superior to others in the genre, but my Chinese acquaintances were not particularly impressed. I'd venture to say that, despite the subtitles, it was a period martial arts movie made from an American perspective, which is why it did well (for its genre) stateside and in Europe, but disappeared without a trace in China.

    CTHD was an Ang Lee, too slow (and long?) as a wuxia movie for modern Chinese audiences, and probably too slow for Chinese audiences of the 70s.

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  129. @Twinkie
    Pretty good overall, but some minor corrections:

    The first year of the war was similar to the opening 90 days of the Great War
     
    More like World War II. North Korea launched a veritable blitzkrieg with its Soviet-equipped, Chinese-trained (ethnic Koreans from the Chinese Civil War) army on poorly trained South Korean army, which was equipped and trained as a constabulary force for putting down insurrections (by communist agitators).

    push the US/ROK almost off the peninsula until they hold the line at Pusan; MacArthur counterattacks at Pusan-near Seoul-and immediately almost cuts off the NORKs from their strategic homebase
     
    MacArthur's master stroke was at Inchon, not Pusan. It was pure genius, because Inchon has a very large tide and is unsuitable for a large scale hostile landing, so the attack was unexpected.

    reestablish the 38th as the hold line
     
    North and South Korea were initially divided by the 38th Parallel, but the DMZ does not follow it.

    This ends around July 1951; at that point both sides dig in for trench warfare and go to the negotiating table to end it (because they see the end result as another 1915-1918 bloodletting). smaller scale offensives to gain strategic advantage at the negotiating table (negotiations go on for another 2 years), which, predictably result in significant casualties
     
    It wasn't so much trench warfare as the battle of little hills. Since major offensives were curtailed for political reasons, many series of small-scale attacks and repulses were conducted to seize hills on the frontlines... for two full years, yes. A series of seemingly never-ending battle for hills, back and forth, switching hands, multiple times.

    the NORK guards stare at you through the windows
     
    But the guards in your photographs inside the building are South Koreans, not North Koreans. Even if someone didn't know the uniforms, their height should clue in the casual observers. The solider outside (seen through the window) in the second picture IS a North Korean though.

    Right; thanks. Didn’t catch the Inchon-Pusan mistake in my hasty pre-post review. I grant your WWII vs WWI comparison as the 1950 ROK Army was not a peer force with the 1950 NORK Army a la the Imperial German Army vs the French Army in 1914. Still, the opening 12 months was sweeping mobile warfare with a not insignificant chance for one side or the other to end it quickly. The 1951-1953 phase saw both sides construct essentially a carbon copy of the Western Front across the peninsula from coast to coast, a fortified defense-in-depth. Not any Verdun- or Somme-like attacks over that period, but attacks/counterattacks for strategic hill positions with the heavy casualties. Conclusion: both of our comparisons are apt to a degree.

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  130. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    He's from a Indian Muslim family. I think that Indian Muslims must have at least a little bit of Middle Eastern conqueror blood in them.

    Anyway if you read the whole account in Babe, she does take off all of her clothes and engage in oral sex with him so the evening was not a total waste from his POV.

    This quote from the article was hilarious:


    Before meeting Ansari, Grace told friends and coworkers about the date and consulted her go-to group chat about what she should wear to fit the “cocktail chic” dress-code he gave her. She settled on “a tank-top dress and jeans.” She showed me a picture, it was a good outfit.
     
    Well thank God for that. The woman is alleging that she has been all but raped, but she is still looking for confirmation that she wore a nice outfit.

    https://babe.net/2018/01/13/aziz-ansari-28355

    Tamil Muslims? Very unlikely. The guy could be a poster boy for the LTTE he’s so stereotypically Tamil.

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  131. Romanian says: • Website
    @Expletive Deleted
    Hadn't the Greekiest (civilized) Greeks thrown in the towel by then, and kowtowed to satrapy? Only the Spartans (who, let's face it, were more than a bit .. mental?) and their mincing and totally faa-a-bulous allies the brave Thespians (God bless 'em) were too "stupid" to cry uncle?

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians. Probably just the surviving warriors. Who wandered off in the usual manner and made everyone's life a rampant gaylord misery until they latched onto the hapless Laconians and Messenians. They were probably ready to decamp and head back north if need be, and the Persians would never dare follow (c.f. wild Dacians, innumerable Thracians, brutish and gigantic Illyrians et multi alii)

    Well, you are right in a way, but the Greeks did consider themselves a sort of nation and every nation has its internal variance. Even the most warlike nation today has its doves who can and do form political factions or even social classes. They just sorted themselves out even better because of the fractured political scene.

    wild Dacians

    We wuz Barbarians! The Dacians could fight, but Herodotus also states that they would retreat to their mountain strongholds (with the murus dacicus type walls) to weather the worst storms – Dacii inhaerent montibus – the Dacians cling to the mountains.

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  132. @Hippopotamusdrome


    he expected his TV star status to be seduction enough

     

    It was, actually, enough...


    He sat back and pointed to his penis and motioned for me to go down on him. And I did.

     

    It's good to be the King (or a TV actor).

    She seems like a groupie who got what she came for. Bad choice of words?

    She seems like a groupie who got what she came for. Bad choice of words?

    Indeed. I doubt she came at all. Who knows why she blew him? Perhaps because he went down on her and he was pressuring her for penetration and she wanted to avoid it while feeling guilty for receiving “the lash”?

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  133. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    Hadn't the Greekiest (civilized) Greeks thrown in the towel by then, and kowtowed to satrapy? Only the Spartans (who, let's face it, were more than a bit .. mental?) and their mincing and totally faa-a-bulous allies the brave Thespians (God bless 'em) were too "stupid" to cry uncle?

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians. Probably just the surviving warriors. Who wandered off in the usual manner and made everyone's life a rampant gaylord misery until they latched onto the hapless Laconians and Messenians. They were probably ready to decamp and head back north if need be, and the Persians would never dare follow (c.f. wild Dacians, innumerable Thracians, brutish and gigantic Illyrians et multi alii)

    You missed Athens.

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  134. Twinkie says:
    @Expletive Deleted
    Hadn't the Greekiest (civilized) Greeks thrown in the towel by then, and kowtowed to satrapy? Only the Spartans (who, let's face it, were more than a bit .. mental?) and their mincing and totally faa-a-bulous allies the brave Thespians (God bless 'em) were too "stupid" to cry uncle?

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians. Probably just the surviving warriors. Who wandered off in the usual manner and made everyone's life a rampant gaylord misery until they latched onto the hapless Laconians and Messenians. They were probably ready to decamp and head back north if need be, and the Persians would never dare follow (c.f. wild Dacians, innumerable Thracians, brutish and gigantic Illyrians et multi alii)

    The Spartans give every impression of being the ruthless, psychotic survivors of some previous undocumented near-extermination event visited upon a (northern?) clan of Hellenic savages, possibly Macedonians.

    No. Don’t buy into a cartoonish mythology.

    It’s very simple. The Spartans were better warriors than other Greeks, because the citizens (peers) trained since birth as warriors (leaving their very large slave population to tend to economic needs, i.e. farming). Theirs was a highly repressive and militarized state, dedicated to nothing but war. And even without war, they were on constant rebellion watch. The price of all this was their exceptionally low fertility (they essentially died out) and extreme sensitivity to casualties among peers (although they were often very courageous in battle, their government was always hyper-concerned even when a few of them were killed or captured, precisely because they were so few in number and had so few children).

    Meanwhile, men of other ancient Greek city states were part-time soldiers at best, with all that entails about competence. The fact that, as warfare became more endemic, large-scale, and brutal, the use of professional mercenaries (especially those that could skirmish AND fight in melee) grew greatly should tell you about the relative utility of ordinary part-time Greek hoplites.

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