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Will the Middlebury Outrage Mark a Turning Point?

The beating of Middlebury professor Alison Stanger for daring to converse with Charles Murray instead of screeching at him has struck a lot of liberals as a disgrace. For example, black studies professor Cornel West joined with Robert P. George in issuing an open letter in response to Middlebury:

Sign the Statement: Truth Seeking, Democracy, and Freedom of Thought and Expression – A Statement by Robert P. George and Cornel West

March 14, 2017
The pursuit of knowledge and the maintenance of a free and democratic society require the cultivation and practice of the virtues of intellectual humility, openness of mind, and, above all, love of truth. These virtues will manifest themselves and be strengthened by one’s willingness to listen attentively and respectfully to intelligent people who challenge one’s beliefs and who represent causes one disagrees with and points of view one does not share.

That’s why all of us should seek respectfully to engage with people who challenge our views. And we should oppose efforts to silence those with whom we disagree—especially on college and university campuses. As John Stuart Mill taught, a recognition of the possibility that we may be in error is a good reason to listen to and honestly consider—and not merely to tolerate grudgingly—points of view that we do not share, and even perspectives that we find shocking or scandalous. What’s more, as Mill noted, even if one happens to be right about this or that disputed matter, seriously and respectfully engaging people who disagree will deepen one’s understanding of the truth and sharpen one’s ability to defend it.

Also, the sharp decline in applications to the U. of Missouri after its Black Fall in 2015 (seven dorms are now shuttered) has brought home to campus grown-ups that there can be a cost for egging on shameful behavior.

At Harvard, some students formed the Open Campus Initiative and invited Murray to speak in September and U. of Toronto psychologist Jordan Peterson to speak earlier this week. They succeeded in shaming the Illiberal Left into letting Peterson, who is in trouble over transgressing some World War T mandate involving pronouns, speak on campus without violence or even chanting to drown him out.

The Harvard Crimson editorial board sort of more or less kind of come out in support of OCI.

They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.

The Harvard administration should back this symbolic redress of American academia’s disgrace by announcing that the Harvard campus police will enforce
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 268 Section 34 against wearing a mask for the purpose of getting away with riot.

It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college.

If Harvard won’t do this, a challenger such as the U. of Chicago should take the lead.

 
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  1. Robert P. George, “Corell West” etc. are no friends of western civilization.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Why is a Catholic natural-law theorist on your s**t list?
    , @owen
    You're certainly right about Cornel West, but why Robert George? He's a devout Catholic conservative. True, he didn't vote for Trump but he also refused to vote for Hillary.

    I don't agree with that perspective, but I can at least respect it. The real "conservative" enemies are people like the Bushes who actually endorsed Hillary. Anyway, George himself has done a lot of good despite that lapse in judgement.
    , @International Jew
    More importantly, they're both old guys. The younger generation of college professors may be too radical for anyone to turn this ship around anymore.

    The original Neoconservatives (Podhoretz, Krystal, Moynihan...) split from the left over just this sort of totalitarian illiberalism. And the result is that the universities just kept getting more illiberal and the Neoconservatives had to retreat to think tanks and magazines.
    , @Rod1963
    Agreed.

    Greorge may be a Catholic but he's part of academic like West. The fact these old goats are complaining isn't a good sign. It's the equivalent of vultures circling a dying beast.

    They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.

     

    This has to be a joke. The bullies and loons are running the asylum. Ever since the 60's the Left has been systematically acquiring power across the social, legal and education spheres within our society and now have a total lock on them. As well as most cities across the U.S.

    And what were "conservatives" doing this time? Well these losers ceded the culture war in the 70's which turned out to be the key to everything while the "conservatives" were just too busy shafting the blue collars and middle-class all in the name of the almighty buck and general naval gazing.

    Too many of them forgot how to talk to ordinary Americans and ask them what was important and get them on their side.

    The Harvard administration should back this symbolic redress of American academia’s disgrace by announcing that the Harvard campus police will enforce
    Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 268 Section 34 against wearing a mask for the purpose of getting away with riot.
     
    Why should they. Is it hurting applications and donations? Apparently not so there is no reason to change. Harvard still remains the school for the elite and those aspiring to be part of the elite. Doesn't matter if they let masked thugs shut down opinions they don't like. After all conformity of thought is one of the hallmarks of the elite in this country.
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  2. I don’t get the sense that people care that much about what happened at Middlebury.

    If there is a turning point, I would guess it would be in the other direction: toward a growing habituation to censorship of, even violence against, unpopular thinkers

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    If there is a turning point, I would guess it would be in the other direction: toward a growing habituation to censorship of, even violence against, unpopular thinkers
     
    And that's why you're a commenter and Steve is the host.

    Don't underestimate his influence, nor overestimate the strength of your adversaries. They are many in number because they are slow on the uptake.
  3. Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?
     
    Administrators already have a pair, and then some. They're hired for their chutzpah = shamelessness in generating the cash money.

    The point is that (a) faculty have drawn the boundaries of what counts as academic, and thus free, ever more narrowly and for self-serving/self-preserving reasons (b) there are still academics, even if a minority, on the anti-freedom side who in effect have free reign due to the rest neither advocating their own values nor contesting the illiberalism of their colleagues/their students.
    , @Dr. X

    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?
     
    The idea that academics "support and always have supported academic freedom" is a self-serving lie. Academics support academic freedom for themselves, never for anyone else. Academics are the ultimate passive-aggressive dweeb-clique, and they enforce herd mentality ruthlessly. They support "academic freedom" only to perpetrate leftist and feminist claptrap at taxpayer expense, but they are always the first in line to suppress conservative, white men, and any sort of nationalist tradition.

    They haven't been "bullied into submission" -- they ARE the bullies. Administrators are never going to "grow a pair" -- partly because so many are women, but mostly because they're the ringmasters at the circus. They're 100% on board with all the leftist nonsense, but they have to put on an act for the taxpayers, the trustees, and the public and pretend to be academic professionals to keep the revenue stream flowing. Administrators are the most vile scum you can imagine.

    The filthiest crack whore turning tricks in the gutter for $20 has more honor and integrity than a college administrator.

    , @MBlanc46
    I work in scholarly publishing. I read several dozen academic monographs--many of them "tenure books"--every year. Many of the authors proudly describe themselves as "scholar activists", i.e., Leftist advocates. Those that don't nevertheless almost always focus their work on identity grievance. These people are not defenders of free speech.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Hopefully its a sign that its now popular to virtue signal academic freedom.
  4. They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.
    [...]
    It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college.

    Couldn’t agree more!

    Answering the Question: What is Enlightenment?

    The key to throwing off these chains of mental immaturity is reason. There is hope that the entire public could become a force of free thinking individuals if they are free to do so. Why? There will always be a few people, even among the institutional “guardians,” who think for themselves. They will help the rest of us to “cultivate our minds.” Kant shows himself a man of his times when he observes that “a revolution may well put an end to autocratic despotism . . . or power-seeking oppression, but it will never produce a true reform in ways of thinking.” The recently completed American Revolution had made a great impression in Europe; Kant cautions that new prejudice will replace the old and become a new leash to control the “great unthinking masses.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Answering_the_Question:_What_is_Enlightenment%3F

    Read More
  5. If only…

    Of course, freedom for Murray is not quite the same as freedom for Nazi extremists like Milo, much less for super-Nazis like Steve Sailer, but it’s a move in the right direction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    You can recognize these supervillains easily by their gayly colored cape and domino mask. Generally they also have some made-to-order skintight suit with an emblazoned runic logo or a frog image.

    However the Liberal Justice League of America, in particular the heroic duo SuperTransGressive and Beater-of-Eggheads, is standing watch and will push back!
  6. WaPo columnist and LOTB dreamgirl Catherine Rampell also weighs in against leftwing censorship here: https://twitter.com/mdpurzycki/status/852996412480643074

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    The responses to that tweet are why this sort of thing won't actually work. Too many people believe in "free speech, but...". To wit:

    "A valid opinion had two tests:
    1.It uses a generally agreed upon body of facts or other evidence
    2.It is logically consistent."

    So, basically, any opinion which differs from the majority can be considered "invalid", and thus not protected speech.

    I mean, feminism isn't logically consistent. Trannydom isn't "generally agreed upon". But I don't think they'll get called "invalid". They'll save that for things like discussions of IQ, which, as everyone on campus knows, "isn't a thing".
  7. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college.

    Well, there’s a middle ground that many can take: cancel the event over “safety concerns”.

    Read More
  8. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.”

    Don’t let Harvard off the hook. The poison came from institutions like Harvard.
    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still “don’t ask, don’t tell”.

    And Larry Summers was shut down over some speculative remarks about sex and IQ.

    Harvard is more to blame than any other institution. It set the template for the lunacy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Oh, of course! I think Steve's point (which I agree with) is that if they do that, free speech gains cachet (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia), which helps it with the academic crowd. Academics are very sensitive to the perception of their peers and intellectual fashion (if not the regular kind).
    , @slumber_j

    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still “don’t ask, don’t tell”.
     
    Harvard's decades-long ban on ROTC started long, long before DADT was even a twinkle in anyone's eye: it was just another manifestation of Vietnam-era anti-militarism. My classmate Alphonse T. "Buddy" Fletcher '87, for example, had to do ROTC down Mass. Ave. at MIT.
    , @Anonymous
    Harvard is lost. It is nothing more than a super-PC finishing school and a social network for the children of the elites.

    Look to the University of Chicago or Purdue for top universities that truly value intellectual expression and exchanges of ideas.
    , @Alden
    Absolutely right. Most commenters went to college. Even if you were in STEM you had to take the general ed liberal Marxist anti White brainwashing courses. For instance nursing and medicine courses are adamant that immigrants don't bring in TB. That is totally false but that is what is taught.

    I went to a top ten college when I was young and finished my life at another top ten college 40 years later. All that has changed is Marxist class war turned into race war against Whites and now gay tranny war against heterosexuals.

    Cornell West's little fairy tale advising how to turn the colleges back to free speech is just laughable. He's some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn't he.

    Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist.

  9. I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently — when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a “negationist” and the other a “racist,” are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven’t appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won’t be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn’t hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    Read More
    • Agree: Nico, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @El Dato
    Not to mention the wail about "antisemitism" complete with lawfare/lawsuit by uninterested parties whenever someone dares suggest that Israel has dirty underwear.
    , @Nico
    I also live in France and I validate everything you say. Unless some un(?)fortunate accident of history results in the liquidation of the majority of French magistrates and American judges there is little to do but bide our time and cultivate our resistance underground.
    , @reiner Tor

    In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost.
     
    Yes, the most frightening part is that not only do they ever tighten the laws to persecute those who point out that two plus two equals four, they don't even pretend to apply them evenhandedly. What will happen when a nonwhite majority will apply these laws? Following the totalitarian logic it could lead to gulags even while white anti-racists are making and applying them.
    , @Desiderius

    it won’t be checked unless a lot of academics
     
    Doesn't need to be a lot, at first. Just the right ones.
    , @daniel le mouche
    What did the NYT protest that Dylan was accused of?

    As to the article, hopefully the student thought police will finally start to be put in their place (at the bottom) after this (yet another) shameful incident against free speech at universities. Bring in Ernst Zundel and David Irving, Ward Churchill too I say.
  10. @FKA Max


    They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.
    [...]
    It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college.
     
    Couldn't agree more!

    Answering the Question: What is Enlightenment?

    The key to throwing off these chains of mental immaturity is reason. There is hope that the entire public could become a force of free thinking individuals if they are free to do so. Why? There will always be a few people, even among the institutional "guardians," who think for themselves. They will help the rest of us to "cultivate our minds." Kant shows himself a man of his times when he observes that "a revolution may well put an end to autocratic despotism . . . or power-seeking oppression, but it will never produce a true reform in ways of thinking." The recently completed American Revolution had made a great impression in Europe; Kant cautions that new prejudice will replace the old and become a new leash to control the "great unthinking masses."
     
    - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Answering_the_Question:_What_is_Enlightenment%3F

    Sapere aude to you.

    Read More
  11. Wouldn’t Alt-Right, white nationalist, human biodiversity ideas have more appeal and caché on campus if they were formally banned. “Hey, students, here’s what the Administration doesn’t want you to hear. Be a part of the new underground, of the new resistance!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Forget caché, why be hidden? Alt-Right/WN/HBD ideas either stand up to scrutiny or not. Hardcore partisans won’t be swayed, but some undergrads may be amenable to new ideas/voices. Like him or not, at least Richard Spencer has some fight in him, and vows to show up with protection at Auburn this Tuesday despite being disinvited due to fear of “civil unrest.”
    , @snorlax
    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not). Mao's Red Guards were a semi-formalization of this phenomenon.
  12. “Will the Middlebury Outrage Mark a Turning Point?”

    Short answer: no.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.
  13. @reiner Tor
    If only...

    Of course, freedom for Murray is not quite the same as freedom for Nazi extremists like Milo, much less for super-Nazis like Steve Sailer, but it's a move in the right direction.

    You can recognize these supervillains easily by their gayly colored cape and domino mask. Generally they also have some made-to-order skintight suit with an emblazoned runic logo or a frog image.

    However the Liberal Justice League of America, in particular the heroic duo SuperTransGressive and Beater-of-Eggheads, is standing watch and will push back!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker

    Beater-of-Eggheads
     
    More likely Beta-of-Eggheads.
    , @Laurel
    I prefer a simple, dignified Runic Frog, personally.
    , @Melendwyr
    Was that a typo for 'gaily', or is there a subtext there?
  14. @BozoB
    I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently -- when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a "negationist" and the other a "racist," are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven't appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won't be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn't hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    Not to mention the wail about “antisemitism” complete with lawfare/lawsuit by uninterested parties whenever someone dares suggest that Israel has dirty underwear.

    Read More
    • Replies: @biz
    Are you talking about France? Can you name a case where someone been threatened in France under hate speech laws for criticizing Israel, as opposed to Jews generally or engaging in Holocaust denial?

    Or are you talking about the US, in which case I suppose the same question applies.
  15. No. It’s not.

    Post me some convictions of people involved in the riot and assault. I’ll wait.

    Read More
  16. @neutral
    "Will the Middlebury Outrage Mark a Turning Point?"

    Short answer: no.

    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of “What’s the use?”

    This is why your enemies win.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Leave to an iSteve commenter to think that demanding fair play from a hostile enemy is a "call to action".
    , @Veritatis
    Have to agree.
    , @Jack D
    No, it's realism. The chances that Harvard will reverse decades of creeping PC leftism and suddenly advocate for an absolutist view of the Constitution , especially in this age where the "greatest danger to our freedom is the fascist Trump" are small.

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it's easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn't include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting "fire" in a crowded theater - it's not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can't take any action against you - it doesn't say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    You would think that Trump's election would cause the Left to realize that sometimes the shoe is on the other foot, so that they would hesitate purely out of practical considerations. But they are so infected with who-whomism that they are literally incapable of seeing the argument from the other side. Even now they see Trump as a temporary detour and that the Great Arc of Progress will soon resume. And I'm not sure that they are really wrong about this in the long run, given the demographics, etc..
    , @Stealth
    The enemies win because they are far more numerous, organized, prosperous and capable. Plus they now fully control the levers of power.

    Optimism and pessimism are irrelevant.

    , @Moshe
    I want the academy to go as far down the rabbit hole as it needs to for it to lose all credibility.
    , @ben tillman
    Call to action? What action?
    , @Kevin C.
    "This is why your enemies win."

    No, they win because they are insurmountably stronger; because they have unshakeable, iron-fisted control over all the real centers of power in our society; because democracy is always a sham, with a small elite ruling over powerless masses, and they are the elite while we are the peasant masses; because whoever we vote into the temporary, merely-elected "government", they control the real, permanent government; because myths about "separation of church and state" aside, every society ultimately has an "official religion" to which all who would be members of the elite must assent, and the insane ideology of our enemies is that "official religion", enforced with all the zeal of a fanatical theocracy; because all the people with the sort of weapons that matter in our present world answer unequivocally to their orders. They've been winning for centuries.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    My enemies lost the last presidential election.
  17. @BozoB
    I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently -- when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a "negationist" and the other a "racist," are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven't appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won't be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn't hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    I also live in France and I validate everything you say. Unless some un(?)fortunate accident of history results in the liquidation of the majority of French magistrates and American judges there is little to do but bide our time and cultivate our resistance underground.

    Read More
  18. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    Leave to an iSteve commenter to think that demanding fair play from a hostile enemy is a “call to action”.

    Read More
  19. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Yo, Dato… How about a link, or at least a reference to even a single case where criticizing Israeli actions or policies have unequivocally resulted in legal action by the French state…

    Just can’t keep yerself from whacking on the Jooos, ehhh?

    Read More
  20. @BozoB
    I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently -- when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a "negationist" and the other a "racist," are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven't appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won't be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn't hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost.

    Yes, the most frightening part is that not only do they ever tighten the laws to persecute those who point out that two plus two equals four, they don’t even pretend to apply them evenhandedly. What will happen when a nonwhite majority will apply these laws? Following the totalitarian logic it could lead to gulags even while white anti-racists are making and applying them.

    Read More
  21. Yeah i wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for Harvard or some other group of academics to assume moral leadership. Can anyone remember a time when a bunch of liberal pencil necks held the line for public decency and fair play? Certainly not in my admittedly short lifetime

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  22. @Diversity Heretic
    Wouldn't Alt-Right, white nationalist, human biodiversity ideas have more appeal and caché on campus if they were formally banned. "Hey, students, here's what the Administration doesn't want you to hear. Be a part of the new underground, of the new resistance!"

    Forget caché, why be hidden? Alt-Right/WN/HBD ideas either stand up to scrutiny or not. Hardcore partisans won’t be swayed, but some undergrads may be amenable to new ideas/voices. Like him or not, at least Richard Spencer has some fight in him, and vows to show up with protection at Auburn this Tuesday despite being disinvited due to fear of “civil unrest.”

    Read More
  23. Don’t be fooled by this. It’s a bit of noise, a slight distraction from the reality of a fait accompli. American universities — the elite ones, the mediocre ones and the crappy ones, all — are now ruled by the Stalinists. Look what happened recently at good old Jesuit Marquette University recently where they rolled out the red carpet for a career Marxist thug like Angela Davis (paid big bucks to come and spew out the same old Leninist tropes), but where anyone to the right of Hillary Clinton would be stoned.

    See: http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2017/04/isit-possible-to-shame-whoever-is.html

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  24. @Anon
    "They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia."

    Don't let Harvard off the hook. The poison came from institutions like Harvard.
    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still "don't ask, don't tell".

    And Larry Summers was shut down over some speculative remarks about sex and IQ.

    Harvard is more to blame than any other institution. It set the template for the lunacy.

    Oh, of course! I think Steve’s point (which I agree with) is that if they do that, free speech gains cachet (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia), which helps it with the academic crowd. Academics are very sensitive to the perception of their peers and intellectual fashion (if not the regular kind).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art
    (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia)

    Really – BEST – hmm - Harvard takes money from mega rich parents as an admission bribe.

    Jared Kushner’s father (an x-convict) paid Harvard 2.5 million dollars to get his son into Harvard.

    You can be sure our "first son in law" got all A’s.

    p.s. That is the quality of the lineage that leads our White House!
    , @Desiderius

    since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world
     
    I'm sure the founders would be proud to learn that they've been reduced to a mere brand.
  25. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    Have to agree.

    Read More
  26. The only thing that’s likely to make much of a difference is removing subsidies and taxpayer funds from students and institutions, followed by a large scale Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Sure, but no politician is ever going to be in a position to remove those subsidies like that. There is simply no way to achieve a Dissolution of the Monasteries, however necessary or desirable it may be.
  27. @Opinionator
    I don't get the sense that people care that much about what happened at Middlebury.

    If there is a turning point, I would guess it would be in the other direction: toward a growing habituation to censorship of, even violence against, unpopular thinkers

    If there is a turning point, I would guess it would be in the other direction: toward a growing habituation to censorship of, even violence against, unpopular thinkers

    And that’s why you’re a commenter and Steve is the host.

    Don’t underestimate his influence, nor overestimate the strength of your adversaries. They are many in number because they are slow on the uptake.

    Read More
  28. @BozoB
    I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently -- when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a "negationist" and the other a "racist," are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven't appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won't be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn't hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    it won’t be checked unless a lot of academics

    Doesn’t need to be a lot, at first. Just the right ones.

    Read More
  29. @Chrisnonymous
    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they've been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    Administrators already have a pair, and then some. They’re hired for their chutzpah = shamelessness in generating the cash money.

    The point is that (a) faculty have drawn the boundaries of what counts as academic, and thus free, ever more narrowly and for self-serving/self-preserving reasons (b) there are still academics, even if a minority, on the anti-freedom side who in effect have free reign due to the rest neither advocating their own values nor contesting the illiberalism of their colleagues/their students.

    Read More
  30. Dare we hope that the tide has turned? Frankly I’m not optimistic. The SJWs have tasted blood and they like the taste.

    Read More
  31. Not holding my breath. If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty. I know of one institution that hired about fifty faculty members over the period running from 1990 to 2001 to whom it later granted tenure. A disgruntled student group discovered on reviewing the voter roll of the relevant counties in 2006 that the number of registered Republicans in those 12 cohorts of faculty equaled precisely zero. I’ll wager if you conduct a careful survey and interview series, you’ll discover the Gen-X crew on American faculties is worse than their elders. With regard to the Millennial cohorts succeeding them, they don’t have to do much screening to keep out their notion of who’s the riff-raff; Millennials who take an interest in academic life swallow all the bs whole.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty.
     
    So not only did Esau manage to hold on to his own birthright, he also denied Jacob his own with predicable results.

    My hunch is that this phenomenon was not just limited to academia - see three presidents born in 1946 for instance.
  32. @Diversity Heretic
    Wouldn't Alt-Right, white nationalist, human biodiversity ideas have more appeal and caché on campus if they were formally banned. "Hey, students, here's what the Administration doesn't want you to hear. Be a part of the new underground, of the new resistance!"

    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not). Mao’s Red Guards were a semi-formalization of this phenomenon.

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Curle
    Funny you mention punk. I remember vividly punk disappearing, almost overnight, as a popular outlet for truly transgressive youth just about the time industry leaders blackballed F.E.A.R. and started promoting the Dead Kennedys (nice, safe, Right hating Leftists) as punk. Also look up Topper Headon's piece describing how the Clash got marketed as A 'political' band by Lefty industry types. And how their Leftism was 100% manufactured.

    Here's F.E.A.R. anticipating the future.






    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yJAlIHsXcLY
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not).
     
    That is how Trump got elected. You seem to think that the resistance to this nonsense is supine, spineless and stupid. But if so, Trump would not have won.
  33. These kids need a cause because otherwise they have no direction and no sense of purpose. They find self-meaning in these protests and until there is a substitute they will continue.

    Read More
  34. @Chrisnonymous
    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they've been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    The idea that academics “support and always have supported academic freedom” is a self-serving lie. Academics support academic freedom for themselves, never for anyone else. Academics are the ultimate passive-aggressive dweeb-clique, and they enforce herd mentality ruthlessly. They support “academic freedom” only to perpetrate leftist and feminist claptrap at taxpayer expense, but they are always the first in line to suppress conservative, white men, and any sort of nationalist tradition.

    They haven’t been “bullied into submission” — they ARE the bullies. Administrators are never going to “grow a pair” — partly because so many are women, but mostly because they’re the ringmasters at the circus. They’re 100% on board with all the leftist nonsense, but they have to put on an act for the taxpayers, the trustees, and the public and pretend to be academic professionals to keep the revenue stream flowing. Administrators are the most vile scum you can imagine.

    The filthiest crack whore turning tricks in the gutter for $20 has more honor and integrity than a college administrator.

    Read More
    • Agree: PV van der Byl, Kylie
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Dr. X, very nicely stated and don't forget that they are, for the most part, extremely well paid. So, no need to upset the apple cart and lose out on big paychecks.
  35. @El Dato
    You can recognize these supervillains easily by their gayly colored cape and domino mask. Generally they also have some made-to-order skintight suit with an emblazoned runic logo or a frog image.

    However the Liberal Justice League of America, in particular the heroic duo SuperTransGressive and Beater-of-Eggheads, is standing watch and will push back!

    Beater-of-Eggheads

    More likely Beta-of-Eggheads.

    Read More
  36. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    No, it’s realism. The chances that Harvard will reverse decades of creeping PC leftism and suddenly advocate for an absolutist view of the Constitution , especially in this age where the “greatest danger to our freedom is the fascist Trump” are small.

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it’s easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn’t include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting “fire” in a crowded theater – it’s not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    You would think that Trump’s election would cause the Left to realize that sometimes the shoe is on the other foot, so that they would hesitate purely out of practical considerations. But they are so infected with who-whomism that they are literally incapable of seeing the argument from the other side. Even now they see Trump as a temporary detour and that the Great Arc of Progress will soon resume. And I’m not sure that they are really wrong about this in the long run, given the demographics, etc..

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it’s easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn’t include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting “fire” in a crowded theater – it’s not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.
     
    This has recently (well, recently in the mainstream left) been extended to "just because the government can't take action against you doesn't mean they have to protect you from being beaten."
    , @Dr. X

    Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.
     
    Yes, but Harvard is Federally-regulated, Federally-funded, and Federally tax exempt. It also accepts students from any state, so it is involved in interstate commerce.

    Just as in the 1960s the Federal government forced the owners of private property such as hotels, restaurants, and other businesses to accept blacks against their will, the Federal government can force Harvard (and other colleges) to respect the First Amendment.

    The Federal government has plenty of leverage against Harvard, if it wants to use it.
  37. @El Dato
    Not to mention the wail about "antisemitism" complete with lawfare/lawsuit by uninterested parties whenever someone dares suggest that Israel has dirty underwear.

    Are you talking about France? Can you name a case where someone been threatened in France under hate speech laws for criticizing Israel, as opposed to Jews generally or engaging in Holocaust denial?

    Or are you talking about the US, in which case I suppose the same question applies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    So, .... I had a memory of Stéphane Hessel (holocaust survivor, jewish) being dragged to court for hate speech and antisemitism in 2010 because he was supporting the BDS movement:

    http://www.france-palestine.org/Touche-pas-a-Israel-S-Hessel-en

    Looks like in that case as in others, the procedure is triggered by "concerned citizens", i.e. the CRIF:

    http://www.ujfp.org/spip.php?article5402

    Similar story from the neighboring Luxembourg. A call out to the local jewish community to take a stand on Israel's blowing up of Gaza is made on TV during a talk show, so the president of the jewish consistory comes out and says he has detected the successor of Rosenberg, which of course means open season for lawfare:

    http://www.eutopic.lautre.net/coordination/spip.php?article5437

    In the real world, actual "incidents" classified as antisemitic or antimuslim are down 80% y-o-y apparently due to harsh policing:

    http://www.lemonde.fr/police-justice/article/2016/05/09/les-actes-antisemites-et-antimusulmans-en-baisse-de-80-au-premier-trimestre_4916303_1653578.html

    Which is nice.
  38. If Harvard won’t do this, a challenger such as the U. of Chicago should take the lead.

    Chicago already did with that letter to incoming students earlier in the year against safe spaces and trigger warnings.

    Read More
  39. @Jack D
    No, it's realism. The chances that Harvard will reverse decades of creeping PC leftism and suddenly advocate for an absolutist view of the Constitution , especially in this age where the "greatest danger to our freedom is the fascist Trump" are small.

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it's easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn't include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting "fire" in a crowded theater - it's not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can't take any action against you - it doesn't say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    You would think that Trump's election would cause the Left to realize that sometimes the shoe is on the other foot, so that they would hesitate purely out of practical considerations. But they are so infected with who-whomism that they are literally incapable of seeing the argument from the other side. Even now they see Trump as a temporary detour and that the Great Arc of Progress will soon resume. And I'm not sure that they are really wrong about this in the long run, given the demographics, etc..

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it’s easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn’t include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting “fire” in a crowded theater – it’s not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    This has recently (well, recently in the mainstream left) been extended to “just because the government can’t take action against you doesn’t mean they have to protect you from being beaten.”

    Read More
  40. This shout it down/shut it down behavior is now the standard behavior of the left in public discourse. If you don’t believe that , view the videos of any Republican member of congress trying to have a town hall meeting with their constituents.

    Read More
  41. If the fate of Western Civilization counts on Robert P. George and Cornel West, you should, direct your energies toward what comes after the very bloody civil war that is as a certain as the sun rising in the east and setting in the west.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    What comes during and after "the very bloody civil war" is almost certainly the extinction of our sort, and the global collapse of all modern civilization beyond any hope of recovery (as an Industrial Revolution is a once-per-planet event due to the depletion of the "low-hanging fruit" of non-renewable resources extractable with preindustrial technology).
  42. Liberal arts schools and departments have simply gone back to being finishing schools.

    Invite Charles Murray to speak?

    It simply isn’t done.

    Finishing schools were never bastions of free speech and rigorous inquiry-quite the opposite.

    So why are people here fussing about it now?

    Read More
  43. Has a single student from the Middlebury incident been punished yet? We aren’t even close to turning the corner on this. Missouri took a financial hit, but if the same thing happened there next week, how would the response differ? The private schools are even worse in most cases, as long as they have their endowments, nothing is going to change.

    Read More
  44. They’re only doing this because they are running into resistance in their own classrooms. They can see the wind blowing in a dangerous direction. It didn’t matter how good of a leftist you are once the mob decides against you. The Revolution eats its own. The kids are hungry and getting hungrier.

    Read More
  45. @Anon
    "They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia."

    Don't let Harvard off the hook. The poison came from institutions like Harvard.
    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still "don't ask, don't tell".

    And Larry Summers was shut down over some speculative remarks about sex and IQ.

    Harvard is more to blame than any other institution. It set the template for the lunacy.

    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still “don’t ask, don’t tell”.

    Harvard’s decades-long ban on ROTC started long, long before DADT was even a twinkle in anyone’s eye: it was just another manifestation of Vietnam-era anti-militarism. My classmate Alphonse T. “Buddy” Fletcher ’87, for example, had to do ROTC down Mass. Ave. at MIT.

    Read More
  46. Jack and Jill can get a better education on YouTube than they can at most universities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Yes, but without the credential of a degree from a properly "accredited" institution, what's that education worth in our modern HR-dominated job market?
  47. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    The enemies win because they are far more numerous, organized, prosperous and capable. Plus they now fully control the levers of power.

    Optimism and pessimism are irrelevant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    I agree on all but perhaps the "numerous" part, and even that's just a matter of time with our demographic trends. Their advantages have long since become insurmountable.
  48. @Jack D
    No, it's realism. The chances that Harvard will reverse decades of creeping PC leftism and suddenly advocate for an absolutist view of the Constitution , especially in this age where the "greatest danger to our freedom is the fascist Trump" are small.

    Once you begin to believe that the Constitution is an infinitely malleable document that can and MUST be reinterpreted in accordance with the needs of the day, then there are no longer any red lines and it's easy enough to say that freedom of speech doesn't include hate speech at all. Hate speech is like shouting "fire" in a crowded theater - it's not protected by the Constitution at all, blah, blah, etc. Even if it is, Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can't take any action against you - it doesn't say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    You would think that Trump's election would cause the Left to realize that sometimes the shoe is on the other foot, so that they would hesitate purely out of practical considerations. But they are so infected with who-whomism that they are literally incapable of seeing the argument from the other side. Even now they see Trump as a temporary detour and that the Great Arc of Progress will soon resume. And I'm not sure that they are really wrong about this in the long run, given the demographics, etc..

    Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.

    Yes, but Harvard is Federally-regulated, Federally-funded, and Federally tax exempt. It also accepts students from any state, so it is involved in interstate commerce.

    Just as in the 1960s the Federal government forced the owners of private property such as hotels, restaurants, and other businesses to accept blacks against their will, the Federal government can force Harvard (and other colleges) to respect the First Amendment.

    The Federal government has plenty of leverage against Harvard, if it wants to use it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    "The Federal government has plenty of leverage against Harvard, if it wants to use it."

    But, of course, no matter what we do or how we vote, the Federal government is never, ever going to want to.
  49. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Dave Pinsen
    WaPo columnist and LOTB dreamgirl Catherine Rampell also weighs in against leftwing censorship here: https://twitter.com/mdpurzycki/status/852996412480643074

    The responses to that tweet are why this sort of thing won’t actually work. Too many people believe in “free speech, but…”. To wit:

    “A valid opinion had two tests:
    1.It uses a generally agreed upon body of facts or other evidence
    2.It is logically consistent.”

    So, basically, any opinion which differs from the majority can be considered “invalid”, and thus not protected speech.

    I mean, feminism isn’t logically consistent. Trannydom isn’t “generally agreed upon”. But I don’t think they’ll get called “invalid”. They’ll save that for things like discussions of IQ, which, as everyone on campus knows, “isn’t a thing”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Curle
    They meant 'generally agreed upon by womens studies faculty at Oberlin.'
  50. Comes a point when even the most broad-minded of academics realizes that the risk of being branded as a “Fascist” for standing up for basic human rights of free speech and peaceable assembly is preferable to destroying one’s self respect by consorting with communist-inspired, do-nothing dolts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Are you sure? Because it looks to me like most will prefer survival over "self-respect", and consort with whoever they need to, mouth whatever shibboleths they must, keep as quiet as needed, so as to avoid being cast forever into the Outer Darkness with the deplorables.
  51. @El Dato
    You can recognize these supervillains easily by their gayly colored cape and domino mask. Generally they also have some made-to-order skintight suit with an emblazoned runic logo or a frog image.

    However the Liberal Justice League of America, in particular the heroic duo SuperTransGressive and Beater-of-Eggheads, is standing watch and will push back!

    I prefer a simple, dignified Runic Frog, personally.

    Read More
  52. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    I want the academy to go as far down the rabbit hole as it needs to for it to lose all credibility.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Sure, the academy may end up "losing all credibility" with us powerless, deplorable peasants, but what makes you think it will, no matter how insane it becomes, ever lose credibility with the people who actually matter?
  53. Academia is pretty much rotted to the core. As we saw with the University of Missouri, once donations and enrollment dropped, they just doubled down on campus marxism. It’s all these people know as it is a byproduct of 50-60 years of indoctrination where it is stacked with true believers and those who will pretend to believe enough to get along.

    I know guys like Peter Thiel try to entice kids not to go to college but I wonder if their energy is better devoted to creating a parallel academia system that is considered every bit as credible and valid as the current system. Except this time it is 100% online. Maybe once in a while you meet at a facility somewhere but not in a place that gets turned into a marxist breeding ground. I know online colleges are a joke now but there’s got to be a better way than just indulging a system that is the nexus of leftist BS.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    I know guys like Peter Thiel try to entice kids not to go to college but I wonder if their energy is better devoted to creating a parallel academia system that is considered every bit as credible and valid as the current system.
     
    From what I understand, people have tried, but it simply cannot be done. Because unless the school issuing it is properly "accredited", a degree is just a worthless piece of paper from a "diploma mill." And if you try to set up your own accreditation institution, well, that's just a worthless "accreditation mill" for "diploma mills"; only those accrediting bodies approved by the Department of Education get to count.
  54. Off-topic,

    WGN cancels a show about poor White people:

    WGA America just made a bold move to their lineup. The network canceled their coal mining drama The Outsiders, but the most interesting thing about it is the reasoning behind the decision.

    “After three years of investing in marquee, brand-defining dramas, WGN America has successfully expanded its audience, its reach, and its presence in the minds of viewers. In our next phase, we intend to expand our original and unique content to continue growing our relevance and appeal to the widest possible audience.” Peter Kern, interim president and CEO of Tribune Media, said in a statement.

    He continued: “To achieve this, we will be reallocating our resources to a more diverse programming strategy and to new structures, enabling us to expand both the quantity and breadth of content aired by WGN America. This move is designed to deliver even more value to our advertising and distribution partners. To free up the resources to reach this goal, we will unfortunately not be renewing ‘Outsiders.’ We are grateful to our production partners at Sony Pictures Television and the terrifically talented people who made the show possible.”

    https://www.themarysue.com/wgn-outsiders-cancelled/

    Needless to say, SJWs are quite happy:

    I don’t really buy that white people are ‘marginalized’ even if they’re poor……

    White people have their privilege to bootstrap them out of poverty.

    I think the issue is, when it comes to economic status and marginalized poor people; there are other groups that could probably use that representation more. There are plenty of Asian Americans that don’t get the “benefit” of model minority status, and having a show about those groups would be amazing.

    At the same time, it’s rarer to see a show specifically about poor White’s people (more realistic) struggles, but poor White people in media aren’t really rare in general; whereas PoC groups are more rare in comparison.

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  55. @Chrisnonymous
    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they've been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    I work in scholarly publishing. I read several dozen academic monographs–many of them “tenure books”–every year. Many of the authors proudly describe themselves as “scholar activists”, i.e., Leftist advocates. Those that don’t nevertheless almost always focus their work on identity grievance. These people are not defenders of free speech.

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  56. Well, I hope we’ve reached a turning point — but not so at Brown. At Brown, all social and moral rules are dictated by what “they” say:

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2017/04/out-of-their-minds-at-brown.php

    Read More
  57. @johnlee0
    Robert P. George, "Corell West" etc. are no friends of western civilization.

    Why is a Catholic natural-law theorist on your s**t list?

    Read More
  58. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anon
    "They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia."

    Don't let Harvard off the hook. The poison came from institutions like Harvard.
    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still "don't ask, don't tell".

    And Larry Summers was shut down over some speculative remarks about sex and IQ.

    Harvard is more to blame than any other institution. It set the template for the lunacy.

    Harvard is lost. It is nothing more than a super-PC finishing school and a social network for the children of the elites.

    Look to the University of Chicago or Purdue for top universities that truly value intellectual expression and exchanges of ideas.

    Read More
  59. @Dr. X

    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they’ve been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?
     
    The idea that academics "support and always have supported academic freedom" is a self-serving lie. Academics support academic freedom for themselves, never for anyone else. Academics are the ultimate passive-aggressive dweeb-clique, and they enforce herd mentality ruthlessly. They support "academic freedom" only to perpetrate leftist and feminist claptrap at taxpayer expense, but they are always the first in line to suppress conservative, white men, and any sort of nationalist tradition.

    They haven't been "bullied into submission" -- they ARE the bullies. Administrators are never going to "grow a pair" -- partly because so many are women, but mostly because they're the ringmasters at the circus. They're 100% on board with all the leftist nonsense, but they have to put on an act for the taxpayers, the trustees, and the public and pretend to be academic professionals to keep the revenue stream flowing. Administrators are the most vile scum you can imagine.

    The filthiest crack whore turning tricks in the gutter for $20 has more honor and integrity than a college administrator.

    Dr. X, very nicely stated and don’t forget that they are, for the most part, extremely well paid. So, no need to upset the apple cart and lose out on big paychecks.

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  60. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    Call to action? What action?

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  61. It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college. If Harvard won’t do this, a challenger such as the U. of Chicago should take the lead.

    Well, the University of Chicago has been in the lead this entire time: you rarely hear about it in the news because the school is completely up front about its no-nonsense commitment to free speech , so students know not to pull the kind of nonsense seen at Middlebury, and students interested in such nonsense don’t go there.

    I would hate to see Chicago’s quiet professionalism usurped by an undeserving Harvard. Even if Harvard completely embraced the OCI, you would still have effective censorship of déclassé speakers. Harvard has to reckon with a Charles Murray or a Jordan Peterson, but would simply never invite the likes of Milo Yiannopoulos or Heather MacDonald, the City Journal writer who got shouted down at Pomona a few weeks ago.

    Speaking of those two, they’ve most recently put to the test one other odd wrinkle of the campus free speech struggle: the surprising continued relevance of California’s public universities. You’d think that, with the effectively bankrupt state having now reached the point of charging private school fees for state school accommodations and amenities, such schools would be effectively useless. Not so! As state institutions, they are actually legally obligated to defend the constitutional rights of students and faculty in a way that private universities are not. Hence, a few years ago the efforts of “no platforming” activists to “disinvite” a number of speakers to the UC system (Bill Maher[!] was one of them) were legally blocked; MacDonald was able to give her talk at UCLA, but not at Pomona; and it took criminal violence affecting the entire Berkeley campus to shut down Milo (all of which should be actionable in federal court as a conspiracy to deny civil rights, but I think Milo has a lot on his plate right now).

    This probably doesn’t hold for every state (e.g., Mizzou), but to the extent that it does I’m afraid that freedom of speech and deviation from p.c. orthodoxy are now already associated with “déclassé” state schools, and that Harvard is likely to toe these waters very tentatively as a result. To the extent that state authorities are no longer willing to defend the constitutional rights of the less well-connected students attending these state schools, I am afraid that we may already have reached a tipping point, and not the positive one suggested here.

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  62. @biz
    Are you talking about France? Can you name a case where someone been threatened in France under hate speech laws for criticizing Israel, as opposed to Jews generally or engaging in Holocaust denial?

    Or are you talking about the US, in which case I suppose the same question applies.

    So, …. I had a memory of Stéphane Hessel (holocaust survivor, jewish) being dragged to court for hate speech and antisemitism in 2010 because he was supporting the BDS movement:

    http://www.france-palestine.org/Touche-pas-a-Israel-S-Hessel-en

    Looks like in that case as in others, the procedure is triggered by “concerned citizens”, i.e. the CRIF:

    http://www.ujfp.org/spip.php?article5402

    Similar story from the neighboring Luxembourg. A call out to the local jewish community to take a stand on Israel’s blowing up of Gaza is made on TV during a talk show, so the president of the jewish consistory comes out and says he has detected the successor of Rosenberg, which of course means open season for lawfare:

    http://www.eutopic.lautre.net/coordination/spip.php?article5437

    In the real world, actual “incidents” classified as antisemitic or antimuslim are down 80% y-o-y apparently due to harsh policing:

    http://www.lemonde.fr/police-justice/article/2016/05/09/les-actes-antisemites-et-antimusulmans-en-baisse-de-80-au-premier-trimestre_4916303_1653578.html

    Which is nice.

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  63. Turning point?

    No.

    The present low-boil of the progs is merely their election cycle version of hudna – a spell of relatively low aggression to bide time and marshal their forces until the pro-Globali$t E$tabli$hment Invade The World / Invite The World $ellout useful Left-lib-proglodyte idiots again ramp up their $ellout E$tabli$hment-funded-&-protected harassment, intimidation, and violence in the months preceding the mid-term elections. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

    Besides, what does chatter about a “turning point” matter, now that Trump is cucking on “America First” by bombing Syria and Afghanistan, by sending a navy task force toward North Korea, by reversing himself with “NATO is not obsolete,” and by doing nothing – actually by ramping up Refugee Resettlement Racket intake – on what Mr. Derbyshire rightly calls “The National Question” – you know, that National Question on which Americans elected “America First” candidate Trump?

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  64. @johnlee0
    Robert P. George, "Corell West" etc. are no friends of western civilization.

    You’re certainly right about Cornel West, but why Robert George? He’s a devout Catholic conservative. True, he didn’t vote for Trump but he also refused to vote for Hillary.

    I don’t agree with that perspective, but I can at least respect it. The real “conservative” enemies are people like the Bushes who actually endorsed Hillary. Anyway, George himself has done a lot of good despite that lapse in judgement.

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  65. @BozoB
    I live in France, where all sorts of politically incorrect comments are routinely made into criminal matters and adjudicated by courts. The French news media make not the slightest protest about this. The New York Times is no better, although it did protest once recently -- when Bob Dylan was accused. The bias in the application of these laws is quite obvious. In fact, there is a group called AGRIF that tries to bring such cases when ordinary French people or Catholics are offended; in almost every case it is told to get lost. At least two people I can think of, one a "negationist" and the other a "racist," are on the lam after being sentenced to prison for expressing their opinions. (And they haven't appealed for violence or any other sort of true offense.) The situation on the U.S. campuses appears to be quite similar, and it won't be checked unless a lot of academics (or perhaps those who contribute to pay them) risk their necks to protest. I wouldn't hold my breath, though; the misuse of power (not to mention the misuse of language) seems to be increasing these days, not diminishing.

    What did the NYT protest that Dylan was accused of?

    As to the article, hopefully the student thought police will finally start to be put in their place (at the bottom) after this (yet another) shameful incident against free speech at universities. Bring in Ernst Zundel and David Irving, Ward Churchill too I say.

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  66. Like I mentioned to Steve, I’m much more concerned about what’s happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.

    Here’s a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It’s more likely to hurt.

    But the much bigger issue is that low-end public universities, which are already struggling to maintain their ability to give good education to able but poor kids, have now given up the fight entirely because they were failing too many un-able kids. So now they’ll just give everyone credit for all courses.

    And for those fools who want to ape cool and cynical, saying “oh, college degrees have been worthless for decades except for certain technical subjects”, you don’t know what you’re talking about, so please spare the thread.

    Corrupted College.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I’m much more concerned about what’s happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.
     
    The one follows the other, like lemmings off a cliff if it comes to that, and it looks like it might.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    ed, NY and California are proposing free tuition for all in state students, in NY that is for all SUNY colleges and universities. This will make a BA or BS the equivalent of a GED
    , @anon
    Here’s a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It’s more likely to hurt.

    I'm not saying that you're wrong, and you would certainly be in a better position to know than I would, but why is it that you think that? It isn't really the impression that I get from the outside.
  67. Its not so much the students as the administrators, teachers from tenured profs to part time TAs and most of all the grievance employees. All colleges have more grievance counselors than they have teachers. They run the black, brown, muslim, feminazi, gay trans, bi etc clubs.

    Their full time job is to organize the brainwashed docile students in to mobs who do everything they are told. At least Lenin had to pay the mobs that took over Moscow and Leningrad. But the naïve students do everything they are told. The grievance clubs can also count on outsiders of the black, brown, muslim, feminazi, gay, trans, bi communities to come on campus to start the demonstrations.

    I spent the last 13 years of my working life at one of the major cesspits of anti White racism. I was a floating AA so I got around the campus. Here is one example. UCLA has of course a Spanish language department and a major in Latin American History. And of course lots of Spanish history courses in the history department. But the metizo morons who only got into college through affirmative action claimed they wanted a special separate Chicano history department.

    It went back and forth for a year or so. Then the MECHA and LARAZA clubs went on a mad attack on the faculty club at noon and rioted in front of fraternities at night.

    So the university immediately capitulated to the “student” demands. But almost none of the rioters who were detained were university students. They were just paid thugs.

    When I was in college it was the profs who stirred up the vietname demos

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  68. A lot of all this grievance garbage is jobs for affirmative action and female morons. I went o college 1960 to 1964. There was a dean of women and a dean of men. There were housemothers in the sororities and a few grad students getting free rent in the dorms for something or other. Orientation was 3 days and totally practical and non political at all.

    A lot of the liberal arts requirement teachers were old left over lefties but since the students were solidly Republican we just listened and scoffed.

    Now orientation is at least a week and devoted to questioning and brainwashing sessions accusing the kids of racism, homophobia, lookism etc. It is really serious brainwashing sessions, things that might get a corporation sued if they tried it on employees.

    There can be more than a thousand clubs on the big campuses mostly devoted to black brown muslim feminazi gay bi tranny garbage. The proliferation of non teaching, non cleaning and cooking, non clerical staff is immense. If anyone checked they would probably discover that there are more grievance mongers employed than teachers of any kind.

    Its about jobs, and empire building. Why do you thing all the teachers unions want unlimited immigration. Because the more students there are the more jobs. The more third and fifth world morons with special needs there are the more jobs. Its not just teaching jobs. its the endless administrative, psychology, counseling etc jobs.

    Why do you thing districts created the middle school? Adding a third separate school meant adding more teaching and administrative jobs.

    And of course its all paid for by student loan extortion and the taxpayers who can’t get into the state universities their gr great grandparents founded because the state schools want nothing but non White foreign students.

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  69. Charles Murray came to Indiana U. this week and things went moderately well, due to having what looked to be 30 or so police on hand. I made the following comment in our local newspaper. A problem is that conservative are not organized. If I had time, I’d make sure there was pressure on IU to expel disruptive students and on the county prosecutor to bring charges. But I don’t have time, so nobody will do it. Note that *anybody* can do that who is willing to spend some time on it. You don’t even have to live nearby. You *do* have to understand information flows and personal pressure points a bit and have persistence.

    “The IDS says the young man being puhed is sophomore Jacob Mills. Is Indiana University in the process of undertaking disciplinary proceedings against him? That would show whether we really believes in freedom of speech and in teaching our students to respect it.

    I aso wonder if blocking somebody’s car in this way with apparent intent to detain them indefinitely against their will is an example of “criminal confinement”. If somebody has the time to research this a bit, it might be helpful in dealing with future attempts to intimidate speakers. See: § 35-42-3-3 (a) A person who knowingly or intentionally confines another person without the other person’s consent commits criminal confinement. Except as provided in subsection (b), the offense of criminal confinement is a Level 6 felony. – See more at: http://codes.findlaw.com/…/in-code-sect-35-42-3-3.html…” http://www.heraldtimesonline.com/free_access/video-shows-state-trooper-shoving-young-man-to-ground-at/article_cd212658-207a-11e7-853a-476e18c2fb51.html?mode=comments

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  70. “The Harvard administration should back this symbolic redress of American academia’s disgrace by announcing that the Harvard campus police will enforce
    Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 268 Section 34 against wearing a mask for the purpose of getting away with riot.

    It would be very helpful if free speech became associated with the most prestigious universities such as Harvard, while masked vigilanteism came to be seen as the mark of a déclassé college.

    If Harvard won’t do this, a challenger such as the U. of Chicago should take the lead.”

    LOL!!! Whoever wrote this must still believe in the tooth fairy and the Easter Bunny. It will never happen. The truth is, the non Catholic colleges were taken over by FDR’s communist worshippers in the 1930′s. All the colleges were taken over by liberals and commies in the 1950′s. They laid low for a while and then the Vietnam war gave them the chance to come out in the open. And they have ruled the colleges ever since.

    The only way it will change is if every college in the country is closed down, every college employee except the illegals who work cleaning gardening and cooking is detained somewhere along with every student who is active in the grievance clubs.

    Personally, I don’t see why almost 600 years after the invention of printing, 200 years after books became affordable and now the internet there is any reason for college except for science, math and STEM. I learned more in my college library than I ever learned from those leftover lefty professors. When I was in college almost all professors were White men. But they were as anti American and hard left as any feminazi nowdays.

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  71. A separate comment: Harvard inviting Murray is good, but what would be better would be for Middlebury College to invite him back and do the right thing this time. Indeed, that is obvious. If they don’t do it, that shows they aren’t sorry. Same for Claremont.

    That’s one of the basic principles of church discipline, or, indeed, any situation where you are trying to evaluate whether repentance is genuine. The church, convict up for parole, or whatever will usually say the right things, shed some tears, etc., because that is in their interest and if they are truly *un*repentant they will be quite willing to put on a show. You need to press down and say, “OK– now go back to the wife you divorced” or “OK– now go back to all the kids you molested and apologize to each one and offer whatever compensation they require” or “OK— pay back your company the money you took”.

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  72. @Art Deco
    Not holding my breath. If some data I've seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty. I know of one institution that hired about fifty faculty members over the period running from 1990 to 2001 to whom it later granted tenure. A disgruntled student group discovered on reviewing the voter roll of the relevant counties in 2006 that the number of registered Republicans in those 12 cohorts of faculty equaled precisely zero. I'll wager if you conduct a careful survey and interview series, you'll discover the Gen-X crew on American faculties is worse than their elders. With regard to the Millennial cohorts succeeding them, they don't have to do much screening to keep out their notion of who's the riff-raff; Millennials who take an interest in academic life swallow all the bs whole.

    If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty.

    So not only did Esau manage to hold on to his own birthright, he also denied Jacob his own with predicable results.

    My hunch is that this phenomenon was not just limited to academia – see three presidents born in 1946 for instance.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    "If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty."

    I'm sure you are right.
    , @Art Deco
    https://literature.ucsc.edu/faculty/singleton.php?&singleton=true&cruz_id=tyrus

    http://www.miis.edu/academics/faculty/mruehsen


    Oh, you've got plenty of Gen-X faculty. These two individuals were very unlike most of their peers at a certain time and place. They're in academe. Few of their peers are.
  73. @education realist
    Like I mentioned to Steve, I'm much more concerned about what's happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.

    Here's a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It's more likely to hurt.

    But the much bigger issue is that low-end public universities, which are already struggling to maintain their ability to give good education to able but poor kids, have now given up the fight entirely because they were failing too many un-able kids. So now they'll just give everyone credit for all courses.

    And for those fools who want to ape cool and cynical, saying "oh, college degrees have been worthless for decades except for certain technical subjects", you don't know what you're talking about, so please spare the thread.

    Corrupted College.

    I’m much more concerned about what’s happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.

    The one follows the other, like lemmings off a cliff if it comes to that, and it looks like it might.

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    • Replies: @Alden
    In some ways the 5th rate and community colleges can be a lot worse as they are trying to raise their status by even more radicalism. For instance a biology teacher at Santa Monica City College teaches that "blonde hair and blue eyes are mutations and the sooner they are bred out the better" She is a Swede from Minnesota with natural red hair and skin as white as paper.

    Another so called English teacher spends her time blathering away about how the Caribbean Islands had tons of gold in gold mines and the evil Spanish stole it all. There was gold in the islands. But it was gold the Mexicans mined and processed and traded to the islanders.

    They are all horrible.
  74. @johnlee0
    Robert P. George, "Corell West" etc. are no friends of western civilization.

    More importantly, they’re both old guys. The younger generation of college professors may be too radical for anyone to turn this ship around anymore.

    The original Neoconservatives (Podhoretz, Krystal, Moynihan…) split from the left over just this sort of totalitarian illiberalism. And the result is that the universities just kept getting more illiberal and the Neoconservatives had to retreat to think tanks and magazines.

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  75. @Anon
    "They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia."

    Don't let Harvard off the hook. The poison came from institutions like Harvard.
    Harvard once banned ROTC when the US military was still "don't ask, don't tell".

    And Larry Summers was shut down over some speculative remarks about sex and IQ.

    Harvard is more to blame than any other institution. It set the template for the lunacy.

    Absolutely right. Most commenters went to college. Even if you were in STEM you had to take the general ed liberal Marxist anti White brainwashing courses. For instance nursing and medicine courses are adamant that immigrants don’t bring in TB. That is totally false but that is what is taught.

    I went to a top ten college when I was young and finished my life at another top ten college 40 years later. All that has changed is Marxist class war turned into race war against Whites and now gay tranny war against heterosexuals.

    Cornell West’s little fairy tale advising how to turn the colleges back to free speech is just laughable. He’s some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn’t he.

    Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist.

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    • Replies: @Kylie
    "Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist."

    Agreed. Too many "conservative" whites fall over themselves trying to express their fervent admiration for conservative blacks.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Cornell West.... He’s some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn’t he.
     
    Cornell West is no conservative. And no conservative worships him.
  76. @Desiderius

    I’m much more concerned about what’s happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.
     
    The one follows the other, like lemmings off a cliff if it comes to that, and it looks like it might.

    In some ways the 5th rate and community colleges can be a lot worse as they are trying to raise their status by even more radicalism. For instance a biology teacher at Santa Monica City College teaches that “blonde hair and blue eyes are mutations and the sooner they are bred out the better” She is a Swede from Minnesota with natural red hair and skin as white as paper.

    Another so called English teacher spends her time blathering away about how the Caribbean Islands had tons of gold in gold mines and the evil Spanish stole it all. There was gold in the islands. But it was gold the Mexicans mined and processed and traded to the islanders.

    They are all horrible.

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    • Replies: @Whiskey
    What that college prof at Santa Monica City College is really on about is how much she HATE HATE HATES White men, for the only thing women hate -- not being dominant/violent/sexy enough.

    Thought experiment -- if every White dude was at least as violent and dangerous as say, John Wesley Hardin, would this anti-White stuff go on? I'd say no, since the anti-White male sentiment stems from two mutually supporting social changes:

    1. The vastly increased power of women coupled with their resentment at their men being equals not their superior; and

    2. The growth of the Burnham-Sam Francis "Managerial Class" in being a transnational ruling aristocracy that it is both new and insecure, and very, very stupid.

    The current riots in Beserkley where Trump supporters (idiots -- Trump has nothing but contempt for the Deplorables aka the Gullibles) are getting the good old anti-fa beatdown are a good example. This is where everything is headed, recall Eric Rudolph ate out of garbage cans and lived in the woods while Bill Ayers sat in luxury in his lawyer's houseboat in Lake Michigan.

    Violence favors the Left, aka the global aristocracy, and will never ever cease: why would it when the aristocracy owns and controls the media, courts, lawyers, NGOs, government, and military, and the reason the aristocracy does so is because WOMEN all want a highly hierarchical, dominating, uncertain place where a woman can rise to the mother of Sultans by their feminine wiles and the luck of a dumb but ruthless male.

    This is why stuff like stories about White dude coal miners gets canceled and things featuring ultra-violent men like Breaking Bad (from nebbish loser to dominant/violent killer aka sexy), the Sopranos (ditto), Animal Kingdom (aging harpy controls her violent sons), Sons of Anarchy (ditto) etc. all appeal to women on a visceral level.

    If you view the political divide as aristocrats in the managerial class and ordinary White working men on the other side, with women and non-Whites the allies of the aristocracy, that's a good a model in predictive behavior as any.

    Harvard and the rest are just as likely to sponsor Three Minutes (because we need that extra minute) of hate against Bad Persons since violence WORKS for them, and has the happy bonus of making anti-fa and non-White thugs even sexier to women. What will some coed sleep with, an anti-fa who beat some dude's head in with a skateboard, or some BLM thug, or a doofus Master Debater who is "nice?"

    There is no end to the ways in which women and aristocrats are the eternal enemy of the average working White man and the idea of Hopium is just that -- Hopium. Survival and destruction of the University system while understanding violence is completely in the left's favor is the only rational course of action.

    A thousand lawsuits against Harvard or Yale or the local university, along with every other effort to drain out the money, is the way to go. We can't burn them down but we can bleed them of cash; recall the USSR fell when the Soviets could no longer pay soldiers and secret police (in their case for over two years).
  77. Extreme political correctness in universities is inevitable when you have a neoliberal economy and a left-liberal culture. Most young people who want to go university tend to be liberal, and in a neoliberal economy the customer is always right and universities have to make money. Hence, universities have to be nice to liberal kids and give them good grades. If they don’t they go out of business.

    There is an extremely tight employment market for university graduates without STEM degrees, so both students and educators are very nervous about upsetting the apple cart.

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  78. @education realist
    Like I mentioned to Steve, I'm much more concerned about what's happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.

    Here's a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It's more likely to hurt.

    But the much bigger issue is that low-end public universities, which are already struggling to maintain their ability to give good education to able but poor kids, have now given up the fight entirely because they were failing too many un-able kids. So now they'll just give everyone credit for all courses.

    And for those fools who want to ape cool and cynical, saying "oh, college degrees have been worthless for decades except for certain technical subjects", you don't know what you're talking about, so please spare the thread.

    Corrupted College.

    ed, NY and California are proposing free tuition for all in state students, in NY that is for all SUNY colleges and universities. This will make a BA or BS the equivalent of a GED

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Only if they bloat the census and matriculation cohorts. SUNY has been conservative in its investments. The bloat's been in CUNY, with Medgar Evers, York, Staten Island, and the College of Technology in the most troubled condition.
  79. @Desiderius

    If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty.
     
    So not only did Esau manage to hold on to his own birthright, he also denied Jacob his own with predicable results.

    My hunch is that this phenomenon was not just limited to academia - see three presidents born in 1946 for instance.

    “If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty.”

    I’m sure you are right.

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  80. The time may be ripe for a new “Free Speech” movement on campus. MOST students are sick of PC and being intimidated.

    What a concept! End the Dark Ages of universities, as, “isles of repression in a sea of freedom”.

    Until that time, one will get more provocative, thoughtful discussions from hardhats on a construction site than from the classes in the halls of Harvard.

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  81. “ed, NY and California are proposing free tuition for all in state students, in NY that is for all SUNY colleges and universities. This will make a BA or BS the equivalent of a GED”

    I guess the plus side of that is we won’t be wasting federal dollars on diplomas for middle school classes.

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  82. Seems like there’s an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit. You’ve got a glut of PhDs, and skyrocketing tuition at even middling schools. You can put a school anywhere, so you don’t need to get hosed on real estate prices.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism? There’s a huge pool of smart and industrious applicants rejected by Ivies and other elite schools. Take the best of them. Give visiting professorships to people like Jason Richwine — you’ll get plenty of press for it, and you’ll attract more of the right kind of faculty, students, and donors.

    Admit self-reliant boy scout-type students and save on bloated admin costs. Maybe have a cooking program as part of the school, and have the faculty and students run the dining hall. Have the engineering department handle facilities management, and let the students take turns vacuuming the halls. Partner with a local hospital, and add a medical school, the faculty of which can also run the school clinic. Pass the savings on in the form of lower tuition.

    The kind of students attracted by that arrangement aren’t going to be self-indulgent protestors, so your school will be more attractive to heterodox guest speakers, which will make it a more interesting and attractive place, and so on.

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    • Agree: PV van der Byl
    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism?
     
    Because the (left-controlled) bodies that "accredit" colleges and universities will see what you're trying to do and gin up whatever excuse they need to deny your school accreditation and condemn it as a "diploma mill".
    , @Eric Rasmusen
    That's Hillsdale College--- hugely successful, in remote Michigan. It's a college though, not a university. Baylor has some possibility to be a conservative university, but is not very bold about it. A problem is that billionaires are usually clueless about how to run colleges--- witness the failure of Ave Maria, which was due to the rich man's unwillingness to let it be independent of him and ignorance that he couldn't get good faculty if he treated them like pizza delivery boys.
    , @Steve Sailer
    What's the most famous college started in the last 40 years?
    , @academic gossip

    Seems like there’s an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit.
     
    It won't work, except by draining students out of the universities into cheaper parallel systems such as MOOCs, certification exams, cognitive/personality testing, and paid apprenticeships.

    In the US university system, there isn't a functioning market in which to take a niche. Government "financial aid" grants and student loans, the legality of charging students according to parents' wealth ("need-based" pricing), and tax exemption of non-educational assets (endowments!), all combine to reward universities for maximizing their tuition costs. A school that offers a lower fee for the same service is just leaving money on the table, which means less endowment and therefore lower competitiveness in the long term.

    One would need a coalition of billionaires, not just one rich guy, to fund a genuine competitor to any of the elite universities.

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.

  83. @anon
    The responses to that tweet are why this sort of thing won't actually work. Too many people believe in "free speech, but...". To wit:

    "A valid opinion had two tests:
    1.It uses a generally agreed upon body of facts or other evidence
    2.It is logically consistent."

    So, basically, any opinion which differs from the majority can be considered "invalid", and thus not protected speech.

    I mean, feminism isn't logically consistent. Trannydom isn't "generally agreed upon". But I don't think they'll get called "invalid". They'll save that for things like discussions of IQ, which, as everyone on campus knows, "isn't a thing".

    They meant ‘generally agreed upon by womens studies faculty at Oberlin.’

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  84. @snorlax
    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not). Mao's Red Guards were a semi-formalization of this phenomenon.

    Funny you mention punk. I remember vividly punk disappearing, almost overnight, as a popular outlet for truly transgressive youth just about the time industry leaders blackballed F.E.A.R. and started promoting the Dead Kennedys (nice, safe, Right hating Leftists) as punk. Also look up Topper Headon’s piece describing how the Clash got marketed as A ‘political’ band by Lefty industry types. And how their Leftism was 100% manufactured.

    Here’s F.E.A.R. anticipating the future.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=yJAlIHsXcLY

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  85. @Alden
    "If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty."

    I'm sure you are right.

    That quote is from Art Deco.

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  86. Dave, I’ve often wondered why billionaires don’t spend some of their money on that, as opposed to ‘fixing” k-12. Set a simple standard, much like the one I mentioned. You could even limit the number of degrees offered. Require a particular score on an SAT subject test or a GRE subject test to graduate. Employers would be assured of competence.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Yeah, it really wouldn't take long to establish an elite reputation if your standards were high and you limited yourself to industrious students. Conservative employers would flock to hire from a school like that, particularly if it taught practical skills.

    I'd limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment. Have an English department, if you want, but gear it toward students writing for remuneration (plays, screenplays, teleplays, books, magazine essays, etc.). You can still study the classics, but with an eye toward influencing your own work, not producing literary criticism no one will read. No one gets an English degree without having produced paid work prior to graduation.

  87. @Alden
    In some ways the 5th rate and community colleges can be a lot worse as they are trying to raise their status by even more radicalism. For instance a biology teacher at Santa Monica City College teaches that "blonde hair and blue eyes are mutations and the sooner they are bred out the better" She is a Swede from Minnesota with natural red hair and skin as white as paper.

    Another so called English teacher spends her time blathering away about how the Caribbean Islands had tons of gold in gold mines and the evil Spanish stole it all. There was gold in the islands. But it was gold the Mexicans mined and processed and traded to the islanders.

    They are all horrible.

    What that college prof at Santa Monica City College is really on about is how much she HATE HATE HATES White men, for the only thing women hate — not being dominant/violent/sexy enough.

    Thought experiment — if every White dude was at least as violent and dangerous as say, John Wesley Hardin, would this anti-White stuff go on? I’d say no, since the anti-White male sentiment stems from two mutually supporting social changes:

    1. The vastly increased power of women coupled with their resentment at their men being equals not their superior; and

    2. The growth of the Burnham-Sam Francis “Managerial Class” in being a transnational ruling aristocracy that it is both new and insecure, and very, very stupid.

    The current riots in Beserkley where Trump supporters (idiots — Trump has nothing but contempt for the Deplorables aka the Gullibles) are getting the good old anti-fa beatdown are a good example. This is where everything is headed, recall Eric Rudolph ate out of garbage cans and lived in the woods while Bill Ayers sat in luxury in his lawyer’s houseboat in Lake Michigan.

    Violence favors the Left, aka the global aristocracy, and will never ever cease: why would it when the aristocracy owns and controls the media, courts, lawyers, NGOs, government, and military, and the reason the aristocracy does so is because WOMEN all want a highly hierarchical, dominating, uncertain place where a woman can rise to the mother of Sultans by their feminine wiles and the luck of a dumb but ruthless male.

    This is why stuff like stories about White dude coal miners gets canceled and things featuring ultra-violent men like Breaking Bad (from nebbish loser to dominant/violent killer aka sexy), the Sopranos (ditto), Animal Kingdom (aging harpy controls her violent sons), Sons of Anarchy (ditto) etc. all appeal to women on a visceral level.

    If you view the political divide as aristocrats in the managerial class and ordinary White working men on the other side, with women and non-Whites the allies of the aristocracy, that’s a good a model in predictive behavior as any.

    Harvard and the rest are just as likely to sponsor Three Minutes (because we need that extra minute) of hate against Bad Persons since violence WORKS for them, and has the happy bonus of making anti-fa and non-White thugs even sexier to women. What will some coed sleep with, an anti-fa who beat some dude’s head in with a skateboard, or some BLM thug, or a doofus Master Debater who is “nice?”

    There is no end to the ways in which women and aristocrats are the eternal enemy of the average working White man and the idea of Hopium is just that — Hopium. Survival and destruction of the University system while understanding violence is completely in the left’s favor is the only rational course of action.

    A thousand lawsuits against Harvard or Yale or the local university, along with every other effort to drain out the money, is the way to go. We can’t burn them down but we can bleed them of cash; recall the USSR fell when the Soviets could no longer pay soldiers and secret police (in their case for over two years).

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  88. Sorry, but I’m confident that the answer to the headline question here is “no”. This is not a “turning point”, but only a bump in the road. The SJW orthodoxy will keep marching on in their slow but inevitable conquest of the world.

    There is no way on Earth whatsoever that the Harvard administration will ever announce “that the Harvard campus police will enforce Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 268 Section 34 against wearing a mask for the purpose of getting away with riot.” Nor will “the U. of Chicago” or any other rival. When the masked “antifas” riot, if any sort of police are present, their purpose will be not to stop them, but to protect them; the cops won’t touch a hair on the black-masked lefties’s heads no matter how criminal their behavior, but will step in to act only to take down (and throw the book at) any “deplorable” who dares to fight back or even too vigorously resist the antifas. It’s only going to keep getting worse.

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  89. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    “This is why your enemies win.”

    No, they win because they are insurmountably stronger; because they have unshakeable, iron-fisted control over all the real centers of power in our society; because democracy is always a sham, with a small elite ruling over powerless masses, and they are the elite while we are the peasant masses; because whoever we vote into the temporary, merely-elected “government”, they control the real, permanent government; because myths about “separation of church and state” aside, every society ultimately has an “official religion” to which all who would be members of the elite must assent, and the insane ideology of our enemies is that “official religion”, enforced with all the zeal of a fanatical theocracy; because all the people with the sort of weapons that matter in our present world answer unequivocally to their orders. They’ve been winning for centuries.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Wow, with that level of pessimism I'd bet you are on the payroll of George Soros. But maybe not. And, if not, and if you do not mind, please offer an explanation of how despair motivates you to achieve great ends. And if you are not motivated to achieve great ends then shut the f\/ck up.

    The rest of us are not Denethor, nor addled by your moral reprobation, and have no intention of succumbing to despair.
  90. @dearieme
    The only thing that's likely to make much of a difference is removing subsidies and taxpayer funds from students and institutions, followed by a large scale Dissolution of the Monasteries.

    Sure, but no politician is ever going to be in a position to remove those subsidies like that. There is simply no way to achieve a Dissolution of the Monasteries, however necessary or desirable it may be.

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  91. Harvard has never had the militant leftism that Berkeley sports, given the wealth and career ambitions of its students. They have always had some prominent right wing faculty and invited speakers who espoused un-PC views. Some of the professors and administrators (Wilson, Summers) suffered for it but not so much due to protests by students, at least not in the last 40 years. There have been a few occupations of the university president’s office, but never over PC speech control issues.

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  92. @The Z Blog
    If the fate of Western Civilization counts on Robert P. George and Cornel West, you should, direct your energies toward what comes after the very bloody civil war that is as a certain as the sun rising in the east and setting in the west.

    What comes during and after “the very bloody civil war” is almost certainly the extinction of our sort, and the global collapse of all modern civilization beyond any hope of recovery (as an Industrial Revolution is a once-per-planet event due to the depletion of the “low-hanging fruit” of non-renewable resources extractable with preindustrial technology).

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  93. @The True and Original David
    Jack and Jill can get a better education on YouTube than they can at most universities.

    Yes, but without the credential of a degree from a properly “accredited” institution, what’s that education worth in our modern HR-dominated job market?

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  94. @Stealth
    The enemies win because they are far more numerous, organized, prosperous and capable. Plus they now fully control the levers of power.

    Optimism and pessimism are irrelevant.

    I agree on all but perhaps the “numerous” part, and even that’s just a matter of time with our demographic trends. Their advantages have long since become insurmountable.

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  95. @Dr. X

    Harvard is a private institution and has no obligation to enforce the 1st Amendment. The 1st Amendment says that the government can’t take any action against you – it doesn’t say anything about not losing your job. Etc.
     
    Yes, but Harvard is Federally-regulated, Federally-funded, and Federally tax exempt. It also accepts students from any state, so it is involved in interstate commerce.

    Just as in the 1960s the Federal government forced the owners of private property such as hotels, restaurants, and other businesses to accept blacks against their will, the Federal government can force Harvard (and other colleges) to respect the First Amendment.

    The Federal government has plenty of leverage against Harvard, if it wants to use it.

    “The Federal government has plenty of leverage against Harvard, if it wants to use it.”

    But, of course, no matter what we do or how we vote, the Federal government is never, ever going to want to.

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  96. @ThreeCranes
    Comes a point when even the most broad-minded of academics realizes that the risk of being branded as a "Fascist" for standing up for basic human rights of free speech and peaceable assembly is preferable to destroying one's self respect by consorting with communist-inspired, do-nothing dolts.

    Are you sure? Because it looks to me like most will prefer survival over “self-respect”, and consort with whoever they need to, mouth whatever shibboleths they must, keep as quiet as needed, so as to avoid being cast forever into the Outer Darkness with the deplorables.

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  97. I’m hopeful that the uproar in his comments section will inspire Scott Alexander to rethink his position on this topic.

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    In the words of Upton Sinclair, "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!"
    , @Desiderius
    link?
  98. @Moshe
    I want the academy to go as far down the rabbit hole as it needs to for it to lose all credibility.

    Sure, the academy may end up “losing all credibility” with us powerless, deplorable peasants, but what makes you think it will, no matter how insane it becomes, ever lose credibility with the people who actually matter?

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  99. @education realist
    Dave, I've often wondered why billionaires don't spend some of their money on that, as opposed to 'fixing" k-12. Set a simple standard, much like the one I mentioned. You could even limit the number of degrees offered. Require a particular score on an SAT subject test or a GRE subject test to graduate. Employers would be assured of competence.

    Yeah, it really wouldn’t take long to establish an elite reputation if your standards were high and you limited yourself to industrious students. Conservative employers would flock to hire from a school like that, particularly if it taught practical skills.

    I’d limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment. Have an English department, if you want, but gear it toward students writing for remuneration (plays, screenplays, teleplays, books, magazine essays, etc.). You can still study the classics, but with an eye toward influencing your own work, not producing literary criticism no one will read. No one gets an English degree without having produced paid work prior to graduation.

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    • Replies: @Art Deco
    I’d limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment.

    Not all academic departments are troubled. I doubt the natural science and mathematics faculties do a lick of good on faculty committees (except may trying to scotch approval of 'journal-of-your-feelings' courses), but their instructional programs are not in themselves a waste. Ditto economics, the natural science wing of psychology, foreign language faculties, the better sort of history faculties (not American history), the better sort of philosophy faculty, foreign language faculties, and the more quantitatively oriented poli sci and sociology faculties. Conversely, vocational faculties concerned with teacher-training, social work, and library administration are commonly a scandal. Law schools can be loci of scandal. Not sure I'd trust the school of public health, either.

  100. @Buffalo Joe
    ed, NY and California are proposing free tuition for all in state students, in NY that is for all SUNY colleges and universities. This will make a BA or BS the equivalent of a GED

    Only if they bloat the census and matriculation cohorts. SUNY has been conservative in its investments. The bloat’s been in CUNY, with Medgar Evers, York, Staten Island, and the College of Technology in the most troubled condition.

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  101. @Random Dude on the Internet
    Academia is pretty much rotted to the core. As we saw with the University of Missouri, once donations and enrollment dropped, they just doubled down on campus marxism. It's all these people know as it is a byproduct of 50-60 years of indoctrination where it is stacked with true believers and those who will pretend to believe enough to get along.

    I know guys like Peter Thiel try to entice kids not to go to college but I wonder if their energy is better devoted to creating a parallel academia system that is considered every bit as credible and valid as the current system. Except this time it is 100% online. Maybe once in a while you meet at a facility somewhere but not in a place that gets turned into a marxist breeding ground. I know online colleges are a joke now but there's got to be a better way than just indulging a system that is the nexus of leftist BS.

    I know guys like Peter Thiel try to entice kids not to go to college but I wonder if their energy is better devoted to creating a parallel academia system that is considered every bit as credible and valid as the current system.

    From what I understand, people have tried, but it simply cannot be done. Because unless the school issuing it is properly “accredited”, a degree is just a worthless piece of paper from a “diploma mill.” And if you try to set up your own accreditation institution, well, that’s just a worthless “accreditation mill” for “diploma mills”; only those accrediting bodies approved by the Department of Education get to count.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's not that hard to get accreditation, it's hard to build a reputation. That takes a generation at least. Few billionaires want to start new colleges because they won't get much prestige out of it during their lifetimes. They'd rather get their names on a building at Stanford.
  102. @Dave Pinsen
    Yeah, it really wouldn't take long to establish an elite reputation if your standards were high and you limited yourself to industrious students. Conservative employers would flock to hire from a school like that, particularly if it taught practical skills.

    I'd limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment. Have an English department, if you want, but gear it toward students writing for remuneration (plays, screenplays, teleplays, books, magazine essays, etc.). You can still study the classics, but with an eye toward influencing your own work, not producing literary criticism no one will read. No one gets an English degree without having produced paid work prior to graduation.

    I’d limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment.

    Not all academic departments are troubled. I doubt the natural science and mathematics faculties do a lick of good on faculty committees (except may trying to scotch approval of ‘journal-of-your-feelings’ courses), but their instructional programs are not in themselves a waste. Ditto economics, the natural science wing of psychology, foreign language faculties, the better sort of history faculties (not American history), the better sort of philosophy faculty, foreign language faculties, and the more quantitatively oriented poli sci and sociology faculties. Conversely, vocational faculties concerned with teacher-training, social work, and library administration are commonly a scandal. Law schools can be loci of scandal. Not sure I’d trust the school of public health, either.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I wasn't suggesting all academic departments were troubled. But if I were starting a school from scratch, I'd focus on more applied stuff to make a dent in the universe, build up alumni networks, etc.
  103. @Dave Pinsen
    Seems like there's an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit. You've got a glut of PhDs, and skyrocketing tuition at even middling schools. You can put a school anywhere, so you don't need to get hosed on real estate prices.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism? There's a huge pool of smart and industrious applicants rejected by Ivies and other elite schools. Take the best of them. Give visiting professorships to people like Jason Richwine -- you'll get plenty of press for it, and you'll attract more of the right kind of faculty, students, and donors.

    Admit self-reliant boy scout-type students and save on bloated admin costs. Maybe have a cooking program as part of the school, and have the faculty and students run the dining hall. Have the engineering department handle facilities management, and let the students take turns vacuuming the halls. Partner with a local hospital, and add a medical school, the faculty of which can also run the school clinic. Pass the savings on in the form of lower tuition.

    The kind of students attracted by that arrangement aren't going to be self-indulgent protestors, so your school will be more attractive to heterodox guest speakers, which will make it a more interesting and attractive place, and so on.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism?

    Because the (left-controlled) bodies that “accredit” colleges and universities will see what you’re trying to do and gin up whatever excuse they need to deny your school accreditation and condemn it as a “diploma mill”.

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  104. @Dave Pinsen
    Seems like there's an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit. You've got a glut of PhDs, and skyrocketing tuition at even middling schools. You can put a school anywhere, so you don't need to get hosed on real estate prices.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism? There's a huge pool of smart and industrious applicants rejected by Ivies and other elite schools. Take the best of them. Give visiting professorships to people like Jason Richwine -- you'll get plenty of press for it, and you'll attract more of the right kind of faculty, students, and donors.

    Admit self-reliant boy scout-type students and save on bloated admin costs. Maybe have a cooking program as part of the school, and have the faculty and students run the dining hall. Have the engineering department handle facilities management, and let the students take turns vacuuming the halls. Partner with a local hospital, and add a medical school, the faculty of which can also run the school clinic. Pass the savings on in the form of lower tuition.

    The kind of students attracted by that arrangement aren't going to be self-indulgent protestors, so your school will be more attractive to heterodox guest speakers, which will make it a more interesting and attractive place, and so on.

    That’s Hillsdale College— hugely successful, in remote Michigan. It’s a college though, not a university. Baylor has some possibility to be a conservative university, but is not very bold about it. A problem is that billionaires are usually clueless about how to run colleges— witness the failure of Ave Maria, which was due to the rich man’s unwillingness to let it be independent of him and ignorance that he couldn’t get good faculty if he treated them like pizza delivery boys.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    American Jews built lots of fine hospitals and country clubs, but not many colleges.

    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?
  105. @Greg Pandatshang
    I'm hopeful that the uproar in his comments section will inspire Scott Alexander to rethink his position on this topic.

    In the words of Upton Sinclair, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!”

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  106. @Kevin C.

    I know guys like Peter Thiel try to entice kids not to go to college but I wonder if their energy is better devoted to creating a parallel academia system that is considered every bit as credible and valid as the current system.
     
    From what I understand, people have tried, but it simply cannot be done. Because unless the school issuing it is properly "accredited", a degree is just a worthless piece of paper from a "diploma mill." And if you try to set up your own accreditation institution, well, that's just a worthless "accreditation mill" for "diploma mills"; only those accrediting bodies approved by the Department of Education get to count.

    It’s not that hard to get accreditation, it’s hard to build a reputation. That takes a generation at least. Few billionaires want to start new colleges because they won’t get much prestige out of it during their lifetimes. They’d rather get their names on a building at Stanford.

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    It's still not a workable plan; any attempt to create an "alternative" to Left-dominated academia will, one way or another, be utterly thwarted and crushed by the insurmountable might of the unstoppable Leftist juggernaut. Nothing has been done because nothing can be done.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    I don't think it necessarily would take a generation to build a reputation. Not quite apples-to-apples, but look what Paul Graham did with Y Combinator within a decade or so.
  107. @Steve Sailer
    It's not that hard to get accreditation, it's hard to build a reputation. That takes a generation at least. Few billionaires want to start new colleges because they won't get much prestige out of it during their lifetimes. They'd rather get their names on a building at Stanford.

    It’s still not a workable plan; any attempt to create an “alternative” to Left-dominated academia will, one way or another, be utterly thwarted and crushed by the insurmountable might of the unstoppable Leftist juggernaut. Nothing has been done because nothing can be done.

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  108. @Desiderius

    If some data I’ve seen are representative, people from the 1958-70 cohorts (who tended to be Republicans in their youth) were successfully screened by the cohorts immediately older so that few if any among the majority type ever made it onto any academic faculty.
     
    So not only did Esau manage to hold on to his own birthright, he also denied Jacob his own with predicable results.

    My hunch is that this phenomenon was not just limited to academia - see three presidents born in 1946 for instance.

    https://literature.ucsc.edu/faculty/singleton.php?&singleton=true&cruz_id=tyrus

    http://www.miis.edu/academics/faculty/mruehsen

    Oh, you’ve got plenty of Gen-X faculty. These two individuals were very unlike most of their peers at a certain time and place. They’re in academe. Few of their peers are.

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  109. Or over in The Crimson, there’s what can be described as the SJW response to the Peterson talk:http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/4/14/ramirez-class-dissent-open-campus/

    Some tidbits:

    We must make it clear that this back and forth is not an even fight. Equating a single individual’s opinion to the same level of importance as an individual’s identity is unacceptable. We cannot afford to “test” the limits of free speech. A very clear line already exists; you are welcome to your own opinion so long as your opinion does not threaten another person’s existence. The line has been crossed here.

    As an academic institution, Harvard is meant to place extreme value on a student’s pursuit of knowledge and education. By promoting hate speech, the Open Campus Initiative is being hypocritical in helping to foster students’ educational enrichment. Such an act deters a student’s ability to focus on academics when they have to spend their valuable time trying to convince someone, who hasn’t felt their struggles, that they are deserving of basic human rights.

    Reading this gives all the indication of a mind which has sunk beyond all hope of recovery into a belief system which is fully and completely closed against criticism. How many are simply too far gone?

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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Not too far at all.

    He imagines himself in a position where he can demand others defend their rights. Once he realizes that that is not in fact the position in which he finds himself, he'll adjust accordingly.
  110. @Greg Pandatshang
    I'm hopeful that the uproar in his comments section will inspire Scott Alexander to rethink his position on this topic.

    link?

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    • Replies: @Greg Pandatshang
    http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/11/sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/

    and the clarification: http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/12/clarification-to-sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/
  111. @SFG
    Oh, of course! I think Steve's point (which I agree with) is that if they do that, free speech gains cachet (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia), which helps it with the academic crowd. Academics are very sensitive to the perception of their peers and intellectual fashion (if not the regular kind).

    (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia)

    Really – BEST – hmm – Harvard takes money from mega rich parents as an admission bribe.

    Jared Kushner’s father (an x-convict) paid Harvard 2.5 million dollars to get his son into Harvard.

    You can be sure our “first son in law” got all A’s.

    p.s. That is the quality of the lineage that leads our White House!

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  112. @johnlee0
    Robert P. George, "Corell West" etc. are no friends of western civilization.

    Agreed.

    Greorge may be a Catholic but he’s part of academic like West. The fact these old goats are complaining isn’t a good sign. It’s the equivalent of vultures circling a dying beast.

    They should invite Murray and Stanger to recreate their aborted discussion at Middlebury on the big stage at Harvard in front of a peaceful, quiet, respectful audience. Have Harvard be the role model for how intellectual debate should be carried on in American academia.

    This has to be a joke. The bullies and loons are running the asylum. Ever since the 60′s the Left has been systematically acquiring power across the social, legal and education spheres within our society and now have a total lock on them. As well as most cities across the U.S.

    And what were “conservatives” doing this time? Well these losers ceded the culture war in the 70′s which turned out to be the key to everything while the “conservatives” were just too busy shafting the blue collars and middle-class all in the name of the almighty buck and general naval gazing.

    Too many of them forgot how to talk to ordinary Americans and ask them what was important and get them on their side.

    The Harvard administration should back this symbolic redress of American academia’s disgrace by announcing that the Harvard campus police will enforce
    Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 268 Section 34 against wearing a mask for the purpose of getting away with riot.

    Why should they. Is it hurting applications and donations? Apparently not so there is no reason to change. Harvard still remains the school for the elite and those aspiring to be part of the elite. Doesn’t matter if they let masked thugs shut down opinions they don’t like. After all conformity of thought is one of the hallmarks of the elite in this country.

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  113. @Alden
    Absolutely right. Most commenters went to college. Even if you were in STEM you had to take the general ed liberal Marxist anti White brainwashing courses. For instance nursing and medicine courses are adamant that immigrants don't bring in TB. That is totally false but that is what is taught.

    I went to a top ten college when I was young and finished my life at another top ten college 40 years later. All that has changed is Marxist class war turned into race war against Whites and now gay tranny war against heterosexuals.

    Cornell West's little fairy tale advising how to turn the colleges back to free speech is just laughable. He's some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn't he.

    Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist.

    “Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist.”

    Agreed. Too many “conservative” whites fall over themselves trying to express their fervent admiration for conservative blacks.

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  114. @Desiderius
    link?
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    • Replies: @Desiderius
    He was making a similar argument to the one I was making with SPMoore.

    Basically, libertarianism wrought (way too) large has nuked a great deal of our common mores. People feel this in their bones, and the SJWs have exploited that feeling. The solution to the SJWs isn't re-nuking it with another serving of libertarianism (i.e. free speech fundamentalism). It's to point out the bold-faced lies of the SJWs (while also rebuilding the institutions and traditions which originally established those mores in the first place).
    , @anon
    From that article:

    If people actually care about free speech, the number one thing they can do right now is very loudly invoke it every time a liberal is silenced.
     
    Yeah, because that happens so often.

    If we have to wait for that, free speech is screwed.
  115. @Kevin C.
    Or over in The Crimson, there's what can be described as the SJW response to the Peterson talk:http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/4/14/ramirez-class-dissent-open-campus/

    Some tidbits:

    We must make it clear that this back and forth is not an even fight. Equating a single individual’s opinion to the same level of importance as an individual’s identity is unacceptable. We cannot afford to “test” the limits of free speech. A very clear line already exists; you are welcome to your own opinion so long as your opinion does not threaten another person’s existence. The line has been crossed here.
     

    As an academic institution, Harvard is meant to place extreme value on a student’s pursuit of knowledge and education. By promoting hate speech, the Open Campus Initiative is being hypocritical in helping to foster students’ educational enrichment. Such an act deters a student’s ability to focus on academics when they have to spend their valuable time trying to convince someone, who hasn’t felt their struggles, that they are deserving of basic human rights.
     
    Reading this gives all the indication of a mind which has sunk beyond all hope of recovery into a belief system which is fully and completely closed against criticism. How many are simply too far gone?

    Not too far at all.

    He imagines himself in a position where he can demand others defend their rights. Once he realizes that that is not in fact the position in which he finds himself, he’ll adjust accordingly.

    Read More
  116. @snorlax
    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not). Mao's Red Guards were a semi-formalization of this phenomenon.

    No, not when there are regime-approved youth subcultures (antifa, SJW, black nationalist, environmentalist, punk, hippie, anarchist etc) that are constantly praised from all corners for being as righteous and super-cool as they are radical and transgressive (not).

    That is how Trump got elected. You seem to think that the resistance to this nonsense is supine, spineless and stupid. But if so, Trump would not have won.

    Read More
  117. @SFG
    Oh, of course! I think Steve's point (which I agree with) is that if they do that, free speech gains cachet (since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world, and certainly academia), which helps it with the academic crowd. Academics are very sensitive to the perception of their peers and intellectual fashion (if not the regular kind).

    since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world

    I’m sure the founders would be proud to learn that they’ve been reduced to a mere brand.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The "stock of the Puritans" has officially died out, but The Brand lives on!
  118. @Greg Pandatshang
    http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/11/sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/

    and the clarification: http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/12/clarification-to-sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/

    He was making a similar argument to the one I was making with SPMoore.

    Basically, libertarianism wrought (way too) large has nuked a great deal of our common mores. People feel this in their bones, and the SJWs have exploited that feeling. The solution to the SJWs isn’t re-nuking it with another serving of libertarianism (i.e. free speech fundamentalism). It’s to point out the bold-faced lies of the SJWs (while also rebuilding the institutions and traditions which originally established those mores in the first place).

    Read More
  119. @Desiderius

    since Harvard has one of the best brands in the world
     
    I'm sure the founders would be proud to learn that they've been reduced to a mere brand.

    The “stock of the Puritans” has officially died out, but The Brand lives on!

    Read More
  120. @Eric Rasmusen
    That's Hillsdale College--- hugely successful, in remote Michigan. It's a college though, not a university. Baylor has some possibility to be a conservative university, but is not very bold about it. A problem is that billionaires are usually clueless about how to run colleges--- witness the failure of Ave Maria, which was due to the rich man's unwillingness to let it be independent of him and ignorance that he couldn't get good faculty if he treated them like pizza delivery boys.

    American Jews built lots of fine hospitals and country clubs, but not many colleges.

    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    Has nothing to do with it. Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.
    , @Brutusale
    Boston Latin School, established in 1635, a year before Harvard. Last year two sista girls caused such a ruckus about their treatment by their white peers that Latin now has an interim headmaster.
  121. @Dave Pinsen
    Seems like there's an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit. You've got a glut of PhDs, and skyrocketing tuition at even middling schools. You can put a school anywhere, so you don't need to get hosed on real estate prices.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism? There's a huge pool of smart and industrious applicants rejected by Ivies and other elite schools. Take the best of them. Give visiting professorships to people like Jason Richwine -- you'll get plenty of press for it, and you'll attract more of the right kind of faculty, students, and donors.

    Admit self-reliant boy scout-type students and save on bloated admin costs. Maybe have a cooking program as part of the school, and have the faculty and students run the dining hall. Have the engineering department handle facilities management, and let the students take turns vacuuming the halls. Partner with a local hospital, and add a medical school, the faculty of which can also run the school clinic. Pass the savings on in the form of lower tuition.

    The kind of students attracted by that arrangement aren't going to be self-indulgent protestors, so your school will be more attractive to heterodox guest speakers, which will make it a more interesting and attractive place, and so on.

    What’s the most famous college started in the last 40 years?

    Read More
    • Replies: @candid_observer
    Actually, one interesting case of a college that's very new (1997) -- but also quite small (350 undergrads) -- is the Olin School of Engineering. It's actually highly ranked (#3) among engineering schools that award no graduate degrees.

    It was started by the Olin Foundation, which put up about 450 million dollars to get it going.

    Imagine what any of our multibillionaires could do with their foundations/money in this direction if they had the mind and vision to do so.

    Instead, Bill Gates is spending umpteen billions of dollars in Africa to make sure that, in the future, there are billions of them to starve in famines.

    Again, it's all about vision.

  122. @PN
    Leave it to iSteve readers to respond to a mild call to action with a shrug of the shoulders and a faint whimper of "What's the use?"

    This is why your enemies win.

    My enemies lost the last presidential election.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Melendwyr
    It's increasingly looking like everyone lost the last presidential election.
  123. @Kevin C.
    "This is why your enemies win."

    No, they win because they are insurmountably stronger; because they have unshakeable, iron-fisted control over all the real centers of power in our society; because democracy is always a sham, with a small elite ruling over powerless masses, and they are the elite while we are the peasant masses; because whoever we vote into the temporary, merely-elected "government", they control the real, permanent government; because myths about "separation of church and state" aside, every society ultimately has an "official religion" to which all who would be members of the elite must assent, and the insane ideology of our enemies is that "official religion", enforced with all the zeal of a fanatical theocracy; because all the people with the sort of weapons that matter in our present world answer unequivocally to their orders. They've been winning for centuries.

    Wow, with that level of pessimism I’d bet you are on the payroll of George Soros. But maybe not. And, if not, and if you do not mind, please offer an explanation of how despair motivates you to achieve great ends. And if you are not motivated to achieve great ends then shut the f\/ck up.

    The rest of us are not Denethor, nor addled by your moral reprobation, and have no intention of succumbing to despair.

    Read More
  124. @Kevin C.
    Sure, but no politician is ever going to be in a position to remove those subsidies like that. There is simply no way to achieve a Dissolution of the Monasteries, however necessary or desirable it may be.

    Have you never heard of Henry VIII?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Sure, but the problem is that while ol' Henry was a powerful unelected ruler who wanted the monasteries dissolved, our powerful unelected rulers are on the side of the modern-day monasteries.
  125. @Steve Sailer
    It's not that hard to get accreditation, it's hard to build a reputation. That takes a generation at least. Few billionaires want to start new colleges because they won't get much prestige out of it during their lifetimes. They'd rather get their names on a building at Stanford.

    I don’t think it necessarily would take a generation to build a reputation. Not quite apples-to-apples, but look what Paul Graham did with Y Combinator within a decade or so.

    Read More
  126. @Alden
    Absolutely right. Most commenters went to college. Even if you were in STEM you had to take the general ed liberal Marxist anti White brainwashing courses. For instance nursing and medicine courses are adamant that immigrants don't bring in TB. That is totally false but that is what is taught.

    I went to a top ten college when I was young and finished my life at another top ten college 40 years later. All that has changed is Marxist class war turned into race war against Whites and now gay tranny war against heterosexuals.

    Cornell West's little fairy tale advising how to turn the colleges back to free speech is just laughable. He's some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn't he.

    Garbage like this article and the conservative worship of conservative blacks is why I am not a conservative but a White Nationalist.

    Cornell West…. He’s some kind of black conservative just worshipped by the conservatives isn’t he.

    Cornell West is no conservative. And no conservative worships him.

    Read More
  127. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @education realist
    Like I mentioned to Steve, I'm much more concerned about what's happening at the lower-tier public universities than at the top .05%.

    Here's a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It's more likely to hurt.

    But the much bigger issue is that low-end public universities, which are already struggling to maintain their ability to give good education to able but poor kids, have now given up the fight entirely because they were failing too many un-able kids. So now they'll just give everyone credit for all courses.

    And for those fools who want to ape cool and cynical, saying "oh, college degrees have been worthless for decades except for certain technical subjects", you don't know what you're talking about, so please spare the thread.

    Corrupted College.

    Here’s a simple test: would leading those riots help or hurt you in terms of a media job? In academia? My sense is that Middlebury is the end of it helping. It’s more likely to hurt.

    I’m not saying that you’re wrong, and you would certainly be in a better position to know than I would, but why is it that you think that? It isn’t really the impression that I get from the outside.

    Read More
  128. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Greg Pandatshang
    http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/11/sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/

    and the clarification: http://slatestarcodex.com/2017/04/12/clarification-to-sacred-principles-as-exhaustible-resources/

    From that article:

    If people actually care about free speech, the number one thing they can do right now is very loudly invoke it every time a liberal is silenced.

    Yeah, because that happens so often.

    If we have to wait for that, free speech is screwed.

    Read More
  129. A great many laws are currently in violation of the First Amendment. “Congress shall pass no law [...] abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.” But many federal laws do precisely that, by funding institutions that abridge the freedom of speech and of the press (universities foremost among them).

    Read More
  130. Anon–earlier, no. I’m saying the change might be happening now.

    Steve–William and Mary, 1693. And Yale missed it by 1. But yeah.

    However, I think I agree with Dave that a college focused on a low-cost, low muss degree for the qualified might get some cachet.

    Not accredited? OK. Employers won’t care if they know the quality’s good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    However, I think I agree with Dave that a college focused on a low-cost, low muss degree for the qualified might get some cachet.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty93RYkzYQQ
    , @Desiderius

    Not accredited? OK. Employers won’t care if they know the quality’s good.
     
    Tell it to the judge.
  131. @education realist
    Anon--earlier, no. I'm saying the change might be happening now.

    Steve--William and Mary, 1693. And Yale missed it by 1. But yeah.

    However, I think I agree with Dave that a college focused on a low-cost, low muss degree for the qualified might get some cachet.

    Not accredited? OK. Employers won't care if they know the quality's good.

    However, I think I agree with Dave that a college focused on a low-cost, low muss degree for the qualified might get some cachet.

    Read More
  132. @education realist
    Anon--earlier, no. I'm saying the change might be happening now.

    Steve--William and Mary, 1693. And Yale missed it by 1. But yeah.

    However, I think I agree with Dave that a college focused on a low-cost, low muss degree for the qualified might get some cachet.

    Not accredited? OK. Employers won't care if they know the quality's good.

    Not accredited? OK. Employers won’t care if they know the quality’s good.

    Tell it to the judge.

    Read More
  133. “‘Tell it to the judge.”

    Don’t have to. No judge involved.

    The real issue would be not getting into a Master’s program.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    HR/legal is very concerned about what it can tell the judge.
  134. @education realist
    "'Tell it to the judge."

    Don't have to. No judge involved.

    The real issue would be not getting into a Master's program.

    HR/legal is very concerned about what it can tell the judge.

    Read More
  135. .”HR/legal is very concerned about what it can tell the judge.”

    That would be in the event that they were hiring these graduates instead of black and Hispanic grads from credentialed institutions, and I don’t know where you’ve been for the past quarter of a century if you think that’s an issue outside of cops and firefighters. And they have their own academies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Trying to get hired by HR/legal. They'll take any excuse they can find.
    , @Nico

    That would be in the event that they were hiring these graduates instead of black and Hispanic grads from credentialed institutions, and I don’t know where you’ve been for the past quarter of a century if you think that’s an issue outside of cops and firefighters. And they have their own academies.
     
    Just to clarify: are you saying having to choose between scrappy, clever white or Asian graduates of the School of Hard Knocks versus black and Hispanic graduates of, say, U of Chicago is NOT something HR/legal would be faced with in the start-up U situation you hypothesized above, apart from in police and fire stations?

    Sorry if I come across as dense but I couldn't quite figure out the gist on the face of it.

    (Happy Easter, by the way!)
  136. @Dave Pinsen
    Seems like there's an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit. You've got a glut of PhDs, and skyrocketing tuition at even middling schools. You can put a school anywhere, so you don't need to get hosed on real estate prices.

    So why not start a university from scratch and cut out all the affirmative action and cultural Marxism? There's a huge pool of smart and industrious applicants rejected by Ivies and other elite schools. Take the best of them. Give visiting professorships to people like Jason Richwine -- you'll get plenty of press for it, and you'll attract more of the right kind of faculty, students, and donors.

    Admit self-reliant boy scout-type students and save on bloated admin costs. Maybe have a cooking program as part of the school, and have the faculty and students run the dining hall. Have the engineering department handle facilities management, and let the students take turns vacuuming the halls. Partner with a local hospital, and add a medical school, the faculty of which can also run the school clinic. Pass the savings on in the form of lower tuition.

    The kind of students attracted by that arrangement aren't going to be self-indulgent protestors, so your school will be more attractive to heterodox guest speakers, which will make it a more interesting and attractive place, and so on.

    Seems like there’s an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit.

    It won’t work, except by draining students out of the universities into cheaper parallel systems such as MOOCs, certification exams, cognitive/personality testing, and paid apprenticeships.

    In the US university system, there isn’t a functioning market in which to take a niche. Government “financial aid” grants and student loans, the legality of charging students according to parents’ wealth (“need-based” pricing), and tax exemption of non-educational assets (endowments!), all combine to reward universities for maximizing their tuition costs. A school that offers a lower fee for the same service is just leaving money on the table, which means less endowment and therefore lower competitiveness in the long term.

    One would need a coalition of billionaires, not just one rich guy, to fund a genuine competitor to any of the elite universities.

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.
     
    Do you have a link for that?

    This article is relevant to the overall topic: http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/04/education/college-money-a-free-bachelor-s-no-kidding.html
  137. @education realist
    ."HR/legal is very concerned about what it can tell the judge."

    That would be in the event that they were hiring these graduates instead of black and Hispanic grads from credentialed institutions, and I don't know where you've been for the past quarter of a century if you think that's an issue outside of cops and firefighters. And they have their own academies.

    Trying to get hired by HR/legal. They’ll take any excuse they can find.

    Read More
  138. People who think so should read this tweet by Mark Cuban and the replies — eg people wondering why they need to have a free speech rally in Berkeley anyway since there’s already plenty of free speech, right?

    What happened at #Berkeley was not a riot or protest. It was an organized alt-right terrorist attack. Sad!

    Read More
  139. @education realist
    ."HR/legal is very concerned about what it can tell the judge."

    That would be in the event that they were hiring these graduates instead of black and Hispanic grads from credentialed institutions, and I don't know where you've been for the past quarter of a century if you think that's an issue outside of cops and firefighters. And they have their own academies.

    That would be in the event that they were hiring these graduates instead of black and Hispanic grads from credentialed institutions, and I don’t know where you’ve been for the past quarter of a century if you think that’s an issue outside of cops and firefighters. And they have their own academies.

    Just to clarify: are you saying having to choose between scrappy, clever white or Asian graduates of the School of Hard Knocks versus black and Hispanic graduates of, say, U of Chicago is NOT something HR/legal would be faced with in the start-up U situation you hypothesized above, apart from in police and fire stations?

    Sorry if I come across as dense but I couldn’t quite figure out the gist on the face of it.

    (Happy Easter, by the way!)

    Read More
  140. @Steve Sailer
    What's the most famous college started in the last 40 years?

    Actually, one interesting case of a college that’s very new (1997) — but also quite small (350 undergrads) — is the Olin School of Engineering. It’s actually highly ranked (#3) among engineering schools that award no graduate degrees.

    It was started by the Olin Foundation, which put up about 450 million dollars to get it going.

    Imagine what any of our multibillionaires could do with their foundations/money in this direction if they had the mind and vision to do so.

    Instead, Bill Gates is spending umpteen billions of dollars in Africa to make sure that, in the future, there are billions of them to starve in famines.

    Again, it’s all about vision.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    It's also about ethics. Bill Gates doesn't know right from wrong just like your typical liberal. Giving back to your own society which has made you rich and famous is morally wrong , while irresponsibly playing god in Africa like some modern - day Kurtz is the right thing to do.
  141. Marc Kelly Smith, founding father of Poetry Slam, was PC’d off the stage the other day at the National College Slam for some very tame poems. http://www.marckellysmith.net/poems.html

    Read More
  142. “It won’t work, except by draining students out of the universities into cheaper parallel systems such as MOOCs, certification exams, cognitive/personality testing, and paid apprenticeships.”

    No, that’ won’t work. Create a testing system and Asians will cheat to the point that the test is near worthless. Already happening now.

    “Just to clarify: are you saying having to choose between scrappy, clever white or Asian graduates of the School of Hard Knocks versus black and Hispanic graduates of, say, U of Chicago is NOT something HR/legal would be faced with in the start-up U situation you hypothesized above, apart from in police and fire stations?”

    More accurately, I’m saying that having to choose between clever people, most of whom would be white, but would also be all other races , with clear qualifications (BA in x), would not result in a lawsuit. It’s clearly not happening now. Cf tech, finance, teaching. Even in larger corporations, diversity hires in jobs of actual performance jobs hasn’t been an issue for a long time.

    I’m not saying diversity hiring doesn’t happen at all. I’m saying the idea that hiring from such a school would be impossible because ALL hiring of any sort is scrutinized by race and hiring from this school would get you sued is just absurd.

    And this proposed school will.not.work if it’s mostly or even disproportionately Asian. That’s the good news, though–most Asian parents would reject a no-name school.

    The best way to assure you wouldn’t get a mostly Asian population that has no idea what its doing other than buying or gaming SAT tests is a writing test done with no notice and no fixed format.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I’m saying the idea that hiring from such a school would be impossible because ALL hiring of any sort is scrutinized by race and hiring from this school would get you sued is just absurd.
     
    No lawyer worth his billable hours will leave your organization open to such scrutiny if he has anything to say about it. Hires with degrees from non-accredited institutions leave you too open.

    Accreditation is too big a fig leaf to forgo when the asses you need to cover are that formidable.

    That said, alternatives will eventually arise one way or another. It just doesn't do anyone any good to imagine that their way will be easy and it's useful to understand the impediments that have prevented such alternatives from arising already.

  143. “In the US university system, there isn’t a functioning market in which to take a niche. Government “financial aid” grants and student loans, the legality of charging students according to parents’ wealth (“need-based” pricing), and tax exemption of non-educational assets (endowments!), all combine to reward universities for maximizing their tuition costs. A school that offers a lower fee for the same service is just leaving money on the table, which means less endowment and therefore lower competitiveness in the long term.”

    yeah, someone’s totally missing the point of the proposal.

    Read More
    • Replies: @academic gossip
    There were two very different proposals, yours and Dave Pinsen's, whose only common point is the idea that conservative billionaires should step in to make it happen.

    You propose to create "low fuss" baseline post-secondary certification (or whatever else it is that you would like the enlightened Trumpist whales to subsidize). Pinsen's idea is to create Berea Deluxe University, a bargain-basement mockup of a very selective college that would not only come to be perceived as "elite", but acquire that reputation quickly. I explained some reasons why the second plan won't work.

    There is not exactly a shortage of billionaires potentially interested in putting their names on new colleges, nor of people interested in selling a new college scheme to billionaires. That there is not a lot of entry into this "market" should tell you that there are fundamental reasons why these launches are not a simple matter of market economics and "build it and they will come".

  144. @academic gossip

    Seems like there’s an obvious market niche in higher ed that a conservative billionaire could exploit.
     
    It won't work, except by draining students out of the universities into cheaper parallel systems such as MOOCs, certification exams, cognitive/personality testing, and paid apprenticeships.

    In the US university system, there isn't a functioning market in which to take a niche. Government "financial aid" grants and student loans, the legality of charging students according to parents' wealth ("need-based" pricing), and tax exemption of non-educational assets (endowments!), all combine to reward universities for maximizing their tuition costs. A school that offers a lower fee for the same service is just leaving money on the table, which means less endowment and therefore lower competitiveness in the long term.

    One would need a coalition of billionaires, not just one rich guy, to fund a genuine competitor to any of the elite universities.

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.

    Do you have a link for that?

    This article is relevant to the overall topic: http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/04/education/college-money-a-free-bachelor-s-no-kidding.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @academic gossip
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_W._Olin_College_of_Engineering

    Funded in 1997, five years to get up and running. Cost: one million dollars of endowment per student, though they are skimping by outsourcing some classes to other already-built schools.

    It doesn't matter so much if these places have free or cheap tuition. Undergraduate science and engineering can be learned cheaply without college. Some high school whiz kids do that in their spare time. What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.

  145. @Chrisnonymous
    Much as we despise them, most academics support and have always supported academic freedom. I think they've been bullied into submission in many cases. So what kind of turning point do you mean? Just administrators growing a pair?

    Hopefully its a sign that its now popular to virtue signal academic freedom.

    Read More
  146. @candid_observer
    Actually, one interesting case of a college that's very new (1997) -- but also quite small (350 undergrads) -- is the Olin School of Engineering. It's actually highly ranked (#3) among engineering schools that award no graduate degrees.

    It was started by the Olin Foundation, which put up about 450 million dollars to get it going.

    Imagine what any of our multibillionaires could do with their foundations/money in this direction if they had the mind and vision to do so.

    Instead, Bill Gates is spending umpteen billions of dollars in Africa to make sure that, in the future, there are billions of them to starve in famines.

    Again, it's all about vision.

    It’s also about ethics. Bill Gates doesn’t know right from wrong just like your typical liberal. Giving back to your own society which has made you rich and famous is morally wrong , while irresponsibly playing god in Africa like some modern – day Kurtz is the right thing to do.

    Read More
  147. @education realist
    "It won’t work, except by draining students out of the universities into cheaper parallel systems such as MOOCs, certification exams, cognitive/personality testing, and paid apprenticeships."

    No, that' won't work. Create a testing system and Asians will cheat to the point that the test is near worthless. Already happening now.


    "Just to clarify: are you saying having to choose between scrappy, clever white or Asian graduates of the School of Hard Knocks versus black and Hispanic graduates of, say, U of Chicago is NOT something HR/legal would be faced with in the start-up U situation you hypothesized above, apart from in police and fire stations?"

    More accurately, I'm saying that having to choose between clever people, most of whom would be white, but would also be all other races , with clear qualifications (BA in x), would not result in a lawsuit. It's clearly not happening now. Cf tech, finance, teaching. Even in larger corporations, diversity hires in jobs of actual performance jobs hasn't been an issue for a long time.

    I'm not saying diversity hiring doesn't happen at all. I'm saying the idea that hiring from such a school would be impossible because ALL hiring of any sort is scrutinized by race and hiring from this school would get you sued is just absurd.

    And this proposed school will.not.work if it's mostly or even disproportionately Asian. That's the good news, though--most Asian parents would reject a no-name school.

    The best way to assure you wouldn't get a mostly Asian population that has no idea what its doing other than buying or gaming SAT tests is a writing test done with no notice and no fixed format.

    I’m saying the idea that hiring from such a school would be impossible because ALL hiring of any sort is scrutinized by race and hiring from this school would get you sued is just absurd.

    No lawyer worth his billable hours will leave your organization open to such scrutiny if he has anything to say about it. Hires with degrees from non-accredited institutions leave you too open.

    Accreditation is too big a fig leaf to forgo when the asses you need to cover are that formidable.

    That said, alternatives will eventually arise one way or another. It just doesn’t do anyone any good to imagine that their way will be easy and it’s useful to understand the impediments that have prevented such alternatives from arising already.

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  148. @res

    There was a new engineering school opened in Boston 10-20 years ago with zero tuition, like Cooper Union but with entering students more in the MIT range of SAT scores. Reputation is OK but rep ultimately comes from faculty, not the undergraduates.
     
    Do you have a link for that?

    This article is relevant to the overall topic: http://www.nytimes.com/1998/01/04/education/college-money-a-free-bachelor-s-no-kidding.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_W._Olin_College_of_Engineering

    Funded in 1997, five years to get up and running. Cost: one million dollars of endowment per student, though they are skimping by outsourcing some classes to other already-built schools.

    It doesn’t matter so much if these places have free or cheap tuition. Undergraduate science and engineering can be learned cheaply without college. Some high school whiz kids do that in their spare time. What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Thanks. It looks like they are down to funding half of tuition. The cross registration looks interesting. From your wiki link:

    All accepted students receive the Olin Scholarship, which pays for half of tuition and covers cross-registration with Babson College, Wellesley College, and Brandeis University. Olin also shares clubs and intramural sports with the aforementioned colleges. In addition to the Olin Scholarship, the college provides need-based grants. It used to provide full-tuition scholarships, but in 2009, responding to a significant decline in the college's endowment caused by the Great Recession, the trustees decided to reduce the scholarships to half-tuition for all students as of the 2010-11 academic year.[6] There have been no official statements on whether full scholarships will be restored if the endowment recovers.
     
    From your comment:

    What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.
     
    Those are key. I would also add at least some relationships with companies for hiring and/or internships. It's important to get their students out there so people see what they can do.

    Do you have any sense what the value proposition for the faculty is? "five-year renewable contracts with no opportunity for tenure" does not sound terribly appealing, but perhaps the market for professors is competitive enough that they can still get good people?
  149. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Have you never heard of Henry VIII?

    Sure, but the problem is that while ol’ Henry was a powerful unelected ruler who wanted the monasteries dissolved, our powerful unelected rulers are on the side of the modern-day monasteries.

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  150. @Art Deco
    I’d limit majors to ones with a connection to future employment.

    Not all academic departments are troubled. I doubt the natural science and mathematics faculties do a lick of good on faculty committees (except may trying to scotch approval of 'journal-of-your-feelings' courses), but their instructional programs are not in themselves a waste. Ditto economics, the natural science wing of psychology, foreign language faculties, the better sort of history faculties (not American history), the better sort of philosophy faculty, foreign language faculties, and the more quantitatively oriented poli sci and sociology faculties. Conversely, vocational faculties concerned with teacher-training, social work, and library administration are commonly a scandal. Law schools can be loci of scandal. Not sure I'd trust the school of public health, either.

    I wasn’t suggesting all academic departments were troubled. But if I were starting a school from scratch, I’d focus on more applied stuff to make a dent in the universe, build up alumni networks, etc.

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  151. @education realist
    "In the US university system, there isn’t a functioning market in which to take a niche. Government “financial aid” grants and student loans, the legality of charging students according to parents’ wealth (“need-based” pricing), and tax exemption of non-educational assets (endowments!), all combine to reward universities for maximizing their tuition costs. A school that offers a lower fee for the same service is just leaving money on the table, which means less endowment and therefore lower competitiveness in the long term."

    yeah, someone's totally missing the point of the proposal.

    There were two very different proposals, yours and Dave Pinsen’s, whose only common point is the idea that conservative billionaires should step in to make it happen.

    You propose to create “low fuss” baseline post-secondary certification (or whatever else it is that you would like the enlightened Trumpist whales to subsidize). Pinsen’s idea is to create Berea Deluxe University, a bargain-basement mockup of a very selective college that would not only come to be perceived as “elite”, but acquire that reputation quickly. I explained some reasons why the second plan won’t work.

    There is not exactly a shortage of billionaires potentially interested in putting their names on new colleges, nor of people interested in selling a new college scheme to billionaires. That there is not a lot of entry into this “market” should tell you that there are fundamental reasons why these launches are not a simple matter of market economics and “build it and they will come”.

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  152. @Steve Sailer
    American Jews built lots of fine hospitals and country clubs, but not many colleges.

    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    Has nothing to do with it. Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.
     
    That's all very interesting, but you're leaving out the underlying question, which is where Steve is heading, of why all these people were hired, instead of others or instead of not hiring anyone (in the case of student affair, for instance). He's looking at who is scratching the checks, and why. You're looking at who is cashing them.
  153. @Art Deco
    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    Has nothing to do with it. Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.

    Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.

    That’s all very interesting, but you’re leaving out the underlying question, which is where Steve is heading, of why all these people were hired, instead of others or instead of not hiring anyone (in the case of student affair, for instance). He’s looking at who is scratching the checks, and why. You’re looking at who is cashing them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    There is no set of proprietors hiring these people. Earlier cohorts of these people are hiring later cohorts.
  154. @El Dato
    You can recognize these supervillains easily by their gayly colored cape and domino mask. Generally they also have some made-to-order skintight suit with an emblazoned runic logo or a frog image.

    However the Liberal Justice League of America, in particular the heroic duo SuperTransGressive and Beater-of-Eggheads, is standing watch and will push back!

    Was that a typo for ‘gaily’, or is there a subtext there?

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  155. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    My enemies lost the last presidential election.

    It’s increasingly looking like everyone lost the last presidential election.

    Read More
  156. @academic gossip
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_W._Olin_College_of_Engineering

    Funded in 1997, five years to get up and running. Cost: one million dollars of endowment per student, though they are skimping by outsourcing some classes to other already-built schools.

    It doesn't matter so much if these places have free or cheap tuition. Undergraduate science and engineering can be learned cheaply without college. Some high school whiz kids do that in their spare time. What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.

    Thanks. It looks like they are down to funding half of tuition. The cross registration looks interesting. From your wiki link:

    All accepted students receive the Olin Scholarship, which pays for half of tuition and covers cross-registration with Babson College, Wellesley College, and Brandeis University. Olin also shares clubs and intramural sports with the aforementioned colleges. In addition to the Olin Scholarship, the college provides need-based grants. It used to provide full-tuition scholarships, but in 2009, responding to a significant decline in the college’s endowment caused by the Great Recession, the trustees decided to reduce the scholarships to half-tuition for all students as of the 2010-11 academic year.[6] There have been no official statements on whether full scholarships will be restored if the endowment recovers.

    From your comment:

    What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.

    Those are key. I would also add at least some relationships with companies for hiring and/or internships. It’s important to get their students out there so people see what they can do.

    Do you have any sense what the value proposition for the faculty is? “five-year renewable contracts with no opportunity for tenure” does not sound terribly appealing, but perhaps the market for professors is competitive enough that they can still get good people?

    Read More
    • Replies: @academic gossip
    It can work, but like the cross-registration it is only possible by "sharing" the physical and academic capital of other institutions. To do it independently would cost a lot more than their current endowment.

    They're in Boston, center of the academic empire. There are enough desperate new PhDs who would happily fill a 5-year untenured position there, so the lack of tenure is not necessarily a big issue as long as the salary is similar to other postdocs.

    The problem is that to hire people interested in continuing to do research, the school has to either have its own facilities (expensive), or arrange collaborations at research centers nearby, turning the job into a sort of joint position where the teaching, salary payments and office space happen in one place and the research in another. Over time this kind of revolving-door collaboration turns into a supply of free part-time slaves to other institutions and will be treated as such. So in the longer term the school has to either accept getting lower quality faculty that don't care as much about research, or pay for its own facilities.

    Basically Cheapo U is like socialism, it can function but only on the back of a much wealthier/expensive system of academia or capitalism.

  157. @Desiderius
    Trying to get hired by HR/legal. They'll take any excuse they can find.

    Dad told you to be a plumber, but did you listen? ;-)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Dad is a pretty decent one - he flipped houses for fun for thirty years, now he mostly works for HfH - though he's never advised me to be one.

    It might not have been the worst career if I had it to do over again.
  158. @res
    Thanks. It looks like they are down to funding half of tuition. The cross registration looks interesting. From your wiki link:

    All accepted students receive the Olin Scholarship, which pays for half of tuition and covers cross-registration with Babson College, Wellesley College, and Brandeis University. Olin also shares clubs and intramural sports with the aforementioned colleges. In addition to the Olin Scholarship, the college provides need-based grants. It used to provide full-tuition scholarships, but in 2009, responding to a significant decline in the college's endowment caused by the Great Recession, the trustees decided to reduce the scholarships to half-tuition for all students as of the 2010-11 academic year.[6] There have been no official statements on whether full scholarships will be restored if the endowment recovers.
     
    From your comment:

    What matters, if the upstarts want to be real competitors to the elite schools, is having on-campus dormitories full of other high performing students to meet and mate, and faculty that do high profile research. No startup college is going to have that type of faculty anytime soon at one million per student.
     
    Those are key. I would also add at least some relationships with companies for hiring and/or internships. It's important to get their students out there so people see what they can do.

    Do you have any sense what the value proposition for the faculty is? "five-year renewable contracts with no opportunity for tenure" does not sound terribly appealing, but perhaps the market for professors is competitive enough that they can still get good people?

    It can work, but like the cross-registration it is only possible by “sharing” the physical and academic capital of other institutions. To do it independently would cost a lot more than their current endowment.

    They’re in Boston, center of the academic empire. There are enough desperate new PhDs who would happily fill a 5-year untenured position there, so the lack of tenure is not necessarily a big issue as long as the salary is similar to other postdocs.

    The problem is that to hire people interested in continuing to do research, the school has to either have its own facilities (expensive), or arrange collaborations at research centers nearby, turning the job into a sort of joint position where the teaching, salary payments and office space happen in one place and the research in another. Over time this kind of revolving-door collaboration turns into a supply of free part-time slaves to other institutions and will be treated as such. So in the longer term the school has to either accept getting lower quality faculty that don’t care as much about research, or pay for its own facilities.

    Basically Cheapo U is like socialism, it can function but only on the back of a much wealthier/expensive system of academia or capitalism.

    Read More
  159. @Desiderius

    Try exploring the biography of faculty members, how they fancy themselves contra more lucrative occupations, what they expect of their matrix, and the attitude they maintain regarding their students. Then examine the admissions office. Examine the student affairs apparat. And recall that college presidents are fundraisers acting as mediators between clamoring constituencies.
     
    That's all very interesting, but you're leaving out the underlying question, which is where Steve is heading, of why all these people were hired, instead of others or instead of not hiring anyone (in the case of student affair, for instance). He's looking at who is scratching the checks, and why. You're looking at who is cashing them.

    There is no set of proprietors hiring these people. Earlier cohorts of these people are hiring later cohorts.

    Read More
  160. @The True and Original David
    Dad told you to be a plumber, but did you listen? ;-)

    Dad is a pretty decent one – he flipped houses for fun for thirty years, now he mostly works for HfH – though he’s never advised me to be one.

    It might not have been the worst career if I had it to do over again.

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    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    You retained your sanity and good humor. A rather good outcome I would say.

    And to hell with HR ladies.
  161. @Desiderius
    Dad is a pretty decent one - he flipped houses for fun for thirty years, now he mostly works for HfH - though he's never advised me to be one.

    It might not have been the worst career if I had it to do over again.

    You retained your sanity and good humor. A rather good outcome I would say.

    And to hell with HR ladies.

    Read More
  162. @Steve Sailer
    American Jews built lots of fine hospitals and country clubs, but not many colleges.

    One reason universities try to act super-progressive is because they are so conservative. How many other 17th Century institutions are there in the U.S. besides Harvard?

    Boston Latin School, established in 1635, a year before Harvard. Last year two sista girls caused such a ruckus about their treatment by their white peers that Latin now has an interim headmaster.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/09/26/federal-probe-finds-harassment-discrimination-boston-latin-school-orders-reforms/FgjoGiZVzF56iIYfIKK3PL/story.html

    We have the U.S. Attorney investigating chicken-s*** trash talk between adolescents. We live in a farcical world.
  163. @Brutusale
    Boston Latin School, established in 1635, a year before Harvard. Last year two sista girls caused such a ruckus about their treatment by their white peers that Latin now has an interim headmaster.

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2016/09/26/federal-probe-finds-harassment-discrimination-boston-latin-school-orders-reforms/FgjoGiZVzF56iIYfIKK3PL/story.html

    We have the U.S. Attorney investigating chicken-s*** trash talk between adolescents. We live in a farcical world.

    Read More

Comments are closed.

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