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William Kristol: "Steve Sailer and Ann Coulter Were Wrong." [2:47:30]
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I’d point out that Trump did a mostly excellent job of synthesizing immigration and trade into the overarching question of Borders for America, which he strongly favored while Hillary tended to act ambivalent toward the whole concept. Borders was the meta-issue of 2016.

Sailer’s Thesis: immigration

Kristol’s Antithesis: trade

Trump’s Synthesis: borders

On the question of predicting Trump’s victory, to be precise, unlike Ann, I don’t believe I predicted that Trump would win (nor did I predict that Trump would lose). My contribution over the last 16 years has been to point out that there was an alternative strategy for the GOP rather than the Bush Family’s dominant strategy of more Hispanic immigration, and that my strategy made at least as much sense as the conventional wisdom.

In case you are wondering about who is participating in this video:

WEEKLY STANDARD editor William Kristol provided his post-election analysis with the Brookings Institution’s William Galston and Boston College professor Susan Shell at Harvard University last week. Moderated by Harvard professor and frequent Conversations with Bill Kristol guest Harvey Mansfield, the discussion is part of a biennial debate series between Kristol and Galston presented by Harvard’s Program on Constitutional Government.

 
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  1. WOW, he is angry! If someone had asked him about the immigration policy of Israel I think he would have had a stroke.

    • Replies: @Johnny F. Ive
    That would have been a very good question. He probably has some sophism on that topic to fool people with. Israel should have the same open immigration policy as ever other democracy.
    , @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).
  2. And they call us a Basket of Deplorables. That man is brain dead.

  3. is that blowhard irving kristol’s son?

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yes. I used to think he was a smart guy, but that was 20 years ago.
    , @Thomas
    Yep. Maintaining a country for your descendants is out of bounds for neocons, but maintaining a movement and a sinecure at a magazine is just peachy.
  4. I love how the questioner ignited Billy boy.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    *triggered
  5. How’s that Egg McMuffin workin’ out for ya, Mr regression to the mean?

  6. Interestingly, Kristol’s son-in-law has a more realistic and honest appraisal of Trump:

    http://freebeacon.com/politics/the-trump-revolution/

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    That's a really good summary of the whole business. Thanks.
  7. They say politics is show biz for ugly people? The dude next to Kristol surely proves that.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    As I've noted before Kristol is a gnome. For some magical reason he appears better on video than in real life.
  8. Kristol flinched when the questioner mentioned your name Steve. It was a flinch of shame. He knows he’s a fraud. Not in your league. Disgraciada!!!

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I don't think he thinks he's a fraud. He seems rather impervious to logic (they should talk about 'unskilled" rather "third world", btw. )

    Masses of unskilled immigrants can't be good for unemployed Americans.

    Kristol is either stupid and doesn't understand or he's glossing over the unskilled immigrants for whatever reason (likely because wants support the corporate class). He comes across as arrogant.
  9. Immigration won Trump the primaries, there can be no doubt.

    The Sailer Strategy was his key to victory in the general, but I do not think immigration is what pushed him over the top in the general. My take is that it was the war on political correctness that did it.

    Trump didn’t use ethnic or racial fears to drive resentment among working class whites – instead he used political correctness. PC is the cugel used by the (upper class) elites to silence (lower class) whites. Trump stood against the PC overreach of BLM, Trans bathrooms, and all the other slights that have been building since the triumphant celebration of gay marriage. In some ways it was an intra-white class struggle, with lower class voters using Trump to strike back against their betters.

    It alienated more cuckservative whites, but activated the passion and enthusiasm of the more numerous lower class whites, enabling Trump to successfully implement the Sailer strategy.

    Whether that happened by luck, instinct, or design is an interesting question to be answered in the weeks to come.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    Rejection of PC embraces the collective angst of all of these things (which are themselves facets of the same thing), which include immigration and outsourcing. This is probably because PC is the main enforcement mechanism for the oppression and dispossession of working class whites - it prohibits political organization and political speech to oppose the anti-white globalist project.
    , @Lagertha
    Agree. But, it is more simple than that. I discovered Steve's blog about 2.5 years ago...and it was overwhelming for me. I have 3 Millennial sons, sons who are immigrant stock for the most part (recent; relatively - 20th century - immigrants) from Europe and a Middle Eastern country. And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    My sons have been dismissed/denigrated (the all athletes/fraternity bros are predators sh*t) these last 10 years for being white during college application process (they are in the top 1% with raw test scores and IQ) . This, this has freaked me out. If a country ignores its most talented/intellectually gifted young people because they are white, well, shit, I need to go find a time machine for me and my babies to go back in time when every country was looking for the smartest people to introduce the latest technology, and save their asses from the sun burning them to death, or something.

    STEM kids are a rarity. Every nation, like Finland (they still do this) should be celebrating the smartest kids! History lesson for anyone who doesn't know this: After WW2, when Finland lost to Soviets, the idea was, we need to see "our children" as a national resource...we need to stimulate and help the smartest children. Women had already gone into the public sphere (50% of adult males were dead/wounded) to spur the economic wheel to get into the "glory" of the 20th century. Children and families became a YUGE focus...not a leftist (FY!) focus, a national focus to survive and prosper.

    So, yeah, I hate these talking heads who have always been comfortable and nonplussed in the USA, often privileged adults or privileged parents. Without money they didn't earn by themselves, they've got 'nuthin'.

  10. Kristol is unable to understand the complimentary alienation of the economic effects of globalism (outsourcing production to the Third World) and immigration (in-sourcing low skilled labor) which yield an acute loss of dignity and humiliation greater than the sum of the parts. Likely he could understand it if he tries but doesn’t care to understand it.

    The sense that you can’t achieve reasonable lifetime milestones while simultaneously enduring the psychic shock of having often hostile, ethnically chauvinist foreigners replace you and overcome you with a healthy assist from your own government, while your relative lower status is applauded as “progress” and just desserts.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Forget about psychic shock - it's pure economics. If blue collar whites have their factory jobs sent to Mexico and are outcompeted by low priced immigrants in the domestic market for semi-skilled labor, what's left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like, which is not enough to achieve ANY sort of milestone?
    , @anon
    Agree ... we are importing cheap goods from China and cheap labor from Mexico. The instant that Kristol tries to draw a distinction between the two illustrates that he doesn't get it.

    And throwing in the popular vote? If these themes weren't hugely popular, they couldn't have over come Trump's overwhelming negatives as a candidate. I don't even think Trump did a good job of articulating these positions. The point being that the policies were more popular than the candidate. It's a bad idea to ignore this.
  11. I attended a panel discussion at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government in the early 90s, the panel was made up of Norman Podhoretz, Irving Kristol, Nathan Glazer and William Phillips. The topic was the Roots and Future of Neoconservatism. Irving Kristol was flying off the handle in a similar way to Billy Boy here, and that was a very sympathetic panel and even the audience was mild.The difference being Irving Kristol had some grounding and charm from growing up in Brooklyn and his Jewish immigrant parentage. Billy Boy has no charm at all.

    • Replies: @antipater_1
    Irving Kristol also had intellectual achievements in life. Billy Boy has none.
    , @Anonymous
    Billy Boy has no charm at all.

    Bill Kristol increasingly reminds me of a bullfrog.
  12. Can I point out that Infogalactic discusses the “Sailer Strategy” while that inferior one does not really accord it the gravitas it deserves:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Steve_Sailer#The_Sailer_Strategy

  13. But did Trump do a good job connecting immigration to jobs and wage levels? Did he do that at all?

    I think he missed a huge opportunity. Polls also showed jobs/economy as the leading concern of people.

    He was more focused on linking immigration to crime and terrorism.

    • Replies: @guest
    He could have done better, yes. But the connection between immigration and jobs is something people just know. They don't need to be told.

    Maybe they would need to be told if Clinton ran on the economy whatsoever, but she didn't. She ran on goosing, so Trump didn't need to be very explicit.
    , @Marat
    Miller, in many warmup rallies before Trump came onstage, explicitly connected immigration to jobs.

    The body language of both was hilarious! Kristol is a smart guy. But he was a little too obvious in nervously jumping on the trade emphasis at the exclusion/ dismissal of immigration.

    Progressive politics of all stripes were shown the door. Trump's hardcore supports don't hate people, they hate progressivism. Ditching the PC made this obvious.
  14. Japan’s Fertility Rate Inches to Highest Level Since Mid-1990s

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/japan-s-fertility-rate-inches-to-highest-level-since-mid-1990s

    Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims.

    I wonder if he might be right about Germany which is not an island nation.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims."

    So is Kristol saying that Japan's problem is a lack of immigration, or a lack of population growth? It's probably true that Japan's struggling economy has something to do with it's slow population growth - or is it actually a net population decline? - but that could just as easily be solved by increased native birthrates as by mass immigration.

    In the short-term (some) immigrants may be an economic advantage because you don't have to wait for them to reach adulthood to become economically productive. In the long-term, native-born Japanese are going to be far more productive than immigrants from almost any country they would likely come from. Chinese immigrants might be one exception to that, but if there's one thing Japan emphatically doesn't need it's a large Fifth Column of citizens working for a country ten times its size just a short way across the sea.
    , @Judah Benjamin Hur
    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It's scary that people in the West and East Asia can't recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.
    , @Anonymous
    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2015-09-20/japan-dumbs-down-its-universities-at-the-wrong-time

    Wow, what if we could have a purge like that...

    What a peculiar country. It's like you press a button and it's done. The infinite possibilities of robotics!

  15. His spirited defense of one of the most infamous reaver cultures on earth transplanted to the quaint Nordics of Minneapolis….I can’t even come up with a verb. His model of reality does not work. Stop acting like he should be listened to.

    Bristol, begone.

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    • Replies: @Percy Gryce

    one of the most infamous reaver cultures on earth
     
    Wow. Cuts like a knife.
  16. He literally sputters when faced with a question about Japanese standards of living. That’s after getting beet red when asked about immigration. I’m surprised he didn’t cover his ears and start yelling “la la la I can’t hear you”.

    You would think when people are consistently this wrong they would eventually lose their jobs instead of doubling down. Post-Trump it seems they may become even more prominent. Peter Principle at play?

    Who was the gentleman that asked him this good questions?

    • Replies: @Lyov Myshkin
    @Anon87

    Who was the gentleman that asked him this good questions?

     

    I believe it was the admirable Tom Sunic.
  17. I still do not understand why anyone listens to him ? He has supported one failure after another (Iraq War, Jeb Bush, Hispanics becoming the new Republicans, election predictions, tax cut for billionaires to win votes, ignore white voters, etc), why is anyone listening to him ? I just wish somebody could ask him straight to his face why he thinks he is an expert when he is always wrong.

    • Replies: @Menschmaschine

    He has supported one failure after another (Iraq War
     
    From the point of view of the Neocons the Iraq War was not a failure. Trashing up Iraq (and now Syria) removed a potential rival to Israeli military dominance in the Middle East.
    , @Boethiuss
    That's exactly what the questioner said. It shouldn't be surprising that didn't go over very well. And even if he had a point, it sounds like sour grapes and a derail.
  18. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    In some ways, Sailer and Coulter were right, in some ways, wrong.

    There were lots of X-factors in 2016.

    Every strategy’s success succeeds or fails within an ever-shifting context, and various factors worked for and against SS.

    One thing for sure however is that Neocon Strategy is toast.

    I still think that in the long run, the only option is to end the GOP, create one party state, have all white cons join the Dems and subvert it from within by forming ANY coalition to bring down the elites.

    Once the head is decapitated, we have real revolutionary conditions.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Take another hit friend, and suck even harder. You are smoking the strong stuff, and just a little more gonja will lead you to ultimate consciousness.
  19. Scott Alexander talks about how the left is destroying the future usefulness of terms like “openly racist” by attaching them to Trump, who clearly is not. What words can be used in the future to describe a candidate who is ACTUALLY openly racist, since if you call him “openly racist” people will assume that you mean it in the devalued Trumpian sense of someone who really isn’t? Now six of the last 4 Republican candidates have been garden variety racists, but only Trump up until now has qualified as openly racist so they will have to think of some new superlative.

    Anyway, Kristol is destroying the meaning of the word “wrong” in the same way. If Sailer and Coulter are “wrong” (even though they were right) then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Now when the Hillary folks tout the fact that she won the popular vote, that’s understandably trying to salvage some dignity from defeat, but what excuse does Kristol have?

    • Replies: @Random Dude on the Internet
    Having been involved in politics since the 2000 election, every Republican presidential candidate is literally Hitler. Each candidate more like Hitler than the last. Calling opponents racist and sexist have been watered down for a long time. The key difference is that the GOP of 2000-2015 would flinch whenever they were inevitably called a racist or sexist where Trump just plowed right through it. I'm sure to guys like Romney or McCain, they liked to have considered themselves non-racists and non-sexists to a fault so they would eagerly try to dispel the labels the best they can, even if it meant throwing their base under a bus. Trump has been the only guy so far to just keep on plowing through and looks like it worked for him. The Democrats are going to panic when they find that calling someone a racist no longer works.
    , @guest
    How has Trump qualified as openly racist? He's not open about it to my knowledge. If he is racist, you have to read into him to find it. Which defeats the whole purpose of saying "openly."

    David Duke is openly racist. There, now you know what that term means.
    , @Elsewhere
    Sure, but I think there are more superlatives to go. After "racist" and "open racist", how about:
    proud racist (supremacist)
    militant racist (skinhead)
    genocidal racist (Nazi Hitler)

    The left can always go one step stronger than necessary. Basically, they are saying what they fear most, rather than what is likely actually true.
  20. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    If we need single payer health care as some folks insist cuz ALL peoples deserve equal basic healthcare, shouldn’t there be some means to ensure that ALL people get some basic truth in the news?

    With all the Big Media owned and controlled by a handful of conglomerates, that isn’t possible.

    Is there some way to create a Public Media that proportionately reflects the People of America?

    • Replies: @NickG

    Is there some way to create a Public Media that proportionately reflects the People of America?
     
    What - like the BBC.

    Good luck with that.
  21. He brings you up again, later in the segment. Contrasts you favorably with “fake news”.

  22. then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Irrelevant.

    And the less anyone pays attention to the clown, the better. These political cognoscenti guys were so far off base compared to some random schmoe like me, and presumably others, they should be hiding their faces in shame.

    This dude would kill to have a documented thread of Trump predictions like I do, he’d be headlining excerpts every day from whatever his sorry-ass rag is and using it to springboard the next phase of his career.

    • Replies: @EdwardM


    then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?
     
    Irrelevant.
     
    Well said. It could a new meme. Kinda like the opposite of "love" is not necessarily "hate," but rather "indifference."
  23. @Egregious Philbin
    is that blowhard irving kristol's son?

    Yes. I used to think he was a smart guy, but that was 20 years ago.

  24. @Alec Leamas
    Kristol is unable to understand the complimentary alienation of the economic effects of globalism (outsourcing production to the Third World) and immigration (in-sourcing low skilled labor) which yield an acute loss of dignity and humiliation greater than the sum of the parts. Likely he could understand it if he tries but doesn't care to understand it.

    The sense that you can't achieve reasonable lifetime milestones while simultaneously enduring the psychic shock of having often hostile, ethnically chauvinist foreigners replace you and overcome you with a healthy assist from your own government, while your relative lower status is applauded as "progress" and just desserts.

    Forget about psychic shock – it’s pure economics. If blue collar whites have their factory jobs sent to Mexico and are outcompeted by low priced immigrants in the domestic market for semi-skilled labor, what’s left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like, which is not enough to achieve ANY sort of milestone?

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    The psychic shock comes in when they go down town on Main Street and Mr. Smith's General Store is now a groceria, the surly denizens are driving pick up trucks all around town with .2 BACs when they're not aggressively propositioning your 13 year old daughter, there's a taco truck on every corner, and a major party Presidential candidate tells the nation "that would be great!" if the entire U.S. looked that way.
    , @Opinionator
    what’s left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like

    Immigrants and infiltrators are squeezing them out of these jobs, too, Jack.

    , @guest
    It's not just economics, or at least not for me. My type probably didn't win Trump the election, though I did vote for him. I'm not what you'd traditionally call "working class," but I'm not above them socio-economically. And I know what it's like to work someplace where you're the only "gringo."

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people's political power. Above all, "diversity" kills community. I don't know the people in my neighborhood anymore. I don't trust strangers.

    That's why I vote the way I do. Not because I want a better job.

  25. Strong is the psychology of previous investment. Despite non-citizen vote fraud and a 10 pt headwind from vicious MSM bias, Trump won 30 states. Add in that the MSM has been trying to stigmatize immigration restrictionism since the 70s. The only time BK will concede Sailer/Coulter’s strategy as winning is if it yields 95% of the white vote & 48 states. And he would attribute that to a Skynet transmission to activate the white supremacy circuit in the frontal cortex.

  26. @Stirner
    Immigration won Trump the primaries, there can be no doubt.

    The Sailer Strategy was his key to victory in the general, but I do not think immigration is what pushed him over the top in the general. My take is that it was the war on political correctness that did it.

    Trump didn't use ethnic or racial fears to drive resentment among working class whites - instead he used political correctness. PC is the cugel used by the (upper class) elites to silence (lower class) whites. Trump stood against the PC overreach of BLM, Trans bathrooms, and all the other slights that have been building since the triumphant celebration of gay marriage. In some ways it was an intra-white class struggle, with lower class voters using Trump to strike back against their betters.

    It alienated more cuckservative whites, but activated the passion and enthusiasm of the more numerous lower class whites, enabling Trump to successfully implement the Sailer strategy.

    Whether that happened by luck, instinct, or design is an interesting question to be answered in the weeks to come.

    Rejection of PC embraces the collective angst of all of these things (which are themselves facets of the same thing), which include immigration and outsourcing. This is probably because PC is the main enforcement mechanism for the oppression and dispossession of working class whites – it prohibits political organization and political speech to oppose the anti-white globalist project.

    • Replies: @415 reasons
    I describe it as the loss of common sense. Common sense says countries should have borders and prioritize the needs of their citizens over all 7 billion other people. Common sense says that we should all be treated in a way that is color blind and equal, not a crazy way where you have to know the 10,000 kinds of special snow flakes there are and how those rank against one another in victim Pokemon points. Common sense says that policing is needed most in violent inner city neighborhoods, not least. Common sense says if there is a string of high profile atrocities committed all over the western world, all done by muslim immigrants, occurring most in countries with the highest percentage muslim population, that if you want less terrorism we should stop letting in muslim immigrants.

    And yet there was no one on either side advocating for any of these policies! The Republican establishment thought a winning idea for their brand was PC Lite with Upper Class Tax Cuts(tm).

    And then people are surprised by the Trump phenomenon. What's more surprising is that establishment Republicans have been so castrated that they don't have the courage to call out even the most absurd liberal pieties.
  27. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    WOW, he is angry! If someone had asked him about the immigration policy of Israel I think he would have had a stroke.

    That would have been a very good question. He probably has some sophism on that topic to fool people with. Israel should have the same open immigration policy as ever other democracy.

    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    So, according to you, "every other democracy" has the "same" open immigration policy? That's news to me.

    Look, American Jews tend to get a great many things wrong. Their curious attitude toward Israeli immigration policy (if they indeed have one, and if it is the same restrictionist policy you assume they hold) might be one of the few things they get right. What's the point, therefore, of wanting to punish US for THEIR perceived ideological misdeeds, via this alleged "same" open immigration policy? No need to answer; your motives are clear.

  28. @Jack D
    Forget about psychic shock - it's pure economics. If blue collar whites have their factory jobs sent to Mexico and are outcompeted by low priced immigrants in the domestic market for semi-skilled labor, what's left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like, which is not enough to achieve ANY sort of milestone?

    The psychic shock comes in when they go down town on Main Street and Mr. Smith’s General Store is now a groceria, the surly denizens are driving pick up trucks all around town with .2 BACs when they’re not aggressively propositioning your 13 year old daughter, there’s a taco truck on every corner, and a major party Presidential candidate tells the nation “that would be great!” if the entire U.S. looked that way.

  29. That was quite a defensive answer. His body language said more than his words.

  30. @Jack D
    Forget about psychic shock - it's pure economics. If blue collar whites have their factory jobs sent to Mexico and are outcompeted by low priced immigrants in the domestic market for semi-skilled labor, what's left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like, which is not enough to achieve ANY sort of milestone?

    what’s left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like

    Immigrants and infiltrators are squeezing them out of these jobs, too, Jack.

  31. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    Roger Stone said it best.

    He learned from Nixon that the candidate has to reach his peak at just the right moment, and Trump did.

    It’s like a surfer. He has to wait for just the moment when ride it all the way.

    Trump managed to catch the right wave.

    At any rate, I do believe Trump would have won much bigger if the media had been at least half-fair. Also, if nevertrumpers(riff on ‘never again’?) hadn’t been so hostile and voted for that fool Gary Johnson.

    Winds were against him, but Trump managed to catch the right wave at just the right time.

    And there were few winds on his side: Wikileaks and Wiener.

    The media try to bury them… but there was the internet.

    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.

    Some will say Obama was internet savvy due to high-tech community support, but he didn’t need the internet to win cuz all the media and big money were behind him.

    But Trump really couldn’t have done this without alternative news and info sources.

    • Agree: anonguy
    • Replies: @Anonym
    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.

    This is very perceptive. Put the 2016 Zeitgeist and demographics in the 2000 election. Does Hillary win? Maybe so.

    Undoubtedly reddit, Wikileaks, breitbart and other alt-right sites played a role. Probably enough to swing it. And it was in spite of Google, Facebook and Twitter trying to jam a thumb on the scales.
  32. I got through ten minutes. This is the dark side of the Big Tent philosophy. A weasel can’t suck the yolk out of the egg unless he is inside the tent.

    On the plus side, he must be experiencing the stabbing pain of irrelevance if that performance was any indication.

  33. @Jack D
    Scott Alexander talks about how the left is destroying the future usefulness of terms like "openly racist" by attaching them to Trump, who clearly is not. What words can be used in the future to describe a candidate who is ACTUALLY openly racist, since if you call him "openly racist" people will assume that you mean it in the devalued Trumpian sense of someone who really isn't? Now six of the last 4 Republican candidates have been garden variety racists, but only Trump up until now has qualified as openly racist so they will have to think of some new superlative.

    Anyway, Kristol is destroying the meaning of the word "wrong" in the same way. If Sailer and Coulter are "wrong" (even though they were right) then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Now when the Hillary folks tout the fact that she won the popular vote, that's understandably trying to salvage some dignity from defeat, but what excuse does Kristol have?

    Having been involved in politics since the 2000 election, every Republican presidential candidate is literally Hitler. Each candidate more like Hitler than the last. Calling opponents racist and sexist have been watered down for a long time. The key difference is that the GOP of 2000-2015 would flinch whenever they were inevitably called a racist or sexist where Trump just plowed right through it. I’m sure to guys like Romney or McCain, they liked to have considered themselves non-racists and non-sexists to a fault so they would eagerly try to dispel the labels the best they can, even if it meant throwing their base under a bus. Trump has been the only guy so far to just keep on plowing through and looks like it worked for him. The Democrats are going to panic when they find that calling someone a racist no longer works.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Trump largely adopted the Democrat playbook - the same one they have been using for years: never apologize, never admit defeat, insult and villify your opponents. It works. It will work. Republicans should pay attention.
  34. Some will say Obama was internet savvy due to high-tech community support, but he didn’t need the internet to win cuz all the media and big money were behind him.

    Not to mention that his opponent for his first election was a crazy warmonger who basically represented the GOP policy that non-GOPers hated the most (war in the middle east) and everything the GOP base hated most (amnesty). Beating McCain was not that difficult.

  35. I wonder if it was a Harvard student who was asking the questions of Kristol.

  36. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    The danger of any strategy is ‘you win some, you lose some’.

    If you appeal to one group, you alienate another group.

    And that was the danger of SS. The idea of GOP appealing to whites was bound to upset Neocons who have nightmares about pitchforks. Also, Wall Street might lean even more to Democrats. And indeed, it did. It showered Hillary with tons. That was a loss for Trump… yet a kind of gain cuz he could use it to his advantage: “Look, the rich guys are behind Hillary”.

    Trump won cuz he won over the Deplorables in key states, in the ones that really mattered. Nationally, SS didn’t play out so evenly, but it worked in key states.
    Still, the sheer hostility against Trump, even from GOP, depressed some white votes that traditionally vote Republican. Considering how goofy and ridiculous Gary Johnson is, I’m surprised at the votes he got. SS might have worked better if so many GOP stalwarts like Romney, Ryan, and McCain weren’t such dogs of Neocon masters. But one advantage of being rejected by his own party was Trump could pose as champion of people vs establishment of both parties.

    But Trump’s victory depended not only on appealing to white working class but finding ways to depress the prog and black vote. Though progs hate Trump, they loathed Hillary too. And Trump played this up to the hilt: Hillary is the candidate of the Donor Class. She love wars. Her wars killed Muslims. She wants WWIII with Russia. He may be supported by Deplorables, but Hillary is supported by GLOBLASTOMA, globalism turned totally malignant and cancerous and destroying the entire world through financial rape, destruction of borders, and endless wars.
    Progs hated, hated, and hated Trump, but they also loathed, loathed, and loathed Hillary. Had it been Trump vs Sanders, the Progs would have turned out more. But then, black vote might have been ever lower as they just some old white guy. In Trump vs Sanders, Wall Street would have a had a tough time.

    Well, good thing Trump connected with the Gordons of the world.

    In the 80s, there were all these SAVE THE FARM movies by Hollywood to embarrass Reagan.

    Trump should move forth with SAVE THE FACTORY theme.

    Trumpman Prophecies.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Respectfully, could people stop using abbreviations without having previously indicated what they are talking about? I see these on iSteve frequently. If the comment is uninteresting, I don't bother doing a Google search on what they mean by "BYMOAT" or whatever. If the comment is interesting, I try to figure it out in context. Example: "And that was the danger of SS." My mind raced through possibilities--Social Security, Secret Service, uh, oh yeah, Steve Sailer, but that doesn't work in context, wait a minute, "Sailer Strategy." So I got it. It only cost me a minute. Am I just slower than everyone else? Possibly. But why not give slow guys like me a break and write "Sailer Strategy (SS)" the first time, since Sailer Strategy had not previously appeared in this post or comments?
  37. Questioner to Kristol at 2:50:20

    “What have you ever been right on in decades?” [ AIR HORNNNN ]

  38. That seals it: Kristol is the hands down winner of this year’s Baghdad Bob Award.

    • Agree: anonguy
  39. It’s sad but understandable that the Democrats are denying the reality of what just happened. It’s absurd to see Republicans and conservatives doing the same. “We won this time but really, if we tried this again, we’d lose! We better go back to what we’ve been trying for the last 20 years.”

    “GOP learning wrong lessons from Trump win, Republicans fear,” Politico, http://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/donald-trump-republicans-wrong-lessons-231523

  40. @Egregious Philbin
    is that blowhard irving kristol's son?

    Yep. Maintaining a country for your descendants is out of bounds for neocons, but maintaining a movement and a sinecure at a magazine is just peachy.

  41. BTW, @Steve_Sailer, I’m seeing you name-checked more and more. Are you no longer an unperson after last Tuesday? Can people now admit that you exist without fear of disappearing themselves?

  42. Kristol: “The majority of the American public voted for more liberal immigration policies.”

    Hahahaha!

    When native-born American citizens (plus some reasonable, non-California-esque percentage of naturalized citizens) get a chance to vote on an immigration-related question they inevitably vote for stricter immigration policies. Hell in Oregon, last the sight of mass anti-Trump riots, 66% of voters voted against a bill to give driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants. Hillary won the majority in eight counties in Oregon, but Measure 88 lost in every county but one (Multnomah). And of course in 1994 Californians voted overwhelmingly (~60%) for a major immigration enforcement bill which the elites decided to nix.

    Kristol: “Immigration was a salient issue for some voters.”

    It was an earth-shattering distinction between the candidates. If there is no distinction between Trump and the other candidates on immigration then Trump doesn’t win. 64% of all voters for whom immigration was the major issue voted for Trump.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    Trump basically addressed the issue in a way that was theretofore verboten and won the Presidency.

    So one is left with the undeniable conclusion that the two party consensus on immigration which totally excluded the Trumpian policy was a falsified preference - a fabrication they nearly made law.

    What they can't allow is a legal immigration pause in the same manner as the 25-65 pause because the people might like it.
  43. Kristol predicted failure for Trump before Super Tuesday,
    over the summer (remember Carly Fiorina accepting the invite to be Ted Cuz’s vive president), after Khazir-Kahn-gate, during the formation of the Renegade Party, and after all three debates before the general election. One of Nate Silvers writers at five-thirty-eight were talking up Evan Mcmullin’s chances not only in Utah, but a path to actual victory nationwide even two weeks before the national election. Silver had one article after the second debate entitled, “Hillary Clinton probably finished off Donald Trump last night”. Kristol assured everyone the entire GOP ticket would be pulled down by Trump.

    What has Bill Kristol been right about again? Nothing in the past year. If he didnt have a name magazine and a perch at Fox, he would be a ranting fool on a sparsely read blog.

  44. The Weekly Standard cult really does seem to have a problem with those 2 (Coulter; Steve). I don’t doubt in the latter case the consternation is less pronounced and less uniform. With Ann it’s obvious they hate her on every front and the style vs. substance reasons could never be unpackaged– recall her pro-McCarthyism book. Yet I think there’s about a half dozen or so regular contributors of theirs now following the unspeakable Unzian blog if only furtively; Caldwell, Carlson, and Last have openly quoted from these dark outlands. Alt-Rights may come and go but the ‘Sphere never stops turnin’

    • Replies: @dfordoom

    With Ann it’s obvious they hate her on every front and the style vs. substance reasons could never be unpackaged– recall her pro-McCarthyism book.
     
    Which is an excellent book by the way, drawing heavily on M. Stanton Evans' even better book Blacklisted by History. Coulter showed guts by coming and saying that McCarthy was right (which he was).
  45. Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don’t look and feel like foreign countries. It’s ridiculous to claim that the “Made in China” print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Immigration changes a country PERMANENTLY.

    Tariffs and trade deals don't. They can be lifted or re-negotiated. Immigration is forever!
    , @utu
    Kristol does not care about immigration because it is hard to make out of immigration issue a good cause for military intervention or war but with the issue of free trade there are endless possibilities. If Trump's trade policy will increase the tension with China, I am sure Kristol will love it.
    , @Lagertha
    He's really creepy. He lost. And, now, we have to endure his negative, sneering, annoying words for 4 years? No, I will never tune into his bullshit. He is the epitome of sour grapes. I hated his pomposity years ago...yawn...to say an old Valley Girl line, "he's so yesterday." Kristol is so over/epic fail/yesterday/non-person/deconstructed...I don't feel sorry for him - he's a mean and sinister person.
    , @Anonymous
    I was too young to personally remember, but it seems to me from reading and watching movies and stuff that trade with Japan was a much bigger deal in the 80s than trade more recently especially with China has been. People seemed to be more worked up about it in the 80s, and a pro-buy American type sentiment, especially with respect to things like cars, seems to have been stronger back then. Perhaps it's a branding thing? The products or their components today might be made in China, but they're generally not Chinese brands. Apple products are still considered American even if some of their components are made in China. Whereas in the 80s, the products were Japanese made and Japanese brands.
    , @Another Canadian
    Free trade and immigration are the one-two punch of globalism. Free trade moves the portable jobs, e.g. manufacturing, overseas for lower wages and environmental costs. Immigration lowers the price point of labour for the less portable jobs, e.g. construction. They both need to be in place for globalism to be running efficiently on all cylinders.
  46. That would have been a very good question. He probably has some sophism on that topic to fool people with. Israel should have the same open immigration policy as ever other democracy.

    Yes, it would take an ANTI-SEMITE!!! and a couple of follow-up questions to truly expose the neocon position.

    What about Israel?

    Israel is surrounded by enemies!

    Yeah but east Asians, Latinos, and Europeans don’t blow up pizza parlors.

    The Holocaust!

    Yeah but diversity is strength, sufficient diversity would guard against anyone having a majority in Israel to carry out another Holocaust, would help disarm Palestinian/Arab hostility too. Plus sets a much better example for the world than Jewish Apartheid state, much better for Jewish reputation, further disarming hostiles.

    Shut up shut Up shut UP!!!

    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.

    Yyyuuuup (said Silicon Valley and the Technocrats through gritted teeth).

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn't there to point to?
  47. Dick Morris on the election.

  48. @Danindc
    Kristol flinched when the questioner mentioned your name Steve. It was a flinch of shame. He knows he's a fraud. Not in your league. Disgraciada!!!

    I don’t think he thinks he’s a fraud. He seems rather impervious to logic (they should talk about ‘unskilled” rather “third world”, btw. )

    Masses of unskilled immigrants can’t be good for unemployed Americans.

    Kristol is either stupid and doesn’t understand or he’s glossing over the unskilled immigrants for whatever reason (likely because wants support the corporate class). He comes across as arrogant.

    • Replies: @jack ryan
    Or he just hates the traditional American nation that was 90% White European before 1965.
  49. Kristol has supported one failure after another for twenty years and it gave us Barack Obama and almost gave us Hillary Clinton.

    Now Trump has triumphed and have given the GOP it’s biggest victory in nearly three decades and is poised to pull the party in a new direction.

    Kristol having failed to make any impact on the primary recruited a nobody solely to give Utah to Hillary and thus cost Trump the electoral college and he couldn’t even succeed in that.

    I suppose I’d be angry too.

    • Replies: @David In TN
    Remember when Kristol tried to recruit NRO Cuckservative David French (my fellow Tennessean) to run for President?
  50. @Wilkey
    Kristol: "The majority of the American public voted for more liberal immigration policies."

    Hahahaha!

    When native-born American citizens (plus some reasonable, non-California-esque percentage of naturalized citizens) get a chance to vote on an immigration-related question they inevitably vote for stricter immigration policies. Hell in Oregon, last the sight of mass anti-Trump riots, 66% of voters voted against a bill to give driver's licenses to illegal immigrants. Hillary won the majority in eight counties in Oregon, but Measure 88 lost in every county but one (Multnomah). And of course in 1994 Californians voted overwhelmingly (~60%) for a major immigration enforcement bill which the elites decided to nix.

    Kristol: "Immigration was a salient issue for some voters."

    It was an earth-shattering distinction between the candidates. If there is no distinction between Trump and the other candidates on immigration then Trump doesn't win. 64% of all voters for whom immigration was the major issue voted for Trump.

    Trump basically addressed the issue in a way that was theretofore verboten and won the Presidency.

    So one is left with the undeniable conclusion that the two party consensus on immigration which totally excluded the Trumpian policy was a falsified preference – a fabrication they nearly made law.

    What they can’t allow is a legal immigration pause in the same manner as the 25-65 pause because the people might like it.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    What they can’t allow is a legal immigration pause in the same manner as the 25-65 pause because the people might like it.

    We must have this Alex. It should be the first priority even before the Wall and everify.

  51. Kristol might be right that immigration was not as an important issue in the general as it was in the primary.

    I think immigration was an important motivating factor in the southeast, where there actually has been a lot of latino immigration, even in the general. During the election coverage, I heard Karl Rove mention that there are now a million lations in North Carolina – probably one of the reasons it is now considered a swing-state – whereas 25 years ago, there were relatively very few. George has a lot too. Even Alabama and Tennessee experienced large influxes of latinos over the last 15-20 years. In the upper midwest, there hasn’t been as much, and straight economic issues might have weighed more heavily. But even in Wisconsin there has been a lot of latino immigration, and that might be beginning to be a bigger issue there too.

    The questioner was right however to mention the general contempt in which the white working class is held by Kristol and others in the Republican think-tank/publication world. Kevin Williams at NRO positively dripped with venom when describing rural whites.

  52. @Random Dude on the Internet
    Having been involved in politics since the 2000 election, every Republican presidential candidate is literally Hitler. Each candidate more like Hitler than the last. Calling opponents racist and sexist have been watered down for a long time. The key difference is that the GOP of 2000-2015 would flinch whenever they were inevitably called a racist or sexist where Trump just plowed right through it. I'm sure to guys like Romney or McCain, they liked to have considered themselves non-racists and non-sexists to a fault so they would eagerly try to dispel the labels the best they can, even if it meant throwing their base under a bus. Trump has been the only guy so far to just keep on plowing through and looks like it worked for him. The Democrats are going to panic when they find that calling someone a racist no longer works.

    Trump largely adopted the Democrat playbook – the same one they have been using for years: never apologize, never admit defeat, insult and villify your opponents. It works. It will work. Republicans should pay attention.

    • Replies: @Marty T
    Exactly. Strength wins, weakness loses.
  53. Billy the Kuck Kristol.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "Billy the Kuck Kristol."

    Kristol is no cuck. He knows exactly what he's doing and why.
  54. Claiming he’s not super-liberal on immigration while in the next breath attacking as racist the use of the term “third world immigration” is neither convincing nor becoming.

    I think I missed the Somali Nobel Prize winners and captains of industry. Plenty of terrorists and welfare cases, though.

    And, yes, illegal immigration does affect my life. It seems Kristol lives in a zip code that is lily white or Asian and where 50% of the adults have a graduate or professional degree, so things may be different for him. He probably gets cheap landscapers, though.

    • Replies: @Wilkey
    It seems Kristol lives in a zip code that is lily white or Asian and where 50% of the adults have a graduate or professional degree, so things may be different for him. He probably gets cheap landscapers, though.

    According to OpenSecrets, Bill Kristol lives in 22101 (McLean, Virginia). There are 232 pages of properties in 22101 currently listed for sale on Zillow. The cheapest single family home is going for $697k. It's 1655 sq ft and was built in 1956. On 176 of the 232 properties the asking price is $1 million or more, and the median asking price is $1.5 million. Zip code 22102, right next to 22101, is the wealthiest zip code in the D.C. Area, which is one of the richest metro areas in the country.

    So yeah, it's safe to say Bill Kristol gives zero shits about your average working class American. The funny thing is that he talks up his opposition to the Gang of Eight Amnesty Bill while providing us with no reason why he actually opposed it. He certainly didn't denigrate Gang of Eight supporters in the same way he derided opponents of the 2006 amnesty bill, which he called "yahoos." Probably he just realized that if he openly supported another attempt at amnesty that no one would ever get caught dead reading his magazine again.
  55. @Wilkey
    Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don't look and feel like foreign countries. It's ridiculous to claim that the "Made in China" print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    Immigration changes a country PERMANENTLY.

    Tariffs and trade deals don’t. They can be lifted or re-negotiated. Immigration is forever!

    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    Immigration changes a country PERMANENTLY. Tariffs and trade deals don’t. They can be lifted or re-negotiated. Immigration is forever!

    Kristol may be right that trade was one of the issues that made the difference. Trump won in three states (Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania) whose economies have been devastated by free trade but who, in relative terms, haven't seen much immigration, especially not of the illegal kind. So if Trump doesn't talk about trade he doesn't win.

    But it's also true that Trump won because of immigration. 13% of all voters told exit pollers their top issue was immigration, and 64% of them voted for Trump while only 32% chose Hillary. It's also frighteningly clear from the map that massive increases in the minority population will move this country to the left.

    I think mass immigration hurts Republicans in another way. If you don't have mass immigration then Americans in states that are falling behind have more options. They can move to states with booming economies and find work. Now no business in California or Arizona tries to recruit unskilled workers from Michigan or Pennsylvania because they don't have to. It's easier just to hire the illegals from right across the border.
  56. Why isn’t there a Steve Sailer podcast?

  57. How many paying subscribers does Kristol’s *Weakly Standard* magazine have?

    • Replies: @Barnard
    They claim in their advertising packet to have a circulation of 100k+ with 90k being paid subscribers. I think National Review claims to have a circulation of 166,000.


    http://influence.mediadc.com/pages/weekly-standard/a-higher-standard
  58. @Anon
    In some ways, Sailer and Coulter were right, in some ways, wrong.

    There were lots of X-factors in 2016.

    Every strategy's success succeeds or fails within an ever-shifting context, and various factors worked for and against SS.

    One thing for sure however is that Neocon Strategy is toast.

    I still think that in the long run, the only option is to end the GOP, create one party state, have all white cons join the Dems and subvert it from within by forming ANY coalition to bring down the elites.

    Once the head is decapitated, we have real revolutionary conditions.

    Take another hit friend, and suck even harder. You are smoking the strong stuff, and just a little more gonja will lead you to ultimate consciousness.

  59. @snootybaronet
    I attended a panel discussion at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in the early 90s, the panel was made up of Norman Podhoretz, Irving Kristol, Nathan Glazer and William Phillips. The topic was the Roots and Future of Neoconservatism. Irving Kristol was flying off the handle in a similar way to Billy Boy here, and that was a very sympathetic panel and even the audience was mild.The difference being Irving Kristol had some grounding and charm from growing up in Brooklyn and his Jewish immigrant parentage. Billy Boy has no charm at all.

    Irving Kristol also had intellectual achievements in life. Billy Boy has none.

  60. Dahlia says:

    That was some question! Guy sounds Asian or Middle Eastern, which, if Frog Twitter has taught me anything, it’s that these folks are very overrepresented among paleocons/alt-Right.

    Steve, I miss you putting real meat on your posts. You have such interesting perspectives and the longer missives or thoughts really give people like me something to chew on. The sparse posts, for me, are uninviting; I would feel like a blowhard just sounding off.

    I guess what I’m saying is that your older style lends to the more conversational.

    Now, if you’re sick or have other personal issues, then I apologize! And, um, get better?

  61. BK’s angst originates from recognizing that he has to hold and defend a flawed and fatally-wounded proposition. The PC description emerged in response to the systematic attack on caucasians; PC has always been used with tongue in cheek and/or outright disdain.

    DT needs to completely reorganize the nation’s human resources which really begins with the education system. This will require a shrewd attorney general to affect the necessary changes, but now is not the time to do away with the Secretary of Education. The universities have 3.2mm students enrolled today and these are the ideological soldiers of the progressive elites. The DOE has tremendous leverage at its disposal through the disbursement of financial aid to post-secondary institutions as well as research grants from other corners of the Federal government. All of these options must be prudently utilized to achieve a rapid reorganization of American culture or domestic millennials will not produce business owners, managers, workers and future generations of sufficiently competent people to move forward.

    The discrimination is structural in the education system and, like with so many other issues DT has pointed out, the existing laws only need to be enforced! Financial aid has been presented to the public as subsidy to students, but all of that financial aid money never touches the student’s hands and immediately is credited to the bursar.

    The student loan crisis is a GREAT crisis that we cannot let go to waste.

    https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_106.10.asp

    http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_303.80.asp

  62. I love it when the questioner asks, “What have you ever been right about in decades?” and Kristol answers, “Most things.” Maybe he’s been right about where he left his car keys, but he’s been wrong about every issue of national significance. If I had been in the audience I would have shouted, “Hear, hear!” after the questioner asked him that one.

  63. One wonders whether he believes himself. I doubt it. His explanation is that people voted for Trump more over Chinese-made goods than immigration? Idiot. Chinese goods was in issue in the 1980s.

  64. @snootybaronet
    I attended a panel discussion at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in the early 90s, the panel was made up of Norman Podhoretz, Irving Kristol, Nathan Glazer and William Phillips. The topic was the Roots and Future of Neoconservatism. Irving Kristol was flying off the handle in a similar way to Billy Boy here, and that was a very sympathetic panel and even the audience was mild.The difference being Irving Kristol had some grounding and charm from growing up in Brooklyn and his Jewish immigrant parentage. Billy Boy has no charm at all.

    Billy Boy has no charm at all.

    Bill Kristol increasingly reminds me of a bullfrog.

  65. @Stirner
    Immigration won Trump the primaries, there can be no doubt.

    The Sailer Strategy was his key to victory in the general, but I do not think immigration is what pushed him over the top in the general. My take is that it was the war on political correctness that did it.

    Trump didn't use ethnic or racial fears to drive resentment among working class whites - instead he used political correctness. PC is the cugel used by the (upper class) elites to silence (lower class) whites. Trump stood against the PC overreach of BLM, Trans bathrooms, and all the other slights that have been building since the triumphant celebration of gay marriage. In some ways it was an intra-white class struggle, with lower class voters using Trump to strike back against their betters.

    It alienated more cuckservative whites, but activated the passion and enthusiasm of the more numerous lower class whites, enabling Trump to successfully implement the Sailer strategy.

    Whether that happened by luck, instinct, or design is an interesting question to be answered in the weeks to come.

    Agree. But, it is more simple than that. I discovered Steve’s blog about 2.5 years ago…and it was overwhelming for me. I have 3 Millennial sons, sons who are immigrant stock for the most part (recent; relatively – 20th century – immigrants) from Europe and a Middle Eastern country. And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    My sons have been dismissed/denigrated (the all athletes/fraternity bros are predators sh*t) these last 10 years for being white during college application process (they are in the top 1% with raw test scores and IQ) . This, this has freaked me out. If a country ignores its most talented/intellectually gifted young people because they are white, well, shit, I need to go find a time machine for me and my babies to go back in time when every country was looking for the smartest people to introduce the latest technology, and save their asses from the sun burning them to death, or something.

    STEM kids are a rarity. Every nation, like Finland (they still do this) should be celebrating the smartest kids! History lesson for anyone who doesn’t know this: After WW2, when Finland lost to Soviets, the idea was, we need to see “our children” as a national resource…we need to stimulate and help the smartest children. Women had already gone into the public sphere (50% of adult males were dead/wounded) to spur the economic wheel to get into the “glory” of the 20th century. Children and families became a YUGE focus…not a leftist (FY!) focus, a national focus to survive and prosper.

    So, yeah, I hate these talking heads who have always been comfortable and nonplussed in the USA, often privileged adults or privileged parents. Without money they didn’t earn by themselves, they’ve got ‘nuthin’.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Maybe you've answered this elsewhere, but I missed it. How did you discover Steve's blog 2.5 years ago? I'm asking this in a marketing sense.
    , @yaqub the mad scientist
    And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    Interesting post. Tip: start calling them men instead of males if they're grown.

  66. @Wilkey
    Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don't look and feel like foreign countries. It's ridiculous to claim that the "Made in China" print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    Kristol does not care about immigration because it is hard to make out of immigration issue a good cause for military intervention or war but with the issue of free trade there are endless possibilities. If Trump’s trade policy will increase the tension with China, I am sure Kristol will love it.

  67. @George
    Japan’s Fertility Rate Inches to Highest Level Since Mid-1990s

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/japan-s-fertility-rate-inches-to-highest-level-since-mid-1990s

    Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims.

    I wonder if he might be right about Germany which is not an island nation.

    “Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims.”

    So is Kristol saying that Japan’s problem is a lack of immigration, or a lack of population growth? It’s probably true that Japan’s struggling economy has something to do with it’s slow population growth – or is it actually a net population decline? – but that could just as easily be solved by increased native birthrates as by mass immigration.

    In the short-term (some) immigrants may be an economic advantage because you don’t have to wait for them to reach adulthood to become economically productive. In the long-term, native-born Japanese are going to be far more productive than immigrants from almost any country they would likely come from. Chinese immigrants might be one exception to that, but if there’s one thing Japan emphatically doesn’t need it’s a large Fifth Column of citizens working for a country ten times its size just a short way across the sea.

  68. @Wilkey
    Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don't look and feel like foreign countries. It's ridiculous to claim that the "Made in China" print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    He’s really creepy. He lost. And, now, we have to endure his negative, sneering, annoying words for 4 years? No, I will never tune into his bullshit. He is the epitome of sour grapes. I hated his pomposity years ago…yawn…to say an old Valley Girl line, “he’s so yesterday.” Kristol is so over/epic fail/yesterday/non-person/deconstructed…I don’t feel sorry for him – he’s a mean and sinister person.

  69. @Alec Leamas
    Rejection of PC embraces the collective angst of all of these things (which are themselves facets of the same thing), which include immigration and outsourcing. This is probably because PC is the main enforcement mechanism for the oppression and dispossession of working class whites - it prohibits political organization and political speech to oppose the anti-white globalist project.

    I describe it as the loss of common sense. Common sense says countries should have borders and prioritize the needs of their citizens over all 7 billion other people. Common sense says that we should all be treated in a way that is color blind and equal, not a crazy way where you have to know the 10,000 kinds of special snow flakes there are and how those rank against one another in victim Pokemon points. Common sense says that policing is needed most in violent inner city neighborhoods, not least. Common sense says if there is a string of high profile atrocities committed all over the western world, all done by muslim immigrants, occurring most in countries with the highest percentage muslim population, that if you want less terrorism we should stop letting in muslim immigrants.

    And yet there was no one on either side advocating for any of these policies! The Republican establishment thought a winning idea for their brand was PC Lite with Upper Class Tax Cuts(tm).

    And then people are surprised by the Trump phenomenon. What’s more surprising is that establishment Republicans have been so castrated that they don’t have the courage to call out even the most absurd liberal pieties.

    • Agree: Opinionator
  70. And at 2:47:37 Kristol doesn’t fail to remind us that Hillary Clinton got more votes than Trump (that’s a tell), ergo, the majority of the people are pro immigration.

  71. Alt-right activists must expose the hollow men of cuckservatism by questioning cuck frauds about the damaging consequences of their ideas.

  72. @Boomstick
    Claiming he's not super-liberal on immigration while in the next breath attacking as racist the use of the term "third world immigration" is neither convincing nor becoming.

    I think I missed the Somali Nobel Prize winners and captains of industry. Plenty of terrorists and welfare cases, though.

    And, yes, illegal immigration does affect my life. It seems Kristol lives in a zip code that is lily white or Asian and where 50% of the adults have a graduate or professional degree, so things may be different for him. He probably gets cheap landscapers, though.

    It seems Kristol lives in a zip code that is lily white or Asian and where 50% of the adults have a graduate or professional degree, so things may be different for him. He probably gets cheap landscapers, though.

    According to OpenSecrets, Bill Kristol lives in 22101 (McLean, Virginia). There are 232 pages of properties in 22101 currently listed for sale on Zillow. The cheapest single family home is going for $697k. It’s 1655 sq ft and was built in 1956. On 176 of the 232 properties the asking price is $1 million or more, and the median asking price is $1.5 million. Zip code 22102, right next to 22101, is the wealthiest zip code in the D.C. Area, which is one of the richest metro areas in the country.

    So yeah, it’s safe to say Bill Kristol gives zero shits about your average working class American. The funny thing is that he talks up his opposition to the Gang of Eight Amnesty Bill while providing us with no reason why he actually opposed it. He certainly didn’t denigrate Gang of Eight supporters in the same way he derided opponents of the 2006 amnesty bill, which he called “yahoos.” Probably he just realized that if he openly supported another attempt at amnesty that no one would ever get caught dead reading his magazine again.

  73. When really pressed – when the questioner pointed out the success of homogenous nations such as Japan and pre-Merkel Germany- Kristol, Galston and sympathizers in the audience respond with laughter and ridicule. This is a time worn tactic of the left, particularly the (((left)). I have seen it in action at debates for decades.

    One cannot have a good faith debate with these people.

    BTW, more free publicity. Keep it coming.

  74. No one here but we ardent meritocrats.

    Gee, I can’t imagine how corporate policies like this might piss off the working class.

  75. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Wilkey
    Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don't look and feel like foreign countries. It's ridiculous to claim that the "Made in China" print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    I was too young to personally remember, but it seems to me from reading and watching movies and stuff that trade with Japan was a much bigger deal in the 80s than trade more recently especially with China has been. People seemed to be more worked up about it in the 80s, and a pro-buy American type sentiment, especially with respect to things like cars, seems to have been stronger back then. Perhaps it’s a branding thing? The products or their components today might be made in China, but they’re generally not Chinese brands. Apple products are still considered American even if some of their components are made in China. Whereas in the 80s, the products were Japanese made and Japanese brands.

    • Replies: @Buddwing
    Concern/paranoia about Japan in the 1980's centered on two observations: (1) American cars were terrible, while Japanese cars exhibited high quality design and manufacture, and (2) the Japanese government's industrial policy (through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI) seemed to point to a strategic command of a national economy that we would need to emulate.

    The first issue was dealt with by much needed reform in Detroit and the Japanese companies building effective factories in the US. (You would not believe the crappiness of American cars. Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months. I was astounded to see a working clock in my friend's Honda Civic in 1974. The clocks in American cars shook apart from road vibration. When a colleague consulting for GM recommended a more expensive clock on Cadillacs, GM told him "Nobody buys a Cadillac for the clock." They were right. People bought a Lexus.)

    The second issue was a constant concern of people like James Fallows. MITI was already losing leverage over Japanese companies, however, and the emergence of companies like Apple and Microsoft convinced most people that central policy in the form of Industrial Policy was more likely to prop up staid companies like IBM than to generate something new and important.
    , @snorlax
    Pearl Harbor was still a recent-ish memory in the 80's.
    , @Bill
    Private sector trade unions existed, sort of, in the 80s. There was still a power base (money and votes) behind protecting middle class manufacturing jobs. Trade unions still had power inside the Democrat Party. They could threaten to defect like the Teamsters did in 1980. They had a coterie of academics and think tanks and pet politicians.

    Today, Richard Trumka, of the formerly formidable United Mine Workers, spends his days rhapsodizing on the glories of gloryholes or gay marriage or whatever.

    The end of private sector unions in the US was a big deal. They disliked immigration. They disliked free trade. And they had a seat at the tables of power. Now, they do as their cultural marxist masters dictate, in the hopes of a few table scraps.
  76. @Anon
    If we need single payer health care as some folks insist cuz ALL peoples deserve equal basic healthcare, shouldn't there be some means to ensure that ALL people get some basic truth in the news?

    With all the Big Media owned and controlled by a handful of conglomerates, that isn't possible.

    Is there some way to create a Public Media that proportionately reflects the People of America?

    Is there some way to create a Public Media that proportionately reflects the People of America?

    What – like the BBC.

    Good luck with that.

  77. @Lord Jeff Sessions
    WOW, he is angry! If someone had asked him about the immigration policy of Israel I think he would have had a stroke.

    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It’s no wonder that there’s a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    • Replies: @guest
    You've got that backwards.
    , @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Trump himself is an equal opportunity critic. Remember Jeb! Bush?
    , @Mr. Anon
    "I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan."

    Whether or not a representative gets ejected from his seat is entirely within the power of his constituents within the limited confines of his district. Cantor's and Ryan's districts are different. Wisconsin is not the same as Virginia; the people are not the same.

    , @Bill
    Republicans: bigoted against Jews
    , @Lyov Myshkin
    Weren't they revolutionaries from the second they stepped off the boat?

    Jews and their defenders never seem to take responsibility for their choices. They're like women in that way.
  78. @George
    Japan’s Fertility Rate Inches to Highest Level Since Mid-1990s

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/japan-s-fertility-rate-inches-to-highest-level-since-mid-1990s

    Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims.

    I wonder if he might be right about Germany which is not an island nation.

    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It’s scary that people in the West and East Asia can’t recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.

    • Replies: @Harold
    Don’t be silly.
    , @reiner Tor
    Over the long run, sure. But I seriously doubt that those fertility rates could stay so low forever. They can't, so they won't.
    , @DJF
    But even with a 90% reduction in Japan's population it will still be Japan

    Replace those 90% with immigrants and Japan will no longer be Japan because it won't be Japanese
    , @AnotherDad

    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It’s scary that people in the West and East Asia can’t recognize that.
     
    That's true--if it continued forever. But it simply does not.

    One million births/year is still a steady state Japan of 80 million people! That's more people than Japan ever had until the let's-make-up-what-we-lost post war bangin' rebound. It's a lot for an island(s) that is smaller than California.

    What *naturally* happens with these low fertility rates is that the population will stall and drop, and employment prospects, housing costs, school crowding, etc. etc. all get better and better and it becomes easier and easier to do "affordable family formation". Plus you are culling off the "you-go-girl", "girls just wanna have fun" types and selecting for "wife and mother" types. This is all to the good. Left alone, you recover from a fertility inhibition condition, to a fertility friendly one.

    But this is the "natural" case. What absolutely *destroys* this recovery--what you absolutely must *not* do--is taking Kristol's advice and allow immigrants to run in and seize the benefits of easing of your population pressure from you for themselves and destroy it.

    Avoid doing what Kristol advocates and while there may be some short term fiscal pain with entitlements, you're fine. Do what Kristol advocates and you're dead.
  79. I don’t believe I predicted

    You did not predict the outcome of the election.

    WEEKLY STANDARD editor William Kristol

    What’s not mentioned is that he’s a so-called neocon Jew who cheerled America into the ill-/un-conceived and ultimately disastrous ‘War on Terror’ (aka ‘Invade the World, Invite the World’) — Kristol has always seemed to be dogmatically stupid and obtuse — also dogmatically malevolent re what is best for America and its people — yet he still appears to be a member of the punditocracy and retains influence — and people wonder why Trump won.

  80. Well, Kristol lost it pretty quickly. His first tack was to insist that “Sailer and Coulter were wrong” (that the vote was about immigration), because Trump didn’t get over 50% of the vote, and the other three candidates were all pro-immigration. Ergo, the American people are pro-immigration.

    When he got pressed on this issue, he started getting accusatory (“what kind of euphemism is ‘third world’), dismissed the Somalis by referencing refugees, and then started getting sarcastic.

    Loser.

  81. Why are my two comments still awaiting moderation while a whole bunch of more recent ones been approved? They didn’t seem out of place.

  82. @neutral
    I still do not understand why anyone listens to him ? He has supported one failure after another (Iraq War, Jeb Bush, Hispanics becoming the new Republicans, election predictions, tax cut for billionaires to win votes, ignore white voters, etc), why is anyone listening to him ? I just wish somebody could ask him straight to his face why he thinks he is an expert when he is always wrong.

    He has supported one failure after another (Iraq War

    From the point of view of the Neocons the Iraq War was not a failure. Trashing up Iraq (and now Syria) removed a potential rival to Israeli military dominance in the Middle East.

    • Agree: Opinionator
  83. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    You’ve got that backwards.

  84. I had a moment; so I listened to this whole fracking symposium….blech! Can these two boring, uncool men, just leave, forever, pleez? They are like the contemptuous snakes in that cartoon that you all are now just visualizing…breathe….think back to when you were 6….breathe, close your eyes…remember that cartoon?

    They are still struggling how Trump trumped their asses! So, they spread the usual: be afraid, be very afraid. These two, some of the most supercilious guys on the planet, do not get it yet. They will be tripping over their own hubris in a few weeks. God, they are awful human beings. I watched this whole dang thang and: It is really hard to come up with a good come-back when you have nuthin’.

    • Replies: @Boomstick
    I didn't have the heart to listen to the whole thing, but I flipped through it. My God, it was dreary and platitudinous and utterly conventional. In contrast there's a Milo/Ann Coulter podcast out that was recorded just before the election. ("In this tiny corner of the world, Ann gets to be the voice of reason.") The conversation was sparkling, funny, and had at least a couple real insights.

    I get that the great and good can't and shouldn't let it rip to quite the same extent a couple epater le bourgeois specialists like Ann and Milo do. But the Kristol/Galston/gal talk reminded me of a Brezhnev-era colloquium in which the whole point is to drone on while avoiding saying anything either interesting or true. That could result in you getting into trouble with the authorities.

  85. @Johnny F. Ive
    That would have been a very good question. He probably has some sophism on that topic to fool people with. Israel should have the same open immigration policy as ever other democracy.

    So, according to you, “every other democracy” has the “same” open immigration policy? That’s news to me.

    Look, American Jews tend to get a great many things wrong. Their curious attitude toward Israeli immigration policy (if they indeed have one, and if it is the same restrictionist policy you assume they hold) might be one of the few things they get right. What’s the point, therefore, of wanting to punish US for THEIR perceived ideological misdeeds, via this alleged “same” open immigration policy? No need to answer; your motives are clear.

    • Replies: @guest
    I can't make out what you're saying , but the point about bringing up Israel with these people is that either they're hypocrites or they practice cognitive dissonance. It's a rhetorical dagger to point out the double standard, because there's really no excuse for it except to say "Israel is special."
    , @Johnny F. Ive
    I should have said Western democracy. Yes, I think Israel should have the same immigration policy that their agents in the US have created here. They should face the same situation. They deserve it for how they have interfered in America. They've bullied the US, stole from the US, almost bankrupted it through wars, and made the US a pariah in the Middle East (and at times the world). I also think any other country that has used the US deserve whatever karma comes their way. What is good for the goose is good for the gander: https://youtu.be/lKDeyuM0-Og

    That cartoon is true in parts of the US now.

    , @Mikey Darmody
    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree. Even Netanyahu said that Europe had a responsibility to accept Syrian refugees, at the beginning of the crisis last year.
    You imply that the motive of this line of questioning is antisemitism. That is a shaming tactic meant to discourage legitimate criticisms. I assume that you are hijacking this conversation with shaming tactics because you are paranoid, neurotic, and because you are anti-Gentile. I'm willing to say that openly.
  86. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    Trump himself is an equal opportunity critic. Remember Jeb! Bush?

  87. @Jack D
    Forget about psychic shock - it's pure economics. If blue collar whites have their factory jobs sent to Mexico and are outcompeted by low priced immigrants in the domestic market for semi-skilled labor, what's left for them other than part time work at Wal-Mart and the like, which is not enough to achieve ANY sort of milestone?

    It’s not just economics, or at least not for me. My type probably didn’t win Trump the election, though I did vote for him. I’m not what you’d traditionally call “working class,” but I’m not above them socio-economically. And I know what it’s like to work someplace where you’re the only “gringo.”

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people’s political power. Above all, “diversity” kills community. I don’t know the people in my neighborhood anymore. I don’t trust strangers.

    That’s why I vote the way I do. Not because I want a better job.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people’s political power. Above all, “diversity” kills community.
     
    Exactly. Jobs and the economy matter, of course, but what you articulated is at least as important, and would never even come up at a Republican presidential debate.
    , @Marat
    Agree 100%.

    I work in a medical environment where I am not the owner/boss, although I am the only specialist. The assistants often lapse into Spanish, have a short attention span, and lack a sense of seriousness that my German roots want to see in a medical setting.

    Although they have training for their jobs, the employees have monotonous disinterest in excellence. In fact, their collective culture prevents any of them from wanting to outshine any of the other employees. They are very protective of each other in this way, and individual effort is seen as apple polishing, causing potential problems for the group.

    And the language games ... not always pleasant.

    A drive through downtown at night is often a near-brush with death. Graffiti is frankly, ugly as sin. And being in any store within 10 minutes of closing - Wole Foods comes to mind - sounds like what a prison must sound like at lights-out.

    Light switches installed upside down, paper dispensers jammed so full they clog, the obtuse "sqaureness" of Mexican / Aztec layout in all manners visual ... It done get tiresome.

    Even a 7th grade acquaintence of gravity, force, application of materials, measurement, and the germ theory of disease would go a long way to prevent enormous wasteage and duplicated effort.

    Standards are noticeably lowered, across the board, even in upscale areas. It's not Third World, but it may well be Second World.
  88. You can judge a man by the enemies his has and you have all the right enemies Steve, congratulations.

  89. @Opinionator
    But did Trump do a good job connecting immigration to jobs and wage levels? Did he do that at all?

    I think he missed a huge opportunity. Polls also showed jobs/economy as the leading concern of people.

    He was more focused on linking immigration to crime and terrorism.

    He could have done better, yes. But the connection between immigration and jobs is something people just know. They don’t need to be told.

    Maybe they would need to be told if Clinton ran on the economy whatsoever, but she didn’t. She ran on goosing, so Trump didn’t need to be very explicit.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    He could have done better, yes. But the connection between immigration and jobs is something people just know. They don’t need to be told.

    That hasn't been my experience at all. When I make the argument with people, I often see the world open up before them. Try it.
  90. @Svigor

    That would have been a very good question. He probably has some sophism on that topic to fool people with. Israel should have the same open immigration policy as ever other democracy.
     
    Yes, it would take an ANTI-SEMITE!!! and a couple of follow-up questions to truly expose the neocon position.

    What about Israel?

    Israel is surrounded by enemies!

    Yeah but east Asians, Latinos, and Europeans don't blow up pizza parlors.

    The Holocaust!

    Yeah but diversity is strength, sufficient diversity would guard against anyone having a majority in Israel to carry out another Holocaust, would help disarm Palestinian/Arab hostility too. Plus sets a much better example for the world than Jewish Apartheid state, much better for Jewish reputation, further disarming hostiles.

    Shut up shut Up shut UP!!!

    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.
     
    Yyyuuuup (said Silicon Valley and the Technocrats through gritted teeth).

    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?

  91. @Alec Leamas
    Trump basically addressed the issue in a way that was theretofore verboten and won the Presidency.

    So one is left with the undeniable conclusion that the two party consensus on immigration which totally excluded the Trumpian policy was a falsified preference - a fabrication they nearly made law.

    What they can't allow is a legal immigration pause in the same manner as the 25-65 pause because the people might like it.

    What they can’t allow is a legal immigration pause in the same manner as the 25-65 pause because the people might like it.

    We must have this Alex. It should be the first priority even before the Wall and everify.

  92. @Jack D
    Scott Alexander talks about how the left is destroying the future usefulness of terms like "openly racist" by attaching them to Trump, who clearly is not. What words can be used in the future to describe a candidate who is ACTUALLY openly racist, since if you call him "openly racist" people will assume that you mean it in the devalued Trumpian sense of someone who really isn't? Now six of the last 4 Republican candidates have been garden variety racists, but only Trump up until now has qualified as openly racist so they will have to think of some new superlative.

    Anyway, Kristol is destroying the meaning of the word "wrong" in the same way. If Sailer and Coulter are "wrong" (even though they were right) then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Now when the Hillary folks tout the fact that she won the popular vote, that's understandably trying to salvage some dignity from defeat, but what excuse does Kristol have?

    How has Trump qualified as openly racist? He’s not open about it to my knowledge. If he is racist, you have to read into him to find it. Which defeats the whole purpose of saying “openly.”

    David Duke is openly racist. There, now you know what that term means.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    That's the point - Trump gets called "openly" racist even though he isn't, so now there's no term left for real open racists. Same thing with Steve and "wrong".
    , @Jasper Been
    David Duke is not my idea of a genius, but he doesn't register as racist to me. In the last few years he has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that's already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews. I've never heard him disparage blacks or latinos, so it makes no sense at all to call him racist. I think he's only been accused of that because the media has been so successful using that term to silence critics over the years.
  93. @guest
    He could have done better, yes. But the connection between immigration and jobs is something people just know. They don't need to be told.

    Maybe they would need to be told if Clinton ran on the economy whatsoever, but she didn't. She ran on goosing, so Trump didn't need to be very explicit.

    He could have done better, yes. But the connection between immigration and jobs is something people just know. They don’t need to be told.

    That hasn’t been my experience at all. When I make the argument with people, I often see the world open up before them. Try it.

  94. @George
    Japan’s Fertility Rate Inches to Highest Level Since Mid-1990s

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-23/japan-s-fertility-rate-inches-to-highest-level-since-mid-1990s

    Japan still has a million live births a year, which is more than they are not having any as kristol claims.

    I wonder if he might be right about Germany which is not an island nation.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2015-09-20/japan-dumbs-down-its-universities-at-the-wrong-time

    Wow, what if we could have a purge like that…

    What a peculiar country. It’s like you press a button and it’s done. The infinite possibilities of robotics!

  95. OT

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Apparently that's a hoax:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/11/17/trump-just-took-credit-for-stopping-ford-from-moving-a-plant-to-mexico-but-it-was-planning-to/
  96. @Jimi Shmendrix
    So, according to you, "every other democracy" has the "same" open immigration policy? That's news to me.

    Look, American Jews tend to get a great many things wrong. Their curious attitude toward Israeli immigration policy (if they indeed have one, and if it is the same restrictionist policy you assume they hold) might be one of the few things they get right. What's the point, therefore, of wanting to punish US for THEIR perceived ideological misdeeds, via this alleged "same" open immigration policy? No need to answer; your motives are clear.

    I can’t make out what you’re saying , but the point about bringing up Israel with these people is that either they’re hypocrites or they practice cognitive dissonance. It’s a rhetorical dagger to point out the double standard, because there’s really no excuse for it except to say “Israel is special.”

    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    I'm saying that it is absurd to suggest demonizing or punishing Israel for the hypocrisy of American Jews who hold or are presumed to hold the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration.
  97. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas
    Kristol is unable to understand the complimentary alienation of the economic effects of globalism (outsourcing production to the Third World) and immigration (in-sourcing low skilled labor) which yield an acute loss of dignity and humiliation greater than the sum of the parts. Likely he could understand it if he tries but doesn't care to understand it.

    The sense that you can't achieve reasonable lifetime milestones while simultaneously enduring the psychic shock of having often hostile, ethnically chauvinist foreigners replace you and overcome you with a healthy assist from your own government, while your relative lower status is applauded as "progress" and just desserts.

    Agree … we are importing cheap goods from China and cheap labor from Mexico. The instant that Kristol tries to draw a distinction between the two illustrates that he doesn’t get it.

    And throwing in the popular vote? If these themes weren’t hugely popular, they couldn’t have over come Trump’s overwhelming negatives as a candidate. I don’t even think Trump did a good job of articulating these positions. The point being that the policies were more popular than the candidate. It’s a bad idea to ignore this.

  98. @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/799432403727028224
    • Replies: @eah
    From the link:

    But the company never planned to move the entire plant, only one of its production lines.

    From you:

    a hoax

    I see -- so where in his tweet did Trump explicitly take credit for Ford's decision? -- am I supposed to believe that Ford's decision not to move jobs to Mexico is 100% unrelated to Trump's election victory? -- apparently you and the WaPo both like to split wordhairs, eg 'plant' vs 'production line' -- their agenda is the same as it ever was: to make themselves look foolish trying to discredit Trump -- no idea what yours is -- lastly, your definition of "hoax" is unique.

  99. @Anon
    Roger Stone said it best.

    He learned from Nixon that the candidate has to reach his peak at just the right moment, and Trump did.

    It's like a surfer. He has to wait for just the moment when ride it all the way.

    Trump managed to catch the right wave.

    At any rate, I do believe Trump would have won much bigger if the media had been at least half-fair. Also, if nevertrumpers(riff on 'never again'?) hadn't been so hostile and voted for that fool Gary Johnson.

    Winds were against him, but Trump managed to catch the right wave at just the right time.

    And there were few winds on his side: Wikileaks and Wiener.

    The media try to bury them... but there was the internet.

    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.

    Some will say Obama was internet savvy due to high-tech community support, but he didn't need the internet to win cuz all the media and big money were behind him.

    But Trump really couldn't have done this without alternative news and info sources.

    If Kennedy was the first TV president, Trump is the first internet president.

    This is very perceptive. Put the 2016 Zeitgeist and demographics in the 2000 election. Does Hillary win? Maybe so.

    Undoubtedly reddit, Wikileaks, breitbart and other alt-right sites played a role. Probably enough to swing it. And it was in spite of Google, Facebook and Twitter trying to jam a thumb on the scales.

  100. RE: Immigration,

    Perhaps Kristol should listen to what Netanyahu has to say on the matter:

    The Israeli prime minister has stoked a volatile debate about refugees and migrant workers from Africa, warning that “illegal infiltrators flooding the country” were threatening the security and identity of the Jewish state.

    “If we don’t stop their entry, the problem that currently stands at 60,000 could grow to 600,000, and that threatens our existence as a Jewish and democratic state,” Binyamin Netanyahu said at Sunday’s cabinet meeting. “This phenomenon is very grave and threatens the social fabric of society, our national security and our national identity.”

    Yohanan Danino, the Israeli police chief, said migrants should be permitted to work to discourage petty crime. Nearly all are unable to work legally, and live in overcrowded and impoverished conditions. “The community needs to be supported in order to prevent economic and social problems,” said Rosenfeld.

    But the interior minister, Eli Yishai, rejected such a move, saying: “Why should we provide them with jobs? I’m sick of the bleeding hearts, including politicians. Jobs would settle them here, they’ll make babies, and that offer will only result in hundreds of thousands more coming over here.”

    Yishai repeated an earlier call for all migrants to be jailed pending deportation. “I want everyone to be able to walk the streets without fear or trepidation … The migrants are giving birth to hundreds of thousands, and the Zionist dream is dying,” he told Army Radio.

    Netanyahu said the state would embark on “the physical withdrawal” of migrants, despite fears among human rights organisations about the dangers they could face in their home countries. Yishai said: “I’m not responsible for what happens in Eritrea and Sudan, the UN is.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/may/20/israel-netanyahu-african-immigrants-jewish

    • Replies: @Perspective
    I love the chutzpah, if only the west had more politicians like that. Trump and the "right wing" parties in Europe are a good start though.
  101. @Jimi Shmendrix
    So, according to you, "every other democracy" has the "same" open immigration policy? That's news to me.

    Look, American Jews tend to get a great many things wrong. Their curious attitude toward Israeli immigration policy (if they indeed have one, and if it is the same restrictionist policy you assume they hold) might be one of the few things they get right. What's the point, therefore, of wanting to punish US for THEIR perceived ideological misdeeds, via this alleged "same" open immigration policy? No need to answer; your motives are clear.

    I should have said Western democracy. Yes, I think Israel should have the same immigration policy that their agents in the US have created here. They should face the same situation. They deserve it for how they have interfered in America. They’ve bullied the US, stole from the US, almost bankrupted it through wars, and made the US a pariah in the Middle East (and at times the world). I also think any other country that has used the US deserve whatever karma comes their way. What is good for the goose is good for the gander:

    That cartoon is true in parts of the US now.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    When you write that they've stolen from the US, and bullied the US, what specifically do you have in mind?
  102. @guest
    I can't make out what you're saying , but the point about bringing up Israel with these people is that either they're hypocrites or they practice cognitive dissonance. It's a rhetorical dagger to point out the double standard, because there's really no excuse for it except to say "Israel is special."

    I’m saying that it is absurd to suggest demonizing or punishing Israel for the hypocrisy of American Jews who hold or are presumed to hold the “Israel is special” attitude with regard to immigration.

    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Can we demonize and punish American Jews for their hypocrisy in holding the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration?
    , @Pericles
    Yes, quite absurd -- who would ever think of a benevolent connection between American Jews and Israel?
    , @guest
    Uh, who's suggesting that? Israel's immigration policies is the one thing the people you're typing about like approve about Israel.

    What are you even talking about?
  103. @Anonymous
    Apparently that's a hoax:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/11/17/trump-just-took-credit-for-stopping-ford-from-moving-a-plant-to-mexico-but-it-was-planning-to/

    From the link:

    But the company never planned to move the entire plant, only one of its production lines.

    From you:

    a hoax

    I see — so where in his tweet did Trump explicitly take credit for Ford’s decision? — am I supposed to believe that Ford’s decision not to move jobs to Mexico is 100% unrelated to Trump’s election victory? — apparently you and the WaPo both like to split wordhairs, eg ‘plant’ vs ‘production line’ — their agenda is the same as it ever was: to make themselves look foolish trying to discredit Trump — no idea what yours is — lastly, your definition of “hoax” is unique.

    • Agree: Lyov Myshkin
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Factchecking strikes again!
    , @Big Bill
    Think about it.

    No one ever "moves" the "plant". Instead, it is gutted of anything useful and just sits there, an empty, rusting, crumbling shell until it is finally torn down.

    One moves the equipment that isinsidea plant and sticks it in a new building/plant constructed in a foreign country.

    Since Washington Post writers, editors and agitators have never worked in a factory or known any factory workers, these obvious facts would utterly escape them and they would think their specious arguments were persuasive.

    "Don't worry, America, we're not moving your factories, we're just moving all of the equipment inside."
  104. @guest
    It's not just economics, or at least not for me. My type probably didn't win Trump the election, though I did vote for him. I'm not what you'd traditionally call "working class," but I'm not above them socio-economically. And I know what it's like to work someplace where you're the only "gringo."

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people's political power. Above all, "diversity" kills community. I don't know the people in my neighborhood anymore. I don't trust strangers.

    That's why I vote the way I do. Not because I want a better job.

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people’s political power. Above all, “diversity” kills community.

    Exactly. Jobs and the economy matter, of course, but what you articulated is at least as important, and would never even come up at a Republican presidential debate.

  105. NYT: Trump’s Biggest Test: Can He Build Something That Inspires Awe?

    Build something awe-inspiring. Something Americans can be proud of. Something that will repay the investment many times over for generations to come.

    Uhhh didn’t Trump mention something about building a huge wall?

  106. @Anonymous
    I was too young to personally remember, but it seems to me from reading and watching movies and stuff that trade with Japan was a much bigger deal in the 80s than trade more recently especially with China has been. People seemed to be more worked up about it in the 80s, and a pro-buy American type sentiment, especially with respect to things like cars, seems to have been stronger back then. Perhaps it's a branding thing? The products or their components today might be made in China, but they're generally not Chinese brands. Apple products are still considered American even if some of their components are made in China. Whereas in the 80s, the products were Japanese made and Japanese brands.

    Concern/paranoia about Japan in the 1980′s centered on two observations: (1) American cars were terrible, while Japanese cars exhibited high quality design and manufacture, and (2) the Japanese government’s industrial policy (through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI) seemed to point to a strategic command of a national economy that we would need to emulate.

    The first issue was dealt with by much needed reform in Detroit and the Japanese companies building effective factories in the US. (You would not believe the crappiness of American cars. Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months. I was astounded to see a working clock in my friend’s Honda Civic in 1974. The clocks in American cars shook apart from road vibration. When a colleague consulting for GM recommended a more expensive clock on Cadillacs, GM told him “Nobody buys a Cadillac for the clock.” They were right. People bought a Lexus.)

    The second issue was a constant concern of people like James Fallows. MITI was already losing leverage over Japanese companies, however, and the emergence of companies like Apple and Microsoft convinced most people that central policy in the form of Industrial Policy was more likely to prop up staid companies like IBM than to generate something new and important.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Japan's MITI notoriously tried to get its 10 or so car companies to merge into just two under Toyota and Nissan. Honda refused.
    , @anonguy

    Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months.
     
    Yeah, I used to wonder that myself back then even as a kid.

    For all the talk about an America that put a man on the moon, it couldn't make a single clock work in a single car. Buddwing is right, they all broke on every single car.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn't have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren't making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn't some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    , @Jack D
    Until the invention of quartz clocks, there was no easy cheap way to build a 12v DC clock. A lot of them are actually wind up clocks but with an electric motor that rewinds them every few minutes. It was kind of a Rube Goldbergish kludgy scheme with lots to break.
  107. @Buddwing
    Concern/paranoia about Japan in the 1980's centered on two observations: (1) American cars were terrible, while Japanese cars exhibited high quality design and manufacture, and (2) the Japanese government's industrial policy (through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI) seemed to point to a strategic command of a national economy that we would need to emulate.

    The first issue was dealt with by much needed reform in Detroit and the Japanese companies building effective factories in the US. (You would not believe the crappiness of American cars. Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months. I was astounded to see a working clock in my friend's Honda Civic in 1974. The clocks in American cars shook apart from road vibration. When a colleague consulting for GM recommended a more expensive clock on Cadillacs, GM told him "Nobody buys a Cadillac for the clock." They were right. People bought a Lexus.)

    The second issue was a constant concern of people like James Fallows. MITI was already losing leverage over Japanese companies, however, and the emergence of companies like Apple and Microsoft convinced most people that central policy in the form of Industrial Policy was more likely to prop up staid companies like IBM than to generate something new and important.

    Japan’s MITI notoriously tried to get its 10 or so car companies to merge into just two under Toyota and Nissan. Honda refused.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Japan’s MITI notoriously tried to get its 10 or so car companies to merge into just two under Toyota and Nissan. Honda refused.
     
    Honda was building motorcycles in the US long before Reagan pressured other Japanese manufacturers (according to Pat Buchanan) to set up shop here. They (actually Honda's #2, Wagner buff Takeo Fujisawa) discovered a hidden cycle market by ignoring Harley's clientele and going after what became known as "soccer moms". They also got the jump, by five years or so, on putting folding seats in minivans. This was "Blue Ocean Strategy" long before INSEAD came up with it.

    Honda was always farsighted. Much of their success (and Sony's as well, I suspect) was due to standing up to MITI. But that's not "industrial democracy", is it?
  108. @Anonymous
    I was too young to personally remember, but it seems to me from reading and watching movies and stuff that trade with Japan was a much bigger deal in the 80s than trade more recently especially with China has been. People seemed to be more worked up about it in the 80s, and a pro-buy American type sentiment, especially with respect to things like cars, seems to have been stronger back then. Perhaps it's a branding thing? The products or their components today might be made in China, but they're generally not Chinese brands. Apple products are still considered American even if some of their components are made in China. Whereas in the 80s, the products were Japanese made and Japanese brands.

    Pearl Harbor was still a recent-ish memory in the 80′s.

  109. @Lagertha
    I had a moment; so I listened to this whole fracking symposium....blech! Can these two boring, uncool men, just leave, forever, pleez? They are like the contemptuous snakes in that cartoon that you all are now just visualizing...breathe....think back to when you were 6....breathe, close your eyes...remember that cartoon?

    They are still struggling how Trump trumped their asses! So, they spread the usual: be afraid, be very afraid. These two, some of the most supercilious guys on the planet, do not get it yet. They will be tripping over their own hubris in a few weeks. God, they are awful human beings. I watched this whole dang thang and: It is really hard to come up with a good come-back when you have nuthin'.

    I didn’t have the heart to listen to the whole thing, but I flipped through it. My God, it was dreary and platitudinous and utterly conventional. In contrast there’s a Milo/Ann Coulter podcast out that was recorded just before the election. (“In this tiny corner of the world, Ann gets to be the voice of reason.”) The conversation was sparkling, funny, and had at least a couple real insights.

    I get that the great and good can’t and shouldn’t let it rip to quite the same extent a couple epater le bourgeois specialists like Ann and Milo do. But the Kristol/Galston/gal talk reminded me of a Brezhnev-era colloquium in which the whole point is to drone on while avoiding saying anything either interesting or true. That could result in you getting into trouble with the authorities.

  110. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    Steve keeps mentioning a high-low tag team to screw over the middle. I noticed some historical parallels, with Jews trying to screw over other Jews through the involvement of outsiders. One could probably make a whole article out of something like this if you find more examples, at the risk of sounding like a conspiratorial nutcase (perfect for Unz.com!)

    From a Wikipedia article on Pompey’s military career (He was Caesar’s opponent in the Civil War):

    “A conflict between the brothers Aristobulus II and Hyrcanus II over the succession to the Hasmonean throne begun in Judea in 69 BC. Aristobulus deposed Hyrcanus. Then Antipater the Idumaean became the adviser of weak-willed Hyrcanus and persuaded him to contend for the throne…The people supported Hyrcanus and only the priests supported Aristobulus…The ambassadors of Aristobulus and Hyrcanus asked for [Pompey's] help.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompey#Judea

    From a Wikipedia article on the last two Jews of Afghanistan:

    “Simintov had lived with the second last remaining Jewish man in Afghanistan, Ishaq Levin… Levin had initially welcomed Simintov but the two fell out permanently when Simintov offered the caretaker help to emigrate to Israel to join the rest of the former Kabul Jewish community…the older man took umbrage, claiming Simintov was trying to take over the synagogue. A feud ensued, with the Taliban becoming involved after both men reported each other to the authorities for alleged wrongdoings ranging from running a brothel to misappropriating religious objects.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zablon_Simintov#Afghan_Jewish_conflict

    • Replies: @Ivy
    That conflict could be turned into a screenplay.
  111. Well Glory ! I thought this was Trump’s platform :

  112. Who gives a flying fuck about what William Kristol has to say?

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Who gives a flying fuck about what William Kristol has to say?
     
    According to the owner of this website, he (Kristol) had the power to -- and did - -make the decision to kill immigration reform in the 1990's.
  113. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It's scary that people in the West and East Asia can't recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.

    Don’t be silly.

  114. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It's scary that people in the West and East Asia can't recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.

    Over the long run, sure. But I seriously doubt that those fertility rates could stay so low forever. They can’t, so they won’t.

  115. @Jimi Shmendrix
    So, according to you, "every other democracy" has the "same" open immigration policy? That's news to me.

    Look, American Jews tend to get a great many things wrong. Their curious attitude toward Israeli immigration policy (if they indeed have one, and if it is the same restrictionist policy you assume they hold) might be one of the few things they get right. What's the point, therefore, of wanting to punish US for THEIR perceived ideological misdeeds, via this alleged "same" open immigration policy? No need to answer; your motives are clear.

    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree. Even Netanyahu said that Europe had a responsibility to accept Syrian refugees, at the beginning of the crisis last year.
    You imply that the motive of this line of questioning is antisemitism. That is a shaming tactic meant to discourage legitimate criticisms. I assume that you are hijacking this conversation with shaming tactics because you are paranoid, neurotic, and because you are anti-Gentile. I’m willing to say that openly.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    Nice try, but fail.

    As I stated elsewhere, it is absurd to suggest punishing Israelis for the ideological misdeeds of a nonexistent American Jewish monolith. The chattering class leftist American Jews will do what they do. Israelis have absolutely nothing to do with that, so why should we pay the price with OUR immigration policy?

    Nothing shaming or anti-Gentile about that.

    But hey, if the anti-Semitic shoe fits...at least man up and OWN it. I for one could not care less if you like me or us. Knock yourself out.

    , @Menschmaschine

    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree.
     
    Actually, it is a highly valuable debate tactic not only with Jews but with unlimited immigration enthusiasts and "Anti-Racists" in general. Very few of them show any inclination to overstep the boundaries of political correctness, which dictate that Israel is off-limits to criticism.
  116. @Mikey Darmody
    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree. Even Netanyahu said that Europe had a responsibility to accept Syrian refugees, at the beginning of the crisis last year.
    You imply that the motive of this line of questioning is antisemitism. That is a shaming tactic meant to discourage legitimate criticisms. I assume that you are hijacking this conversation with shaming tactics because you are paranoid, neurotic, and because you are anti-Gentile. I'm willing to say that openly.

    Nice try, but fail.

    As I stated elsewhere, it is absurd to suggest punishing Israelis for the ideological misdeeds of a nonexistent American Jewish monolith. The chattering class leftist American Jews will do what they do. Israelis have absolutely nothing to do with that, so why should we pay the price with OUR immigration policy?

    Nothing shaming or anti-Gentile about that.

    But hey, if the anti-Semitic shoe fits…at least man up and OWN it. I for one could not care less if you like me or us. Knock yourself out.

    • Replies: @guest
    No one is suggesting that. I declare you unresponsive.
    , @Mikey Darmody
    You are looking for a monster that isn't there. Nobody, altright or otherwise, suggests to any degree of seriousness that Israel ought to literally open its borders wide. By accusing the users of that rhetorical tactic of crimethink, you become a debate-stifler.

    If you can't see that the tactic has only rhetorical force, and if you say that antisemitism is the sole cause of the rhetoric, you are in effect pathologizing an honest impulse of White self-preservation.

    I don't dislike you as a Jew. I don't dislike you as a person, either. So when I call for the end of a double standard, that doesn't mean that I want no standards whatsoever! It would be silly to think so.

    (By the way, neither I nor the iSteve commentariat has any control over the border regulations of Israel. So it is ridiculous to accuse us of wanting to "punish Israel": we can't change its laws. That idea is outside the realm of possibility!)

  117. That slimy turd Kristol. Immigration had no impact in the general election? Here is a Trump general election rally in Ohio, the bellwether state.

  118. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It's scary that people in the West and East Asia can't recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.

    But even with a 90% reduction in Japan’s population it will still be Japan

    Replace those 90% with immigrants and Japan will no longer be Japan because it won’t be Japanese

  119. Lol, neocons say the damndest things, don’t they? Actually, in his defense, I think he’s still reeling after Kristolnacht last week.

  120. @Wilkey
    Kristol claims that free trade is more pressing an issue than immigration. But trade is not, nor should it be, nearly as big an issue for voters as immigration is. Free trade means that some jobs move overseas and that wages are depressed, but Americans get cheaper goods in their place. Open borders means not only wage competition but also means rising real estate prices in the dwindling number of neighborhoods that don't look and feel like foreign countries. It's ridiculous to claim that the "Made in China" print on the back of a package that people seldom read comes even close to the routine feeling that one has become a stranger in his own country.

    Free trade and immigration are the one-two punch of globalism. Free trade moves the portable jobs, e.g. manufacturing, overseas for lower wages and environmental costs. Immigration lowers the price point of labour for the less portable jobs, e.g. construction. They both need to be in place for globalism to be running efficiently on all cylinders.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  121. @Mikey Darmody
    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree. Even Netanyahu said that Europe had a responsibility to accept Syrian refugees, at the beginning of the crisis last year.
    You imply that the motive of this line of questioning is antisemitism. That is a shaming tactic meant to discourage legitimate criticisms. I assume that you are hijacking this conversation with shaming tactics because you are paranoid, neurotic, and because you are anti-Gentile. I'm willing to say that openly.

    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree.

    Actually, it is a highly valuable debate tactic not only with Jews but with unlimited immigration enthusiasts and “Anti-Racists” in general. Very few of them show any inclination to overstep the boundaries of political correctness, which dictate that Israel is off-limits to criticism.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    What if we didn't have that as a debate tool? What would we argue?
  122. @Jimi Shmendrix
    I'm saying that it is absurd to suggest demonizing or punishing Israel for the hypocrisy of American Jews who hold or are presumed to hold the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration.

    Can we demonize and punish American Jews for their hypocrisy in holding the “Israel is special” attitude with regard to immigration?

    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What's the appropriate punishment for "hypocrisy"?
    How do you determine if an individual holds "acceptable" beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they've got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you've got quite a bit in common with them.
  123. @guest
    How has Trump qualified as openly racist? He's not open about it to my knowledge. If he is racist, you have to read into him to find it. Which defeats the whole purpose of saying "openly."

    David Duke is openly racist. There, now you know what that term means.

    That’s the point – Trump gets called “openly” racist even though he isn’t, so now there’s no term left for real open racists. Same thing with Steve and “wrong”.

  124. @Jimi Shmendrix
    I'm saying that it is absurd to suggest demonizing or punishing Israel for the hypocrisy of American Jews who hold or are presumed to hold the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration.

    Yes, quite absurd — who would ever think of a benevolent connection between American Jews and Israel?

  125. @eah
    From the link:

    But the company never planned to move the entire plant, only one of its production lines.

    From you:

    a hoax

    I see -- so where in his tweet did Trump explicitly take credit for Ford's decision? -- am I supposed to believe that Ford's decision not to move jobs to Mexico is 100% unrelated to Trump's election victory? -- apparently you and the WaPo both like to split wordhairs, eg 'plant' vs 'production line' -- their agenda is the same as it ever was: to make themselves look foolish trying to discredit Trump -- no idea what yours is -- lastly, your definition of "hoax" is unique.

    Factchecking strikes again!

  126. @Hunsdon
    Can we demonize and punish American Jews for their hypocrisy in holding the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration?

    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What’s the appropriate punishment for “hypocrisy”?
    How do you determine if an individual holds “acceptable” beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they’ve got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you’ve got quite a bit in common with them.

    • Replies: @guest
    Pointing out other people's hypocrisy and trying to win arguments is policing crimethink? You've fallen into the deep end, buddy.
    , @Comtes
    You hear that, goyim? If you don't bend the knee to your semitic overlords, you're the same thing as the degenerate left.

    Thanks for the guidelines, Rabbi. You truly are our greatest allies.
    , @Bill
    Yes, criticizing Bill Kristol is pretty much the same thing as the Holodomor or the Great Leap Forward.
  127. @syonredux
    RE: Immigration,

    Perhaps Kristol should listen to what Netanyahu has to say on the matter:

    The Israeli prime minister has stoked a volatile debate about refugees and migrant workers from Africa, warning that "illegal infiltrators flooding the country" were threatening the security and identity of the Jewish state.

    "If we don't stop their entry, the problem that currently stands at 60,000 could grow to 600,000, and that threatens our existence as a Jewish and democratic state," Binyamin Netanyahu said at Sunday's cabinet meeting. "This phenomenon is very grave and threatens the social fabric of society, our national security and our national identity."
     

    Yohanan Danino, the Israeli police chief, said migrants should be permitted to work to discourage petty crime. Nearly all are unable to work legally, and live in overcrowded and impoverished conditions. "The community needs to be supported in order to prevent economic and social problems," said Rosenfeld.

    But the interior minister, Eli Yishai, rejected such a move, saying: "Why should we provide them with jobs? I'm sick of the bleeding hearts, including politicians. Jobs would settle them here, they'll make babies, and that offer will only result in hundreds of thousands more coming over here."

    Yishai repeated an earlier call for all migrants to be jailed pending deportation. "I want everyone to be able to walk the streets without fear or trepidation ... The migrants are giving birth to hundreds of thousands, and the Zionist dream is dying," he told Army Radio
    .
     

    Netanyahu said the state would embark on "the physical withdrawal" of migrants, despite fears among human rights organisations about the dangers they could face in their home countries. Yishai said: "I'm not responsible for what happens in Eritrea and Sudan, the UN is."
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/may/20/israel-netanyahu-african-immigrants-jewish

    I love the chutzpah, if only the west had more politicians like that. Trump and the “right wing” parties in Europe are a good start though.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
  128. @Frau Katze
    Immigration changes a country PERMANENTLY.

    Tariffs and trade deals don't. They can be lifted or re-negotiated. Immigration is forever!

    Immigration changes a country PERMANENTLY. Tariffs and trade deals don’t. They can be lifted or re-negotiated. Immigration is forever!

    Kristol may be right that trade was one of the issues that made the difference. Trump won in three states (Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania) whose economies have been devastated by free trade but who, in relative terms, haven’t seen much immigration, especially not of the illegal kind. So if Trump doesn’t talk about trade he doesn’t win.

    But it’s also true that Trump won because of immigration. 13% of all voters told exit pollers their top issue was immigration, and 64% of them voted for Trump while only 32% chose Hillary. It’s also frighteningly clear from the map that massive increases in the minority population will move this country to the left.

    I think mass immigration hurts Republicans in another way. If you don’t have mass immigration then Americans in states that are falling behind have more options. They can move to states with booming economies and find work. Now no business in California or Arizona tries to recruit unskilled workers from Michigan or Pennsylvania because they don’t have to. It’s easier just to hire the illegals from right across the border.

  129. @JohnnyD
    Interestingly, Kristol's son-in-law has a more realistic and honest appraisal of Trump:

    http://freebeacon.com/politics/the-trump-revolution/

    That’s a really good summary of the whole business. Thanks.

  130. @Anonymous
    Billy the Kuck Kristol.

    “Billy the Kuck Kristol.”

    Kristol is no cuck. He knows exactly what he’s doing and why.

    • Replies: @CrunchyButRealistCon
    Quite right – Billy is no Cuck. Paul Gottfried, Sam Francis & others understood this creep's role well. To roughly paraphrase-

    Kristol is best thought of as Senior Enforcement Officer of the Neocon Narrative (i.e, “Invade the World, Invite the World”) He helps create Cucks within the GOP rank & file by ensuring that dissidents from the Neocon Narrative are marginalized & gives his Cucks rhetorical air cover. His modus: the GOP is to remain stauchly Cuckservative; perhaps to win, more likely to loose gracefully, but if deviant, to be sabotaged.

    It is spectacular to those of us who remember the scene 25 yrs ago, that he has failed upwards to such an extent. His one “moment” was handing Quayle a speech in early 92 which suggested that a culture-wide embrace of single motherhood might not be wise. After that, his energies have pretty much been dedicated to undermining the long term interests of the GOP base. Eg. trying to prevent immigration restrictions, shilling for wild overseas adventurism, sustaining mass ignorance of the emerging crony capitalist plutocracy, and plugging for a type of growth which steals from the future & enriches insiders (tax cuts w/o spending cuts, ignoring massive deficit growth & wage stagnation, mindless embrace of trade deals which gut manufacturing expertise…). Occasionally he will make a rattle about a social conservative concern like abortion or gay marriage. But such token bravado is just a distraction – he will be more than happy to acquiesce to domination by the cultural Left. He is just parked in a position of influence since he somehow found Murdoch’s ear in 1993. For him to now feign concern about trade policy now is cute. A single instance when he conceded that Perot, Buchanan, Nadar, or any protectionists had valid points will be very hard to find.

    Having lost control of the GOP's control levers, Kristol is now enlisting kamikazes to inflict as much damage as possible. Johnson & McMuffin served this role well. Expect McCain, Flake, Ryan & Graham to be next in line.
  131. I’d agree that trade was very important, was relatively ignored by the media, and that Trump kept focused on it in the debates and elsewhere in a way that benefited him; my guess was that one of the main benefits of his rallies was keeping an information flow to him about what his supporters were responding to, as well as obviously engaging them. (https://spottedtoad.wordpress.com/2016/11/09/trump-country/ )
    But there’s literally no way an unbiased viewer could watch the election that was just held and not think that it was focused more on immigration than any other I can recall and that Trump’s side- given his enormous structural and personal weaknesses- largely prevailed.

  132. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    “I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan.”

    Whether or not a representative gets ejected from his seat is entirely within the power of his constituents within the limited confines of his district. Cantor’s and Ryan’s districts are different. Wisconsin is not the same as Virginia; the people are not the same.

  133. @Berty
    Kristol has supported one failure after another for twenty years and it gave us Barack Obama and almost gave us Hillary Clinton.

    Now Trump has triumphed and have given the GOP it's biggest victory in nearly three decades and is poised to pull the party in a new direction.

    Kristol having failed to make any impact on the primary recruited a nobody solely to give Utah to Hillary and thus cost Trump the electoral college and he couldn't even succeed in that.

    I suppose I'd be angry too.

    Remember when Kristol tried to recruit NRO Cuckservative David French (my fellow Tennessean) to run for President?

  134. @David Davenport
    How many paying subscribers does Kristol's *Weakly Standard* magazine have?

    They claim in their advertising packet to have a circulation of 100k+ with 90k being paid subscribers. I think National Review claims to have a circulation of 166,000.

    http://influence.mediadc.com/pages/weekly-standard/a-higher-standard

  135. @Anon
    The danger of any strategy is 'you win some, you lose some'.

    If you appeal to one group, you alienate another group.

    And that was the danger of SS. The idea of GOP appealing to whites was bound to upset Neocons who have nightmares about pitchforks. Also, Wall Street might lean even more to Democrats. And indeed, it did. It showered Hillary with tons. That was a loss for Trump... yet a kind of gain cuz he could use it to his advantage: "Look, the rich guys are behind Hillary".

    Trump won cuz he won over the Deplorables in key states, in the ones that really mattered. Nationally, SS didn't play out so evenly, but it worked in key states.
    Still, the sheer hostility against Trump, even from GOP, depressed some white votes that traditionally vote Republican. Considering how goofy and ridiculous Gary Johnson is, I'm surprised at the votes he got. SS might have worked better if so many GOP stalwarts like Romney, Ryan, and McCain weren't such dogs of Neocon masters. But one advantage of being rejected by his own party was Trump could pose as champion of people vs establishment of both parties.

    But Trump's victory depended not only on appealing to white working class but finding ways to depress the prog and black vote. Though progs hate Trump, they loathed Hillary too. And Trump played this up to the hilt: Hillary is the candidate of the Donor Class. She love wars. Her wars killed Muslims. She wants WWIII with Russia. He may be supported by Deplorables, but Hillary is supported by GLOBLASTOMA, globalism turned totally malignant and cancerous and destroying the entire world through financial rape, destruction of borders, and endless wars.
    Progs hated, hated, and hated Trump, but they also loathed, loathed, and loathed Hillary. Had it been Trump vs Sanders, the Progs would have turned out more. But then, black vote might have been ever lower as they just some old white guy. In Trump vs Sanders, Wall Street would have a had a tough time.

    Well, good thing Trump connected with the Gordons of the world.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LttJsxCTyRo

    In the 80s, there were all these SAVE THE FARM movies by Hollywood to embarrass Reagan.

    Trump should move forth with SAVE THE FACTORY theme.

    Trumpman Prophecies.

    Respectfully, could people stop using abbreviations without having previously indicated what they are talking about? I see these on iSteve frequently. If the comment is uninteresting, I don’t bother doing a Google search on what they mean by “BYMOAT” or whatever. If the comment is interesting, I try to figure it out in context. Example: “And that was the danger of SS.” My mind raced through possibilities–Social Security, Secret Service, uh, oh yeah, Steve Sailer, but that doesn’t work in context, wait a minute, “Sailer Strategy.” So I got it. It only cost me a minute. Am I just slower than everyone else? Possibly. But why not give slow guys like me a break and write “Sailer Strategy (SS)” the first time, since Sailer Strategy had not previously appeared in this post or comments?

    • Agree: slumber_j, Peterike, dfordoom
  136. @Lagertha
    Agree. But, it is more simple than that. I discovered Steve's blog about 2.5 years ago...and it was overwhelming for me. I have 3 Millennial sons, sons who are immigrant stock for the most part (recent; relatively - 20th century - immigrants) from Europe and a Middle Eastern country. And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    My sons have been dismissed/denigrated (the all athletes/fraternity bros are predators sh*t) these last 10 years for being white during college application process (they are in the top 1% with raw test scores and IQ) . This, this has freaked me out. If a country ignores its most talented/intellectually gifted young people because they are white, well, shit, I need to go find a time machine for me and my babies to go back in time when every country was looking for the smartest people to introduce the latest technology, and save their asses from the sun burning them to death, or something.

    STEM kids are a rarity. Every nation, like Finland (they still do this) should be celebrating the smartest kids! History lesson for anyone who doesn't know this: After WW2, when Finland lost to Soviets, the idea was, we need to see "our children" as a national resource...we need to stimulate and help the smartest children. Women had already gone into the public sphere (50% of adult males were dead/wounded) to spur the economic wheel to get into the "glory" of the 20th century. Children and families became a YUGE focus...not a leftist (FY!) focus, a national focus to survive and prosper.

    So, yeah, I hate these talking heads who have always been comfortable and nonplussed in the USA, often privileged adults or privileged parents. Without money they didn't earn by themselves, they've got 'nuthin'.

    Maybe you’ve answered this elsewhere, but I missed it. How did you discover Steve’s blog 2.5 years ago? I’m asking this in a marketing sense.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog. I was curious who he was and found an unusual forum, to say the least.

    I had been very gung-ho about education when my children were younger, so I read a lot of stuff about education on blogger's sites. I was skeptical about the direction education was going; the push to dumb-down curricula (elimination of programs for the smartest students) to make it appear that all kids were hitting the benchmark.

    I had terrible issues with my sons because they hated school and were bored out of their minds - they particularly hated "group" work. I always loved school, so I needed to find out what was happening. And, it was all, overwhelmingly depressing! Since private schools were out of the question (tuition is 40,000/year now) I was stuck with public schools. Now, I have fought (with friends) as much as I could in my own community to keep the last accelerated programs - math/music & art, that sort of thing, but it was a great fight 15 years ago against the Board of Finance in our town. Also, the increasing population of SN kids, was busting our budget - remember, SN was federally mandated in 2000, but never federally funded...ergo...why schools cut out programs for the brightest kids, and art & music. It is all about the achievement gap, and never about the brightest kids anymore. I spoke no English when I arrived to a 2nd grade classroom in the USA - I picked it up in 4 months, and was among the top students through HS. There were so many accelerated programs in the 60's...I was one of those rare math-loving girls.

    One of my theories about the peril of not giving the smartest students more advanced work in primary school: we don't develop the STEM students/eventual entrepreneurs we need as a country. STEM fields, ultimately, lead to new industries and companies that employ many people. China definitely knows this.
    , @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.
    , @Mokiki
    Vdare!!
  137. William Kristol is and has always been wrong about everything. And he is ugly and hateful. These are the attributes that have made him an icon in the GOPe.

  138. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It's scary that people in the West and East Asia can't recognize that. If the figure continues for 6 generations, it would result in a roughly 90% reduction in population. John Derbyshire may think Japan can get by on robots in the late 22nd century, but they will be operated by immigrants or, more likely, conquerors. The prevent this, Japan needs to increase the fertility rate dramatically.

    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It’s scary that people in the West and East Asia can’t recognize that.

    That’s true–if it continued forever. But it simply does not.

    One million births/year is still a steady state Japan of 80 million people! That’s more people than Japan ever had until the let’s-make-up-what-we-lost post war bangin’ rebound. It’s a lot for an island(s) that is smaller than California.

    What *naturally* happens with these low fertility rates is that the population will stall and drop, and employment prospects, housing costs, school crowding, etc. etc. all get better and better and it becomes easier and easier to do “affordable family formation”. Plus you are culling off the “you-go-girl”, “girls just wanna have fun” types and selecting for “wife and mother” types. This is all to the good. Left alone, you recover from a fertility inhibition condition, to a fertility friendly one.

    But this is the “natural” case. What absolutely *destroys* this recovery–what you absolutely must *not* do–is taking Kristol’s advice and allow immigrants to run in and seize the benefits of easing of your population pressure from you for themselves and destroy it.

    Avoid doing what Kristol advocates and while there may be some short term fiscal pain with entitlements, you’re fine. Do what Kristol advocates and you’re dead.

    • Agree: Opinionator, Bill B.
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Just to put things into perspective, Japan is 50% larger than Romania (about the size of Germany), but is 75% mountainous, compared to 25% in my country. The population is more than 6 times larger than than in my country, but in a habitable zone two thirds of the one my people have (habitable being non-mountainous). Romania is two thirds of Germany but 4 times less populated. The UK is exactly our size, but three times more populated and counting. Only France and Spain have the same population density as my country. Moldova, Bulgaria and Ukraine are less dense.

    No, I do not want any refugees, thank you! Except maybe Boers. I want my 4 million countrymen gone off to work to come back, sans a certain subcontinental Asian element whose vibrancy is required elsewhere.
  139. Moderator Harvey C. Mansfield is awesome as ever here.

    In my undergraduate days he was known as Harvey C-minus Mansfield: a notoriously tough grader. I understand that he has since moderated his formerly tough stance on grade inflation so that more students would enroll in his classes: he now gives each student a fake grade for the transcript and a real grade so the kids know just how lame they actually (mostly) are. A thoroughly admirable man.

    • Replies: @Marty
    If you're going to talk about Mansfield and grading, how do you leave out the most famous story of all, the one where he told the kids that due to affirmative action, any "A" they get at Harvard is really a C+ by 1975 standards?
  140. @guest
    How has Trump qualified as openly racist? He's not open about it to my knowledge. If he is racist, you have to read into him to find it. Which defeats the whole purpose of saying "openly."

    David Duke is openly racist. There, now you know what that term means.

    David Duke is not my idea of a genius, but he doesn’t register as racist to me. In the last few years he has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that’s already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews. I’ve never heard him disparage blacks or latinos, so it makes no sense at all to call him racist. I think he’s only been accused of that because the media has been so successful using that term to silence critics over the years.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    That's my impression too. He has also evolved into an advocate for Palestinian rights. (Maybe that's why jews hate him so much.)
    , @Mike Sylwester

    In the last few years he [David Duke] has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that’s already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews.
     
    I read Duke's autobiography My Awakening a couple decades ago. His criticisms of Jews were much more lengthy and strident than his criticisms of racial minorities.
  141. The presence of Bill Kristol at this Harvard symposium highlights the desperate need for a new generation of intellectuals who can articulate and expand upon the vision of nationalism that Trump, and corresponding populist movements in Europe, embody.

    There is no place for a Bill Kristol after 2016 — if there ever was. He and his are artifacts of an elite bubble, and have no basis in the larger polity. This was always so, but became indisputable in 2016.

    • Replies: @Bill B.


    The presence of Bill Kristol at this Harvard symposium highlights the desperate need for a new generation of intellectuals who can articulate and expand upon the vision of nationalism that Trump, and corresponding populist movements in Europe, embody.
     
    I agree. The problem is that the best conservative intellectuals tend not to be very combative viz Edmund Burke, Roger Scruton, Kirk et al, at least in the Peter Hitchens sense. Perhaps the screaming whiteophobia and crude ethnic trading of the liberals will change this. This of course means that they will have to identify as our intellectuals rather than be bland universalists.

    France seems to produce hard-edged true conservatives with intellectual heft; the USA and the UK not so much.

    Perhaps we should not look in the direction of the universities but elsewhere? In France the intellectual prose style is more free-wheeling, more discursive, by comparison with the pompous academic racketeering in the USA and the UK.
  142. @eah
    From the link:

    But the company never planned to move the entire plant, only one of its production lines.

    From you:

    a hoax

    I see -- so where in his tweet did Trump explicitly take credit for Ford's decision? -- am I supposed to believe that Ford's decision not to move jobs to Mexico is 100% unrelated to Trump's election victory? -- apparently you and the WaPo both like to split wordhairs, eg 'plant' vs 'production line' -- their agenda is the same as it ever was: to make themselves look foolish trying to discredit Trump -- no idea what yours is -- lastly, your definition of "hoax" is unique.

    Think about it.

    No one ever “moves” the “plant”. Instead, it is gutted of anything useful and just sits there, an empty, rusting, crumbling shell until it is finally torn down.

    One moves the equipment that isinsidea plant and sticks it in a new building/plant constructed in a foreign country.

    Since Washington Post writers, editors and agitators have never worked in a factory or known any factory workers, these obvious facts would utterly escape them and they would think their specious arguments were persuasive.

    “Don’t worry, America, we’re not moving your factories, we’re just moving all of the equipment inside.”

  143. @Johnny F. Ive
    I should have said Western democracy. Yes, I think Israel should have the same immigration policy that their agents in the US have created here. They should face the same situation. They deserve it for how they have interfered in America. They've bullied the US, stole from the US, almost bankrupted it through wars, and made the US a pariah in the Middle East (and at times the world). I also think any other country that has used the US deserve whatever karma comes their way. What is good for the goose is good for the gander: https://youtu.be/lKDeyuM0-Og

    That cartoon is true in parts of the US now.

    When you write that they’ve stolen from the US, and bullied the US, what specifically do you have in mind?

    • Replies: @Johnny F. Ive
    Bully as they tried to prevent a deal with Iran. They have used AIPAC to control the US Congress with fear and money.

    “No other country close to the United States continues to cross the line on espionage like the Israelis do"

    As for stealing: “industrial espionage—folks coming over here on trade missions or with Israeli companies working in collaboration with American companies, [or] intelligence operatives being run directly by the government, which I assume meant out of the [Israeli] Embassy.”
    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/16/israel-wont-stop-spying-us-249757.html

    Stole American nuclear secrets:
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/01/no_author/israels-secret-nuclear-arsenal/
  144. @Menschmaschine

    Criticizing Jewish double-standards on immigration policy is a valid debate tactic, as long as Jews simultaneously support lax border laws here and strict border laws in Israel to a noticeable degree.
     
    Actually, it is a highly valuable debate tactic not only with Jews but with unlimited immigration enthusiasts and "Anti-Racists" in general. Very few of them show any inclination to overstep the boundaries of political correctness, which dictate that Israel is off-limits to criticism.

    What if we didn’t have that as a debate tool? What would we argue?

  145. Mansfield’s been doing that for a long time now…

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/article/12700

    speaking of Mansfield and the Volunteer Thought Police (emphasis added):

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/2014/03/05/academicfreedom/

    What is particularly telling in Ms. Korn’s article is that she identifies perhaps the one conspicuous conservative professor on the Harvard campus for censure, Harvey C. Mansfield (even as she quotes him quite severely out of context). When thinking of who should be silenced at Harvard, she can only think of one person, a single conservative octogenarian. Her call for “censorship” of conservative views on campus is at this point almost wholly unnecessary, since there are nearly no conservatives to be found at Harvard, or on most college campuses today (the University of Colorado has gone so far to create a Chair in Conservative Studies, since there was no other way to locate a conservative on that campus). Her call is actually much less controversial than it appears at first glance, since it effectively describes the de facto political and social condition on most college campuses today.

  146. What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?

    I’m not sure what you’re asking.

    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It’s no wonder that there’s a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    Even the alt-right is very soft on Jews. Squishy, really. E.g., here we had links and stories about Jews voting for Trump, when Jews broke 71% for Clinton, and we had people talking about how Anglo-Saxons in Charlotte voted for Clinton, when best guess is that Anglo-Saxons broke for Trump at a higher percentage than White Catholics did.

    The left, too. E.g., it’s very common to hear from Massimo type libs who say that the defense that White ethnopatriots mount against the leftist charge that Whites “broke” Blacks is “mean-spirited.” Nobody calls Jews’ defense against White ethnopatriotic critique “mean-spirited,” certainly not the left.

    Most of your tribe’s complaints are of the “Princess and the Pea” variety. In fact, vast majorities of the right and the left take your Jewish Supremacist position.

    • Replies: @Anonymous


    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?
     
    I’m not sure what you’re asking.
     
    Sometimes you meet a Jew who's a true believer leftist -- or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away -- and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that's bad. What's your next move?
    , @Opinionator
    I’m not sure what you’re asking.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?
  147. @Jack D
    Scott Alexander talks about how the left is destroying the future usefulness of terms like "openly racist" by attaching them to Trump, who clearly is not. What words can be used in the future to describe a candidate who is ACTUALLY openly racist, since if you call him "openly racist" people will assume that you mean it in the devalued Trumpian sense of someone who really isn't? Now six of the last 4 Republican candidates have been garden variety racists, but only Trump up until now has qualified as openly racist so they will have to think of some new superlative.

    Anyway, Kristol is destroying the meaning of the word "wrong" in the same way. If Sailer and Coulter are "wrong" (even though they were right) then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Now when the Hillary folks tout the fact that she won the popular vote, that's understandably trying to salvage some dignity from defeat, but what excuse does Kristol have?

    Sure, but I think there are more superlatives to go. After “racist” and “open racist”, how about:
    proud racist (supremacist)
    militant racist (skinhead)
    genocidal racist (Nazi Hitler)

    The left can always go one step stronger than necessary. Basically, they are saying what they fear most, rather than what is likely actually true.

  148. Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What’s the appropriate punishment for “hypocrisy”?
    How do you determine if an individual holds “acceptable” beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they’ve got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you’ve got quite a bit in common with them.

    Jews throw us under the bus. We advocate reciprocating (to get them to stop), and you come and criticize us, ignoring who has actually thrown whom under the bus. Your motive is clear; Jewish Supremacy.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Great points.
  149. @Jimi Shmendrix
    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What's the appropriate punishment for "hypocrisy"?
    How do you determine if an individual holds "acceptable" beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they've got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you've got quite a bit in common with them.

    Pointing out other people’s hypocrisy and trying to win arguments is policing crimethink? You’ve fallen into the deep end, buddy.

    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    When one speaks of "punishment", how is it not?

    Idiots
  150. @Jimi Shmendrix
    I'm saying that it is absurd to suggest demonizing or punishing Israel for the hypocrisy of American Jews who hold or are presumed to hold the "Israel is special" attitude with regard to immigration.

    Uh, who’s suggesting that? Israel’s immigration policies is the one thing the people you’re typing about like approve about Israel.

    What are you even talking about?

  151. @Almost Missouri
    Maybe you've answered this elsewhere, but I missed it. How did you discover Steve's blog 2.5 years ago? I'm asking this in a marketing sense.

    He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog. I was curious who he was and found an unusual forum, to say the least.

    I had been very gung-ho about education when my children were younger, so I read a lot of stuff about education on blogger’s sites. I was skeptical about the direction education was going; the push to dumb-down curricula (elimination of programs for the smartest students) to make it appear that all kids were hitting the benchmark.

    I had terrible issues with my sons because they hated school and were bored out of their minds – they particularly hated “group” work. I always loved school, so I needed to find out what was happening. And, it was all, overwhelmingly depressing! Since private schools were out of the question (tuition is 40,000/year now) I was stuck with public schools. Now, I have fought (with friends) as much as I could in my own community to keep the last accelerated programs – math/music & art, that sort of thing, but it was a great fight 15 years ago against the Board of Finance in our town. Also, the increasing population of SN kids, was busting our budget – remember, SN was federally mandated in 2000, but never federally funded…ergo…why schools cut out programs for the brightest kids, and art & music. It is all about the achievement gap, and never about the brightest kids anymore. I spoke no English when I arrived to a 2nd grade classroom in the USA – I picked it up in 4 months, and was among the top students through HS. There were so many accelerated programs in the 60′s…I was one of those rare math-loving girls.

    One of my theories about the peril of not giving the smartest students more advanced work in primary school: we don’t develop the STEM students/eventual entrepreneurs we need as a country. STEM fields, ultimately, lead to new industries and companies that employ many people. China definitely knows this.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Unfortunately, so much intellectual effort is now directed towards automation that I'm skeptical new technologies really will employ many people. I suppose you could say that Apple and Google each employ a large number of people, but the old industries used to employ far more.
    , @Almost Missouri

    "He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog."
     
    Thank you.

    I realize that blogging is Steve's main job, but still, it is surprising how widely he reads and writes. How can anyone keep up?
  152. @Jimi Shmendrix
    Nice try, but fail.

    As I stated elsewhere, it is absurd to suggest punishing Israelis for the ideological misdeeds of a nonexistent American Jewish monolith. The chattering class leftist American Jews will do what they do. Israelis have absolutely nothing to do with that, so why should we pay the price with OUR immigration policy?

    Nothing shaming or anti-Gentile about that.

    But hey, if the anti-Semitic shoe fits...at least man up and OWN it. I for one could not care less if you like me or us. Knock yourself out.

    No one is suggesting that. I declare you unresponsive.

    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    Try to keep up. You can't jump into a conversation midway through and then make false assertions. This interchange BEGAN when another poster made that exact suggestion. Read the whole thread.
  153. Asking Bill Kristol to “analyze” the election of 2016 is like asking Santa Claus to analyze the latest weight loss program. Bill is right that more Americans voted for candidates with more liberal immigration views on Nov. 8, but he fails to mention Bernie Sanders’ stance on immigration that indicates a movement towards stronger immigration policies by those on the far left. No, Sanders’ policies aren’t near where they need to be, but they show that the immigration issue is a rising tide, something that few people talked about (or listened to) in 2004, but now is something that will help determine the outcome of an election 1n 2016.

  154. The GOP is now the party of Trump, no longer the party of the Cucks/NeoCons, and Kristol has to live under the specter of the impending expiration date of his influence. He will also have a hard time convincing the media of his relevance after Trump’s victory. This apoplectic display of rambling word-salad was an example of how he handles being proven wrong, and it’s not a good look.

  155. @candid_observer
    The presence of Bill Kristol at this Harvard symposium highlights the desperate need for a new generation of intellectuals who can articulate and expand upon the vision of nationalism that Trump, and corresponding populist movements in Europe, embody.

    There is no place for a Bill Kristol after 2016 -- if there ever was. He and his are artifacts of an elite bubble, and have no basis in the larger polity. This was always so, but became indisputable in 2016.

    The presence of Bill Kristol at this Harvard symposium highlights the desperate need for a new generation of intellectuals who can articulate and expand upon the vision of nationalism that Trump, and corresponding populist movements in Europe, embody.

    I agree. The problem is that the best conservative intellectuals tend not to be very combative viz Edmund Burke, Roger Scruton, Kirk et al, at least in the Peter Hitchens sense. Perhaps the screaming whiteophobia and crude ethnic trading of the liberals will change this. This of course means that they will have to identify as our intellectuals rather than be bland universalists.

    France seems to produce hard-edged true conservatives with intellectual heft; the USA and the UK not so much.

    Perhaps we should not look in the direction of the universities but elsewhere? In France the intellectual prose style is more free-wheeling, more discursive, by comparison with the pompous academic racketeering in the USA and the UK.

  156. @Lagertha
    He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog. I was curious who he was and found an unusual forum, to say the least.

    I had been very gung-ho about education when my children were younger, so I read a lot of stuff about education on blogger's sites. I was skeptical about the direction education was going; the push to dumb-down curricula (elimination of programs for the smartest students) to make it appear that all kids were hitting the benchmark.

    I had terrible issues with my sons because they hated school and were bored out of their minds - they particularly hated "group" work. I always loved school, so I needed to find out what was happening. And, it was all, overwhelmingly depressing! Since private schools were out of the question (tuition is 40,000/year now) I was stuck with public schools. Now, I have fought (with friends) as much as I could in my own community to keep the last accelerated programs - math/music & art, that sort of thing, but it was a great fight 15 years ago against the Board of Finance in our town. Also, the increasing population of SN kids, was busting our budget - remember, SN was federally mandated in 2000, but never federally funded...ergo...why schools cut out programs for the brightest kids, and art & music. It is all about the achievement gap, and never about the brightest kids anymore. I spoke no English when I arrived to a 2nd grade classroom in the USA - I picked it up in 4 months, and was among the top students through HS. There were so many accelerated programs in the 60's...I was one of those rare math-loving girls.

    One of my theories about the peril of not giving the smartest students more advanced work in primary school: we don't develop the STEM students/eventual entrepreneurs we need as a country. STEM fields, ultimately, lead to new industries and companies that employ many people. China definitely knows this.

    Unfortunately, so much intellectual effort is now directed towards automation that I’m skeptical new technologies really will employ many people. I suppose you could say that Apple and Google each employ a large number of people, but the old industries used to employ far more.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    But, someone needs to build the machines/code the programs/design the look & functionality...and yeah, bring back the Maytag repairman, to tweek when tweeking is needed. Robotics is a huge jumble of people working on just one function. So, maybe, collaboration was not something my sons enjoyed at 4, 7, 10....but, maybe they will, at 35, 45? If automation/machines will replace workers, a new class of workers will be needed to build the machines. Pleez, no Skynet jokes!

    There is renewed talk about bringing back "shop classes" to HS (our HS never got rid of them), and, many fawning articles about how many students in HS should naturally gravitate to shop classes (welding, cutting, soldering, designing, etc. - and continue in tech school), and blow-off college/university; don't go to study lame humanities courses. Japan just cut that sh*t out, and will only tolerate STEM heavy courses for their University students.

    Besides, as you mentioned, Google, Apple, FB & Uber, etc., in SV, don't really contribute something profound to mankind.....they are not creating product and industry that is vital to society. The tech that greatly improves life, is still the most sought after...and which has not been created yet.

    That's why I find the driverless cars so sketchy. There's no way in hell (because so many progressives are fine with mass immigration) that roads will be rid of 25 year old SUV's among all the driverless cars on the roads of 2040. Am I the only one who thinks driverless cars are boring? not fun? I like to grip the wheel of a car and listen to music...daydream.

  157. @Anonymous
    I was too young to personally remember, but it seems to me from reading and watching movies and stuff that trade with Japan was a much bigger deal in the 80s than trade more recently especially with China has been. People seemed to be more worked up about it in the 80s, and a pro-buy American type sentiment, especially with respect to things like cars, seems to have been stronger back then. Perhaps it's a branding thing? The products or their components today might be made in China, but they're generally not Chinese brands. Apple products are still considered American even if some of their components are made in China. Whereas in the 80s, the products were Japanese made and Japanese brands.

    Private sector trade unions existed, sort of, in the 80s. There was still a power base (money and votes) behind protecting middle class manufacturing jobs. Trade unions still had power inside the Democrat Party. They could threaten to defect like the Teamsters did in 1980. They had a coterie of academics and think tanks and pet politicians.

    Today, Richard Trumka, of the formerly formidable United Mine Workers, spends his days rhapsodizing on the glories of gloryholes or gay marriage or whatever.

    The end of private sector unions in the US was a big deal. They disliked immigration. They disliked free trade. And they had a seat at the tables of power. Now, they do as their cultural marxist masters dictate, in the hopes of a few table scraps.

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    Tieing too hard to the Dems cost union power in places. Upon learning that the carpenter's union was going to be giving money to the McGovern campaign in 1972, a man I used to work with drove up to the union hall, and methodically threw every tool owned by the union into the parking lot. His father had been the founder of the union- the first successful one in that deep South area.
  158. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    Republicans: bigoted against Jews

  159. I don’t know if William Kristol is correct to say that trade was a bigger factor in the perception of economic anxiety over immigration. But it’s very important to note that if he is right, our adaptation is likely to be much more difficult.

    Large parts of our intelligentsia are ideologically committed to immigration (including to some extent Mr Kristol though I thought he had flipped on that to some extent) and it’s going to be embarrassing to have to walk that back.

    But the trade issue cuts much deeper than that, in that our standard of living does fundamentally depend on trade. And we can tinker around the edges here and there but there’s strong reason to believe that if our trade regime is substantially restricted then our economy will suffer tremendously.

    So if Mr Kristol is right, we are going to have a much harder time accommodating Trump voters on trade than we would on immigration.

    • Replies: @guest
    Could we just replace our intelligentsia?
    , @Opinionator
    Good points.
  160. @Jimi Shmendrix
    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What's the appropriate punishment for "hypocrisy"?
    How do you determine if an individual holds "acceptable" beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they've got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you've got quite a bit in common with them.

    You hear that, goyim? If you don’t bend the knee to your semitic overlords, you’re the same thing as the degenerate left.

    Thanks for the guidelines, Rabbi. You truly are our greatest allies.

  161. @neutral
    I still do not understand why anyone listens to him ? He has supported one failure after another (Iraq War, Jeb Bush, Hispanics becoming the new Republicans, election predictions, tax cut for billionaires to win votes, ignore white voters, etc), why is anyone listening to him ? I just wish somebody could ask him straight to his face why he thinks he is an expert when he is always wrong.

    That’s exactly what the questioner said. It shouldn’t be surprising that didn’t go over very well. And even if he had a point, it sounds like sour grapes and a derail.

  162. @Opinionator
    But did Trump do a good job connecting immigration to jobs and wage levels? Did he do that at all?

    I think he missed a huge opportunity. Polls also showed jobs/economy as the leading concern of people.

    He was more focused on linking immigration to crime and terrorism.

    Miller, in many warmup rallies before Trump came onstage, explicitly connected immigration to jobs.

    The body language of both was hilarious! Kristol is a smart guy. But he was a little too obvious in nervously jumping on the trade emphasis at the exclusion/ dismissal of immigration.

    Progressive politics of all stripes were shown the door. Trump’s hardcore supports don’t hate people, they hate progressivism. Ditching the PC made this obvious.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    How many people saw the warmup rallies?

    Trump didn't make the connection in any of the debates. In the first debate, when asked about creating jobs, he could have pivoted to immigration rather than stumbling on about trade. Compare it to Session's RNC speech.

    Perhaps the omission was by design.
  163. @Almost Missouri
    Maybe you've answered this elsewhere, but I missed it. How did you discover Steve's blog 2.5 years ago? I'm asking this in a marketing sense.

    I’m curious about that, too — about how people came to find Sailer’s site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I’ve been around here forever, but don’t post a whole lot, and read Steve’s stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It’s just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences — which doesn’t imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It’s so intellectually DISHONEST. And it’s not racist to think otherwise. It’s only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I’m glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called “racist” for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It’s way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs — whom I very much support as a group — and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the “Alt-Right,” a group I identify with. I’m just glad it’s not common, at least from what I’ve seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it’s intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others’ throats.

    • Replies: @Anon
    I cannot remember exactly but I have to believe it was Derb that directed me here. He mentioned Sailer more than once and then after NRO kicked Derb out, I found my way to iSteve.
    , @Anon
    I found Sailer in 2008 as a college girl while googling something to the effect of "why do white guys love Asian girls so much" and stumbled upon "Is Love Colorblind?" After a lot of reading I completely changed my dating strategy (my politics were then closet almost-conservative) and am now a married mother. My husband's only exposure to Steve has been through the Gavin McInnes podcast. He thinks it is funny when he mentions "that blog you read".
    , @guest
    I can't remember how, but I stumbled across Sailer's Obama book and read it because I thought the title was funny. I independently bumped into Unz.com through the article on "Tokyo" John McCain.
    , @Opinionator
    possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does.

    What does the matriarchy do?
    , @Almost Missouri
    Since we're sharing origin stories, I'll add mine, dull though it is.

    As best as I recall, started reading Steve in the aughties at VDare and blogspot, linked from Kathy Shaidle and Ann Coulter. Got to Kathy from Mark Steyn. Knew of Ann from college. Came across Steyn more or less by accident and was struck by his nonconformist opinions rendered in balletic rhetoric.
    , @syonredux

    I’m curious about that, too — about how people came to find Sailer’s site, and how long most of us have been around.
     
    Back when I was an undergrad at Berkeley. Feeling like the only conservative on campus, I would go to the library and read old issues of National Review. Most of the articles were garbage, but Sailer's stuff stood out. A few internet searches, and voila!
    , @duncsbaby
    A friend at work subscribed to National Review & I thought Derbyshire was the funniest, most sensible writer they had. When they fired him I started reading him on Taki Mag which connected me to one of Sailer's movie reviews. At that time I thought he was the smartest writer whose politics for the most part coincided with my own and still do. I no longer read the National Review for what it's worth.
  164. @Jimi Shmendrix
    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What's the appropriate punishment for "hypocrisy"?
    How do you determine if an individual holds "acceptable" beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they've got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you've got quite a bit in common with them.

    Yes, criticizing Bill Kristol is pretty much the same thing as the Holodomor or the Great Leap Forward.

  165. @Jimi Shmendrix
    Nice try, but fail.

    As I stated elsewhere, it is absurd to suggest punishing Israelis for the ideological misdeeds of a nonexistent American Jewish monolith. The chattering class leftist American Jews will do what they do. Israelis have absolutely nothing to do with that, so why should we pay the price with OUR immigration policy?

    Nothing shaming or anti-Gentile about that.

    But hey, if the anti-Semitic shoe fits...at least man up and OWN it. I for one could not care less if you like me or us. Knock yourself out.

    You are looking for a monster that isn’t there. Nobody, altright or otherwise, suggests to any degree of seriousness that Israel ought to literally open its borders wide. By accusing the users of that rhetorical tactic of crimethink, you become a debate-stifler.

    If you can’t see that the tactic has only rhetorical force, and if you say that antisemitism is the sole cause of the rhetoric, you are in effect pathologizing an honest impulse of White self-preservation.

    I don’t dislike you as a Jew. I don’t dislike you as a person, either. So when I call for the end of a double standard, that doesn’t mean that I want no standards whatsoever! It would be silly to think so.

    (By the way, neither I nor the iSteve commentariat has any control over the border regulations of Israel. So it is ridiculous to accuse us of wanting to “punish Israel”: we can’t change its laws. That idea is outside the realm of possibility!)

  166. @guest
    It's not just economics, or at least not for me. My type probably didn't win Trump the election, though I did vote for him. I'm not what you'd traditionally call "working class," but I'm not above them socio-economically. And I know what it's like to work someplace where you're the only "gringo."

    My concern is more aesthetic, intellectual, political, and communitarian (is that a word?) than economic. Immigrants ugly up our culture. They make our country dumber. They swamp, or eventually will swamp, my kind of people's political power. Above all, "diversity" kills community. I don't know the people in my neighborhood anymore. I don't trust strangers.

    That's why I vote the way I do. Not because I want a better job.

    Agree 100%.

    I work in a medical environment where I am not the owner/boss, although I am the only specialist. The assistants often lapse into Spanish, have a short attention span, and lack a sense of seriousness that my German roots want to see in a medical setting.

    Although they have training for their jobs, the employees have monotonous disinterest in excellence. In fact, their collective culture prevents any of them from wanting to outshine any of the other employees. They are very protective of each other in this way, and individual effort is seen as apple polishing, causing potential problems for the group.

    And the language games … not always pleasant.

    A drive through downtown at night is often a near-brush with death. Graffiti is frankly, ugly as sin. And being in any store within 10 minutes of closing – Wole Foods comes to mind – sounds like what a prison must sound like at lights-out.

    Light switches installed upside down, paper dispensers jammed so full they clog, the obtuse “sqaureness” of Mexican / Aztec layout in all manners visual … It done get tiresome.

    Even a 7th grade acquaintence of gravity, force, application of materials, measurement, and the germ theory of disease would go a long way to prevent enormous wasteage and duplicated effort.

    Standards are noticeably lowered, across the board, even in upscale areas. It’s not Third World, but it may well be Second World.

  167. Does anyone know a snail mail address for those wanting to toss their resume into the pile at the White House? I know there’s a website, but I want to send paper.

    Thanks.

  168. @anonguy

    then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?
     
    Irrelevant.

    And the less anyone pays attention to the clown, the better. These political cognoscenti guys were so far off base compared to some random schmoe like me, and presumably others, they should be hiding their faces in shame.

    This dude would kill to have a documented thread of Trump predictions like I do, he'd be headlining excerpts every day from whatever his sorry-ass rag is and using it to springboard the next phase of his career.

    then what do you call an idiot like Kristol who was ACTUALLY wrong, now that the word wrong has lost its original meaning?

    Irrelevant.

    Well said. It could a new meme. Kinda like the opposite of “love” is not necessarily “hate,” but rather “indifference.”

  169. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    I cannot remember exactly but I have to believe it was Derb that directed me here. He mentioned Sailer more than once and then after NRO kicked Derb out, I found my way to iSteve.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Taki, which led to the Unz group, then to various HBD sites like JayMan, HBDChick, then to Education Realist and many other site and book suggestions by commenters. That all suggests framing and path dependency along with serendipity.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    I first came to iSteve when the site was mentioned by Lawrence Auster. Auster was often critical of Steve, as he was of almost everyone, but he did comment of some of Steve's ideas.
  170. @Buddwing
    Concern/paranoia about Japan in the 1980's centered on two observations: (1) American cars were terrible, while Japanese cars exhibited high quality design and manufacture, and (2) the Japanese government's industrial policy (through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI) seemed to point to a strategic command of a national economy that we would need to emulate.

    The first issue was dealt with by much needed reform in Detroit and the Japanese companies building effective factories in the US. (You would not believe the crappiness of American cars. Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months. I was astounded to see a working clock in my friend's Honda Civic in 1974. The clocks in American cars shook apart from road vibration. When a colleague consulting for GM recommended a more expensive clock on Cadillacs, GM told him "Nobody buys a Cadillac for the clock." They were right. People bought a Lexus.)

    The second issue was a constant concern of people like James Fallows. MITI was already losing leverage over Japanese companies, however, and the emergence of companies like Apple and Microsoft convinced most people that central policy in the form of Industrial Policy was more likely to prop up staid companies like IBM than to generate something new and important.

    Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months.

    Yeah, I used to wonder that myself back then even as a kid.

    For all the talk about an America that put a man on the moon, it couldn’t make a single clock work in a single car. Buddwing is right, they all broke on every single car.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn’t have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren’t making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn’t some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Along those same lines, I compare the 3 country clubs planned for the Santa Monica Mountains:

    The 1960s Beverly Hills CC never got finished because the mob skimmed so much money from the Teamsters Pension Fund.

    The 1970s Mountain Gate CC next to the 405 in Sepulveda Pass got built, but it was done kind of cheap and squeezed in and celebrities refused to join it.

    The 1980s Sherwood CC in Thousand Oaks was done on a vast scale with expensive attention to detail and was a huge success in attracting the big new money crowd like Will Smith and Wayne Gretzky.

    , @syonredux

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn’t have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren’t making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

     

    In many respects, the '70s was the nadir of Western Civilization. You can feel the rot in the decade's culture: Mad Max,Death Wish, Ballard's High-Rise,Dawn of the Dead,The Quatermass Conclusion,the Sex Pistols, etc.

    People felt that they were living on a sinking ship.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn’t some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

     

    That'as not the era that they "hearken back to." Their ideal is the 1924-1965 America, the America that made Citizen Kane, wrote The Great Gatsby, sent men to the moon*, defeated Japan, invented the transistor, created information theory, etc.

    *Accomplished in 1969, but the achievement of the old order.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.
     
    If the loss of jobs is the downside of trade, then this is the downside of protection. This is why the two should be used as alternatives, rather than opposing ideologies.

    And yes, I know that the protection of the 50s through 70s was de facto, not de jure. But it still pertained.
  171. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    I found Sailer in 2008 as a college girl while googling something to the effect of “why do white guys love Asian girls so much” and stumbled upon “Is Love Colorblind?” After a lot of reading I completely changed my dating strategy (my politics were then closet almost-conservative) and am now a married mother. My husband’s only exposure to Steve has been through the Gavin McInnes podcast. He thinks it is funny when he mentions “that blog you read”.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Ha! Best story!
  172. @anonguy

    Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months.
     
    Yeah, I used to wonder that myself back then even as a kid.

    For all the talk about an America that put a man on the moon, it couldn't make a single clock work in a single car. Buddwing is right, they all broke on every single car.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn't have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren't making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn't some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    Along those same lines, I compare the 3 country clubs planned for the Santa Monica Mountains:

    The 1960s Beverly Hills CC never got finished because the mob skimmed so much money from the Teamsters Pension Fund.

    The 1970s Mountain Gate CC next to the 405 in Sepulveda Pass got built, but it was done kind of cheap and squeezed in and celebrities refused to join it.

    The 1980s Sherwood CC in Thousand Oaks was done on a vast scale with expensive attention to detail and was a huge success in attracting the big new money crowd like Will Smith and Wayne Gretzky.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Mountaingate had the dubious distinction of being built on a landfill, and so was the subject of a few case studies. I read one that included the following in the title: Mountaingate and the Case of the Teed-Off Homeowner. What was a little methane flaring up in your yard, or on the fairway? Barbecues all around.
  173. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor

    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?
     
    I'm not sure what you're asking.

    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It’s no wonder that there’s a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).
     
    Even the alt-right is very soft on Jews. Squishy, really. E.g., here we had links and stories about Jews voting for Trump, when Jews broke 71% for Clinton, and we had people talking about how Anglo-Saxons in Charlotte voted for Clinton, when best guess is that Anglo-Saxons broke for Trump at a higher percentage than White Catholics did.

    The left, too. E.g., it's very common to hear from Massimo type libs who say that the defense that White ethnopatriots mount against the leftist charge that Whites "broke" Blacks is "mean-spirited." Nobody calls Jews' defense against White ethnopatriotic critique "mean-spirited," certainly not the left.

    Most of your tribe's complaints are of the "Princess and the Pea" variety. In fact, vast majorities of the right and the left take your Jewish Supremacist position.

    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?

    I’m not sure what you’re asking.

    Sometimes you meet a Jew who’s a true believer leftist — or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away — and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that’s bad. What’s your next move?

  174. @Lagertha
    Agree. But, it is more simple than that. I discovered Steve's blog about 2.5 years ago...and it was overwhelming for me. I have 3 Millennial sons, sons who are immigrant stock for the most part (recent; relatively - 20th century - immigrants) from Europe and a Middle Eastern country. And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    My sons have been dismissed/denigrated (the all athletes/fraternity bros are predators sh*t) these last 10 years for being white during college application process (they are in the top 1% with raw test scores and IQ) . This, this has freaked me out. If a country ignores its most talented/intellectually gifted young people because they are white, well, shit, I need to go find a time machine for me and my babies to go back in time when every country was looking for the smartest people to introduce the latest technology, and save their asses from the sun burning them to death, or something.

    STEM kids are a rarity. Every nation, like Finland (they still do this) should be celebrating the smartest kids! History lesson for anyone who doesn't know this: After WW2, when Finland lost to Soviets, the idea was, we need to see "our children" as a national resource...we need to stimulate and help the smartest children. Women had already gone into the public sphere (50% of adult males were dead/wounded) to spur the economic wheel to get into the "glory" of the 20th century. Children and families became a YUGE focus...not a leftist (FY!) focus, a national focus to survive and prosper.

    So, yeah, I hate these talking heads who have always been comfortable and nonplussed in the USA, often privileged adults or privileged parents. Without money they didn't earn by themselves, they've got 'nuthin'.

    And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    Interesting post. Tip: start calling them men instead of males if they’re grown.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    that's my Finnish brain: Two are still child-men (still teen-agers). I know that most of the time, using male and female is in reference to animals. But Men and Women don't quite seem right to me when they are still, technically, teenagers...plus two of them can still not order a Martini in the USA.
  175. Look at how nervous Kristol and his fellow tribesman were after the exchange. They are not used to being challenged and are starting to feel afraid.

  176. @Boethiuss
    I don't know if William Kristol is correct to say that trade was a bigger factor in the perception of economic anxiety over immigration. But it's very important to note that if he is right, our adaptation is likely to be much more difficult.

    Large parts of our intelligentsia are ideologically committed to immigration (including to some extent Mr Kristol though I thought he had flipped on that to some extent) and it's going to be embarrassing to have to walk that back.

    But the trade issue cuts much deeper than that, in that our standard of living does fundamentally depend on trade. And we can tinker around the edges here and there but there's strong reason to believe that if our trade regime is substantially restricted then our economy will suffer tremendously.

    So if Mr Kristol is right, we are going to have a much harder time accommodating Trump voters on trade than we would on immigration.

    Could we just replace our intelligentsia?

  177. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    I can’t remember how, but I stumbled across Sailer’s Obama book and read it because I thought the title was funny. I independently bumped into Unz.com through the article on “Tokyo” John McCain.

  178. @Bill
    Private sector trade unions existed, sort of, in the 80s. There was still a power base (money and votes) behind protecting middle class manufacturing jobs. Trade unions still had power inside the Democrat Party. They could threaten to defect like the Teamsters did in 1980. They had a coterie of academics and think tanks and pet politicians.

    Today, Richard Trumka, of the formerly formidable United Mine Workers, spends his days rhapsodizing on the glories of gloryholes or gay marriage or whatever.

    The end of private sector unions in the US was a big deal. They disliked immigration. They disliked free trade. And they had a seat at the tables of power. Now, they do as their cultural marxist masters dictate, in the hopes of a few table scraps.

    Tieing too hard to the Dems cost union power in places. Upon learning that the carpenter’s union was going to be giving money to the McGovern campaign in 1972, a man I used to work with drove up to the union hall, and methodically threw every tool owned by the union into the parking lot. His father had been the founder of the union- the first successful one in that deep South area.

  179. @Steve Sailer
    Japan's MITI notoriously tried to get its 10 or so car companies to merge into just two under Toyota and Nissan. Honda refused.

    Japan’s MITI notoriously tried to get its 10 or so car companies to merge into just two under Toyota and Nissan. Honda refused.

    Honda was building motorcycles in the US long before Reagan pressured other Japanese manufacturers (according to Pat Buchanan) to set up shop here. They (actually Honda’s #2, Wagner buff Takeo Fujisawa) discovered a hidden cycle market by ignoring Harley’s clientele and going after what became known as “soccer moms”. They also got the jump, by five years or so, on putting folding seats in minivans. This was “Blue Ocean Strategy” long before INSEAD came up with it.

    Honda was always farsighted. Much of their success (and Sony’s as well, I suspect) was due to standing up to MITI. But that’s not “industrial democracy”, is it?

  180. Sailer’s Thesis: immigration

    Kristol’s Antithesis: trade

    Trump’s Synthesis: borders

    The “Blue Wall” doesn’t hold many immigrants these days, relative to the rest of the country. So trade, not immigration, may have given Trump the presidency.

    • Replies: @Marty T
    I'm from one of those Trump "blue wall" states. Just because our states aren't Mexico yet doesn't mean we can't see what's happening elsewhere. I do think immigration was a little more important (Trump's biggest cheers were for the wall) but trade was a great complement. It also happens that cracking down on immigration has fewer negative side effects on Americans than cracking down on trade does.
  181. @anonguy

    Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months.
     
    Yeah, I used to wonder that myself back then even as a kid.

    For all the talk about an America that put a man on the moon, it couldn't make a single clock work in a single car. Buddwing is right, they all broke on every single car.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn't have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren't making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn't some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn’t have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren’t making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    In many respects, the ’70s was the nadir of Western Civilization. You can feel the rot in the decade’s culture: Mad Max,Death Wish, Ballard’s High-Rise,Dawn of the Dead,The Quatermass Conclusion,the Sex Pistols, etc.

    People felt that they were living on a sinking ship.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn’t some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    That’as not the era that they “hearken back to.” Their ideal is the 1924-1965 America, the America that made Citizen Kane, wrote The Great Gatsby, sent men to the moon*, defeated Japan, invented the transistor, created information theory, etc.

    *Accomplished in 1969, but the achievement of the old order.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Disco helped with the cultural nadirization. The swift decline from the late 1960s-early 1970s music was depressing, coming on the heels of the 1974-75 recession. I liken it to a cultural vacuum being filled to the chagrin and disgust of many.
    , @jack ryan
    Also the Beach Boys early music of the paradise of Southern California - Endless Summer.
  182. @anonguy

    Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months.
     
    Yeah, I used to wonder that myself back then even as a kid.

    For all the talk about an America that put a man on the moon, it couldn't make a single clock work in a single car. Buddwing is right, they all broke on every single car.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn't have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren't making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn't some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    If the loss of jobs is the downside of trade, then this is the downside of protection. This is why the two should be used as alternatives, rather than opposing ideologies.

    And yes, I know that the protection of the 50s through 70s was de facto, not de jure. But it still pertained.

  183. @Mr. Anon
    "Billy the Kuck Kristol."

    Kristol is no cuck. He knows exactly what he's doing and why.

    Quite right – Billy is no Cuck. Paul Gottfried, Sam Francis & others understood this creep’s role well. To roughly paraphrase-

    Kristol is best thought of as Senior Enforcement Officer of the Neocon Narrative (i.e, “Invade the World, Invite the World”) He helps create Cucks within the GOP rank & file by ensuring that dissidents from the Neocon Narrative are marginalized & gives his Cucks rhetorical air cover. His modus: the GOP is to remain stauchly Cuckservative; perhaps to win, more likely to loose gracefully, but if deviant, to be sabotaged.

    It is spectacular to those of us who remember the scene 25 yrs ago, that he has failed upwards to such an extent. His one “moment” was handing Quayle a speech in early 92 which suggested that a culture-wide embrace of single motherhood might not be wise. After that, his energies have pretty much been dedicated to undermining the long term interests of the GOP base. Eg. trying to prevent immigration restrictions, shilling for wild overseas adventurism, sustaining mass ignorance of the emerging crony capitalist plutocracy, and plugging for a type of growth which steals from the future & enriches insiders (tax cuts w/o spending cuts, ignoring massive deficit growth & wage stagnation, mindless embrace of trade deals which gut manufacturing expertise…). Occasionally he will make a rattle about a social conservative concern like abortion or gay marriage. But such token bravado is just a distraction – he will be more than happy to acquiesce to domination by the cultural Left. He is just parked in a position of influence since he somehow found Murdoch’s ear in 1993. For him to now feign concern about trade policy now is cute. A single instance when he conceded that Perot, Buchanan, Nadar, or any protectionists had valid points will be very hard to find.

    Having lost control of the GOP’s control levers, Kristol is now enlisting kamikazes to inflict as much damage as possible. Johnson & McMuffin served this role well. Expect McCain, Flake, Ryan & Graham to be next in line.

  184. @slumber_j
    Moderator Harvey C. Mansfield is awesome as ever here.

    In my undergraduate days he was known as Harvey C-minus Mansfield: a notoriously tough grader. I understand that he has since moderated his formerly tough stance on grade inflation so that more students would enroll in his classes: he now gives each student a fake grade for the transcript and a real grade so the kids know just how lame they actually (mostly) are. A thoroughly admirable man.

    If you’re going to talk about Mansfield and grading, how do you leave out the most famous story of all, the one where he told the kids that due to affirmative action, any “A” they get at Harvard is really a C+ by 1975 standards?

  185. @Anon
    OT:

    Steve keeps mentioning a high-low tag team to screw over the middle. I noticed some historical parallels, with Jews trying to screw over other Jews through the involvement of outsiders. One could probably make a whole article out of something like this if you find more examples, at the risk of sounding like a conspiratorial nutcase (perfect for Unz.com!)

    From a Wikipedia article on Pompey's military career (He was Caesar's opponent in the Civil War):

    "A conflict between the brothers Aristobulus II and Hyrcanus II over the succession to the Hasmonean throne begun in Judea in 69 BC. Aristobulus deposed Hyrcanus. Then Antipater the Idumaean became the adviser of weak-willed Hyrcanus and persuaded him to contend for the throne...The people supported Hyrcanus and only the priests supported Aristobulus...The ambassadors of Aristobulus and Hyrcanus asked for [Pompey's] help."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompey#Judea

    From a Wikipedia article on the last two Jews of Afghanistan:

    "Simintov had lived with the second last remaining Jewish man in Afghanistan, Ishaq Levin... Levin had initially welcomed Simintov but the two fell out permanently when Simintov offered the caretaker help to emigrate to Israel to join the rest of the former Kabul Jewish community...the older man took umbrage, claiming Simintov was trying to take over the synagogue. A feud ensued, with the Taliban becoming involved after both men reported each other to the authorities for alleged wrongdoings ranging from running a brothel to misappropriating religious objects."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zablon_Simintov#Afghan_Jewish_conflict

    That conflict could be turned into a screenplay.

  186. @Anon87
    He literally sputters when faced with a question about Japanese standards of living. That's after getting beet red when asked about immigration. I'm surprised he didn't cover his ears and start yelling "la la la I can't hear you".

    You would think when people are consistently this wrong they would eventually lose their jobs instead of doubling down. Post-Trump it seems they may become even more prominent. Peter Principle at play?

    Who was the gentleman that asked him this good questions?

    Who was the gentleman that asked him this good questions?

    I believe it was the admirable Tom Sunic.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Lyov Myshkin,

    Are you sure that the interlocutor was Tom Sunic? (BTW, the interlocutor did a fantastic job.)

    I was unable to discern Tom's voice when comparison was made to some of his podcasts.

    The last I heard was that Tom was "tied down" in Croatia taking care of some family obligations.

    For those unacquainted with Sunic, I would suggest that you get acquainted - he has a lot of interesting things to say.
  187. Someone give the shitlord who asked that question a full time job asking questions like that of people like Kristol. He sounds like an immigrant that is doing jobs Americans won’t do.

  188. @Anon
    I cannot remember exactly but I have to believe it was Derb that directed me here. He mentioned Sailer more than once and then after NRO kicked Derb out, I found my way to iSteve.

    Taki, which led to the Unz group, then to various HBD sites like JayMan, HBDChick, then to Education Realist and many other site and book suggestions by commenters. That all suggests framing and path dependency along with serendipity.

  189. @syonredux

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn’t have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren’t making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

     

    In many respects, the '70s was the nadir of Western Civilization. You can feel the rot in the decade's culture: Mad Max,Death Wish, Ballard's High-Rise,Dawn of the Dead,The Quatermass Conclusion,the Sex Pistols, etc.

    People felt that they were living on a sinking ship.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn’t some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

     

    That'as not the era that they "hearken back to." Their ideal is the 1924-1965 America, the America that made Citizen Kane, wrote The Great Gatsby, sent men to the moon*, defeated Japan, invented the transistor, created information theory, etc.

    *Accomplished in 1969, but the achievement of the old order.

    Disco helped with the cultural nadirization. The swift decline from the late 1960s-early 1970s music was depressing, coming on the heels of the 1974-75 recession. I liken it to a cultural vacuum being filled to the chagrin and disgust of many.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    The best thing about Disco was "Saturday Night Fever." SO many good movies about the Italian immigrant experience came out in the late 70's. Haha! Whenever I get together with Eastern Europeans, by the end of the night, BeeGees and ABBA are trending in the kitchen with tons of women dancing and laughing, wine being splashed around the floor!
  190. @Judah Benjamin Hur
    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor's treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It's no wonder that there's a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).

    Weren’t they revolutionaries from the second they stepped off the boat?

    Jews and their defenders never seem to take responsibility for their choices. They’re like women in that way.

  191. @Steve Sailer
    Along those same lines, I compare the 3 country clubs planned for the Santa Monica Mountains:

    The 1960s Beverly Hills CC never got finished because the mob skimmed so much money from the Teamsters Pension Fund.

    The 1970s Mountain Gate CC next to the 405 in Sepulveda Pass got built, but it was done kind of cheap and squeezed in and celebrities refused to join it.

    The 1980s Sherwood CC in Thousand Oaks was done on a vast scale with expensive attention to detail and was a huge success in attracting the big new money crowd like Will Smith and Wayne Gretzky.

    Mountaingate had the dubious distinction of being built on a landfill, and so was the subject of a few case studies. I read one that included the following in the title: Mountaingate and the Case of the Teed-Off Homeowner. What was a little methane flaring up in your yard, or on the fairway? Barbecues all around.

  192. @Jasper Been
    David Duke is not my idea of a genius, but he doesn't register as racist to me. In the last few years he has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that's already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews. I've never heard him disparage blacks or latinos, so it makes no sense at all to call him racist. I think he's only been accused of that because the media has been so successful using that term to silence critics over the years.

    That’s my impression too. He has also evolved into an advocate for Palestinian rights. (Maybe that’s why jews hate him so much.)

  193. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does.

    What does the matriarchy do?

    • Replies: @Tracy
    The matriarchy claims to push for "equality" while actually tearing boys and men down at every opportunity. Masculinity is pathologized and drugged away. Education is geared toward females, who are always looked after, encouraged, and pushed to thrive while their brothers are left on their own. Men are pushed out of family life through no fault divorce, unfair custody laws, and the expectation that men pay for children born outside of marriage (see, please, The Garbage Generation). Men are portrayed as stupid and incompetent in the media over and over and over again, especially white males, who are always shown as needing the wise input of women or a member or some minority group to get through life. Male health is overlooked while female health concerns are over-represented in terms of research and messaging (c.f. prostate cancer vs. breast cancer funding and awareness). Male psychology is radically misunderstood and their normal needs -- esp. the need to push away from the feminine in order to identify with the masculine -- are interpreted as "misogyny" or "homophobia." Phenomena like the push to get people to believe in the "campus rape crisis" paint men as criminals, as animals who need to be reined in. With regard to that "campus rape" nonsense, young males are actually deprived of due process. I could go on for a long, long time.

    And meanwhile, feminists are always lying (e.g., the wage gap) and claiming to defend women while hating everything that is biologically feminine -- e.g, pregnancy and nursing and other aspects of motherhood they want to use science to wish away; female psychology that wants to look up to the masculine and experience male strength (without any condescension or disrespect). They claim to want "equality" -- but they don't want to be drafted or have to sign up for selective service. They ignore biological, psychological, and social realities in the service of dogma. They have zero respect for and gratitude toward men, not having any sense of the truth of what Camille Paglia said about how if it weren't for men, we'd be living in grass huts. They don't stop to think for 5 seconds about how it's overwhelmingly MEN who've invented almost everything we take for granted, who maintain the infrastructure that prevents disease and makes life a lot better, etc. They have no sense of respect for what men risk in work and during defensive wars -- and mostly to serve and protect women and children. They have no idea that it is, or at least was, we women and our children -- where "our" refers to women and men -- who inspire boys to become men and to use their (sexy!) power for the Good, and that all men want out of the deal is to know their kids are their own, good sex, love, some f***ing respect, and, if their wives are homemakers, some decent food once in a while.

    Feminists (at least the Third Wavers) teach women to be shrewish, hateful, ungrateful bitches. I want nothing to do with them.

  194. @Marat
    Miller, in many warmup rallies before Trump came onstage, explicitly connected immigration to jobs.

    The body language of both was hilarious! Kristol is a smart guy. But he was a little too obvious in nervously jumping on the trade emphasis at the exclusion/ dismissal of immigration.

    Progressive politics of all stripes were shown the door. Trump's hardcore supports don't hate people, they hate progressivism. Ditching the PC made this obvious.

    How many people saw the warmup rallies?

    Trump didn’t make the connection in any of the debates. In the first debate, when asked about creating jobs, he could have pivoted to immigration rather than stumbling on about trade. Compare it to Session’s RNC speech.

    Perhaps the omission was by design.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    As far as I can tell he hasn't really talked about punishing employers for hiring illegals either, which is one way of pivoting from the deportation question.

    Maybe he doesn't want to spook the business Republicans, or he himself doesn't really have his heart in that aspect of the issue. If the Central Park Five is anything to go by he's more angry at the crime aspect.

  195. @Boethiuss
    I don't know if William Kristol is correct to say that trade was a bigger factor in the perception of economic anxiety over immigration. But it's very important to note that if he is right, our adaptation is likely to be much more difficult.

    Large parts of our intelligentsia are ideologically committed to immigration (including to some extent Mr Kristol though I thought he had flipped on that to some extent) and it's going to be embarrassing to have to walk that back.

    But the trade issue cuts much deeper than that, in that our standard of living does fundamentally depend on trade. And we can tinker around the edges here and there but there's strong reason to believe that if our trade regime is substantially restricted then our economy will suffer tremendously.

    So if Mr Kristol is right, we are going to have a much harder time accommodating Trump voters on trade than we would on immigration.

    Good points.

  196. @Svigor

    Demonization is already underway in certain circles.
    What’s the appropriate punishment for “hypocrisy”?
    How do you determine if an individual holds “acceptable” beliefs?
    You could consult with the Left; they’ve got plenty of experience policing crimethink.
    Actually, you’ve got quite a bit in common with them.
     
    Jews throw us under the bus. We advocate reciprocating (to get them to stop), and you come and criticize us, ignoring who has actually thrown whom under the bus. Your motive is clear; Jewish Supremacy.

    Great points.

  197. @Top Diplomitt
    The Weekly Standard cult really does seem to have a problem with those 2 (Coulter; Steve). I don't doubt in the latter case the consternation is less pronounced and less uniform. With Ann it's obvious they hate her on every front and the style vs. substance reasons could never be unpackaged-- recall her pro-McCarthyism book. Yet I think there's about a half dozen or so regular contributors of theirs now following the unspeakable Unzian blog if only furtively; Caldwell, Carlson, and Last have openly quoted from these dark outlands. Alt-Rights may come and go but the 'Sphere never stops turnin'

    With Ann it’s obvious they hate her on every front and the style vs. substance reasons could never be unpackaged– recall her pro-McCarthyism book.

    Which is an excellent book by the way, drawing heavily on M. Stanton Evans’ even better book Blacklisted by History. Coulter showed guts by coming and saying that McCarthy was right (which he was).

  198. @Svigor

    What arguments could we make if the Israel Hypocrisy wasn’t there to point to?
     
    I'm not sure what you're asking.

    I find it interesting how Jews are treated dramatically differently by many on the right when it comes to immigration views, compare Cantor’s treatment with the more open borders Ryan. It’s no wonder that there’s a disproportionate number of Jewish politicians on the left (far more disproportionate than Jewish voters who prefer Democrats about 2.7 to 1).
     
    Even the alt-right is very soft on Jews. Squishy, really. E.g., here we had links and stories about Jews voting for Trump, when Jews broke 71% for Clinton, and we had people talking about how Anglo-Saxons in Charlotte voted for Clinton, when best guess is that Anglo-Saxons broke for Trump at a higher percentage than White Catholics did.

    The left, too. E.g., it's very common to hear from Massimo type libs who say that the defense that White ethnopatriots mount against the leftist charge that Whites "broke" Blacks is "mean-spirited." Nobody calls Jews' defense against White ethnopatriotic critique "mean-spirited," certainly not the left.

    Most of your tribe's complaints are of the "Princess and the Pea" variety. In fact, vast majorities of the right and the left take your Jewish Supremacist position.

    I’m not sure what you’re asking.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?

  199. @Anonymous
    Unfortunately, so much intellectual effort is now directed towards automation that I'm skeptical new technologies really will employ many people. I suppose you could say that Apple and Google each employ a large number of people, but the old industries used to employ far more.

    But, someone needs to build the machines/code the programs/design the look & functionality…and yeah, bring back the Maytag repairman, to tweek when tweeking is needed. Robotics is a huge jumble of people working on just one function. So, maybe, collaboration was not something my sons enjoyed at 4, 7, 10….but, maybe they will, at 35, 45? If automation/machines will replace workers, a new class of workers will be needed to build the machines. Pleez, no Skynet jokes!

    There is renewed talk about bringing back “shop classes” to HS (our HS never got rid of them), and, many fawning articles about how many students in HS should naturally gravitate to shop classes (welding, cutting, soldering, designing, etc. – and continue in tech school), and blow-off college/university; don’t go to study lame humanities courses. Japan just cut that sh*t out, and will only tolerate STEM heavy courses for their University students.

    Besides, as you mentioned, Google, Apple, FB & Uber, etc., in SV, don’t really contribute something profound to mankind…..they are not creating product and industry that is vital to society. The tech that greatly improves life, is still the most sought after…and which has not been created yet.

    That’s why I find the driverless cars so sketchy. There’s no way in hell (because so many progressives are fine with mass immigration) that roads will be rid of 25 year old SUV’s among all the driverless cars on the roads of 2040. Am I the only one who thinks driverless cars are boring? not fun? I like to grip the wheel of a car and listen to music…daydream.

  200. @Ivy
    Disco helped with the cultural nadirization. The swift decline from the late 1960s-early 1970s music was depressing, coming on the heels of the 1974-75 recession. I liken it to a cultural vacuum being filled to the chagrin and disgust of many.

    The best thing about Disco was “Saturday Night Fever.” SO many good movies about the Italian immigrant experience came out in the late 70′s. Haha! Whenever I get together with Eastern Europeans, by the end of the night, BeeGees and ABBA are trending in the kitchen with tons of women dancing and laughing, wine being splashed around the floor!

  201. @yaqub the mad scientist
    And, my 3 Millennial sons are highly educated males who are more or less than 1 generation immigrant, off the steamer at Ellis Island.

    Interesting post. Tip: start calling them men instead of males if they're grown.

    that’s my Finnish brain: Two are still child-men (still teen-agers). I know that most of the time, using male and female is in reference to animals. But Men and Women don’t quite seem right to me when they are still, technically, teenagers…plus two of them can still not order a Martini in the USA.

  202. @snootybaronet
    I love how the questioner ignited Billy boy.

    *triggered

  203. @Father O'Hara
    They say politics is show biz for ugly people? The dude next to Kristol surely proves that.

    As I’ve noted before Kristol is a gnome. For some magical reason he appears better on video than in real life.

  204. @Hodag
    His spirited defense of one of the most infamous reaver cultures on earth transplanted to the quaint Nordics of Minneapolis....I can't even come up with a verb. His model of reality does not work. Stop acting like he should be listened to.

    Bristol, begone.

    one of the most infamous reaver cultures on earth

    Wow. Cuts like a knife.

  205. @Opinionator
    How many people saw the warmup rallies?

    Trump didn't make the connection in any of the debates. In the first debate, when asked about creating jobs, he could have pivoted to immigration rather than stumbling on about trade. Compare it to Session's RNC speech.

    Perhaps the omission was by design.

    As far as I can tell he hasn’t really talked about punishing employers for hiring illegals either, which is one way of pivoting from the deportation question.

    Maybe he doesn’t want to spook the business Republicans, or he himself doesn’t really have his heart in that aspect of the issue. If the Central Park Five is anything to go by he’s more angry at the crime aspect.

  206. @Anon
    I cannot remember exactly but I have to believe it was Derb that directed me here. He mentioned Sailer more than once and then after NRO kicked Derb out, I found my way to iSteve.

    I first came to iSteve when the site was mentioned by Lawrence Auster. Auster was often critical of Steve, as he was of almost everyone, but he did comment of some of Steve’s ideas.

    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Thought of Lawrence when it was assured that Trump won. His blog was exceptional, top notch always. As calls for immigration sanity go, his was one of the loneliest voices in the wilderness. He started advocating in 1989 when it was on practically nobody's radar. Trump's win was an overdue tribute to many including Lawrence, John Tanton, Sam Francis, Phyllis Schlafly, & Barbara Coe
  207. @Buddwing
    Concern/paranoia about Japan in the 1980's centered on two observations: (1) American cars were terrible, while Japanese cars exhibited high quality design and manufacture, and (2) the Japanese government's industrial policy (through the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI) seemed to point to a strategic command of a national economy that we would need to emulate.

    The first issue was dealt with by much needed reform in Detroit and the Japanese companies building effective factories in the US. (You would not believe the crappiness of American cars. Every car had a clock, but no clock continued working for more than six months. I was astounded to see a working clock in my friend's Honda Civic in 1974. The clocks in American cars shook apart from road vibration. When a colleague consulting for GM recommended a more expensive clock on Cadillacs, GM told him "Nobody buys a Cadillac for the clock." They were right. People bought a Lexus.)

    The second issue was a constant concern of people like James Fallows. MITI was already losing leverage over Japanese companies, however, and the emergence of companies like Apple and Microsoft convinced most people that central policy in the form of Industrial Policy was more likely to prop up staid companies like IBM than to generate something new and important.

    Until the invention of quartz clocks, there was no easy cheap way to build a 12v DC clock. A lot of them are actually wind up clocks but with an electric motor that rewinds them every few minutes. It was kind of a Rube Goldbergish kludgy scheme with lots to break.

  208. @Opinionator
    When you write that they've stolen from the US, and bullied the US, what specifically do you have in mind?

    Bully as they tried to prevent a deal with Iran. They have used AIPAC to control the US Congress with fear and money.

    “No other country close to the United States continues to cross the line on espionage like the Israelis do”

    As for stealing: “industrial espionage—folks coming over here on trade missions or with Israeli companies working in collaboration with American companies, [or] intelligence operatives being run directly by the government, which I assume meant out of the [Israeli] Embassy.”

    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/16/israel-wont-stop-spying-us-249757.html

    Stole American nuclear secrets:

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/01/no_author/israels-secret-nuclear-arsenal/

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Thanks.

    What occurred to me as falling under stealing is the massive amounts of "aid" we are forced to hand over to them and, as bribes to be nice to Israel, to surrounding Arab countries, plus the commandeering of our military to fight their enemies for them.
  209. @SnakeEyes
    Who gives a flying fuck about what William Kristol has to say?

    Who gives a flying fuck about what William Kristol has to say?

    According to the owner of this website, he (Kristol) had the power to — and did – -make the decision to kill immigration reform in the 1990′s.

  210. @Harry Baldwin
    I first came to iSteve when the site was mentioned by Lawrence Auster. Auster was often critical of Steve, as he was of almost everyone, but he did comment of some of Steve's ideas.

    Thought of Lawrence when it was assured that Trump won. His blog was exceptional, top notch always. As calls for immigration sanity go, his was one of the loneliest voices in the wilderness. He started advocating in 1989 when it was on practically nobody’s radar. Trump’s win was an overdue tribute to many including Lawrence, John Tanton, Sam Francis, Phyllis Schlafly, & Barbara Coe

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  211. @Johnny F. Ive
    Bully as they tried to prevent a deal with Iran. They have used AIPAC to control the US Congress with fear and money.

    “No other country close to the United States continues to cross the line on espionage like the Israelis do"

    As for stealing: “industrial espionage—folks coming over here on trade missions or with Israeli companies working in collaboration with American companies, [or] intelligence operatives being run directly by the government, which I assume meant out of the [Israeli] Embassy.”
    http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/16/israel-wont-stop-spying-us-249757.html

    Stole American nuclear secrets:
    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/01/no_author/israels-secret-nuclear-arsenal/

    Thanks.

    What occurred to me as falling under stealing is the massive amounts of “aid” we are forced to hand over to them and, as bribes to be nice to Israel, to surrounding Arab countries, plus the commandeering of our military to fight their enemies for them.

  212. @Lyov Myshkin
    @Anon87

    Who was the gentleman that asked him this good questions?

     

    I believe it was the admirable Tom Sunic.

    Lyov Myshkin,

    Are you sure that the interlocutor was Tom Sunic? (BTW, the interlocutor did a fantastic job.)

    I was unable to discern Tom’s voice when comparison was made to some of his podcasts.

    The last I heard was that Tom was “tied down” in Croatia taking care of some family obligations.

    For those unacquainted with Sunic, I would suggest that you get acquainted – he has a lot of interesting things to say.

    • Replies: @Lyov Myshkin
    Hey Dan,

    The first time I heard the audio I was convinced it was Sunic but have listened a few more times and I think you're right.

    Kudos to whoever it was.
  213. @guest
    Pointing out other people's hypocrisy and trying to win arguments is policing crimethink? You've fallen into the deep end, buddy.

    When one speaks of “punishment”, how is it not?

    Idiots

  214. Who do readers think is more slimy on immigration and all things

    William Kristol here or

    NYC Senator Charles Schumer?

    Schumer is always offering conservative Republicans the poison apple advice that they should welcome huge numbers of Hispanic immigrants because hispanics are natural Conservative voters with strong family values, the same with Muslim immigrants.

    There really is no use trying to use reason with these types.

  215. @guest
    No one is suggesting that. I declare you unresponsive.

    Try to keep up. You can’t jump into a conversation midway through and then make false assertions. This interchange BEGAN when another poster made that exact suggestion. Read the whole thread.

  216. @Frau Katze
    I don't think he thinks he's a fraud. He seems rather impervious to logic (they should talk about 'unskilled" rather "third world", btw. )

    Masses of unskilled immigrants can't be good for unemployed Americans.

    Kristol is either stupid and doesn't understand or he's glossing over the unskilled immigrants for whatever reason (likely because wants support the corporate class). He comes across as arrogant.

    Or he just hates the traditional American nation that was 90% White European before 1965.

  217. @syonredux

    The 1970s are what I call the Golden Era of Crappy American Workmanship.

    Pretty much everything sucked in both design and execution, e.g., the furniture was ugly and uncomfortable but at least it was made so poorly it fell apart promptly so you didn’t have to tolerate for too long.

    Virtually every single product was adulterated/degraded and everything was always, well, they aren’t making these like they used to. Even raw materials, lumber grades suffered from inflation, construction materials were cheesier, etc.

     

    In many respects, the '70s was the nadir of Western Civilization. You can feel the rot in the decade's culture: Mad Max,Death Wish, Ballard's High-Rise,Dawn of the Dead,The Quatermass Conclusion,the Sex Pistols, etc.

    People felt that they were living on a sinking ship.

    This was that 90% white America BTW that some around here hearken back to. Wasn’t some high functioning paradise like some WNs would have everyone believe.

     

    That'as not the era that they "hearken back to." Their ideal is the 1924-1965 America, the America that made Citizen Kane, wrote The Great Gatsby, sent men to the moon*, defeated Japan, invented the transistor, created information theory, etc.

    *Accomplished in 1969, but the achievement of the old order.

    Also the Beach Boys early music of the paradise of Southern California – Endless Summer.

  218. [Sorry Steve, it's a long one. If you want to skip, there's no tough talk within, I promise]

    Sometimes you meet a Jew who’s a true believer leftist — or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away — and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that’s bad. What’s your next move?

    I don’t think I’ve ever framed Israel’s policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I’d say something like, “no, you still don’t get it. It’s not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that’s bad, it’s Jewish opposition to European peoples doing the same thing that’s bad. And it exposes how wrong your position is; if Jews were really true believers, they’d oppose self-preservation for Jews in Israel, too. But they don’t. Their behavior shows that 1) they think self-preservation is good (for the self-preservers), and 2) their sin is in opposing this good for European peoples.”

    For a true believer, I would point out that borders should be no barrier to him, and that he should drop everything and focus on Israel, because that’s where the money is, so to speak. Missionaries go where the pagans are, Doctors Without Borders go where the sick people are, etc. Anything else would show a lack of seriousness. Think Globally, Act Locally. If tribalism/ethnocentrism/racism is his favored sin, he should have his hands full with Israel (or east Asia, etc.), and have no time left over for the mote in White America’s eye.

    The hypocrisy need not be present in any given individual, by the way. It’s there at the group level in spades. There’s lots of ways to approach the “I am not my tribe’s keeper” argument (most of them pioneered by the left), but that’s a different conversation.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?

    Fortunately, Israel does exist (as a shining example of how to take your own side, not just hypocrisy (the hypocrisy stretches across the entire establishment, not just diaspora Jewry)), so we don’t need to work without it. But my basic argument works like this:

    Humans are animals, and animals are, at their core, “racist.” Species begin as races. The opposition to this is anti-human, anti-animal, anti-life. It’s like swimming against the tide; eventually, you’re going to lose. (To borrow a phrase, leftists stand athwart Evolution shouting “stop”) The effect of the left is merely to do as much damage, to wreck as much of civilization as possible, before failing to rewrite human nature (Social Identity Theory suggests that race-mixing will not solve the problem – new “racisms” will form). Their whole argument is that the people who build skyscrapers and put people on the Moon are less worthy of preservation than the Snowy Egret (sure, we can speculate that there’s nothing special about these peoples, but it’s insane to assume there isn’t and insist on burning every bridge). But leave all that aside; we should preserve all peoples, simply because we do conserve species and sub-species (races) for its own sake.

    Race is part of who we are – all of us. To deny it is to deny who we are.

    Then there’s the whole eggs and baskets argument (if diversity is good, then preserving HBD is a good idea). Then there’s the fact that only White countries are being subjected to this multiculti onslaught. Which suggests that the whole thing is a giant con, and only being pushed, like a con, because the con-artists smell a sucker with money. Then there’s the whole diversity + proximity = war thing. Then there’s the fact that we have never actually had a national conversation about this, only lectures from the oligarch class, and their stooges.

    Then there’s the matter of up sides and down sides (false negatives are safer bets than false positives). If race realists are wrong, and we make room in the world for separatism, we’ll have lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. If race realists are right, and we make room for separatism, then we just won the jackpot. If race realists are wrong, and we don’t make room for separatism, we’ve lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. But if race realists are right, and we don’t make room for separatism, we’ve just made one of the most catastrophic errors in the history of mankind.

    It’s a broad subject. This blog’s archives are as good a primer as any. There are fewer WNs here than at others, but the back-and-forth is as good here as anywhere, in my experience (I would love to know of a free speech forum where leftists come in numbers and stick around, but alas, they avoid free speech like the plague).

    There are millions of people who did not sign on to being race-replaced. They were never asked. A majority vote (let’s be generous and pretend these people lost a plebiscite, and that plebiscites on national suicide are valid, and that discussion in our captured public sphere isn’t completely rigged) does not invalidate their right to self-determination, any more than it would invalidate their right to free speech, the right to bear arms, etc. These people deserve a home (and who would deny that they constitute a “wrecker” problem for the glorious globalist multiculti future?).

    As for “just,” being invaded is the ultimate casus belli. Oh, this one just occurred to me: the very fact that Whites are so concerned that the cause of their own survival be a “just” one suggests injustice isn’t our problem.

    Sorry for the patchy, stream-of-consciousness reply. My brain just isn’t set up to do the “cold call” anymore. It’s been years since I did that stuff. [Steve, if you're still reading; sorry! :| ]

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Thank you
    , @Opinionator
    What would you say to someone who believes that immigration is the lifeblood of our country?
    , @Opinionator
    I don’t think I’ve ever framed Israel’s policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I’d say something like, “no, you still don’t get it. It’s not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that’s bad

    And you would say the same about Paurstinians' self-preservation in the land mass called Israel?
  219. Hoax

    Eah did a good job replying, but I would like to point out that Trump was right (0r at least, not wrong), and Big Media is wrong, as usual.

    “Plant” encompasses “production line” as well as “entire production facility.”

    Plant (disambiguation)

    Physical plant, often just called “plant”, a facility’s infrastructure (i.e., “Plant Room”)

    Trump’s quote (via a quick web search):

    I worked hard with Bill Ford to keep the Lincoln plant in Kentucky.

  220. Thought of Lawrence [Auster] when it was assured that Trump won. His blog was exceptional, top notch always.

    Echo chamber squared. I could never take seriously a blogger that neither blocks all comments, nor allows (at least relatively) free discussion, but cherry-picks a select few comments to reinforce the echo. Worse than refusing discussion altogether, IMO. Not the sort of person I’m interested in listening to, though I understand why others’ tastes differ.

    Taki, which led to the Unz group, then to various HBD sites like JayMan, HBDChick, then to Education Realist and many other site and book suggestions by commenters. That all suggests framing and path dependency along with serendipity.

    It’s fun hearing people tell their “how I found Steve” stories. They almost always involve moving rightward/racialist-ward through various web sites. I got here from the other direction. Rather different scenery. :)

    Jews and their defenders never seem to take responsibility for their choices. They’re like women in that way.

    More like Blacks. It’s always YT’s fault.

  221. David Duke strikes me as someone like Donald Trump channeling Kevin MacDonald.

    [Kristol] will also have a hard time convincing the media of his relevance after Trump’s victory.

    I can see you’re an optimist.

  222. @Opinionator
    possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does.

    What does the matriarchy do?

    The matriarchy claims to push for “equality” while actually tearing boys and men down at every opportunity. Masculinity is pathologized and drugged away. Education is geared toward females, who are always looked after, encouraged, and pushed to thrive while their brothers are left on their own. Men are pushed out of family life through no fault divorce, unfair custody laws, and the expectation that men pay for children born outside of marriage (see, please, The Garbage Generation). Men are portrayed as stupid and incompetent in the media over and over and over again, especially white males, who are always shown as needing the wise input of women or a member or some minority group to get through life. Male health is overlooked while female health concerns are over-represented in terms of research and messaging (c.f. prostate cancer vs. breast cancer funding and awareness). Male psychology is radically misunderstood and their normal needs — esp. the need to push away from the feminine in order to identify with the masculine — are interpreted as “misogyny” or “homophobia.” Phenomena like the push to get people to believe in the “campus rape crisis” paint men as criminals, as animals who need to be reined in. With regard to that “campus rape” nonsense, young males are actually deprived of due process. I could go on for a long, long time.

    And meanwhile, feminists are always lying (e.g., the wage gap) and claiming to defend women while hating everything that is biologically feminine — e.g, pregnancy and nursing and other aspects of motherhood they want to use science to wish away; female psychology that wants to look up to the masculine and experience male strength (without any condescension or disrespect). They claim to want “equality” — but they don’t want to be drafted or have to sign up for selective service. They ignore biological, psychological, and social realities in the service of dogma. They have zero respect for and gratitude toward men, not having any sense of the truth of what Camille Paglia said about how if it weren’t for men, we’d be living in grass huts. They don’t stop to think for 5 seconds about how it’s overwhelmingly MEN who’ve invented almost everything we take for granted, who maintain the infrastructure that prevents disease and makes life a lot better, etc. They have no sense of respect for what men risk in work and during defensive wars — and mostly to serve and protect women and children. They have no idea that it is, or at least was, we women and our children — where “our” refers to women and men — who inspire boys to become men and to use their (sexy!) power for the Good, and that all men want out of the deal is to know their kids are their own, good sex, love, some f***ing respect, and, if their wives are homemakers, some decent food once in a while.

    Feminists (at least the Third Wavers) teach women to be shrewish, hateful, ungrateful bitches. I want nothing to do with them.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Very interesting observations.
    , @Lagertha
    music to my ears! Spoken like a true Shield Maiden. Having 3 sons completely changed my view points politically and socially....but, I was always a renegade. I love Camille Paglia and the late, Oriana Fallaci. She saw the Migrant Crisis decades before in happened as Italy was being filled-up with economic migrants from MENA.
  223. @Tracy
    The matriarchy claims to push for "equality" while actually tearing boys and men down at every opportunity. Masculinity is pathologized and drugged away. Education is geared toward females, who are always looked after, encouraged, and pushed to thrive while their brothers are left on their own. Men are pushed out of family life through no fault divorce, unfair custody laws, and the expectation that men pay for children born outside of marriage (see, please, The Garbage Generation). Men are portrayed as stupid and incompetent in the media over and over and over again, especially white males, who are always shown as needing the wise input of women or a member or some minority group to get through life. Male health is overlooked while female health concerns are over-represented in terms of research and messaging (c.f. prostate cancer vs. breast cancer funding and awareness). Male psychology is radically misunderstood and their normal needs -- esp. the need to push away from the feminine in order to identify with the masculine -- are interpreted as "misogyny" or "homophobia." Phenomena like the push to get people to believe in the "campus rape crisis" paint men as criminals, as animals who need to be reined in. With regard to that "campus rape" nonsense, young males are actually deprived of due process. I could go on for a long, long time.

    And meanwhile, feminists are always lying (e.g., the wage gap) and claiming to defend women while hating everything that is biologically feminine -- e.g, pregnancy and nursing and other aspects of motherhood they want to use science to wish away; female psychology that wants to look up to the masculine and experience male strength (without any condescension or disrespect). They claim to want "equality" -- but they don't want to be drafted or have to sign up for selective service. They ignore biological, psychological, and social realities in the service of dogma. They have zero respect for and gratitude toward men, not having any sense of the truth of what Camille Paglia said about how if it weren't for men, we'd be living in grass huts. They don't stop to think for 5 seconds about how it's overwhelmingly MEN who've invented almost everything we take for granted, who maintain the infrastructure that prevents disease and makes life a lot better, etc. They have no sense of respect for what men risk in work and during defensive wars -- and mostly to serve and protect women and children. They have no idea that it is, or at least was, we women and our children -- where "our" refers to women and men -- who inspire boys to become men and to use their (sexy!) power for the Good, and that all men want out of the deal is to know their kids are their own, good sex, love, some f***ing respect, and, if their wives are homemakers, some decent food once in a while.

    Feminists (at least the Third Wavers) teach women to be shrewish, hateful, ungrateful bitches. I want nothing to do with them.

    Very interesting observations.

  224. @Svigor
    [Sorry Steve, it's a long one. If you want to skip, there's no tough talk within, I promise]

    Sometimes you meet a Jew who’s a true believer leftist — or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away — and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that’s bad. What’s your next move?
     
    I don't think I've ever framed Israel's policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I'd say something like, "no, you still don't get it. It's not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that's bad, it's Jewish opposition to European peoples doing the same thing that's bad. And it exposes how wrong your position is; if Jews were really true believers, they'd oppose self-preservation for Jews in Israel, too. But they don't. Their behavior shows that 1) they think self-preservation is good (for the self-preservers), and 2) their sin is in opposing this good for European peoples."

    For a true believer, I would point out that borders should be no barrier to him, and that he should drop everything and focus on Israel, because that's where the money is, so to speak. Missionaries go where the pagans are, Doctors Without Borders go where the sick people are, etc. Anything else would show a lack of seriousness. Think Globally, Act Locally. If tribalism/ethnocentrism/racism is his favored sin, he should have his hands full with Israel (or east Asia, etc.), and have no time left over for the mote in White America's eye.

    The hypocrisy need not be present in any given individual, by the way. It's there at the group level in spades. There's lots of ways to approach the "I am not my tribe's keeper" argument (most of them pioneered by the left), but that's a different conversation.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?
     
    Fortunately, Israel does exist (as a shining example of how to take your own side, not just hypocrisy (the hypocrisy stretches across the entire establishment, not just diaspora Jewry)), so we don't need to work without it. But my basic argument works like this:

    Humans are animals, and animals are, at their core, "racist." Species begin as races. The opposition to this is anti-human, anti-animal, anti-life. It's like swimming against the tide; eventually, you're going to lose. (To borrow a phrase, leftists stand athwart Evolution shouting "stop") The effect of the left is merely to do as much damage, to wreck as much of civilization as possible, before failing to rewrite human nature (Social Identity Theory suggests that race-mixing will not solve the problem - new "racisms" will form). Their whole argument is that the people who build skyscrapers and put people on the Moon are less worthy of preservation than the Snowy Egret (sure, we can speculate that there's nothing special about these peoples, but it's insane to assume there isn't and insist on burning every bridge). But leave all that aside; we should preserve all peoples, simply because we do conserve species and sub-species (races) for its own sake.

    Race is part of who we are - all of us. To deny it is to deny who we are.

    Then there's the whole eggs and baskets argument (if diversity is good, then preserving HBD is a good idea). Then there's the fact that only White countries are being subjected to this multiculti onslaught. Which suggests that the whole thing is a giant con, and only being pushed, like a con, because the con-artists smell a sucker with money. Then there's the whole diversity + proximity = war thing. Then there's the fact that we have never actually had a national conversation about this, only lectures from the oligarch class, and their stooges.

    Then there's the matter of up sides and down sides (false negatives are safer bets than false positives). If race realists are wrong, and we make room in the world for separatism, we'll have lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. If race realists are right, and we make room for separatism, then we just won the jackpot. If race realists are wrong, and we don't make room for separatism, we've lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. But if race realists are right, and we don't make room for separatism, we've just made one of the most catastrophic errors in the history of mankind.

    It's a broad subject. This blog's archives are as good a primer as any. There are fewer WNs here than at others, but the back-and-forth is as good here as anywhere, in my experience (I would love to know of a free speech forum where leftists come in numbers and stick around, but alas, they avoid free speech like the plague).

    There are millions of people who did not sign on to being race-replaced. They were never asked. A majority vote (let's be generous and pretend these people lost a plebiscite, and that plebiscites on national suicide are valid, and that discussion in our captured public sphere isn't completely rigged) does not invalidate their right to self-determination, any more than it would invalidate their right to free speech, the right to bear arms, etc. These people deserve a home (and who would deny that they constitute a "wrecker" problem for the glorious globalist multiculti future?).

    As for "just," being invaded is the ultimate casus belli. Oh, this one just occurred to me: the very fact that Whites are so concerned that the cause of their own survival be a "just" one suggests injustice isn't our problem.

    Sorry for the patchy, stream-of-consciousness reply. My brain just isn't set up to do the "cold call" anymore. It's been years since I did that stuff. [Steve, if you're still reading; sorry! :| ]

    Thank you

  225. @Svigor
    [Sorry Steve, it's a long one. If you want to skip, there's no tough talk within, I promise]

    Sometimes you meet a Jew who’s a true believer leftist — or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away — and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that’s bad. What’s your next move?
     
    I don't think I've ever framed Israel's policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I'd say something like, "no, you still don't get it. It's not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that's bad, it's Jewish opposition to European peoples doing the same thing that's bad. And it exposes how wrong your position is; if Jews were really true believers, they'd oppose self-preservation for Jews in Israel, too. But they don't. Their behavior shows that 1) they think self-preservation is good (for the self-preservers), and 2) their sin is in opposing this good for European peoples."

    For a true believer, I would point out that borders should be no barrier to him, and that he should drop everything and focus on Israel, because that's where the money is, so to speak. Missionaries go where the pagans are, Doctors Without Borders go where the sick people are, etc. Anything else would show a lack of seriousness. Think Globally, Act Locally. If tribalism/ethnocentrism/racism is his favored sin, he should have his hands full with Israel (or east Asia, etc.), and have no time left over for the mote in White America's eye.

    The hypocrisy need not be present in any given individual, by the way. It's there at the group level in spades. There's lots of ways to approach the "I am not my tribe's keeper" argument (most of them pioneered by the left), but that's a different conversation.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?
     
    Fortunately, Israel does exist (as a shining example of how to take your own side, not just hypocrisy (the hypocrisy stretches across the entire establishment, not just diaspora Jewry)), so we don't need to work without it. But my basic argument works like this:

    Humans are animals, and animals are, at their core, "racist." Species begin as races. The opposition to this is anti-human, anti-animal, anti-life. It's like swimming against the tide; eventually, you're going to lose. (To borrow a phrase, leftists stand athwart Evolution shouting "stop") The effect of the left is merely to do as much damage, to wreck as much of civilization as possible, before failing to rewrite human nature (Social Identity Theory suggests that race-mixing will not solve the problem - new "racisms" will form). Their whole argument is that the people who build skyscrapers and put people on the Moon are less worthy of preservation than the Snowy Egret (sure, we can speculate that there's nothing special about these peoples, but it's insane to assume there isn't and insist on burning every bridge). But leave all that aside; we should preserve all peoples, simply because we do conserve species and sub-species (races) for its own sake.

    Race is part of who we are - all of us. To deny it is to deny who we are.

    Then there's the whole eggs and baskets argument (if diversity is good, then preserving HBD is a good idea). Then there's the fact that only White countries are being subjected to this multiculti onslaught. Which suggests that the whole thing is a giant con, and only being pushed, like a con, because the con-artists smell a sucker with money. Then there's the whole diversity + proximity = war thing. Then there's the fact that we have never actually had a national conversation about this, only lectures from the oligarch class, and their stooges.

    Then there's the matter of up sides and down sides (false negatives are safer bets than false positives). If race realists are wrong, and we make room in the world for separatism, we'll have lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. If race realists are right, and we make room for separatism, then we just won the jackpot. If race realists are wrong, and we don't make room for separatism, we've lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. But if race realists are right, and we don't make room for separatism, we've just made one of the most catastrophic errors in the history of mankind.

    It's a broad subject. This blog's archives are as good a primer as any. There are fewer WNs here than at others, but the back-and-forth is as good here as anywhere, in my experience (I would love to know of a free speech forum where leftists come in numbers and stick around, but alas, they avoid free speech like the plague).

    There are millions of people who did not sign on to being race-replaced. They were never asked. A majority vote (let's be generous and pretend these people lost a plebiscite, and that plebiscites on national suicide are valid, and that discussion in our captured public sphere isn't completely rigged) does not invalidate their right to self-determination, any more than it would invalidate their right to free speech, the right to bear arms, etc. These people deserve a home (and who would deny that they constitute a "wrecker" problem for the glorious globalist multiculti future?).

    As for "just," being invaded is the ultimate casus belli. Oh, this one just occurred to me: the very fact that Whites are so concerned that the cause of their own survival be a "just" one suggests injustice isn't our problem.

    Sorry for the patchy, stream-of-consciousness reply. My brain just isn't set up to do the "cold call" anymore. It's been years since I did that stuff. [Steve, if you're still reading; sorry! :| ]

    What would you say to someone who believes that immigration is the lifeblood of our country?

  226. @Svigor
    [Sorry Steve, it's a long one. If you want to skip, there's no tough talk within, I promise]

    Sometimes you meet a Jew who’s a true believer leftist — or who can see the gambit coming from a mile away — and will agree with you that Israel has an ethnic-preserving immigration policy and that’s bad. What’s your next move?
     
    I don't think I've ever framed Israel's policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I'd say something like, "no, you still don't get it. It's not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that's bad, it's Jewish opposition to European peoples doing the same thing that's bad. And it exposes how wrong your position is; if Jews were really true believers, they'd oppose self-preservation for Jews in Israel, too. But they don't. Their behavior shows that 1) they think self-preservation is good (for the self-preservers), and 2) their sin is in opposing this good for European peoples."

    For a true believer, I would point out that borders should be no barrier to him, and that he should drop everything and focus on Israel, because that's where the money is, so to speak. Missionaries go where the pagans are, Doctors Without Borders go where the sick people are, etc. Anything else would show a lack of seriousness. Think Globally, Act Locally. If tribalism/ethnocentrism/racism is his favored sin, he should have his hands full with Israel (or east Asia, etc.), and have no time left over for the mote in White America's eye.

    The hypocrisy need not be present in any given individual, by the way. It's there at the group level in spades. There's lots of ways to approach the "I am not my tribe's keeper" argument (most of them pioneered by the left), but that's a different conversation.

    I feel that our cause would be just, whether or not Israel existed as a shining example of awesome jewish hypocrisy.

    But what are the arguments that show that?
     
    Fortunately, Israel does exist (as a shining example of how to take your own side, not just hypocrisy (the hypocrisy stretches across the entire establishment, not just diaspora Jewry)), so we don't need to work without it. But my basic argument works like this:

    Humans are animals, and animals are, at their core, "racist." Species begin as races. The opposition to this is anti-human, anti-animal, anti-life. It's like swimming against the tide; eventually, you're going to lose. (To borrow a phrase, leftists stand athwart Evolution shouting "stop") The effect of the left is merely to do as much damage, to wreck as much of civilization as possible, before failing to rewrite human nature (Social Identity Theory suggests that race-mixing will not solve the problem - new "racisms" will form). Their whole argument is that the people who build skyscrapers and put people on the Moon are less worthy of preservation than the Snowy Egret (sure, we can speculate that there's nothing special about these peoples, but it's insane to assume there isn't and insist on burning every bridge). But leave all that aside; we should preserve all peoples, simply because we do conserve species and sub-species (races) for its own sake.

    Race is part of who we are - all of us. To deny it is to deny who we are.

    Then there's the whole eggs and baskets argument (if diversity is good, then preserving HBD is a good idea). Then there's the fact that only White countries are being subjected to this multiculti onslaught. Which suggests that the whole thing is a giant con, and only being pushed, like a con, because the con-artists smell a sucker with money. Then there's the whole diversity + proximity = war thing. Then there's the fact that we have never actually had a national conversation about this, only lectures from the oligarch class, and their stooges.

    Then there's the matter of up sides and down sides (false negatives are safer bets than false positives). If race realists are wrong, and we make room in the world for separatism, we'll have lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. If race realists are right, and we make room for separatism, then we just won the jackpot. If race realists are wrong, and we don't make room for separatism, we've lost nothing, because people are interchangeable. But if race realists are right, and we don't make room for separatism, we've just made one of the most catastrophic errors in the history of mankind.

    It's a broad subject. This blog's archives are as good a primer as any. There are fewer WNs here than at others, but the back-and-forth is as good here as anywhere, in my experience (I would love to know of a free speech forum where leftists come in numbers and stick around, but alas, they avoid free speech like the plague).

    There are millions of people who did not sign on to being race-replaced. They were never asked. A majority vote (let's be generous and pretend these people lost a plebiscite, and that plebiscites on national suicide are valid, and that discussion in our captured public sphere isn't completely rigged) does not invalidate their right to self-determination, any more than it would invalidate their right to free speech, the right to bear arms, etc. These people deserve a home (and who would deny that they constitute a "wrecker" problem for the glorious globalist multiculti future?).

    As for "just," being invaded is the ultimate casus belli. Oh, this one just occurred to me: the very fact that Whites are so concerned that the cause of their own survival be a "just" one suggests injustice isn't our problem.

    Sorry for the patchy, stream-of-consciousness reply. My brain just isn't set up to do the "cold call" anymore. It's been years since I did that stuff. [Steve, if you're still reading; sorry! :| ]

    I don’t think I’ve ever framed Israel’s policy of ethnic self-preservation as immoral. My approach has always been to frame it as people usually frame self-preservation; as sensible, reasonable, just, expected, and life-affirming. So, to use your example, I’d say something like, “no, you still don’t get it. It’s not Jewish self-preservation in Israel that’s bad

    And you would say the same about Paurstinians’ self-preservation in the land mass called Israel?

  227. @AnotherDad

    A 1.46 fertility rate means annihilation. It’s scary that people in the West and East Asia can’t recognize that.
     
    That's true--if it continued forever. But it simply does not.

    One million births/year is still a steady state Japan of 80 million people! That's more people than Japan ever had until the let's-make-up-what-we-lost post war bangin' rebound. It's a lot for an island(s) that is smaller than California.

    What *naturally* happens with these low fertility rates is that the population will stall and drop, and employment prospects, housing costs, school crowding, etc. etc. all get better and better and it becomes easier and easier to do "affordable family formation". Plus you are culling off the "you-go-girl", "girls just wanna have fun" types and selecting for "wife and mother" types. This is all to the good. Left alone, you recover from a fertility inhibition condition, to a fertility friendly one.

    But this is the "natural" case. What absolutely *destroys* this recovery--what you absolutely must *not* do--is taking Kristol's advice and allow immigrants to run in and seize the benefits of easing of your population pressure from you for themselves and destroy it.

    Avoid doing what Kristol advocates and while there may be some short term fiscal pain with entitlements, you're fine. Do what Kristol advocates and you're dead.

    Just to put things into perspective, Japan is 50% larger than Romania (about the size of Germany), but is 75% mountainous, compared to 25% in my country. The population is more than 6 times larger than than in my country, but in a habitable zone two thirds of the one my people have (habitable being non-mountainous). Romania is two thirds of Germany but 4 times less populated. The UK is exactly our size, but three times more populated and counting. Only France and Spain have the same population density as my country. Moldova, Bulgaria and Ukraine are less dense.

    No, I do not want any refugees, thank you! Except maybe Boers. I want my 4 million countrymen gone off to work to come back, sans a certain subcontinental Asian element whose vibrancy is required elsewhere.

  228. @Tracy
    The matriarchy claims to push for "equality" while actually tearing boys and men down at every opportunity. Masculinity is pathologized and drugged away. Education is geared toward females, who are always looked after, encouraged, and pushed to thrive while their brothers are left on their own. Men are pushed out of family life through no fault divorce, unfair custody laws, and the expectation that men pay for children born outside of marriage (see, please, The Garbage Generation). Men are portrayed as stupid and incompetent in the media over and over and over again, especially white males, who are always shown as needing the wise input of women or a member or some minority group to get through life. Male health is overlooked while female health concerns are over-represented in terms of research and messaging (c.f. prostate cancer vs. breast cancer funding and awareness). Male psychology is radically misunderstood and their normal needs -- esp. the need to push away from the feminine in order to identify with the masculine -- are interpreted as "misogyny" or "homophobia." Phenomena like the push to get people to believe in the "campus rape crisis" paint men as criminals, as animals who need to be reined in. With regard to that "campus rape" nonsense, young males are actually deprived of due process. I could go on for a long, long time.

    And meanwhile, feminists are always lying (e.g., the wage gap) and claiming to defend women while hating everything that is biologically feminine -- e.g, pregnancy and nursing and other aspects of motherhood they want to use science to wish away; female psychology that wants to look up to the masculine and experience male strength (without any condescension or disrespect). They claim to want "equality" -- but they don't want to be drafted or have to sign up for selective service. They ignore biological, psychological, and social realities in the service of dogma. They have zero respect for and gratitude toward men, not having any sense of the truth of what Camille Paglia said about how if it weren't for men, we'd be living in grass huts. They don't stop to think for 5 seconds about how it's overwhelmingly MEN who've invented almost everything we take for granted, who maintain the infrastructure that prevents disease and makes life a lot better, etc. They have no sense of respect for what men risk in work and during defensive wars -- and mostly to serve and protect women and children. They have no idea that it is, or at least was, we women and our children -- where "our" refers to women and men -- who inspire boys to become men and to use their (sexy!) power for the Good, and that all men want out of the deal is to know their kids are their own, good sex, love, some f***ing respect, and, if their wives are homemakers, some decent food once in a while.

    Feminists (at least the Third Wavers) teach women to be shrewish, hateful, ungrateful bitches. I want nothing to do with them.

    music to my ears! Spoken like a true Shield Maiden. Having 3 sons completely changed my view points politically and socially….but, I was always a renegade. I love Camille Paglia and the late, Oriana Fallaci. She saw the Migrant Crisis decades before in happened as Italy was being filled-up with economic migrants from MENA.

  229. @Lagertha
    He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog. I was curious who he was and found an unusual forum, to say the least.

    I had been very gung-ho about education when my children were younger, so I read a lot of stuff about education on blogger's sites. I was skeptical about the direction education was going; the push to dumb-down curricula (elimination of programs for the smartest students) to make it appear that all kids were hitting the benchmark.

    I had terrible issues with my sons because they hated school and were bored out of their minds - they particularly hated "group" work. I always loved school, so I needed to find out what was happening. And, it was all, overwhelmingly depressing! Since private schools were out of the question (tuition is 40,000/year now) I was stuck with public schools. Now, I have fought (with friends) as much as I could in my own community to keep the last accelerated programs - math/music & art, that sort of thing, but it was a great fight 15 years ago against the Board of Finance in our town. Also, the increasing population of SN kids, was busting our budget - remember, SN was federally mandated in 2000, but never federally funded...ergo...why schools cut out programs for the brightest kids, and art & music. It is all about the achievement gap, and never about the brightest kids anymore. I spoke no English when I arrived to a 2nd grade classroom in the USA - I picked it up in 4 months, and was among the top students through HS. There were so many accelerated programs in the 60's...I was one of those rare math-loving girls.

    One of my theories about the peril of not giving the smartest students more advanced work in primary school: we don't develop the STEM students/eventual entrepreneurs we need as a country. STEM fields, ultimately, lead to new industries and companies that employ many people. China definitely knows this.

    “He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog.”

    Thank you.

    I realize that blogging is Steve’s main job, but still, it is surprising how widely he reads and writes. How can anyone keep up?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    He is what I call, a creative obsessive. In other words, he doesn't quite create something like an artist, but his obsessiveness and intensity about current events/subject matter that is troubling; or historical problems he ruminates about, lead him to create and present a conundrum, mystery or irony for all of us to consider and expound upon....wait, duh, so he is really just like the 80's "installation artists," but, whoa, so much smarter!

    The golf obsession makes perfect sense for me: when "the world is too much with us," he will bring up a post that is lighthearted...and, of course the movie critiques to pull everyone back to reality with the unreality of movies.

  230. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    Since we’re sharing origin stories, I’ll add mine, dull though it is.

    As best as I recall, started reading Steve in the aughties at VDare and blogspot, linked from Kathy Shaidle and Ann Coulter. Got to Kathy from Mark Steyn. Knew of Ann from college. Came across Steyn more or less by accident and was struck by his nonconformist opinions rendered in balletic rhetoric.

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    My origin story: I have probably read various Sailer texts over the years but what brought me to this site was the fact that it was only site that was discussing the UVA rape hoax; and I wanted to talk about that.

    (Bradley has a klunky blog not designed for high traffic.)

    I have stayed because this is a better place to discuss current events than most others I can think of, and because it has a right-ward slant. Also our host is clearly very bright and writes in an engaging style, and promotes some excellent ideas. Finally, the blog allows you to wander off topic, and it is sufficient well moderated that I don't have to wade through a lot of nonsense to get to the more meaty comments. I should add, the quality of the contributors is high, and a big plus. Clearly I don't agree with many posters and many posters don't agree with me, but we've managed to keep it civil for the past two years.
  231. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    I’m curious about that, too — about how people came to find Sailer’s site, and how long most of us have been around.

    Back when I was an undergrad at Berkeley. Feeling like the only conservative on campus, I would go to the library and read old issues of National Review. Most of the articles were garbage, but Sailer’s stuff stood out. A few internet searches, and voila!

  232. @Almost Missouri
    Since we're sharing origin stories, I'll add mine, dull though it is.

    As best as I recall, started reading Steve in the aughties at VDare and blogspot, linked from Kathy Shaidle and Ann Coulter. Got to Kathy from Mark Steyn. Knew of Ann from college. Came across Steyn more or less by accident and was struck by his nonconformist opinions rendered in balletic rhetoric.

    My origin story: I have probably read various Sailer texts over the years but what brought me to this site was the fact that it was only site that was discussing the UVA rape hoax; and I wanted to talk about that.

    (Bradley has a klunky blog not designed for high traffic.)

    I have stayed because this is a better place to discuss current events than most others I can think of, and because it has a right-ward slant. Also our host is clearly very bright and writes in an engaging style, and promotes some excellent ideas. Finally, the blog allows you to wander off topic, and it is sufficient well moderated that I don’t have to wade through a lot of nonsense to get to the more meaty comments. I should add, the quality of the contributors is high, and a big plus. Clearly I don’t agree with many posters and many posters don’t agree with me, but we’ve managed to keep it civil for the past two years.

  233. @Almost Missouri

    "He replied to a comment I made on an educational blog."
     
    Thank you.

    I realize that blogging is Steve's main job, but still, it is surprising how widely he reads and writes. How can anyone keep up?

    He is what I call, a creative obsessive. In other words, he doesn’t quite create something like an artist, but his obsessiveness and intensity about current events/subject matter that is troubling; or historical problems he ruminates about, lead him to create and present a conundrum, mystery or irony for all of us to consider and expound upon….wait, duh, so he is really just like the 80′s “installation artists,” but, whoa, so much smarter!

    The golf obsession makes perfect sense for me: when “the world is too much with us,” he will bring up a post that is lighthearted…and, of course the movie critiques to pull everyone back to reality with the unreality of movies.

  234. @Dan Hayes
    Lyov Myshkin,

    Are you sure that the interlocutor was Tom Sunic? (BTW, the interlocutor did a fantastic job.)

    I was unable to discern Tom's voice when comparison was made to some of his podcasts.

    The last I heard was that Tom was "tied down" in Croatia taking care of some family obligations.

    For those unacquainted with Sunic, I would suggest that you get acquainted - he has a lot of interesting things to say.

    Hey Dan,

    The first time I heard the audio I was convinced it was Sunic but have listened a few more times and I think you’re right.

    Kudos to whoever it was.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Hi Lyov Myshkin,

    Thanks.

    I concur with you judgement that the interlocutor did a bang-up job. Whoever he is, we need more of them.

    P.S. For those interested in Sunic he appears now and then in the internet's Occidental Observer and its parent the Occidental Quarterly.
  235. @Tracy
    I'm curious about that, too -- about how people came to find Sailer's site, and how long most of us have been around. Me, I forget, actually, how I came across it, but am a paleocon of the trad Catholic variety and have been so for years and years, so likely came across it via links from some other (truly) conservative site. I've been around here forever, but don't post a whole lot, and read Steve's stuff for a long time before I ever posted at all. This blog is my favorite of all blogs and I try to read it daily. By my reading, Sailer is a true intellect, very interesting, a seemingly nice guy, a decent guy, intellectually honest, realistic, and not racist in any sane sense of the term.

    It's just fascinating that the same people who push the idea that life came from non-life and evolved into what we see today are the same people who deny racial differences -- which doesn't imply some ontological racial supremacy (though it does imply that some races, as groups, might be better at X than others, while those other races, as groups, might be better at Y than others, etc.). It's so intellectually DISHONEST. And it's not racist to think otherwise. It's only racist if hatred, ill-will, holding back individuals because of their race, thinking one race is more beloved by God, or withholding charity to anyone because of race is involved. I'm glad European and European-derived people are standing up to being called "racist" for simply having eyes and intellectual integrity. It's way, way past time.

    That said, I am scared of a real racial backlash on the part of some, just as I am with regard to some MRAs -- whom I very much support as a group -- and a possible backlash against women in general because of what the matriarchy does. I have seen some nastiness and actual racism and actual misogyny in small parts of the "Alt-Right," a group I identify with. I'm just glad it's not common, at least from what I've seen. But the SJWs and mainstream media seem to be begging for such a thing, the way they go on. With regard to the former, I chalk it up to projection and hysteria; as to the latter, I think it's intentional. I think they want a race war, and they want men and women at each others' throats.

    A friend at work subscribed to National Review & I thought Derbyshire was the funniest, most sensible writer they had. When they fired him I started reading him on Taki Mag which connected me to one of Sailer’s movie reviews. At that time I thought he was the smartest writer whose politics for the most part coincided with my own and still do. I no longer read the National Review for what it’s worth.

  236. Kristol sure is an insufferable slippery SOB. I don’t know where this arrogant prick lives, but he really needs 5000 Somalis dumped into his front yard.
    So Japan is a dying society? What a friggin moron. How stupid can someone be?
    and Joe McCarthy was right. Does anyone not think that the commies and Marxists that he observed did not burrow themselves into the State Dept and academia and education, just as he feared?

  237. @Almost Missouri
    Maybe you've answered this elsewhere, but I missed it. How did you discover Steve's blog 2.5 years ago? I'm asking this in a marketing sense.

    Vdare!!

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    Okay, but how'd you get to VDare?
  238. @Lyov Myshkin
    Hey Dan,

    The first time I heard the audio I was convinced it was Sunic but have listened a few more times and I think you're right.

    Kudos to whoever it was.

    Hi Lyov Myshkin,

    Thanks.

    I concur with you judgement that the interlocutor did a bang-up job. Whoever he is, we need more of them.

    P.S. For those interested in Sunic he appears now and then in the internet’s Occidental Observer and its parent the Occidental Quarterly.

  239. What would you say to someone who believes that immigration is the lifeblood of our country?

    That his belief is simplistic, for one thing. Nothing in life is that simple. Nothing in life is eternal. Pretty much anything can be taken to excess. Immigration had its run, and the world is different now. There billions of people who would like to live here, but all they will do is bring their homelands with them. We had a moratorium on immigration from 1925 to 1965 (don’t feel like checking exact years), and we did better than we’ve done since we ended it. What’s the point of having different countries, if we’re just going to import whole foreign populations? Just look at how immigration is tearing this country apart. Plus, the Diversity Cult tells us that everyone’s interchangeable, so why bother importing foreigners when they’re just more of the same?

    I’d point out that the smart folks – Israelis, Chinese, Japanese, etc. – do not treat immigration as their “lifeblood.” At most, they treat it like a buffet, where they pick and choose (not a good analogy, since the quickest way to describe their relationship with immigration is that they reject it, with few exceptions). We’re the odd dummies out.

    I’d also mention that he’s set up immigration like a blood transfusion; while we’re getting the lifeblood, we’re draining it from someone else.

    And you would say the same about Paurstinians’ self-preservation in the land mass called Israel?

    Of course.

  240. @Jasper Been
    David Duke is not my idea of a genius, but he doesn't register as racist to me. In the last few years he has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that's already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews. I've never heard him disparage blacks or latinos, so it makes no sense at all to call him racist. I think he's only been accused of that because the media has been so successful using that term to silence critics over the years.

    In the last few years he [David Duke] has hammered away (perhaps on a nail that’s already fully in the board) on the pernicious influence of Jews.

    I read Duke’s autobiography My Awakening a couple decades ago. His criticisms of Jews were much more lengthy and strident than his criticisms of racial minorities.

  241. @Mr. Anon
    Trump largely adopted the Democrat playbook - the same one they have been using for years: never apologize, never admit defeat, insult and villify your opponents. It works. It will work. Republicans should pay attention.

    Exactly. Strength wins, weakness loses.

  242. @Reg Cæsar

    Sailer’s Thesis: immigration

    Kristol’s Antithesis: trade

    Trump’s Synthesis: borders
     
    The "Blue Wall" doesn't hold many immigrants these days, relative to the rest of the country. So trade, not immigration, may have given Trump the presidency.

    I’m from one of those Trump “blue wall” states. Just because our states aren’t Mexico yet doesn’t mean we can’t see what’s happening elsewhere. I do think immigration was a little more important (Trump’s biggest cheers were for the wall) but trade was a great complement. It also happens that cracking down on immigration has fewer negative side effects on Americans than cracking down on trade does.

  243. @Anon
    I found Sailer in 2008 as a college girl while googling something to the effect of "why do white guys love Asian girls so much" and stumbled upon "Is Love Colorblind?" After a lot of reading I completely changed my dating strategy (my politics were then closet almost-conservative) and am now a married mother. My husband's only exposure to Steve has been through the Gavin McInnes podcast. He thinks it is funny when he mentions "that blog you read".

    Ha! Best story!

  244. @Mokiki
    Vdare!!

    Okay, but how’d you get to VDare?

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