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Will Mugabe's Jacket JuJu Save Him One More Time?
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GQ in 2077: President-for-Life Kaepernick delivers his 47th annual State of the President Address

As iSteve readers know, we are big fans of Zimbabwe president-for-life Robert Mugabe’s favorite sports coat.

Because there appears to be a coup of some sort going on in Zimbabwe at the moment, we are taking the precaution of running a picture of the 93-year-old dictator’s Mugabe Jacket one more time.

 
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  1. As iSteve readers know, we are big fans of Zimbabwe president-for-life Robert Mugabe’s favorite sports coat.

    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    That might be a cage match worthy of the "Titans of Totality" challenge, with contests including: number of children sired, number of "rivals" eliminated, domination of cultural communication channels, degree of self obsession, "living in your nation's mind", and true weaselflair or "all wolverine" in the face of imminent destruction. Bring on the Titans!
    , @NickG

    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?
     
    On a par with Lance Armstrong and exactly half way between uncle Donald and Hilary.
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    He definitely has Adolf beat with the longevity genes. Adolf was rumored to be in general poor health in his middle age. Had nature taken its course, it’s doubtful he would have made it past the early 1950’s. The same thing is often said about JFK’s health. He probably would have died not long after leaving his second term.
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  2. Rod1963 says:

    Maybe, but the Grimm Reaper always gets his man in the end. Or as Bugs Bunny said, “No one gets out of here alive.”

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  3. Bugg says:

    Stylistically not cool.; it’s trying to hard. Mick Jagger doesn’t wear a Rolling Stones t-shirt.

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    • Replies: @mobi

    Stylistically not cool.; it’s trying to hard. Mick Jagger doesn’t wear a Rolling Stones t-shirt.
     
    Mick Jagger needs to care.

    At least it's just a jacket. Is Zimbabwe covered in monuments to the guy? By historical megalomaniac standards, he might qualify as modest and understated.

    I suspect at this point, he's just too whacked-out to care much about anything anymore.

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  4. Berty says:

    So are you ever going to comment on Roy Moore?

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    • Replies: @Jasper Been
    That’s just not the kind of foolishness Mr. Sailer comments on.
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  5. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it’s being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    Read More
    • Troll: L Woods, Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before.
     
    And, after all, who needs mere food when you've got tobacco. Smokes for everyone, courtesy of Captain Bob!
    , @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous:

    While thousands of blacks are tobacco farming, they are doing it under the supervision/control of non-blacks, primarily Chinese.
    , @celt darnell
    Robert Mugabe killed many, many more black Zimbabweans than Ian Smith ever did.

    Oh, and the average black Zimbabwean still has a lower per capital GDP than he did in 1980.

    Is that what you mean by restoring "dignity" to black Zimbabweans?

    Do tell.
    , @Danand
    “By 2016 the economy had collapsed, nationwide protests took place throughout the country and the finance minister admitted "Right now we literally have nothing." There was the introduction of bond notes to literally fight the biting cash crisi and liquidity crunch. Cash became scarce on the market in the year 2017.”

    The above is from Wiki. Maybe those ultra productive Zimbabwean farmers would do well to plant opium next crop?
    , @Anonymous
    Zimbabwe is one of those instances where white nationalists and neoliberal globalists are on the same side.
    , @bomag
    If Zimbabwe is a successful example of African leadership I'd hate to see what a failure would look like.
    , @Pat Boyle
    I read a very large and long history of the African liberation movement last year. I don't remember all that much about it or rather I keep getting the black liberators mixed up.

    There seem to be two major types of black leaders. The first type built private zoos so they could raise crocodiles that they could feed with their political opponents. The second type ate their political rivals themselves. They didn't build zoos. They built kitchens.
    , @Jack D
    This year there will be a record cabbage harvest in the Donbas! And tractor production will exceed the Five Year Plan, comrades! Soon we will overtake the imperialists in the production of selenium!

    Will you shut up already about the tobacco farms? As has been explained to you a million times, the Chinese have assumed leadership of this sector in Zimbabwe and brought some organization to it, so the white colonialists have now been replaced by yellow colonialists.

    Otherwise, the Zimbabwe economy is a disaster with 90% unemployment. From one end of sub-Saharan Africa to the other, it's abundantly clear that blacks are incapable of running a modern economy. The more thoroughly they purge non-blacks from their country, the greater the resulting disaster. Nor is this a case where the lot of the average (African) man is improved as a result of displacing white masters - the pie shrinks for everyone except for a small corrupt black elite.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I'm not familiar with the claims you're referring to, but when "white nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm," I doubt very much that they meant literally couldn't grow crops. Blacks farm in other places in Africa and the Americas, so it would be silly to claim they couldn't in Zimbabwe.

    What they probably meant is that blacks couldn't farm at scale, requiring more complex management. As far as that goes, isn't it true that white farms in Zimbabwe were split up and given to small land owners? How are any large farms faring compared to smaller ones? Why are there any failing farms for Chinese to take over if blacks have proven to be thoroughly competent at running the tobacco industry?
    , @ia
    From the CIA World Factbook:

    Zimbabwe’s government entered a second Staff Monitored Program with the IMF in 2014 and undertook other measures to reengage with international financial institutions. Zimbabwe repaid roughly $108 million in arrears to the IMF in October 2016, but financial observers note that Zimbabwe is unlikely to gain new financing because the government has not disclosed how it plans to repay more than $1.7 billion in arrears to the World Bank and African Development Bank.
     
    It's a shithole supported by rich whites but they're backing out.
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  6. RIP Bobby Mugabe. We’ll miss you, as your regime proved so much of our program to the world. Your nation was great as Rhodesia, it was great in an entirely different way as Zimbabwe, I hope these coup plotters don’t succeed in imposing mediocrity on your fair people.

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  7. Here’s a classic recap of Rhodesia’s history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCbqVkjIZA8

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Most of the soldiers Rhodesians fought against were around 12 years old. This is a really embarrassing fact that they tend to hide in distorted histories. They lost a war to a bunch of kids.
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  8. TWS says:

    He’s really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    He’s really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?
     
    Apres moi, le deluge.
    , @PiltdownMan

    He’s really 93? Pretty well preserved.
     
    Black don't crack.
    , @Bugg
    I'm Bobby Mugabe. I was beheading white guys by the thousands and turning the rest of them into a delicious suppertime treat while you were running around in a some half-assed children's army trying to figure out which end of the AK the bullets came out of.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    You're only as old as the woman you feel up, as they say.
    , @Jack D
    Until recently, his successor WAS chosen - it was Emmerson (sp) Mnangagwa, a 75 year old head chopper (former Minister of State Security said to be responsible for 20,000 deaths). But then Mugabe's wife whispered into Mugabe's ear that SHE would like to succeed him and continue the family dynasty. The military was not really keen about serving under this foul woman (foul even by low Zimbabwe standards) and that set the ball rolling for the coup.

    As a young man, Emmerson escaped execution for blowing up a locomotive by (falsely) claiming to have been under 21 at the time of his crime. Sound familiar? Apparently it is really hard to tell how old black people are - at 16 they look like they are 25 so at 25 they look like they are 16.
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  9. @Reg Cæsar

    As iSteve readers know, we are big fans of Zimbabwe president-for-life Robert Mugabe’s favorite sports coat.
     
    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?

    That might be a cage match worthy of the “Titans of Totality” challenge, with contests including: number of children sired, number of “rivals” eliminated, domination of cultural communication channels, degree of self obsession, “living in your nation’s mind”, and true weaselflair or “all wolverine” in the face of imminent destruction. Bring on the Titans!

    Read More
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  10. He must have his own textile supplier. Or perhaps these jackets are a thing in Harare?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Reminiscent of that non-PC joke about what Polish brides wear
    , @Corn
    Clearly my life is incomplete until I have employed the services of a Zimbabwean tailor.
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  11. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    He’s a good Catholic.

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  12. athEIst says:

    So, it’s agreed, Mugabe leaves Zimbabwe if, and only if, he takes his warderobe with him.

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  13. TWS, it appears that he has booted his chosen successor (who had the support of the military) in an attempt to set his wife up instead, hence coup.

    Read More
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  14. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Aristippus
    Here's a classic recap of Rhodesia's history https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCbqVkjIZA8

    Most of the soldiers Rhodesians fought against were around 12 years old. This is a really embarrassing fact that they tend to hide in distorted histories. They lost a war to a bunch of kids.

    Read More
    • Troll: bomag
    • Replies: @celt darnell
    Uh yeah. And most Rhodesian soldiers were only 10 years old.

    Does lying come naturally to you or do work hard at it?
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  15. newrouter says:
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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    speaking of geezers:

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Conyers
     
    He started out working for John Dingell, who's only three years older, but long retired. Something tells me there's a significant gap between their NRA scores.
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  16. He must have his own textile supplier. Or perhaps these jackets are a thing in Harare?

    Are they watching Monkees and Banana Splits reruns in Zimbabwe?

    Erik von Kuehnelt-Leddihn said Africans looked quite good in bright colors, but he sure didn’t mean psychedelic. Even the Wiggles wore solids.

    By the way, the jacket in the top photo is eerily reminiscent of Soylent Green. Or, at best, Spongebob.

    Read More
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  17. snorlax says:

    OT: Billionaire Jesus freak wants to open a Bible museum, the deep state (USG, and the people he hired to run the museum) won’t let him. https://www.facebook.com/wsj/posts/10156912964253128

    Read More
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  18. gman says:

    OT

    Here is a good follow-up on Locol in an industry trade publication

    https://www.qsrmagazine.com/fast-casual/why-locol-struggling

    In less than two years, Locol’s initial optimism has given way to hard realities. Can the socially minded concept still deliver on its mission?

    iSteve April article:

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/hipster-helper-a-celebrity-chef-opens-a-restaurant-in-watts/

    Read More
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  19. @newrouter
    speaking of geezers:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Conyers

    speaking of geezers:

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Conyers

    He started out working for John Dingell, who’s only three years older, but long retired. Something tells me there’s a significant gap between their NRA scores.

    Read More
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  20. njguy73 says:

    He started out working for John Dingell, who’s only three years older, but long retired. Something tells me there’s a significant gap between their NRA scores.

    Fun fact: For 45.5% of Michigan’s existence as a U.S. state, someone named John Dingell has represented it in Congress.

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73
    In fact, since 1933, the state has gone uninterrupted from John Sr. to John Jr. to Debbie (Mrs. John Jr.) If she holds her seat through 2030, the state will have spent more time being represented by a Dingell than not.
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  21. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before.

    And, after all, who needs mere food when you’ve got tobacco. Smokes for everyone, courtesy of Captain Bob!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Old Bob certainly does not encourage the youth to smoke. In fact smoking is not very popular at all in Zimbabwe or really anywhere else in Africa because it's hot most of the time.

    The people of Zimbabwe would be starving following your logic. It's backwards economics to grow your own food. Zimbabwe is growing the crop that provides the most export income.
    , @Anonymous
    That's agronomics 101: you grow cash crops, crops that yield the most profit under the circumstances.
    , @Anonymous
    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.
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  22. Mr. Anon says:
    @TWS
    He's really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    He’s really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    Apres moi, le deluge.

    Read More
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  23. Lagertha says:

    They’ve all ripped-off Elvis..or want to be Elvis, or be revered like Elvis. Elvis was perhaps, Mugabe’s icon of a cool guy? Elvis was like John Wayne…no gay stuff happening.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Peter Lund
    Huh? Wasn't Wayne bi?
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  24. njguy73 says:
    @njguy73

    He started out working for John Dingell, who’s only three years older, but long retired. Something tells me there’s a significant gap between their NRA scores.
     
    Fun fact: For 45.5% of Michigan's existence as a U.S. state, someone named John Dingell has represented it in Congress.

    In fact, since 1933, the state has gone uninterrupted from John Sr. to John Jr. to Debbie (Mrs. John Jr.) If she holds her seat through 2030, the state will have spent more time being represented by a Dingell than not.

    Read More
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  25. Dan Hayes says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    Anonymous:

    While thousands of blacks are tobacco farming, they are doing it under the supervision/control of non-blacks, primarily Chinese.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Chinese investors own about 5 large farms somewhere. Considering the size of the industry (anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco) this hardly amounts to control or supervision. But it does seem like you what to falsify the situation.
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  26. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    Musabe’s psychedelic jackets brings back fond memories of the Japanese jacket my late brother-in-law brought back to me on his return from the Korean War. The jacket was multi-colored but way more subdued than the Zimbabwe ones.

    Read More
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  27. Dingell only retired in 2014. Conyers is an interesting fella; way to the Left of most Black representatives.

    Read More
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  28. wren says:

    He looks pretty cool to me.

    Which gives me an excuse to post these guys again.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    When I lived in New Orleans in the mid seventies, pastel suits like that were all the rage with the Brothas. I don't know whether this is still the case.

    I was riding my bike through City Park one balmy evening, coincidently, just before the start of an outdoor concert. The headliner was Barry White.

    My oh my. You should have seen the couples promenade as they made their way across the lawn to the venue. They looked like flowers in a Monet painting. Of course, the men outshone the women (which is the norm in black culture).

    On the return leg of my ride I could hear, as I passed the concert, Barry's low voice mesmerizing the crowd. It sounded like Voodoo. Even though it was getting dark, I felt safe cause I knew everyone was in there getting hypnotized.

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  29. Bubba says:

    Since the 21sr century began, I’ve been trying in vain to find out if the late Libyan dictator Mohamer Khadafi and Robert Mugabe share the same fashion designer. Khadafi wasn’t as colorful as Mugabe, but he did like to adorn his clothing with pictures of himself before Mugabe thereby making fashionista history.

    Read More
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  30. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dan Hayes
    Anonymous:

    While thousands of blacks are tobacco farming, they are doing it under the supervision/control of non-blacks, primarily Chinese.

    Chinese investors own about 5 large farms somewhere. Considering the size of the industry (anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco) this hardly amounts to control or supervision. But it does seem like you what to falsify the situation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    I'm not familiar with the details here, but I suspect there are some foreigners arranging the marketing of said tobacco.

    anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco
     
    The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle.

    The confiscation was like taking a country's "evil" corporations and giving them to some guys hanging out on a street corner.
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  31. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before.
     
    And, after all, who needs mere food when you've got tobacco. Smokes for everyone, courtesy of Captain Bob!

    Old Bob certainly does not encourage the youth to smoke. In fact smoking is not very popular at all in Zimbabwe or really anywhere else in Africa because it’s hot most of the time.

    The people of Zimbabwe would be starving following your logic. It’s backwards economics to grow your own food. Zimbabwe is growing the crop that provides the most export income.

    Read More
    • Replies: @biz
    Ahem, in Zimbabwe it is not "hot most of the time." Much of Zimbabwe is at a significant altitude and has low humidity leading to a highland climate with moderate days and cold nights.

    e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harare#Climate
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  32. @TWS
    He's really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    He’s really 93? Pretty well preserved.

    Black don’t crack.

    Read More
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  33. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before.
     
    And, after all, who needs mere food when you've got tobacco. Smokes for everyone, courtesy of Captain Bob!

    That’s agronomics 101: you grow cash crops, crops that yield the most profit under the circumstances.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    Agronomy 101 tells us that tobacco is only suitable on a fraction of arable land; plenty of food staples can be grown on ground that is unsuitable for tobacco.
    , @CCZ
    Disagree 101

    An African agronomist paints a rather negative portrait of the effects of tobacco cultivation, even by smallholder farmers: soil depletion, toxic heavy metals, and very little income to the actual farmers.


    Tobacco Cultivation Effects on Soil Fertility and Heavy Metals Concentration on Smallholder Farms in Western Kenya
    Kisinyo Peter Oloo
    Accepted 31 May 2016
    Department of Agronomy, Rongo University College, Rongo, Kenya

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) production in Kenya has increased over the years and is mainly cultivated by smallholder farmers (SHF). Between 1972 and 1991, the number of tobacco growing farmers increased by 67%, between 1991 and 2000 by 36% and between 2001 and 2005 by 15%. In Kenya, about 35,000 SHF are growing the crop on 4500 ha of land with a production of approximately 16,000 tons per year. Increased land acreage under tobacco has led to a decrease in the availability of land for production of food crops (such as maize, cassava, millet and sweet potatoes) therefore giving rise to food insecurity in tobacco growing areas (Ministry of Agriculture, 2004). Although a cash crop, increased acreage under production by farmers has not improved the livelihoods of the SHF, because the profits are too little to make any significance difference in the lives of the poor farmers compared to the benefit enjoyed by the Tobacco Companies (Kweyuh,1997).

    Tobacco cultivation has a lot of impact on the environment such as deforestation, environmental pollution due to use of agrochemicals and soil fertility depletion (Yanda, 2010). The crop is a heavy feeder on soil nutrients and as a result depletes soil nutrients very much faster compared to other crops, thereby making such soils unsuitable for healthy plant growth (Trenbath, 1986; Yanda, 2010). Its depletes soil nutrients so much faster such that subsequent food crops do not benefit from the residual fertilizer applications (Geist, 1999). The use of agrochemicals such as insecticides and herbicides is another factor that contributes a lot in the accumulation of heavy metals in the soil (Kibwageet al., 2008). When heavy metals are present in the soil, they have the potential to interfere with the activity of soil organisms, pollute food crops, water bodies, wildlife and humans (Kutub and Falgunee, 2015).

     

    And in the US, the ill effect of continuous tobacco cultivation on soil productivity was widely recognized:

    Historian Avery O. Craven, in Soil Exhaustion in the Agricultural History of Virginia and Maryland, 1606-1860 (1926), maintained that "soil exhaustion and tobacco cultivation went hand in hand." Tobacco rapidly depleted the soil, hence luxuriant crops could be grown for only three or four years. Soon after planting, soil nutrients — especially nitrogen and potassium—began to decline and soil microorganisms created toxins that poisoned tobacco plants.
     
    , @AndrewR
    "You" grow cash crops after "you" grow enough food to feed your people.
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  34. @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    Robert Mugabe killed many, many more black Zimbabweans than Ian Smith ever did.

    Oh, and the average black Zimbabwean still has a lower per capital GDP than he did in 1980.

    Is that what you mean by restoring “dignity” to black Zimbabweans?

    Do tell.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The guy is a monster even by black African standards and the sooner he assumes dirt temperature the better.
    , @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.
    , @Anonymous
    The aim of the policy was to turn the mass of rural and landless poor into small scale farming land owners. It's been successful by that measure. There's obviously a dignity in the genteel poverty of small landholders tilling their fields rather than being employed as field hands on huge plantations or as domestic servants. Moreover, the former provides the conditions and incentives for development, while the latter doesn't.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/thank-you-mr-mugabe-zimbabwe-s-forced-land-redistribution-led-to-huge-controversy-but-it-has-8923229.html

    “This is the best thing that could have happened to me and my family and the generality of black Zimbabweans,” the former machine operator said at his six-hectare (15-acre) farm near the tobacco-farming town of Karoi, 93 miles north of the capital, Harare. “I now lead a far better life,” he says.

    Mr Matashu, 34, says he was allocated land by the government in 2001 after a white-owned farm was seized and its former owner emigrated to South Africa. He grew cotton for a decade before switching to tobacco. This year he earned $34,000 and won an award for being the best small-scale tobacco farmer in Karoi.

    ...

    “In the biggest land reform in Africa, 6,000 white farmers have been replaced by 245,000 Zimbabwean farmers. These are primarily ordinary poor people who have become more productive farmers.”

    ...

    The tobacco industry is no longer marked by the pattern of large, white-owned farms, which have been seized and resettled. In 2000 the crop was grown by 1,500 large-scale farmers while 5,000 small-scale growers produced 3 per cent of the crop. This year 110,000 small-scale farmers grew 65 per cent of the crop, according to the government’s Tobacco Industry Marketing Board. While most of the tobacco used to be auctioned, most is now grown under contract for leaf merchants.

    More than a fifth of the growers were registered this year, and farmers are being encouraged to grow the crop in the arid region of Matabeleland.

    “It took the minority more than 50 years to reach 220 million kilograms,” said Lovemore Chikweya, regional coordinator for the TIMB in Nyamandhlovu, 230 miles south-west of Harare, in an interview. “With these new farmers that number can and will be surpassed within five years,” he said, forecasting production at 200 million kilograms in 2014.
     
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  35. @Anonymous
    Most of the soldiers Rhodesians fought against were around 12 years old. This is a really embarrassing fact that they tend to hide in distorted histories. They lost a war to a bunch of kids.

    Uh yeah. And most Rhodesian soldiers were only 10 years old.

    Does lying come naturally to you or do work hard at it?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The typical Rhodesian conscript was 20 years old.
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  36. mobi says:
    @Bugg
    Stylistically not cool.; it's trying to hard. Mick Jagger doesn't wear a Rolling Stones t-shirt.

    Stylistically not cool.; it’s trying to hard. Mick Jagger doesn’t wear a Rolling Stones t-shirt.

    Mick Jagger needs to care.

    At least it’s just a jacket. Is Zimbabwe covered in monuments to the guy? By historical megalomaniac standards, he might qualify as modest and understated.

    I suspect at this point, he’s just too whacked-out to care much about anything anymore.

    Read More
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  37. Danand says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    “By 2016 the economy had collapsed, nationwide protests took place throughout the country and the finance minister admitted “Right now we literally have nothing.” There was the introduction of bond notes to literally fight the biting cash crisi and liquidity crunch. Cash became scarce on the market in the year 2017.”

    The above is from Wiki. Maybe those ultra productive Zimbabwean farmers would do well to plant opium next crop?

    Read More
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  38. With respect to the supposed coup d’etat in Zimbabwe, to quote a certain hag, “What difference, at this point, does it make?”

    Rhodesia was a success story. Zimbabwe? Just another African basket case.

    Does anyone think this event will make the slightest bit of difference?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.
     
    , @AndrewR
    Probably not, but it is fascinating to see the longest-ruling dictator alive* be removed in a coup


    *Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea have longer-ruling dictators but, completely unlike Mugabe, they are essentially unknown outside their regions.

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  39. CCZ says:

    A look at Google Earth and Bing shows Harare, Zimbabwe as a relatively modest sized national capital of 2 million. But, of interest to some, within 7 miles of the center of the city, Harare has 8 golf courses/country clubs, including the Police Golf Club.

    National Heroes Acre, 57-acres (230,000 m2), is situated on a ridge seven kilometres from Harare. The actual monument itself is modeled after two AK-47s lying back-to-back; the graves are meant to resemble their magazines. The monument is an early example of work of the North Korean firm Mansudae Overseas Projects. It closely mirrors the design of the Revolutionary Martyrs’ Cemetery in Taesong-guyŏk, just outside Pyongyang, North Korea.

    Read More
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  40. eah says:

    OT

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    In other (not so) breaking news...

    https://twitter.com/ComfortablySmug/status/930601787018670081
    , @Gunner
    What has changed is that she no longer needs the votes of white people.
    , @eah
    https://twitter.com/kausmickey/status/930619469965217797
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  41. eah says:
    @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/FAIRImmigration/status/930480553664679943

    In other (not so) breaking news…

    Read More
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  42. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before.
     
    And, after all, who needs mere food when you've got tobacco. Smokes for everyone, courtesy of Captain Bob!

    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.
     
    Which they desparately need because they don't grow enough food to feed themselves.

    You know, opium might bring in even more money. Maybe they should grow that.
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  43. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    Zimbabwe is one of those instances where white nationalists and neoliberal globalists are on the same side.

    Read More
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  44. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @celt darnell
    Uh yeah. And most Rhodesian soldiers were only 10 years old.

    Does lying come naturally to you or do work hard at it?

    The typical Rhodesian conscript was 20 years old.

    Read More
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  45. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @celt darnell
    Robert Mugabe killed many, many more black Zimbabweans than Ian Smith ever did.

    Oh, and the average black Zimbabwean still has a lower per capital GDP than he did in 1980.

    Is that what you mean by restoring "dignity" to black Zimbabweans?

    Do tell.

    The guy is a monster even by black African standards and the sooner he assumes dirt temperature the better.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    No worse than Charlie Taylor or General Butt-Naked.
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  46. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @celt darnell
    Robert Mugabe killed many, many more black Zimbabweans than Ian Smith ever did.

    Oh, and the average black Zimbabwean still has a lower per capital GDP than he did in 1980.

    Is that what you mean by restoring "dignity" to black Zimbabweans?

    Do tell.

    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion’s share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants.
     
    I don't know about the mining sector, but the ag sector paid plenty of taxes.

    How high a standard of living could anyone achieve in Zimbabwe? Most people were there for the love of the land and the vocation of farming. You seem to think White people ply the globe looking for Black people to exploit.

    For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.
     
    I suspect that 95% of Blacks would be a bit bemused to find out that they have been psychologically whipped around by Whites.

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    “Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue.“

    That will probably end up going to the Chinese.
    , @Sandmich
    Ah the ol' black rallying cry: 'tis better to rule in hell than serve in heaven. You seem too earnest to be a genuine troll, though your pro-ethnic cleansing stance would seem to invalidate your supposed intellectual stance so I dunno.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I actually knew someone from that 95%, bright guy who worked for me and hell, even a member of their elite. The Mugabe system is so dysfunctional that he was sincerely hoping that the Chinese or Russians would soon take over the country so that they would actually be able to begin to earn wages that didn't completely vanish to corruption.

    The system there is so enormously broken - to be an honest tradesman, for example, you should learn to practice how to disguise/cheat on your earnings to prevent the government from legally robbing you that to sort it out is mindboggling.
    , @Jack D

    That counts for a kind of dignity.
     
    Yes, the kind of dignity where your head is held high but stomach is empty. The kind of dignity you get in the slums of Haiti. The kind of dignity you get when you know that the crooks in charge are the same color as you. What a wonderful kind of dignity that is!
    , @Olorin

    they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites.
     
    My goodness, what fragile snowflakes are our noble African brethren.

    Yeah, whitey's to blame.

    https://zimbabwe-today.com/zimbabwe-economy-meltdown-due-to-poor-mismanagement-and-stealing-not-just-sanctions/
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  47. He’ll be missed. I’m a big fan of the “Robert Mugabe quotes” memes, too.

    Read More
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  48. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @celt darnell
    Robert Mugabe killed many, many more black Zimbabweans than Ian Smith ever did.

    Oh, and the average black Zimbabwean still has a lower per capital GDP than he did in 1980.

    Is that what you mean by restoring "dignity" to black Zimbabweans?

    Do tell.

    The aim of the policy was to turn the mass of rural and landless poor into small scale farming land owners. It’s been successful by that measure. There’s obviously a dignity in the genteel poverty of small landholders tilling their fields rather than being employed as field hands on huge plantations or as domestic servants. Moreover, the former provides the conditions and incentives for development, while the latter doesn’t.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/thank-you-mr-mugabe-zimbabwe-s-forced-land-redistribution-led-to-huge-controversy-but-it-has-8923229.html

    “This is the best thing that could have happened to me and my family and the generality of black Zimbabweans,” the former machine operator said at his six-hectare (15-acre) farm near the tobacco-farming town of Karoi, 93 miles north of the capital, Harare. “I now lead a far better life,” he says.

    Mr Matashu, 34, says he was allocated land by the government in 2001 after a white-owned farm was seized and its former owner emigrated to South Africa. He grew cotton for a decade before switching to tobacco. This year he earned $34,000 and won an award for being the best small-scale tobacco farmer in Karoi.

    “In the biggest land reform in Africa, 6,000 white farmers have been replaced by 245,000 Zimbabwean farmers. These are primarily ordinary poor people who have become more productive farmers.”

    The tobacco industry is no longer marked by the pattern of large, white-owned farms, which have been seized and resettled. In 2000 the crop was grown by 1,500 large-scale farmers while 5,000 small-scale growers produced 3 per cent of the crop. This year 110,000 small-scale farmers grew 65 per cent of the crop, according to the government’s Tobacco Industry Marketing Board. While most of the tobacco used to be auctioned, most is now grown under contract for leaf merchants.

    More than a fifth of the growers were registered this year, and farmers are being encouraged to grow the crop in the arid region of Matabeleland.

    “It took the minority more than 50 years to reach 220 million kilograms,” said Lovemore Chikweya, regional coordinator for the TIMB in Nyamandhlovu, 230 miles south-west of Harare, in an interview. “With these new farmers that number can and will be surpassed within five years,” he said, forecasting production at 200 million kilograms in 2014.

    Read More
  49. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    If Zimbabwe is a successful example of African leadership I’d hate to see what a failure would look like.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No one is arguing that Zimbabwe is in good shape. What is being discussed is that more tobacco is being grown under black ownership than when whites clung onto the land. That's not cherry picking. Back when the Zimbabwe economy had collapsed in the immediate aftermath of land reform, white nationalist yokels like those on American Renaissance were hee hawing like crazy donkeys about the plight of blacks in Zimbabwe because there were no longer white farmers to grow tobacco and produce exports. White nationalists have been proven wrong based on the point they made years ago.
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  50. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    That's agronomics 101: you grow cash crops, crops that yield the most profit under the circumstances.

    Agronomy 101 tells us that tobacco is only suitable on a fraction of arable land; plenty of food staples can be grown on ground that is unsuitable for tobacco.

    Read More
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  51. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @celt darnell
    With respect to the supposed coup d'etat in Zimbabwe, to quote a certain hag, "What difference, at this point, does it make?"

    Rhodesia was a success story. Zimbabwe? Just another African basket case.

    Does anyone think this event will make the slightest bit of difference?

    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields.
     
    Zimbabwe's White farms blew past this model sixty years ago; they were highly mechanized with state of the art crop yields. They were the manufacturing engine of the country.

    You are just sprouting (sic) propaganda.
    , @Anonymous
    Can you go by Anonymous 2? TY
    , @blank-misgivings
    I've read Studwell's excellent book on land reform in East and South East Asia, but I doubt Mugabe had the wherewithal to follow the path of Taiwan or that top-down anarchy is the same thing as an agricultural development policy.
    , @WJ
    This must be why the typical Zimbabwean lives to the ripe old age of 58. Now for the good news, obesity rates are very low.
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  52. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Chinese investors own about 5 large farms somewhere. Considering the size of the industry (anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco) this hardly amounts to control or supervision. But it does seem like you what to falsify the situation.

    I’m not familiar with the details here, but I suspect there are some foreigners arranging the marketing of said tobacco.

    anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco

    The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle.

    The confiscation was like taking a country’s “evil” corporations and giving them to some guys hanging out on a street corner.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle."

    You are constructing the myth of the white superfarmer. That myth was shattered after tobacco production came roaring back under black ownership. Part of the explanation for why smallholder black farmers could produce more than the white landowners is that the blacks farmed more land. It turned out that a lot of the white landowners weren't doing much farming. They were "conservationists" as they styled themselves. But really they were just too lazy or didn't have the capital or too lazy to get the capital to exploit all of the land they owned so it went uncultivated.
    , @Anonymous
    So I guess you'll have the same attitude when the last remnants of America's dying middle class are left out on street corners hooked on opiods and everything is owned by corporations and oligarchs in New York City.
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  53. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.
     

    Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields.

    Zimbabwe’s White farms blew past this model sixty years ago; they were highly mechanized with state of the art crop yields. They were the manufacturing engine of the country.

    You are just sprouting (sic) propaganda.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A feudal political economy does not mean that there is no mechanization. There were machines in the Middle Ages. It refers to patterns of ownership and distribution.
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  54. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.
     

    Can you go by Anonymous 2? TY

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Just so nobody takes Anonymous 4. It's a Medieval/Renaissance recording group.
    , @Anon
    He can, so long as I'm still the Anon with the Canon.
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  55. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    The aim of the policy was to turn the mass of rural and landless poor into small scale farming land owners. It's been successful by that measure. There's obviously a dignity in the genteel poverty of small landholders tilling their fields rather than being employed as field hands on huge plantations or as domestic servants. Moreover, the former provides the conditions and incentives for development, while the latter doesn't.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/thank-you-mr-mugabe-zimbabwe-s-forced-land-redistribution-led-to-huge-controversy-but-it-has-8923229.html

    “This is the best thing that could have happened to me and my family and the generality of black Zimbabweans,” the former machine operator said at his six-hectare (15-acre) farm near the tobacco-farming town of Karoi, 93 miles north of the capital, Harare. “I now lead a far better life,” he says.

    Mr Matashu, 34, says he was allocated land by the government in 2001 after a white-owned farm was seized and its former owner emigrated to South Africa. He grew cotton for a decade before switching to tobacco. This year he earned $34,000 and won an award for being the best small-scale tobacco farmer in Karoi.

    ...

    “In the biggest land reform in Africa, 6,000 white farmers have been replaced by 245,000 Zimbabwean farmers. These are primarily ordinary poor people who have become more productive farmers.”

    ...

    The tobacco industry is no longer marked by the pattern of large, white-owned farms, which have been seized and resettled. In 2000 the crop was grown by 1,500 large-scale farmers while 5,000 small-scale growers produced 3 per cent of the crop. This year 110,000 small-scale farmers grew 65 per cent of the crop, according to the government’s Tobacco Industry Marketing Board. While most of the tobacco used to be auctioned, most is now grown under contract for leaf merchants.

    More than a fifth of the growers were registered this year, and farmers are being encouraged to grow the crop in the arid region of Matabeleland.

    “It took the minority more than 50 years to reach 220 million kilograms,” said Lovemore Chikweya, regional coordinator for the TIMB in Nyamandhlovu, 230 miles south-west of Harare, in an interview. “With these new farmers that number can and will be surpassed within five years,” he said, forecasting production at 200 million kilograms in 2014.
     

    Misleading. Besides the usual massaging of statistics in service to feelz!, Zimbabwe gave up state of the art production of corn, wheat, cotton, and peanuts just to get small producers to equal the tobacco production of twenty years ago. This is an almost a criminal analysis of the situation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No, it's not, since the aim of land reform is to develop the political economy of the nation, which consists of a mass of rural peasants, not to maximize GDP or the returns to large landholders.
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  56. CCZ says:
    @Anonymous
    That's agronomics 101: you grow cash crops, crops that yield the most profit under the circumstances.

    Disagree 101

    An African agronomist paints a rather negative portrait of the effects of tobacco cultivation, even by smallholder farmers: soil depletion, toxic heavy metals, and very little income to the actual farmers.

    Tobacco Cultivation Effects on Soil Fertility and Heavy Metals Concentration on Smallholder Farms in Western Kenya
    Kisinyo Peter Oloo
    Accepted 31 May 2016
    Department of Agronomy, Rongo University College, Rongo, Kenya

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) production in Kenya has increased over the years and is mainly cultivated by smallholder farmers (SHF). Between 1972 and 1991, the number of tobacco growing farmers increased by 67%, between 1991 and 2000 by 36% and between 2001 and 2005 by 15%. In Kenya, about 35,000 SHF are growing the crop on 4500 ha of land with a production of approximately 16,000 tons per year. Increased land acreage under tobacco has led to a decrease in the availability of land for production of food crops (such as maize, cassava, millet and sweet potatoes) therefore giving rise to food insecurity in tobacco growing areas (Ministry of Agriculture, 2004). Although a cash crop, increased acreage under production by farmers has not improved the livelihoods of the SHF, because the profits are too little to make any significance difference in the lives of the poor farmers compared to the benefit enjoyed by the Tobacco Companies (Kweyuh,1997).

    Tobacco cultivation has a lot of impact on the environment such as deforestation, environmental pollution due to use of agrochemicals and soil fertility depletion (Yanda, 2010). The crop is a heavy feeder on soil nutrients and as a result depletes soil nutrients very much faster compared to other crops, thereby making such soils unsuitable for healthy plant growth (Trenbath, 1986; Yanda, 2010). Its depletes soil nutrients so much faster such that subsequent food crops do not benefit from the residual fertilizer applications (Geist, 1999). The use of agrochemicals such as insecticides and herbicides is another factor that contributes a lot in the accumulation of heavy metals in the soil (Kibwageet al., 2008). When heavy metals are present in the soil, they have the potential to interfere with the activity of soil organisms, pollute food crops, water bodies, wildlife and humans (Kutub and Falgunee, 2015).

    And in the US, the ill effect of continuous tobacco cultivation on soil productivity was widely recognized:

    Historian Avery O. Craven, in Soil Exhaustion in the Agricultural History of Virginia and Maryland, 1606-1860 (1926), maintained that “soil exhaustion and tobacco cultivation went hand in hand.” Tobacco rapidly depleted the soil, hence luxuriant crops could be grown for only three or four years. Soon after planting, soil nutrients — especially nitrogen and potassium—began to decline and soil microorganisms created toxins that poisoned tobacco plants.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You can find similar criticisms leveled against virtually every other cash crop grown by farmers around the world. State of the art American agribusinesses growing soybeans receive the same kind of criticism.
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  57. I wonder how events such as this will influence Chinese decisions whether or not to continue to invest in Africa. At a minimum, it seems to me that you have to pay bribes twice.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    China's investments in Africa are not out of charity. Mugabe started running Zimbabwe in 1980. One coup every 37 years is not a big deal. If there had been another coup within the last few years, then your comment would make more sense.
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  58. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants.

    I don’t know about the mining sector, but the ag sector paid plenty of taxes.

    How high a standard of living could anyone achieve in Zimbabwe? Most people were there for the love of the land and the vocation of farming. You seem to think White people ply the globe looking for Black people to exploit.

    For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    I suspect that 95% of Blacks would be a bit bemused to find out that they have been psychologically whipped around by Whites.

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    There was almost no income tax in Rhodesia because natural resource extraction was the mainstay of the economy. Do you think anyone is paying taxes in the Gulf countries? Obviously not because the economy is based on extraction.

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes. The standard of living was so high because there was a big pot of fiscal gold in the royalties paid by mining companies. It's fair to say that what is extracted from the ground should go to all the citizens of a country after the mining company takes its cut. However, in Rhodesia only whites were the real citizens under the white regime. Whites greedily devoured the money the mines made.
    , @Anonymous

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.
     
    A few thousand white land owners owned almost all of the good land in 2000 right before the fast track land reforms were commenced. Despite attempts to negotiate with the white landowners over the years (20 years from the start of Zimbabwe until fast track land reform), the white landowners refused to budge. Because they wanted it all, the white landowners ended up with nothing.
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  59. eah says:

    Mugabe looks like he shops at…

    …except they don’t offer men’s clothing:

    All kidding aside:

    The end for Mugabe: Zimbabwe’s leader and his despised wife are detained by military in ‘bloodless transition’ of power as deposed vice-president returns from exile

    As I’ve pointed out before: since black rule (ie the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe), the population of Zimbabwe has doubled while GDP has fallen by half — ‘do the math’ on that so see what it means for the average standard of living there (GDP per capita) — for the sake of Zimbabweans I hope things improve/this trend can be reversed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
    This ought to be of comfort to Mr Mugabe.

    https://twitter.com/DPRK_News/status/930851807957602304
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  60. NickG says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    As iSteve readers know, we are big fans of Zimbabwe president-for-life Robert Mugabe’s favorite sports coat.
     
    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?

    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?

    On a par with Lance Armstrong and exactly half way between uncle Donald and Hilary.

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  61. Money Talks, and we’re the living proof. There ain’t no limit to what money can do.

    It can also buy you a loud suit.

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  62. @Lagertha
    They've all ripped-off Elvis..or want to be Elvis, or be revered like Elvis. Elvis was perhaps, Mugabe's icon of a cool guy? Elvis was like John Wayne...no gay stuff happening.

    Huh? Wasn’t Wayne bi?

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  63. @Reg Cæsar

    As iSteve readers know, we are big fans of Zimbabwe president-for-life Robert Mugabe’s favorite sports coat.
     
    How does Bantu Bob stack up against Aryan Adolf in the testicular fortitude department?

    He definitely has Adolf beat with the longevity genes. Adolf was rumored to be in general poor health in his middle age. Had nature taken its course, it’s doubtful he would have made it past the early 1950’s. The same thing is often said about JFK’s health. He probably would have died not long after leaving his second term.

    Read More
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  64. @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    “Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue.“

    That will probably end up going to the Chinese.

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  65. I had a strange experience in a London cafe this morning. Several besuited Chinese gentleman were at a table talking in an animated way that I’d usually associate with Italians. They hushed as I passed their table. In the middle of the table was newspaper open to the story about Zimbabwe. The cafe was in Marylebone, about 5 mins from the Chinese embassy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    Maybe the Chinese are still thinking along the lines of this poster from the time of the "Cultural Revolution" which appeals for the "Third World" to crush the evil forces of American imperialism and Soviet "revisionism":

    https://digitalcommons.whitworth.edu/chinese_art_posters/66/


    Detailed explanation of poster here: http://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-its-not-okay-for-your-kids-to-be-white/#comment-2075599
    , @Eagle Eye
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/15/zimbabwe-general-visited-beijing-just-days-executing-coup/

    Where is our Deep State when we need it?

    Is there some kind of quiet deal between the U.S. and China about spheres of influence in Africa and beyond?

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  66. @wren
    He looks pretty cool to me.

    Which gives me an excuse to post these guys again.

    https://youtu.be/W27PnUuXR_A

    When I lived in New Orleans in the mid seventies, pastel suits like that were all the rage with the Brothas. I don’t know whether this is still the case.

    I was riding my bike through City Park one balmy evening, coincidently, just before the start of an outdoor concert. The headliner was Barry White.

    My oh my. You should have seen the couples promenade as they made their way across the lawn to the venue. They looked like flowers in a Monet painting. Of course, the men outshone the women (which is the norm in black culture).

    On the return leg of my ride I could hear, as I passed the concert, Barry’s low voice mesmerizing the crowd. It sounded like Voodoo. Even though it was getting dark, I felt safe cause I knew everyone was in there getting hypnotized.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Corn
    A coworker of mine had worked in the past as a gravedigger. He once observed a black burial from afar and his naive honky self was blown away by the brothas attire. Black or navy blue suits weren’t fitting for these fellows. According to him there were red, bright blue, and green, even yellow suits galore.
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  67. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants.
     
    I don't know about the mining sector, but the ag sector paid plenty of taxes.

    How high a standard of living could anyone achieve in Zimbabwe? Most people were there for the love of the land and the vocation of farming. You seem to think White people ply the globe looking for Black people to exploit.

    For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.
     
    I suspect that 95% of Blacks would be a bit bemused to find out that they have been psychologically whipped around by Whites.

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.

    There was almost no income tax in Rhodesia because natural resource extraction was the mainstay of the economy. Do you think anyone is paying taxes in the Gulf countries? Obviously not because the economy is based on extraction.

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes. The standard of living was so high because there was a big pot of fiscal gold in the royalties paid by mining companies. It’s fair to say that what is extracted from the ground should go to all the citizens of a country after the mining company takes its cut. However, in Rhodesia only whites were the real citizens under the white regime. Whites greedily devoured the money the mines made.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes...
     
    At least they ran profitable mines and spent a good portion of the money in-country, which generally helps everyone out in the long run. A functioning golf course can be a good investment.

    The kleptocrats that followed usually blew it on foreign consumer goods for themselves.

    Eating the rich is seldom a good strategy.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Tiny Duck has found Wikipedia!

    Where's Leonard Pitts when you need him?

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  68. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants.
     
    I don't know about the mining sector, but the ag sector paid plenty of taxes.

    How high a standard of living could anyone achieve in Zimbabwe? Most people were there for the love of the land and the vocation of farming. You seem to think White people ply the globe looking for Black people to exploit.

    For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.
     
    I suspect that 95% of Blacks would be a bit bemused to find out that they have been psychologically whipped around by Whites.

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.

    A few thousand white land owners owned almost all of the good land in 2000 right before the fast track land reforms were commenced. Despite attempts to negotiate with the white landowners over the years (20 years from the start of Zimbabwe until fast track land reform), the white landowners refused to budge. Because they wanted it all, the white landowners ended up with nothing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    Despite attempts to negotiate... over the years
     
    Whites gave up apartheid; they went along with Mugabe socializing the country until they were essentially land owning serfs; but that was not enough, so the rest had to go.

    That's a cautionary tale we are seeing elsewhere: demand equality; demand equal outcomes; demand everything.
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  69. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    I'm not familiar with the details here, but I suspect there are some foreigners arranging the marketing of said tobacco.

    anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco
     
    The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle.

    The confiscation was like taking a country's "evil" corporations and giving them to some guys hanging out on a street corner.

    “The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle.”

    You are constructing the myth of the white superfarmer. That myth was shattered after tobacco production came roaring back under black ownership. Part of the explanation for why smallholder black farmers could produce more than the white landowners is that the blacks farmed more land. It turned out that a lot of the white landowners weren’t doing much farming. They were “conservationists” as they styled themselves. But really they were just too lazy or didn’t have the capital or too lazy to get the capital to exploit all of the land they owned so it went uncultivated.

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  70. Gunner says:
    @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/FAIRImmigration/status/930480553664679943

    What has changed is that she no longer needs the votes of white people.

    Read More
    • Agree: eah
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  71. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    If Zimbabwe is a successful example of African leadership I'd hate to see what a failure would look like.

    No one is arguing that Zimbabwe is in good shape. What is being discussed is that more tobacco is being grown under black ownership than when whites clung onto the land. That’s not cherry picking. Back when the Zimbabwe economy had collapsed in the immediate aftermath of land reform, white nationalist yokels like those on American Renaissance were hee hawing like crazy donkeys about the plight of blacks in Zimbabwe because there were no longer white farmers to grow tobacco and produce exports. White nationalists have been proven wrong based on the point they made years ago.

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  72. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    It is a great jacket. Where can I buy one?? Is it for sale in the isteve store?? I would gladly pay one trillions Zimbabwe dollars.

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  73. AndrewR says:
    @Anonymous
    That's agronomics 101: you grow cash crops, crops that yield the most profit under the circumstances.

    “You” grow cash crops after “you” grow enough food to feed your people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    Not in the Neo liberal-free trade-Paul Krugmanesque economy of the present (and future). As Anon said above, you grow what you can most profitably export. And then when the foreign monied class transplants the same agri-technology to another even more needy country where labor costs are ever cheaper, you go bankrupt. And, having lost the infrastructure and knowledge base to be self sufficient, you go broke. And starve.

    Then the IMF and World Bank step in with emergency loans. You must privatize everything owned by the public sector. You must separate your treasury from political control. Helpfully, the IMF will appoint a former Goldman Sachs manager to run your State Bank. And finally, you must remove controls and allow your currency to float, which will (if all goes according to plan) immediately cause it to plunge in value which then enables outsiders to swoop in and buy your assets for a dime on the dollar.

    Now that's an efficient market!
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  74. AndrewR says:
    @celt darnell
    With respect to the supposed coup d'etat in Zimbabwe, to quote a certain hag, "What difference, at this point, does it make?"

    Rhodesia was a success story. Zimbabwe? Just another African basket case.

    Does anyone think this event will make the slightest bit of difference?

    Probably not, but it is fascinating to see the longest-ruling dictator alive* be removed in a coup

    *Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea have longer-ruling dictators but, completely unlike Mugabe, they are essentially unknown outside their regions.

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  75. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous
    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.

    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.

    Which they desparately need because they don’t grow enough food to feed themselves.

    You know, opium might bring in even more money. Maybe they should grow that.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Name a country in the world that doesn't desire having exports.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?
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  76. biz says:
    @Anonymous
    Old Bob certainly does not encourage the youth to smoke. In fact smoking is not very popular at all in Zimbabwe or really anywhere else in Africa because it's hot most of the time.

    The people of Zimbabwe would be starving following your logic. It's backwards economics to grow your own food. Zimbabwe is growing the crop that provides the most export income.

    Ahem, in Zimbabwe it is not “hot most of the time.” Much of Zimbabwe is at a significant altitude and has low humidity leading to a highland climate with moderate days and cold nights.

    e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harare#Climate

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  77. @PiltdownMan
    He must have his own textile supplier. Or perhaps these jackets are a thing in Harare?

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/08/12/article-2390351-1AD41E97000005DC-36_634x463.jpg

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/12/15/article-2074619-0F1A4A0000000578-372_306x467.jpg

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/12/15/article-2074619-0F18222400000578-903_634x552.jpg

    http://www.newzimbabwe.com//news/images/news_bBobody%20250.jpg

    Reminiscent of that non-PC joke about what Polish brides wear

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    I don't know that joke. What DO they wear?

    The one I know is this - What do Polish brides get on their wedding night that is long and hard?

    A new last name.
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  78. @Anonymous
    Can you go by Anonymous 2? TY

    Just so nobody takes Anonymous 4. It’s a Medieval/Renaissance recording group.

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  79. @Anonymous
    The guy is a monster even by black African standards and the sooner he assumes dirt temperature the better.

    No worse than Charlie Taylor or General Butt-Naked.

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  80. Bugg says:
    @TWS
    He's really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    I’m Bobby Mugabe. I was beheading white guys by the thousands and turning the rest of them into a delicious suppertime treat while you were running around in a some half-assed children’s army trying to figure out which end of the AK the bullets came out of.

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  81. Pat Boyle says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    I read a very large and long history of the African liberation movement last year. I don’t remember all that much about it or rather I keep getting the black liberators mixed up.

    There seem to be two major types of black leaders. The first type built private zoos so they could raise crocodiles that they could feed with their political opponents. The second type ate their political rivals themselves. They didn’t build zoos. They built kitchens.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You are the biggest troll in this discussion thread.
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  82. Sandmich says:
    @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    Ah the ol’ black rallying cry: ’tis better to rule in hell than serve in heaven. You seem too earnest to be a genuine troll, though your pro-ethnic cleansing stance would seem to invalidate your supposed intellectual stance so I dunno.

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  83. eah says:
    @eah
    OT

    https://twitter.com/FAIRImmigration/status/930480553664679943

    Read More
    • Replies: @eah
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  84. Corn says:
    @PiltdownMan
    He must have his own textile supplier. Or perhaps these jackets are a thing in Harare?

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/08/12/article-2390351-1AD41E97000005DC-36_634x463.jpg

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/12/15/article-2074619-0F1A4A0000000578-372_306x467.jpg

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/12/15/article-2074619-0F18222400000578-903_634x552.jpg

    http://www.newzimbabwe.com//news/images/news_bBobody%20250.jpg

    Clearly my life is incomplete until I have employed the services of a Zimbabwean tailor.

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  85. eah says:
    @eah
    https://twitter.com/kausmickey/status/930619469965217797
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  86. @Anonymous
    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.
     

    I’ve read Studwell’s excellent book on land reform in East and South East Asia, but I doubt Mugabe had the wherewithal to follow the path of Taiwan or that top-down anarchy is the same thing as an agricultural development policy.

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  87. @TWS
    He's really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    You’re only as old as the woman you feel up, as they say.

    Read More
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  88. @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    I actually knew someone from that 95%, bright guy who worked for me and hell, even a member of their elite. The Mugabe system is so dysfunctional that he was sincerely hoping that the Chinese or Russians would soon take over the country so that they would actually be able to begin to earn wages that didn’t completely vanish to corruption.

    The system there is so enormously broken – to be an honest tradesman, for example, you should learn to practice how to disguise/cheat on your earnings to prevent the government from legally robbing you that to sort it out is mindboggling.

    Read More
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  89. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    This year there will be a record cabbage harvest in the Donbas! And tractor production will exceed the Five Year Plan, comrades! Soon we will overtake the imperialists in the production of selenium!

    Will you shut up already about the tobacco farms? As has been explained to you a million times, the Chinese have assumed leadership of this sector in Zimbabwe and brought some organization to it, so the white colonialists have now been replaced by yellow colonialists.

    Otherwise, the Zimbabwe economy is a disaster with 90% unemployment. From one end of sub-Saharan Africa to the other, it’s abundantly clear that blacks are incapable of running a modern economy. The more thoroughly they purge non-blacks from their country, the greater the resulting disaster. Nor is this a case where the lot of the average (African) man is improved as a result of displacing white masters – the pie shrinks for everyone except for a small corrupt black elite.

    Read More
    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You're speaking from a biased perspective. The historical experience of urban professional Jews in European towns is one of economic contention with the rural peasants. The professional Jews in the towns specialized in capital accumulatino and lending, and this occupation clashed economically with independent peasants who are able to accumulate and invest their own capital and develop themselves. For a class specializing in capital accumulation and lending, a peasantry that's dependent on larger capital or landholders for work as hired cheap labor is much more amenable to its economic interests. You're applying this perspective here and thus promoting an economic arrangement in which a distinct caste or class controls economic organization and denying one which incentivizes self-direction by the native peasantry.
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  90. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    That counts for a kind of dignity.

    Yes, the kind of dignity where your head is held high but stomach is empty. The kind of dignity you get in the slums of Haiti. The kind of dignity you get when you know that the crooks in charge are the same color as you. What a wonderful kind of dignity that is!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    To be fair, that's the kind of dignity blacks vote/agitate for in the US, so maybe they prefer it.
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  91. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    There was almost no income tax in Rhodesia because natural resource extraction was the mainstay of the economy. Do you think anyone is paying taxes in the Gulf countries? Obviously not because the economy is based on extraction.

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes. The standard of living was so high because there was a big pot of fiscal gold in the royalties paid by mining companies. It's fair to say that what is extracted from the ground should go to all the citizens of a country after the mining company takes its cut. However, in Rhodesia only whites were the real citizens under the white regime. Whites greedily devoured the money the mines made.

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes…

    At least they ran profitable mines and spent a good portion of the money in-country, which generally helps everyone out in the long run. A functioning golf course can be a good investment.

    The kleptocrats that followed usually blew it on foreign consumer goods for themselves.

    Eating the rich is seldom a good strategy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    This is the trickle down economics argument you hear in the US. Give more wealth to corporations and hedge fund managers, and they'll spend and "invest" it on golf courses, real estate, yachts, restaurants, etc., and the sons and daughters of the formerly middle class can work as caddies, waiters, escorts, etc.
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  92. @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    I’m not familiar with the claims you’re referring to, but when “white nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm,” I doubt very much that they meant literally couldn’t grow crops. Blacks farm in other places in Africa and the Americas, so it would be silly to claim they couldn’t in Zimbabwe.

    What they probably meant is that blacks couldn’t farm at scale, requiring more complex management. As far as that goes, isn’t it true that white farms in Zimbabwe were split up and given to small land owners? How are any large farms faring compared to smaller ones? Why are there any failing farms for Chinese to take over if blacks have proven to be thoroughly competent at running the tobacco industry?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Friends and powerful acquaintances of Mugabe received large farms. Smallholder farmers were allocated land that was split up. There are literally like 5 Chinese owned commercial farms in a vast growing region. That's not much foreign ownership.

    Read Pat Boyle's comment to get a sense of the hee hawing about blacks being totally useless that occurred during Zimbabwe's collapse around 2008.
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  93. Jack D says:
    @TWS
    He's really 93? Pretty well preserved. He is at an age where most men have a successor chosen anyone on the horizon?

    Until recently, his successor WAS chosen – it was Emmerson (sp) Mnangagwa, a 75 year old head chopper (former Minister of State Security said to be responsible for 20,000 deaths). But then Mugabe’s wife whispered into Mugabe’s ear that SHE would like to succeed him and continue the family dynasty. The military was not really keen about serving under this foul woman (foul even by low Zimbabwe standards) and that set the ball rolling for the coup.

    As a young man, Emmerson escaped execution for blowing up a locomotive by (falsely) claiming to have been under 21 at the time of his crime. Sound familiar? Apparently it is really hard to tell how old black people are – at 16 they look like they are 25 so at 25 they look like they are 16.

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  94. @Jack D

    That counts for a kind of dignity.
     
    Yes, the kind of dignity where your head is held high but stomach is empty. The kind of dignity you get in the slums of Haiti. The kind of dignity you get when you know that the crooks in charge are the same color as you. What a wonderful kind of dignity that is!

    To be fair, that’s the kind of dignity blacks vote/agitate for in the US, so maybe they prefer it.

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  95. @Berty
    So are you ever going to comment on Roy Moore?

    That’s just not the kind of foolishness Mr. Sailer comments on.

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  96. @Anonymous
    The aim of the policy was to turn the mass of rural and landless poor into small scale farming land owners. It's been successful by that measure. There's obviously a dignity in the genteel poverty of small landholders tilling their fields rather than being employed as field hands on huge plantations or as domestic servants. Moreover, the former provides the conditions and incentives for development, while the latter doesn't.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/africa/thank-you-mr-mugabe-zimbabwe-s-forced-land-redistribution-led-to-huge-controversy-but-it-has-8923229.html

    “This is the best thing that could have happened to me and my family and the generality of black Zimbabweans,” the former machine operator said at his six-hectare (15-acre) farm near the tobacco-farming town of Karoi, 93 miles north of the capital, Harare. “I now lead a far better life,” he says.

    Mr Matashu, 34, says he was allocated land by the government in 2001 after a white-owned farm was seized and its former owner emigrated to South Africa. He grew cotton for a decade before switching to tobacco. This year he earned $34,000 and won an award for being the best small-scale tobacco farmer in Karoi.

    ...

    “In the biggest land reform in Africa, 6,000 white farmers have been replaced by 245,000 Zimbabwean farmers. These are primarily ordinary poor people who have become more productive farmers.”

    ...

    The tobacco industry is no longer marked by the pattern of large, white-owned farms, which have been seized and resettled. In 2000 the crop was grown by 1,500 large-scale farmers while 5,000 small-scale growers produced 3 per cent of the crop. This year 110,000 small-scale farmers grew 65 per cent of the crop, according to the government’s Tobacco Industry Marketing Board. While most of the tobacco used to be auctioned, most is now grown under contract for leaf merchants.

    More than a fifth of the growers were registered this year, and farmers are being encouraged to grow the crop in the arid region of Matabeleland.

    “It took the minority more than 50 years to reach 220 million kilograms,” said Lovemore Chikweya, regional coordinator for the TIMB in Nyamandhlovu, 230 miles south-west of Harare, in an interview. “With these new farmers that number can and will be surpassed within five years,” he said, forecasting production at 200 million kilograms in 2014.
     

    Zimbabwe Tobacco Booming, but Farmers Growing It Are Not

    “I don’t have any money for food or anything,” Kahari said. “I came here expecting to be paid, so now I will have to borrow.”

    Many of Zimbabwe’s tobacco farmers share the same plight during the ongoing selling season of the crop, Zimbabwe’s second biggest earner after gold. While exported tobacco rakes in hundreds of millions of dollars, small-time farmers feel left out of the lucrative
    cycle.

    Yes, sounds like they’re doing just as well as the white farmers. Yes, indeed.

    Meanwhile, tobacco sales have jumped 30 percent from last year,

    I feel there is likely more to this African success story that you’re promoting, but I don’t know what it is.

    “The country is making money from our tobacco, we deserve some dignity,” said Lloyd Muponda…

    “I will not grow tobacco again,” Hanja said. “This is dehumanizing.”

    Yes, truly Bob has restored dignity to Zimbabweans.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Nothing in that article contradicts what I am arguing. The black smallholder farmers are producing more tobacco and have earned for themselves a lot of money. However in the case the farmer interviewed in the article the money hasn't been posted to his account because of corrupt middlemen. No one here is arguing the Zimbabwe government doesn't have a lot of problems including corruption. The claim is that black smallholder farmers have shown they can take the land of the white landowners and grow more with it. The article you link backs this claim.
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  97. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    Can you go by Anonymous 2? TY

    He can, so long as I’m still the Anon with the Canon.

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  98. @Anonymous
    There was almost no income tax in Rhodesia because natural resource extraction was the mainstay of the economy. Do you think anyone is paying taxes in the Gulf countries? Obviously not because the economy is based on extraction.

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes. The standard of living was so high because there was a big pot of fiscal gold in the royalties paid by mining companies. It's fair to say that what is extracted from the ground should go to all the citizens of a country after the mining company takes its cut. However, in Rhodesia only whites were the real citizens under the white regime. Whites greedily devoured the money the mines made.

    Tiny Duck has found Wikipedia!

    Where’s Leonard Pitts when you need him?

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  99. Jack D says:
    @Rosamond Vincy
    Reminiscent of that non-PC joke about what Polish brides wear

    I don’t know that joke. What DO they wear?

    The one I know is this – What do Polish brides get on their wedding night that is long and hard?

    A new last name.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    "Something old, something blue
    Something borrowed, something blue
    Something pink, something green, something plaid, something striped...."
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  100. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Jack D
    This year there will be a record cabbage harvest in the Donbas! And tractor production will exceed the Five Year Plan, comrades! Soon we will overtake the imperialists in the production of selenium!

    Will you shut up already about the tobacco farms? As has been explained to you a million times, the Chinese have assumed leadership of this sector in Zimbabwe and brought some organization to it, so the white colonialists have now been replaced by yellow colonialists.

    Otherwise, the Zimbabwe economy is a disaster with 90% unemployment. From one end of sub-Saharan Africa to the other, it's abundantly clear that blacks are incapable of running a modern economy. The more thoroughly they purge non-blacks from their country, the greater the resulting disaster. Nor is this a case where the lot of the average (African) man is improved as a result of displacing white masters - the pie shrinks for everyone except for a small corrupt black elite.

    You’re speaking from a biased perspective. The historical experience of urban professional Jews in European towns is one of economic contention with the rural peasants. The professional Jews in the towns specialized in capital accumulatino and lending, and this occupation clashed economically with independent peasants who are able to accumulate and invest their own capital and develop themselves. For a class specializing in capital accumulation and lending, a peasantry that’s dependent on larger capital or landholders for work as hired cheap labor is much more amenable to its economic interests. You’re applying this perspective here and thus promoting an economic arrangement in which a distinct caste or class controls economic organization and denying one which incentivizes self-direction by the native peasantry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Here's a different perspective - one of a black Zimbabwean:

    I was home for three weeks last month, and everyone was saying, “Something’s got to happen. It cannot continue. People are suffering so much.” People are starving in my country. It’s disgraceful. Mugabe inherited, when we finally got independent black rule in 1980, a country that was self-sufficient. Five thousand white farmers, whatever their politics—and I am black—produced enough food to feed more than 8 million people, and food for export. And he has reduced our nation to one in which one-third of the people need food aid. Another third of the nation has left. We are scattered all over the world.
     
    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/interrogation/2017/11/what_will_become_of_zimbabwe_after_robert_mugabe.html
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  101. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    The standard of living for whites in Rhodesia was splendid. Lots of time for golfing, servants, high salaries, almost no taxes...
     
    At least they ran profitable mines and spent a good portion of the money in-country, which generally helps everyone out in the long run. A functioning golf course can be a good investment.

    The kleptocrats that followed usually blew it on foreign consumer goods for themselves.

    Eating the rich is seldom a good strategy.

    This is the trickle down economics argument you hear in the US. Give more wealth to corporations and hedge fund managers, and they’ll spend and “invest” it on golf courses, real estate, yachts, restaurants, etc., and the sons and daughters of the formerly middle class can work as caddies, waiters, escorts, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    This is the trickle down economics argument
     
    Well, I've noticed that wealthy nations have wealthy people...
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  102. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @CCZ
    Disagree 101

    An African agronomist paints a rather negative portrait of the effects of tobacco cultivation, even by smallholder farmers: soil depletion, toxic heavy metals, and very little income to the actual farmers.


    Tobacco Cultivation Effects on Soil Fertility and Heavy Metals Concentration on Smallholder Farms in Western Kenya
    Kisinyo Peter Oloo
    Accepted 31 May 2016
    Department of Agronomy, Rongo University College, Rongo, Kenya

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) production in Kenya has increased over the years and is mainly cultivated by smallholder farmers (SHF). Between 1972 and 1991, the number of tobacco growing farmers increased by 67%, between 1991 and 2000 by 36% and between 2001 and 2005 by 15%. In Kenya, about 35,000 SHF are growing the crop on 4500 ha of land with a production of approximately 16,000 tons per year. Increased land acreage under tobacco has led to a decrease in the availability of land for production of food crops (such as maize, cassava, millet and sweet potatoes) therefore giving rise to food insecurity in tobacco growing areas (Ministry of Agriculture, 2004). Although a cash crop, increased acreage under production by farmers has not improved the livelihoods of the SHF, because the profits are too little to make any significance difference in the lives of the poor farmers compared to the benefit enjoyed by the Tobacco Companies (Kweyuh,1997).

    Tobacco cultivation has a lot of impact on the environment such as deforestation, environmental pollution due to use of agrochemicals and soil fertility depletion (Yanda, 2010). The crop is a heavy feeder on soil nutrients and as a result depletes soil nutrients very much faster compared to other crops, thereby making such soils unsuitable for healthy plant growth (Trenbath, 1986; Yanda, 2010). Its depletes soil nutrients so much faster such that subsequent food crops do not benefit from the residual fertilizer applications (Geist, 1999). The use of agrochemicals such as insecticides and herbicides is another factor that contributes a lot in the accumulation of heavy metals in the soil (Kibwageet al., 2008). When heavy metals are present in the soil, they have the potential to interfere with the activity of soil organisms, pollute food crops, water bodies, wildlife and humans (Kutub and Falgunee, 2015).

     

    And in the US, the ill effect of continuous tobacco cultivation on soil productivity was widely recognized:

    Historian Avery O. Craven, in Soil Exhaustion in the Agricultural History of Virginia and Maryland, 1606-1860 (1926), maintained that "soil exhaustion and tobacco cultivation went hand in hand." Tobacco rapidly depleted the soil, hence luxuriant crops could be grown for only three or four years. Soon after planting, soil nutrients — especially nitrogen and potassium—began to decline and soil microorganisms created toxins that poisoned tobacco plants.
     

    You can find similar criticisms leveled against virtually every other cash crop grown by farmers around the world. State of the art American agribusinesses growing soybeans receive the same kind of criticism.

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  103. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    Misleading. Besides the usual massaging of statistics in service to feelz!, Zimbabwe gave up state of the art production of corn, wheat, cotton, and peanuts just to get small producers to equal the tobacco production of twenty years ago. This is an almost a criminal analysis of the situation.

    No, it’s not, since the aim of land reform is to develop the political economy of the nation, which consists of a mass of rural peasants, not to maximize GDP or the returns to large landholders.

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  104. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields.
     
    Zimbabwe's White farms blew past this model sixty years ago; they were highly mechanized with state of the art crop yields. They were the manufacturing engine of the country.

    You are just sprouting (sic) propaganda.

    A feudal political economy does not mean that there is no mechanization. There were machines in the Middle Ages. It refers to patterns of ownership and distribution.

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  105. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    I'm not familiar with the details here, but I suspect there are some foreigners arranging the marketing of said tobacco.

    anywhere between 60,000 to 90,000 households primarily involved in growing tobacco
     
    The White run farms employed far more than that and payed huge taxes while juggling mind boggling logistic and agronomic knowledge for a modest lifestyle.

    The confiscation was like taking a country's "evil" corporations and giving them to some guys hanging out on a street corner.

    So I guess you’ll have the same attitude when the last remnants of America’s dying middle class are left out on street corners hooked on opiods and everything is owned by corporations and oligarchs in New York City.

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    • Replies: @bomag
    Business is good for a country.

    That doesn't mean you give business everything it wants. But it is also a bad idea to burn them down in the name of some imagined fairness.
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  106. eah says:
    @eah
    Mugabe looks like he shops at...

    https://images-eu.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/03//apparel/brandstores/Desigual/Desigual_Header_Logo._V329126127_.jpg

    ...except they don't offer men's clothing:

    https://angelvancouver.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/desigual-collage-femina-369.jpg

    All kidding aside:

    The end for Mugabe: Zimbabwe's leader and his despised wife are detained by military in 'bloodless transition' of power as deposed vice-president returns from exile

    As I've pointed out before: since black rule (ie the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe), the population of Zimbabwe has doubled while GDP has fallen by half -- 'do the math' on that so see what it means for the average standard of living there (GDP per capita) -- for the sake of Zimbabweans I hope things improve/this trend can be reversed.

    This ought to be of comfort to Mr Mugabe.

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  107. Corn says:
    @ThreeCranes
    When I lived in New Orleans in the mid seventies, pastel suits like that were all the rage with the Brothas. I don't know whether this is still the case.

    I was riding my bike through City Park one balmy evening, coincidently, just before the start of an outdoor concert. The headliner was Barry White.

    My oh my. You should have seen the couples promenade as they made their way across the lawn to the venue. They looked like flowers in a Monet painting. Of course, the men outshone the women (which is the norm in black culture).

    On the return leg of my ride I could hear, as I passed the concert, Barry's low voice mesmerizing the crowd. It sounded like Voodoo. Even though it was getting dark, I felt safe cause I knew everyone was in there getting hypnotized.

    A coworker of mine had worked in the past as a gravedigger. He once observed a black burial from afar and his naive honky self was blown away by the brothas attire. Black or navy blue suits weren’t fitting for these fellows. According to him there were red, bright blue, and green, even yellow suits galore.

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  108. Corn says:

    Serious question if we have any ex-Rhodies or South Africans here. So far Bob seems to be under house arrest and the coup seems to be plodding along nicely. Is that likely to continue? Any chance of a Zimbabwean civil war or a countercoup faction in the army re installing ol’ Bob?

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  109. I think he and Dion Sanders share a tailor. Not jealous, but I can’t afford custom made suits. I suppose that you can find his cast-offs at Am-Vets or Goodwill.

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  110. @AndrewR
    "You" grow cash crops after "you" grow enough food to feed your people.

    Not in the Neo liberal-free trade-Paul Krugmanesque economy of the present (and future). As Anon said above, you grow what you can most profitably export. And then when the foreign monied class transplants the same agri-technology to another even more needy country where labor costs are ever cheaper, you go bankrupt. And, having lost the infrastructure and knowledge base to be self sufficient, you go broke. And starve.

    Then the IMF and World Bank step in with emergency loans. You must privatize everything owned by the public sector. You must separate your treasury from political control. Helpfully, the IMF will appoint a former Goldman Sachs manager to run your State Bank. And finally, you must remove controls and allow your currency to float, which will (if all goes according to plan) immediately cause it to plunge in value which then enables outsiders to swoop in and buy your assets for a dime on the dollar.

    Now that’s an efficient market!

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    • Agree: Brutusale
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Wow. This is the best comment I have read in a very long time. Absolutely devastating summary of our world order.
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  111. @Jack D
    I don't know that joke. What DO they wear?

    The one I know is this - What do Polish brides get on their wedding night that is long and hard?

    A new last name.

    “Something old, something blue
    Something borrowed, something blue
    Something pink, something green, something plaid, something striped….”

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  112. ia says:
    @Anonymous
    Of course the man is reviled here but he did a lot to help restore dignity to black Zimbabweans. When he took almost all the land from white land owners in a fast track land reform program from 2000-2008 and redistributed it to friends and the general black public, white nationalists laughed at what a catastrophe the economy had become. There was hyperinflation, production of tobacco which is the main export had crashed, a lot of farms were reportedly inactive. White nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn't even farm. It was a learning curve but now Zimbabwe is producing more tobacco than ever before. And it's being done by tens of of thousands of black farmers on the land once held by 3,000 white land owners.

    From the CIA World Factbook:

    Zimbabwe’s government entered a second Staff Monitored Program with the IMF in 2014 and undertook other measures to reengage with international financial institutions. Zimbabwe repaid roughly $108 million in arrears to the IMF in October 2016, but financial observers note that Zimbabwe is unlikely to gain new financing because the government has not disclosed how it plans to repay more than $1.7 billion in arrears to the World Bank and African Development Bank.

    It’s a shithole supported by rich whites but they’re backing out.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?

    Sources of funding for the IMF are diverse.
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  113. WJ says:
    @Anonymous
    Rhodesia was a giant plantation employing cheap labor.

    Zimbabwe and any other African country will never develop unless its majority population of poor farm laborers have their own plots to work and thus the right incentives for development, which plantation economies lack.

    https://www.gatesnotes.com/Books/How-Asia-Works

    Agriculture: Studwell’s book does a better job than anything else I’ve read of articulating the key role of agriculture in development. He explains that the one thing that all poor countries have in abundance is farm labor—typically three quarters of their population. Unfortunately, most poor countries have feudal land policies that favor wealthy landowners, with masses of poor farmers working for them. Studwell argues that these policies not only produce huge inequities; they also guarantee lousy crop yields. Conversely, he says, when you give farmers ownership of modest plots and allow them to profit from the fruits of their labor, farm yields are much higher per hectare. And rising yields help countries generate the surpluses and savings they need to power up their manufacturing engine.
     

    This must be why the typical Zimbabwean lives to the ripe old age of 58. Now for the good news, obesity rates are very low.

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  114. Eagle Eye says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    I had a strange experience in a London cafe this morning. Several besuited Chinese gentleman were at a table talking in an animated way that I’d usually associate with Italians. They hushed as I passed their table. In the middle of the table was newspaper open to the story about Zimbabwe. The cafe was in Marylebone, about 5 mins from the Chinese embassy.

    Maybe the Chinese are still thinking along the lines of this poster from the time of the “Cultural Revolution” which appeals for the “Third World” to crush the evil forces of American imperialism and Soviet “revisionism”:

    https://digitalcommons.whitworth.edu/chinese_art_posters/66/

    Detailed explanation of poster here: http://www.unz.com/isteve/nyt-its-not-okay-for-your-kids-to-be-white/#comment-2075599

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  115. GQ in 2077: President-for-Life Kaepernick delivers his 47th annual State of the President Address

    That’s freakin’ hilarious!

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  116. Eagle Eye says:
    @TelfoedJohn
    I had a strange experience in a London cafe this morning. Several besuited Chinese gentleman were at a table talking in an animated way that I’d usually associate with Italians. They hushed as I passed their table. In the middle of the table was newspaper open to the story about Zimbabwe. The cafe was in Marylebone, about 5 mins from the Chinese embassy.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/15/zimbabwe-general-visited-beijing-just-days-executing-coup/

    Where is our Deep State when we need it?

    Is there some kind of quiet deal between the U.S. and China about spheres of influence in Africa and beyond?

    Read More
    • Replies: @George
    The was no coup in Zimbabwe, the ZANU PF is still in charge, and everyone who worked for the gov before still does, except Mugabe and his family members.

    China is building a large number of rail and other projects in Africa. The US is trying to sell the Africans fancy flying robots they cannot afford. My guess is the Chinese were in no way behind the retiring of Mugabe. But when the ZANU PF grandees visited China and asked why the Chinese are not building railroads in Zimbabwe the Chinese probably mentioned the crazy old guy running the place through his wife and wastrel child.

    Some may be interested in the thoughts of David Coltart, Zimbabwean Senator who is also of European ancestry.

    http://www.davidcoltart.com/bio/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Coltart
    https://twitter.com/DavidColtart?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor
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  117. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    But thanks for confirming that it is all about getting whitey, no matter the cost. You could have left whitey with his 5% land share, but, no, you had to take it all.
     
    A few thousand white land owners owned almost all of the good land in 2000 right before the fast track land reforms were commenced. Despite attempts to negotiate with the white landowners over the years (20 years from the start of Zimbabwe until fast track land reform), the white landowners refused to budge. Because they wanted it all, the white landowners ended up with nothing.

    Despite attempts to negotiate… over the years

    Whites gave up apartheid; they went along with Mugabe socializing the country until they were essentially land owning serfs; but that was not enough, so the rest had to go.

    That’s a cautionary tale we are seeing elsewhere: demand equality; demand equal outcomes; demand everything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    There was once a land called Northern Rhodesia. Unlike Southern Rhodesia, when the country gained independence as Zambia it was under majority rule. Eventually in Zambia, 3 years ago in fact, a white man became President through the democratic process.

    The point here is whites in Zimbabwe dug their own grave. Instead of allowing the majority to have their country, they greedily took the whole country and devoured the mining royalties for themselves. That led to war and the lasting resentments that war creates.

    The problem is not blacks, it's the kind of whites that inhabited Southern Rhodesia. The bulk of the whites had been enlisted men and lacked the strategic brains of the more genteel whites in other parts of Africa. They kept on making stupid mistakes. They didn't give up apartheid. They badly lost a war to 12 year olds. And then after losing the war they still tried to keep all the land. Southern Rhodesia had the misfortune of bad quality whites.
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  118. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    So I guess you'll have the same attitude when the last remnants of America's dying middle class are left out on street corners hooked on opiods and everything is owned by corporations and oligarchs in New York City.

    Business is good for a country.

    That doesn’t mean you give business everything it wants. But it is also a bad idea to burn them down in the name of some imagined fairness.

    Read More
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  119. The irony, of course, is that you guys need a leader with Bobby’s balls to deport all them immigrants. So snark all you want, he gave his people their land back, yours are giving yours away.

    Who’s pathetic?

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    We've gotten demonstrably poorer since importing third world hordes.

    Zimbabwe has gotten demonstrably poorer since exporting first world experts.

    Both sets of leaders sit around and congratulate themselves on a job well done.
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  120. AndrewR says:
    @ThreeCranes
    Not in the Neo liberal-free trade-Paul Krugmanesque economy of the present (and future). As Anon said above, you grow what you can most profitably export. And then when the foreign monied class transplants the same agri-technology to another even more needy country where labor costs are ever cheaper, you go bankrupt. And, having lost the infrastructure and knowledge base to be self sufficient, you go broke. And starve.

    Then the IMF and World Bank step in with emergency loans. You must privatize everything owned by the public sector. You must separate your treasury from political control. Helpfully, the IMF will appoint a former Goldman Sachs manager to run your State Bank. And finally, you must remove controls and allow your currency to float, which will (if all goes according to plan) immediately cause it to plunge in value which then enables outsiders to swoop in and buy your assets for a dime on the dollar.

    Now that's an efficient market!

    Wow. This is the best comment I have read in a very long time. Absolutely devastating summary of our world order.

    Read More
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  121. AndrewR says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    I wonder how events such as this will influence Chinese decisions whether or not to continue to invest in Africa. At a minimum, it seems to me that you have to pay bribes twice.

    China’s investments in Africa are not out of charity. Mugabe started running Zimbabwe in 1980. One coup every 37 years is not a big deal. If there had been another coup within the last few years, then your comment would make more sense.

    Read More
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  122. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous
    You're speaking from a biased perspective. The historical experience of urban professional Jews in European towns is one of economic contention with the rural peasants. The professional Jews in the towns specialized in capital accumulatino and lending, and this occupation clashed economically with independent peasants who are able to accumulate and invest their own capital and develop themselves. For a class specializing in capital accumulation and lending, a peasantry that's dependent on larger capital or landholders for work as hired cheap labor is much more amenable to its economic interests. You're applying this perspective here and thus promoting an economic arrangement in which a distinct caste or class controls economic organization and denying one which incentivizes self-direction by the native peasantry.

    Here’s a different perspective – one of a black Zimbabwean:

    I was home for three weeks last month, and everyone was saying, “Something’s got to happen. It cannot continue. People are suffering so much.” People are starving in my country. It’s disgraceful. Mugabe inherited, when we finally got independent black rule in 1980, a country that was self-sufficient. Five thousand white farmers, whatever their politics—and I am black—produced enough food to feed more than 8 million people, and food for export. And he has reduced our nation to one in which one-third of the people need food aid. Another third of the nation has left. We are scattered all over the world.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/interrogation/2017/11/what_will_become_of_zimbabwe_after_robert_mugabe.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's not an argument against land reform. Do you think land reforms elsewhere didn't involve major dislocations and suffering? There's no shortage of blacks anywhere who'll complain and moan and groan if they have to lift a finger and forego an easy lifestyle. The point isn't to indulge these sorts of blacks. You'd rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.
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  123. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Jack D
    Here's a different perspective - one of a black Zimbabwean:

    I was home for three weeks last month, and everyone was saying, “Something’s got to happen. It cannot continue. People are suffering so much.” People are starving in my country. It’s disgraceful. Mugabe inherited, when we finally got independent black rule in 1980, a country that was self-sufficient. Five thousand white farmers, whatever their politics—and I am black—produced enough food to feed more than 8 million people, and food for export. And he has reduced our nation to one in which one-third of the people need food aid. Another third of the nation has left. We are scattered all over the world.
     
    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/interrogation/2017/11/what_will_become_of_zimbabwe_after_robert_mugabe.html

    That’s not an argument against land reform. Do you think land reforms elsewhere didn’t involve major dislocations and suffering? There’s no shortage of blacks anywhere who’ll complain and moan and groan if they have to lift a finger and forego an easy lifestyle. The point isn’t to indulge these sorts of blacks. You’d rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    You’d rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.
     
    This is kind of like advocating that a guy burn down his house and quit his corporate job for the chance at independent development.
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  124. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Chrisnonymous

    Nothing in that article contradicts what I am arguing. The black smallholder farmers are producing more tobacco and have earned for themselves a lot of money. However in the case the farmer interviewed in the article the money hasn’t been posted to his account because of corrupt middlemen. No one here is arguing the Zimbabwe government doesn’t have a lot of problems including corruption. The claim is that black smallholder farmers have shown they can take the land of the white landowners and grow more with it. The article you link backs this claim.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    The claim is that black smallholder farmers have shown they can take the land of the white landowners and grow more with it.
     
    Would you care to run the experiment again and let the previous owners keep their land; add twenty years of agronomic advancement to their enterprises; and see what they would produce?
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  125. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @ia
    From the CIA World Factbook:

    Zimbabwe’s government entered a second Staff Monitored Program with the IMF in 2014 and undertook other measures to reengage with international financial institutions. Zimbabwe repaid roughly $108 million in arrears to the IMF in October 2016, but financial observers note that Zimbabwe is unlikely to gain new financing because the government has not disclosed how it plans to repay more than $1.7 billion in arrears to the World Bank and African Development Bank.
     
    It's a shithole supported by rich whites but they're backing out.

    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?

    Sources of funding for the IMF are diverse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ia

    Are those places shitholes?
     
    If you're not capable of discerning what's a shithole and what isn't I'm afraid I can't help you.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?
     
    Greece and Argentina are white countries.
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  126. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    The tobacco is a cash crop mainly for export markets.
     
    Which they desparately need because they don't grow enough food to feed themselves.

    You know, opium might bring in even more money. Maybe they should grow that.

    Name a country in the world that doesn’t desire having exports.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Name a country in the world that doesn’t desire having exports.
     
    Name a country that doesn't desire food. Or a currency that has a useful lifetime that is greater than toilet paper.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?
     
    Yes. Both are luxury items that are bad for you. If is only in it for the coin, why not plant the crop that yields the greatest profit?
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  127. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Pat Boyle
    I read a very large and long history of the African liberation movement last year. I don't remember all that much about it or rather I keep getting the black liberators mixed up.

    There seem to be two major types of black leaders. The first type built private zoos so they could raise crocodiles that they could feed with their political opponents. The second type ate their political rivals themselves. They didn't build zoos. They built kitchens.

    You are the biggest troll in this discussion thread.

    Read More
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  128. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Chrisnonymous
    I'm not familiar with the claims you're referring to, but when "white nationalists and fellow travelers claimed that blacks couldn’t even farm," I doubt very much that they meant literally couldn't grow crops. Blacks farm in other places in Africa and the Americas, so it would be silly to claim they couldn't in Zimbabwe.

    What they probably meant is that blacks couldn't farm at scale, requiring more complex management. As far as that goes, isn't it true that white farms in Zimbabwe were split up and given to small land owners? How are any large farms faring compared to smaller ones? Why are there any failing farms for Chinese to take over if blacks have proven to be thoroughly competent at running the tobacco industry?

    Friends and powerful acquaintances of Mugabe received large farms. Smallholder farmers were allocated land that was split up. There are literally like 5 Chinese owned commercial farms in a vast growing region. That’s not much foreign ownership.

    Read Pat Boyle’s comment to get a sense of the hee hawing about blacks being totally useless that occurred during Zimbabwe’s collapse around 2008.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    It looks like the Chinese are funding and calling the shots for the tobacco industry in Zimbabwe.

    When you are growing to spec for a corporate overlord, does that satisfy your smallholder requirement?

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  129. bomag says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    The irony, of course, is that you guys need a leader with Bobby's balls to deport all them immigrants. So snark all you want, he gave his people their land back, yours are giving yours away.

    Who's pathetic?

    We’ve gotten demonstrably poorer since importing third world hordes.

    Zimbabwe has gotten demonstrably poorer since exporting first world experts.

    Both sets of leaders sit around and congratulate themselves on a job well done.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Muh GDP.
    , @Nigerian Nationalist
    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won't even bother.
    , @Nigerian Nationalist
    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won't even bother.
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  130. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    That's not an argument against land reform. Do you think land reforms elsewhere didn't involve major dislocations and suffering? There's no shortage of blacks anywhere who'll complain and moan and groan if they have to lift a finger and forego an easy lifestyle. The point isn't to indulge these sorts of blacks. You'd rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.

    You’d rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.

    This is kind of like advocating that a guy burn down his house and quit his corporate job for the chance at independent development.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Given that corporations these days are pretty blatantly inimical to the development of the US and many other nation states and are rapidly hollowing them out, that wouldn't be a bad idea. But that guy wouldn't have to, since corporations these days don't even bother going through the pretense of employing him. They're outsourcing his job and making him train his replacement.
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  131. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Nothing in that article contradicts what I am arguing. The black smallholder farmers are producing more tobacco and have earned for themselves a lot of money. However in the case the farmer interviewed in the article the money hasn't been posted to his account because of corrupt middlemen. No one here is arguing the Zimbabwe government doesn't have a lot of problems including corruption. The claim is that black smallholder farmers have shown they can take the land of the white landowners and grow more with it. The article you link backs this claim.

    The claim is that black smallholder farmers have shown they can take the land of the white landowners and grow more with it.

    Would you care to run the experiment again and let the previous owners keep their land; add twenty years of agronomic advancement to their enterprises; and see what they would produce?

    Read More
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  132. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Friends and powerful acquaintances of Mugabe received large farms. Smallholder farmers were allocated land that was split up. There are literally like 5 Chinese owned commercial farms in a vast growing region. That's not much foreign ownership.

    Read Pat Boyle's comment to get a sense of the hee hawing about blacks being totally useless that occurred during Zimbabwe's collapse around 2008.

    It looks like the Chinese are funding and calling the shots for the tobacco industry in Zimbabwe.

    When you are growing to spec for a corporate overlord, does that satisfy your smallholder requirement?

    Read More
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  133. Olorin says:
    @Anonymous
    No doubt the per capita GDP was higher back in 1980. But where did the lion's share of income go? To the white 5% that reaped the royalties from the mines. Whites had a high standard of living, paid almost no income taxes, and had a lot of servants. That was all possible through distributing the bulk of the benefits of mining to whites.

    Now the black 5% can reap a disproportionate share of the benefits of the mining revenue. For the 95% of blacks that have to deal with more economic instability at least they don't get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites. That counts for a kind of dignity.

    they don’t get whipped around psychologically by snooty whites.

    My goodness, what fragile snowflakes are our noble African brethren.

    Yeah, whitey’s to blame.

    https://zimbabwe-today.com/zimbabwe-economy-meltdown-due-to-poor-mismanagement-and-stealing-not-just-sanctions/

    Read More
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  134. ia says:
    @Anonymous
    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?

    Sources of funding for the IMF are diverse.

    Are those places shitholes?

    If you’re not capable of discerning what’s a shithole and what isn’t I’m afraid I can’t help you.

    Read More
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  135. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous
    Name a country in the world that doesn't desire having exports.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?

    Name a country in the world that doesn’t desire having exports.

    Name a country that doesn’t desire food. Or a currency that has a useful lifetime that is greater than toilet paper.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?

    Yes. Both are luxury items that are bad for you. If is only in it for the coin, why not plant the crop that yields the greatest profit?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Zimbabwe exports a legal commodity to earn hard currency to buy food, machinery, and whatever else rather than growing just its own food. Very complex strategy that you can't seem to figure out.
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  136. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anonymous
    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?

    Sources of funding for the IMF are diverse.

    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?

    Greece and Argentina are white countries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    If you want to argue from a white supremacist perspective that since Greece and Argentina despite also requiring an IMF bailout like Zimbabwe are superior simply because they are white, I don't see why you have to be involved in such a lengthy discussion. You can just declare your belief in white supremacy and then leave the rest of us to debate.
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  137. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    Despite attempts to negotiate... over the years
     
    Whites gave up apartheid; they went along with Mugabe socializing the country until they were essentially land owning serfs; but that was not enough, so the rest had to go.

    That's a cautionary tale we are seeing elsewhere: demand equality; demand equal outcomes; demand everything.

    There was once a land called Northern Rhodesia. Unlike Southern Rhodesia, when the country gained independence as Zambia it was under majority rule. Eventually in Zambia, 3 years ago in fact, a white man became President through the democratic process.

    The point here is whites in Zimbabwe dug their own grave. Instead of allowing the majority to have their country, they greedily took the whole country and devoured the mining royalties for themselves. That led to war and the lasting resentments that war creates.

    The problem is not blacks, it’s the kind of whites that inhabited Southern Rhodesia. The bulk of the whites had been enlisted men and lacked the strategic brains of the more genteel whites in other parts of Africa. They kept on making stupid mistakes. They didn’t give up apartheid. They badly lost a war to 12 year olds. And then after losing the war they still tried to keep all the land. Southern Rhodesia had the misfortune of bad quality whites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous.

    You seem to think Zimbabwe is a rousing success because they stuck it to whitey.

    I notice that minority groups come to the US; take over various parts of the economy; and they are heralded as hardworking; smart; industrious; etc.

    However, when Europeans developed parts of Africa from scratch, it became cause for their dispossession from planet Earth.

    , @Cyrill Joseph Landau
    That is true to an extent, but many of them stayed after majority rule. The other issue is South Africa. Power has shifted from Afrikaaners of Dutch/German/French Calvinist descent to English Protestants. There has been a big dispossession of Afrikaaners in South Africa and minimal improvement for blacks. People say the different between Zimbabwe and South Africa is 20 years, except the farm seizures in Zimbabwe were not as violent as the constant ethnic cleansing of Afrikaaners in South Africa.

    South Africa is two white tribes (English and Afrikaaner speakers), multiple black tribes, coloured, and asian. Zimbabwe is more like three tribes- Shona, Ndebele, everyone else.
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  138. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    There was once a land called Northern Rhodesia. Unlike Southern Rhodesia, when the country gained independence as Zambia it was under majority rule. Eventually in Zambia, 3 years ago in fact, a white man became President through the democratic process.

    The point here is whites in Zimbabwe dug their own grave. Instead of allowing the majority to have their country, they greedily took the whole country and devoured the mining royalties for themselves. That led to war and the lasting resentments that war creates.

    The problem is not blacks, it's the kind of whites that inhabited Southern Rhodesia. The bulk of the whites had been enlisted men and lacked the strategic brains of the more genteel whites in other parts of Africa. They kept on making stupid mistakes. They didn't give up apartheid. They badly lost a war to 12 year olds. And then after losing the war they still tried to keep all the land. Southern Rhodesia had the misfortune of bad quality whites.

    Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous.

    You seem to think Zimbabwe is a rousing success because they stuck it to whitey.

    I notice that minority groups come to the US; take over various parts of the economy; and they are heralded as hardworking; smart; industrious; etc.

    However, when Europeans developed parts of Africa from scratch, it became cause for their dispossession from planet Earth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous."

    Because noticing patterns is inappropriate when applied to entire groups of people? God forbid someone comment on how Rhodesian whites were enlisted men while white settlers in other colonies like Kenya were officers so it was entirely predictable and later confirmed that Rhodesian whites would make decisions that were short-sighted and stupid and lead to their own downfall.
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  139. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    This is the trickle down economics argument you hear in the US. Give more wealth to corporations and hedge fund managers, and they'll spend and "invest" it on golf courses, real estate, yachts, restaurants, etc., and the sons and daughters of the formerly middle class can work as caddies, waiters, escorts, etc.

    This is the trickle down economics argument

    Well, I’ve noticed that wealthy nations have wealthy people…

    Read More
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  140. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    We've gotten demonstrably poorer since importing third world hordes.

    Zimbabwe has gotten demonstrably poorer since exporting first world experts.

    Both sets of leaders sit around and congratulate themselves on a job well done.

    Muh GDP.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag
    Okay, I'll agree that money isn't everything, but you are the one using tobacco production as a measure of societal health.
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  141. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag

    You’d rather indulge the most profligate aspects of their nature by seducing them with the opiate of immediate cash and easy living than give them the chance for independent development.
     
    This is kind of like advocating that a guy burn down his house and quit his corporate job for the chance at independent development.

    Given that corporations these days are pretty blatantly inimical to the development of the US and many other nation states and are rapidly hollowing them out, that wouldn’t be a bad idea. But that guy wouldn’t have to, since corporations these days don’t even bother going through the pretense of employing him. They’re outsourcing his job and making him train his replacement.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    They’re outsourcing his job and making him train his replacement.
     
    True enough. The high bidder/low bidder financial model may well be a ramp to failure.

    But I notice that the replacements come from Zimbabwe type countries. We should pause and consider their role in the hollowing.
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  142. @bomag
    We've gotten demonstrably poorer since importing third world hordes.

    Zimbabwe has gotten demonstrably poorer since exporting first world experts.

    Both sets of leaders sit around and congratulate themselves on a job well done.

    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won’t even bother.

    Read More
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  143. @bomag
    We've gotten demonstrably poorer since importing third world hordes.

    Zimbabwe has gotten demonstrably poorer since exporting first world experts.

    Both sets of leaders sit around and congratulate themselves on a job well done.

    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won’t even bother.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won’t even bother.
     
    Fair enough, on the face of it.

    But our immigrants are wealthier at the end of the day; while everyone's poorer in Zimbabwe; since it is all about the bling.

    And a lot of Zimbabweans have immigrated to South Africa in search of work; and are not all that welcome, from what I understand. If one doesn't like the goose sauce in Zimbabwe, where's the moral consistency in exporting it?
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  144. I am a mix of Azerbaijani Jew and Georgian, and I guess with a mix of other things, and I am a Zimbabwean. I am glad there is a coup, although I wish all the thugs from ZANU-PF go to hell with Mugabe. I would like to return to Zimbabwe soon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    What was going on with that sub-group of Caucasian Jews that formed a SS unit?
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  145. @Anonymous
    There was once a land called Northern Rhodesia. Unlike Southern Rhodesia, when the country gained independence as Zambia it was under majority rule. Eventually in Zambia, 3 years ago in fact, a white man became President through the democratic process.

    The point here is whites in Zimbabwe dug their own grave. Instead of allowing the majority to have their country, they greedily took the whole country and devoured the mining royalties for themselves. That led to war and the lasting resentments that war creates.

    The problem is not blacks, it's the kind of whites that inhabited Southern Rhodesia. The bulk of the whites had been enlisted men and lacked the strategic brains of the more genteel whites in other parts of Africa. They kept on making stupid mistakes. They didn't give up apartheid. They badly lost a war to 12 year olds. And then after losing the war they still tried to keep all the land. Southern Rhodesia had the misfortune of bad quality whites.

    That is true to an extent, but many of them stayed after majority rule. The other issue is South Africa. Power has shifted from Afrikaaners of Dutch/German/French Calvinist descent to English Protestants. There has been a big dispossession of Afrikaaners in South Africa and minimal improvement for blacks. People say the different between Zimbabwe and South Africa is 20 years, except the farm seizures in Zimbabwe were not as violent as the constant ethnic cleansing of Afrikaaners in South Africa.

    South Africa is two white tribes (English and Afrikaaner speakers), multiple black tribes, coloured, and asian. Zimbabwe is more like three tribes- Shona, Ndebele, everyone else.

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  146. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    Name a country in the world that doesn’t desire having exports.
     
    Name a country that doesn't desire food. Or a currency that has a useful lifetime that is greater than toilet paper.

    Has is opium relevant to a discussion about tobacco?
     
    Yes. Both are luxury items that are bad for you. If is only in it for the coin, why not plant the crop that yields the greatest profit?

    Zimbabwe exports a legal commodity to earn hard currency to buy food, machinery, and whatever else rather than growing just its own food. Very complex strategy that you can’t seem to figure out.

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  147. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Mr. Anon

    Lots of countries receive IMF support. Greece, Argentina, etc. Are those places shitholes?
     
    Greece and Argentina are white countries.

    If you want to argue from a white supremacist perspective that since Greece and Argentina despite also requiring an IMF bailout like Zimbabwe are superior simply because they are white, I don’t see why you have to be involved in such a lengthy discussion. You can just declare your belief in white supremacy and then leave the rest of us to debate.

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  148. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @bomag
    Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous.

    You seem to think Zimbabwe is a rousing success because they stuck it to whitey.

    I notice that minority groups come to the US; take over various parts of the economy; and they are heralded as hardworking; smart; industrious; etc.

    However, when Europeans developed parts of Africa from scratch, it became cause for their dispossession from planet Earth.

    “Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous.”

    Because noticing patterns is inappropriate when applied to entire groups of people? God forbid someone comment on how Rhodesian whites were enlisted men while white settlers in other colonies like Kenya were officers so it was entirely predictable and later confirmed that Rhodesian whites would make decisions that were short-sighted and stupid and lead to their own downfall.

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    • Replies: @bomag

    enlisted men... officers
     
    That is an interesting observation.

    But you came on here with the, "White punished; things are now good" narrative, which ignores a host of things, such as punishment of the innocent and running off those that could keep the lights on.
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  149. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Cyrill Joseph Landau
    I am a mix of Azerbaijani Jew and Georgian, and I guess with a mix of other things, and I am a Zimbabwean. I am glad there is a coup, although I wish all the thugs from ZANU-PF go to hell with Mugabe. I would like to return to Zimbabwe soon.

    What was going on with that sub-group of Caucasian Jews that formed a SS unit?

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  150. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Muh GDP.

    Okay, I’ll agree that money isn’t everything, but you are the one using tobacco production as a measure of societal health.

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  151. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    Given that corporations these days are pretty blatantly inimical to the development of the US and many other nation states and are rapidly hollowing them out, that wouldn't be a bad idea. But that guy wouldn't have to, since corporations these days don't even bother going through the pretense of employing him. They're outsourcing his job and making him train his replacement.

    They’re outsourcing his job and making him train his replacement.

    True enough. The high bidder/low bidder financial model may well be a ramp to failure.

    But I notice that the replacements come from Zimbabwe type countries. We should pause and consider their role in the hollowing.

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  152. bomag says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won't even bother.

    They have their land back. A good first step. Yours won’t even bother.

    Fair enough, on the face of it.

    But our immigrants are wealthier at the end of the day; while everyone’s poorer in Zimbabwe; since it is all about the bling.

    And a lot of Zimbabweans have immigrated to South Africa in search of work; and are not all that welcome, from what I understand. If one doesn’t like the goose sauce in Zimbabwe, where’s the moral consistency in exporting it?

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  153. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    "Applying simple morality tales to entire countries is rather vacuous."

    Because noticing patterns is inappropriate when applied to entire groups of people? God forbid someone comment on how Rhodesian whites were enlisted men while white settlers in other colonies like Kenya were officers so it was entirely predictable and later confirmed that Rhodesian whites would make decisions that were short-sighted and stupid and lead to their own downfall.

    enlisted men… officers

    That is an interesting observation.

    But you came on here with the, “White punished; things are now good” narrative, which ignores a host of things, such as punishment of the innocent and running off those that could keep the lights on.

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  154. George says:
    @Eagle Eye
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/15/zimbabwe-general-visited-beijing-just-days-executing-coup/

    Where is our Deep State when we need it?

    Is there some kind of quiet deal between the U.S. and China about spheres of influence in Africa and beyond?

    The was no coup in Zimbabwe, the ZANU PF is still in charge, and everyone who worked for the gov before still does, except Mugabe and his family members.

    China is building a large number of rail and other projects in Africa. The US is trying to sell the Africans fancy flying robots they cannot afford. My guess is the Chinese were in no way behind the retiring of Mugabe. But when the ZANU PF grandees visited China and asked why the Chinese are not building railroads in Zimbabwe the Chinese probably mentioned the crazy old guy running the place through his wife and wastrel child.

    Some may be interested in the thoughts of David Coltart, Zimbabwean Senator who is also of European ancestry.

    http://www.davidcoltart.com/bio/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Coltart

    https://twitter.com/DavidColtart?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

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