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Why Parisians Can't Have Nice Things Anymore

France used to be famous for having nice things. But now (from the Daily Mail) …

France puts the Eiffel Tower behind an 8ft-high glass wall to protect the monument from terrorists following attack at the Louvre

€19million project aims to beef up security in Paris and will be ready by autumn

Involves a glass wall around the landmark to protect it from vehicles and jihadis

Terror attacks on French soil have claimed the lives of 238 people in two years

The wall is expected to be ready by autumn this year amid fears of more attacks

By Gareth Davies For Mailonline

PUBLISHED: 09:33 EST, 9 February 2017

 
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  1. Well the 238 remain dead but by golly we will protect the steel. Steel structures matter.

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    • Replies: @KM'
    There's something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.
    , @SMK
    What will Muslims do to the glass wall and tower when they become the majority, finally and forever, dominant and vengeful and triumphant? Destroy the wall and then the tower and build a mosque? What symbolism!
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  2. Thanks Uncle Sam!

    While the US indulged in obsessing about Iran, the Shia Cresecent and the liberation of various countries for (((democracy))), Sunni extremism emanating from well-known “friends” has managed to go from “sudden towering inferno in NYC” to “persistent problem in Europe”. Probably next with MANPADs sourced from CIA containers.

    Read More
  3. To paraphrase a great poet:

    What’s a King to a man, what’s a God to an unbeliever, what’s a wall to diversity.

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  4. France has the highest Muslim population outside the Mideast and South Asia. OF COURSE there will be more attacks. France is losing a simple numbers game.

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    • Replies: @NickG

    France has the highest Muslim population outside the Mideast and South Asia.

     

    Actually not even close!

    Indonesia is in the far east and has north of 200 million Muslims. A bit north of Indonesia is China, also in the far East, which has around 30 million Muslims. Between the 2 is the Philippines, which has about 6 million Muslims.

    Then there is Africa. Nigeria, replete with 100 Million Muslims - there are perhaps a quarter of a billion Muslims in Sub Saharan Africa and of course North Africa- Algeria has 40 million alone...then there is Tunisia, Chad, Libya etcetera.
  5. @Front toward enemy
    Well the 238 remain dead but by golly we will protect the steel. Steel structures matter.

    There’s something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.

    Read More
    • Agree: Bill B.
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"
    , @syonredux

    There’s something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.
     
    Excellent point. Yeah, looking at the Eiffel Tower does conjure the ghost of Edison, Verne, Isambard Brunel, etc
    , @okie
    There was movie with Clooney, Hugh Laurie and others directed by Brad Bird (Iron Giant, The Incredibles) where they cross pollinated Eiffel /Verne Tech with 60's atomic tech , The problem with the movie was it took those two very optimistic ages and claimed they led to sterile dead end make the science the villain and Diversity the savior. I can only assume that Damon Lindlehof and the studio had to fit a moral for this decade in what could have been a great adventure. You can only have people who are not relativists in animation now days. even adventure movies based on Walt Disney mid century amusement have to kowtow to women and PC. I think it killed the movie, but i may be wrong

    The point of the above ramble is the fin de Siecle and the late 50's early 60's were similar ages, when there was sufficient belief in the science, something they lost in WW1 and we lost to the damn dirty hippies.
    that is what pisses so many off about trump is he is a builder, a corrupted version of the Paris of the boulevards or the post WW2 visionaries, and not a" well on one hand" fellow.
  6. Used to be that the only thing Parisians had to worry about in respect to their capital was the odd German army every few decades. These days the barbarians are already inside the gates thanks to the prayer rugs the French government has laid out for them. When one of the most beautiful cities on the planet has to be hardened against a subset of the population that lives there, something has gone badly wrong.

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  7. Decades ago, when driving in Washington, DC you could swing into the US Capitol east parking lot entrance (right in front of the building) just to make a casual u-turn. No longer. After various overseas terror attacks, the planters and barriers went up. In recent years, the US Capitol Police (separate from the DC Metro Police) seem to take another block every year, expanding the perimeter. All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary.

    Thinking of threatened public monuments, it’s worth remembering what Senator Moynihan said on TV within hours after 9/11 attacks. Essentially, that they could knock down the Capitol and the republic would endure. It would help if Congress enacted some of the recommendations of the continuity-of-government commission offered some years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?
    , @donut
    " All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary. Necessary for what ? To preserve the cesspool that "our" gov't has become . The sooner this rotten structure collapses in on itself the better . The Mehicans will head for the border , and I don't mean Taco Bell , the Negroes will devour each other once the checks stop arriving and public transport breaks down . And those of us who are armed , quite a few I imagine , can compete for a prize for most Somalis , Afghans , and various other Allahu snack bars killed as they scurrying from their dens . Now some of you will disapprove but I will take a bloody triumph with guilt over submission and shame any day .
    , @Milo Minderbinder
    In Washington Goes to War by David Brinkley he describes getting a flat in 1942 while on the way to work. He pulled off the road and drove into the White House entry way where he proceeded to change his tire.
  8. Marine Le Pen will be the next president of France. Marine Le Pen will begin the expulsions of the ones who need to go. I hope that a certain Bernie Levy, who presumes to speak for actual flesh and blood Frenchmen, will accompany the ones that Le Pen removes from France.

    The corporate propaganda apparatus in Europe and America is banging the hollow log about how Marine Le Pen will lose in the second round of French balloting. Bullshit! There will be no repeat of the 2002 Jean-Marie Le Pen squeeze, whereby the horrible whores of the left and the right combined to crush Jean-Marie in the 2nd round of balloting.

    The banlieues must be pacified and resettled out of France. Impossible you say? Wait till Marine Le Pen kills the EU and the ECB. The Le Pens want to save the civilization that is France, and if it takes smashing the current order and the plutocrats who control it, they will do it. The voters are primed for it now, regardless of whether or not there is another terrorist attack.

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  9. Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East?
    , @anon
    the biggest problems of mass muslim immigration are
    - low IQ / high genetic diseases
    - clan-based morality leading to massive amounts of white collar criminality
    - the gradual cleansing of the native population within expanding enclaves
    - the creation of police no-go zones (to protect the criminality)
    - eventual civil war
    - mass ongoing sexual violence focused on the youngest / poorest

    (nb the sexual violence aspect is a permanent feature as long as there is a mixed population as Muslims keep girls at home leading to a gender imbalance among teenagers that leads to gang and sexual violence as both muslim and non-muslim males chase after the non-muslim girls)

    terrorism isn't the biggest problem by far - it's simply the only problem the media can't hide

    #

    I agree the wars in the middle-east were (intended) for the benefit of Israel and those wars have made the terrorism aspect worse and a lot of the people behind the wars are the same people behind opening the borders of the West to Muslim immigration.

    However those two things have focused attention on details of Islamic culture and that focus has revealed things which are sub optimal - certainly for the West but also for themselves.

    So - big exclusionary wall followed by science based cultural imperialism (at least).

    #

    Muslims who are hostile to the West often justify their hostility on two centuries of western imperialism so we can certainly justify reciprocal hostility on the twelve centuries of Islamic imperialism if we want but there are two moral cases - the other being Islam is sub-optimal for getting into space.
    , @AnotherDad

    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.
     
    Oh please stop.

    France has generally had pretty good relations with the Arab world since leaving Algeria. And France hasn't generally been running around intervening everywhere in the Middle East.

    Furthermore, there isn't some unitary "Arab people" that the West--much less France--is going around and bombing.

    The side France took in the Libyan Civil War was if anything the Islamist side. Gaddafi's removal was a benefit to ISIS.

    Likewise Western meddling in Syria was actually a boon to rebel groups and allowed ISIS to get rolling. Though once they were up and rolling, then the West was actively engaged in attacking them. There i'll give you that that's at least a solid casus belli with respect to ISIS. So you could more accurately say "France should stop bombing ISIS, if it doesn't want ISIS terrorist attacks". All right.

    But what about say ... Germany. They haven't bombed anyone in 70+ years. Why blow their shit up? Or rape their women?

    Because they can.

    That's the deeper reality than "France is bombing Muslims!" What JerryC said--"cultural enrichment". The Muslims have been allowed--very stupidly--to be there. To exist in the West. To feel their own inferiority with respect to westerners up close and personal.

    ISIS is just the latest excuse and provocateur. Essentially filling the Soros\BLM role of ginning up the grievance level to get more and more dramatic violence and political drama.

    Before France was bombing anyone, before ISIS existed, their Muslims were regularly rioting and having carbeques. Or "Swedish" Muslims raping western women, turning Malmo into the rape capital of Europe.

    And after the Russians help the Syrian army roll back the new caliphate, and ISIS is yesterday's news and France isn't bombing anyone ... France's Muslims, Europe's Muslims will still be generating riot, rape and disorder. And they'll be some new club, some new nominal cause for launching terror.

    Diversity==conflict. Muslims==extra conflict.
  10. @IndieRafael
    Decades ago, when driving in Washington, DC you could swing into the US Capitol east parking lot entrance (right in front of the building) just to make a casual u-turn. No longer. After various overseas terror attacks, the planters and barriers went up. In recent years, the US Capitol Police (separate from the DC Metro Police) seem to take another block every year, expanding the perimeter. All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary.

    Thinking of threatened public monuments, it's worth remembering what Senator Moynihan said on TV within hours after 9/11 attacks. Essentially, that they could knock down the Capitol and the republic would endure. It would help if Congress enacted some of the recommendations of the continuity-of-government commission offered some years ago.

    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Read More
    • Replies: @IndieRafael
    You are right. I agree.
    , @JerryC
    We stop bombing them and they stop immigrating here. Deal.
    , @BB753
    It's a case of bombing the wrong people. It's Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates we should be bombing.
    , @Anonymous
    Can't happen. The same people pushing the U.S. into destroying Iraq, Libya, Syria, Iran, ... are the same people manipulating to bring in the third world and Muslims. As they hyperventilate about the borders and security of their parasitic pseudo-state.
    , @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Why waste your time asking Americans to stop the U.S. from bombing the Middle East. You have to talk to our boss in Tel Aviv.
    , @Clyde

    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?
     
    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East? Is/was Germany? Finland? Norway? You have no answer so don't bother anyone with your silly arse guilt complex.
    , @Anon
    Maybe Middle Easterners should stop slaughtering their local Christians?
  11. France puts Eiffel Tower behind 8ft high glass wall

    Wow. The Eiffel Tower is much smaller than I thought.

    Can terrorists bypass the wall by going through Belgium?

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    • Replies: @Formerly CARealist
    I wonder if tourists and 20 somethings will still be able to lie around on the lawn nearby and drink. Plenty of entrepreneurs selling wine and beer from ice buckets when we were there. Lots of Africans selling trinkets. All these people were really nice.
  12. @KM'
    There's something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.

    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say…”See, we can do things like this!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    Problem is, steampunk is largely nonfunctional. It's the cave kids in the second Mad Max movie digging up stuff and putting it to decorative or fetishistic effect.

    I never found the Tour Eiffel all that inspiring except as a place to see things from up high and understand birds better. But you can do that from a ship's mast as well, and get somewhere in the process....
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    "A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say…”See, we can do things like this!”"


    Still, that's better than the New Labour abomination commissioned for the 2012 London Olympics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArcelorMittal_Orbit

    It had no other purpose but to say "British people can't do anything, so give us any old crap and we'll say it's great (and London is a World City!)", was 'designed' by a Sri Lankan and a Jewish Indian, paid for by an Indian billionaire, and is just as ugly close up as it is in the picture (more so as the red effect is just floodlighting that only changes the look at night).

    (Since the Olympics it's been improved by adding a helter-skelter)

    , @HA
    "A magnificent piece of steel..."

    The Eiffel Tower is not made of steel. It is made of iron (and was constructed just before steel began to replace iron), which I would guess is why it looks so steampunk.


    ...it was not only the greatest edifice ever built of iron, but also the last of significant size...
     
    , @pyrrhus
    Steampunk represents that Victorian confidence and brashness that was lost in 1914......
  13. If they put up a barrier along their borders, then perhaps all these other, smaller barriers within their borders would be unnecessary.

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    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I remember thinking similarly after the Belgium airport attack, when "experts" suggested moving the security perimeter outside of the airport... I commented, "why not all the way to, I don't know, the border?"
  14. Would Muslims be justified in retaliating against France for France’s role in the destruction of Libya?

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    • Replies: @Neuday

    Would Muslims be justified in retaliating against France for France’s role in the destruction of Libya?
     
    Would Americans be justified in retaliating against Mexico for Mexico's role in the destruction of California?
  15. C’mon. Everybody builds People Dams. Even Shia LeBoeuf.

    They’re only racist if Donald Trump suggests it.

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  16. @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"

    Problem is, steampunk is largely nonfunctional. It’s the cave kids in the second Mad Max movie digging up stuff and putting it to decorative or fetishistic effect.

    I never found the Tour Eiffel all that inspiring except as a place to see things from up high and understand birds better. But you can do that from a ship’s mast as well, and get somewhere in the process….

    Read More
  17. @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"

    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London’s ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven’t been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris’s icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn’t been built?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Probably this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris, or else of course Notre Dame.
    , @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    Sacre Coeur
    , @vinteuil
    "What do you think would be Paris’s icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn’t been built?"

    Easy - L'arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile.
    , @Daniel H
    >>I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London’s ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?<<

    What nonsense are you talking? The Eiffel Tower is a magnificent structure. A beautiful architectural masterpiece.
    , @Discard
    I recall reading that some old Frenchmen called it, "The oil derrick".
    , @sayless
    Agree that the Eiffel Tower is ugly.

    The medieval Tour St Jacques is infinitely more beautiful. It's a stage on the pilgrimage to St James of Compostella.

    Or Notre Dame.
  18. @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    We stop bombing them and they stop immigrating here. Deal.

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    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @Anon
    Hmm, maybe. Let me go and ask the boss...
  19. @KM'
    There's something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.

    There’s something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.

    Excellent point. Yeah, looking at the Eiffel Tower does conjure the ghost of Edison, Verne, Isambard Brunel, etc

    Read More
  20. Dams are fine things too.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Dams are fine things too.
     
    Indeed. Went on a tour of Hoover Dam when I was a teen. Very impressive:


    https://www.google.com/search?q=hoover+dam&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiknbWDj47SAhUB8WMKHcfzDGMQ_AUICSgC&biw=1366&bih=638



    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoover_Dam
  21. True Parisians know:

    If the Moslems knocked down the Tour Eiffel and the Tour Montparnasse, they’d be doing Paris a favor. A big favor.

    Whether you can still have nice things or not, it’s hardest to do something about the permanent eyesores bleeding the city.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Is the Tour Eiffel really considered by the natives to be an eyesore?
  22. They keep saying that terrorism is not an existential threat and that is true in the most literal sense, terrorism will not wipe us from existence.

    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.
  23. Each gets their own place on this planet to exist in relative security and live life as they deem best for their posterity.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Wrong. Each fights to gain control of their own place on this planet to exist in relative security and live life as they deem best for their posterity if they can continue to hold others off of their little plot of land.

    The way that it has always been. The way that it will always be. Indeed, the way that it should be. Whites have forgotten that lesson. Maybe we'll remember it before it's too late; maybe not.
  24. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    Probably this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris, or else of course Notre Dame.

    Read More
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    Sacré-Cœur is really pretty, but it's just too recent to serve as an appropriate icon for this ancient city. It's actually newer than the Eiffel Tower - not finished until 1914. It's kind of the Parisian equivalent of St Petersburg's equally "retro" Church of the Savior on Blood.

    As for Notre-Dame de Paris, it suffers from the comparison with Rheims & Chartres. Anything that's to be the icon of Paris had better be greater than anything in the surrounding countryside.
  25. @Jimi
    They keep saying that terrorism is not an existential threat and that is true in the most literal sense, terrorism will not wipe us from existence.

    But our lives are warped by "this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence."

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Louis Renault
    Explain again how Islam first spread through all the Christian Middle East? Was that by plebiscite where the yes votes were indicated by purple fingers like the Iraqi's use for voters today? I wonder how the no's got recorded.
    , @Doc

    re: "Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence"

     

    How the Arabs feel after Jewish and Western invasions? For the most part, current Arab countries are sitting on invaded Western territory, and, up to 1948, some were on invaded Jewish territory as well.

    Current middle eastern zones of conflict, "Iraq" and "Syria" and "Libya," were Roman, then Byzantine, well within recorded history. The "Iraqi" descendants of Sumerians, the possible originators of civilization, may be called "marsh arabs" by some, but they are distinct from real Arabs, and have been victims of Arab violence and attempted genocide, recently under Saddam Hussein. The descendants of the pyramid builders in Egypt, the Copts, have been similarly marginalized in the land their ancestors built. Their language ("Coptic") was a stage of Egyptian language, and thus far and away the oldest living language until turned into a dead language by Arab rulers from approx. 1300 to 1600 AD. The Arabs are the invaders, and particularly vicious and deadly invaders at that.
    , @Druid
    Very true. This all started after 1967 when Israel attacked the neighboring ArAb countries. Ever since then, the Ziofascists have demonized them in US and world media to turn everyone against the Arabs and massively pro Zionist! It's a long term plan and it's still working. They have used and abused the west for their dastardly purposes and people are asleep to their truly feeling towards Europeans and European stock!
    , @Karl
    31 Opinionator > Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.


    Imagine how the Berbers, the Copts and the Judeans would feel if the Arabs went back to Arabia
    , @Karl
    31 Opinionator > Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.


    Imagine how the Berbers, the Copts and the Judeans would feel if the Arabs went back to Arabia
    , @Johann Ricke

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.
     
    Roughly how the non-Muslim world (and the remnant minorities in what were formerly non-Muslim regions in the Middle East, North Africa, Central Asia and South Asia), feels after a thousand years of Muslim invasions and violence.
    , @Johann Ricke

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.
     
    It appears you don't like Jews. Even if Jews were the enemies of the West, it is possible to have more than one set of enemies at the same time. It wasn't Jews who invaded Spain and occupied it for almost 800 years. It wasn't Jews who fought Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours. And it wasn't Jews who laid siege to Vienna, twice. Even the Chinese had their far western provinces rolled up by Muslim invaders.
  26. @(((Owen)))
    True Parisians know:

    If the Moslems knocked down the Tour Eiffel and the Tour Montparnasse, they'd be doing Paris a favor. A big favor.

    Whether you can still have nice things or not, it's hardest to do something about the permanent eyesores bleeding the city.

    Is the Tour Eiffel really considered by the natives to be an eyesore?

    Read More
    • Replies: @European-American
    Some people think the Sacré Cœur basilica in Montmartre is an eyesore.

    http://www.margotdarby.com/news/2014/09/why-sacre-coeur-is-so-ugly/

    Its history is certainly less playful than the Eiffel Tower's.

    The reaction to the communes of Paris and Lyon were triumphalist monuments, the Sacré-Cœur of Montmartre and the basilica of Fourvière, dominating both cities. These buildings were erected using private funds, as gigantic ex-votos, thanking God for the victory over the socialists and in expiation of the sins of modern France.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris

    Maupassant claimed the Eiffel Tower made staying in Paris unbearable.
    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maupassant_vie_errante.JPG
    , @Weltanschauung
    When it was brash and new, it was disliked by people of a conservative temperament. Our commentator European-American links to Maupassant saying that he finally left Paris because he was so tired of the Eiffel Tower. Before he did so, it was noticed that he frequented one of the Eiffel Tower restaurants, and when asked to explain, he said it was the only place in town where he couldn't see the thing.

    But time has vindicated Eiffel.
  27. President Bush urged us to go shopping after 9/11 less the ‘terrorists win’ but they have won. It is reflected in our architecture. No longer do government agencies build grand monuments to their power and influence nor do corporate titans, Trump aside, build eponymous towers. They create suburban campuses with vast setbacks and single access gated entries. Public access is either forbidden or restricted to guided tours. You can’t just enter the lobby of the Woolworth or Chrysler towers in New York to admire how it used to be. We are ‘too diverse’ to trust each other now.

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  28. We should not be building glass walls, but glass bridges, to our glass houses

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    • Replies: @BB753
    I really loathe the Louvre pyramid, to the point I wouldn't mind if they blew that atrocity to smithereens. It really spoils the view.
  29. Although only appearing very briefly, this movie is Dolph Lundgren’s first on-screen role, playing General Gogol’s KGB bodyguard Venz. He landed the position because he was dating Grace Jones at the time of the filming, and was conveniently on set when director John Glen realized he quickly needed someone to fill in as a simple gun wielding body guard. —-
    A View to a Kill video filmed at Eiffel Tower

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  30. On the downside, that wall will eliminate a source of amusement for tourists. Visualize a gendarme or three on bicycles busy herding Nigerian fake purse sellers. They round up the miscreants and funnel them into waiting vans for processing. Now that former lively floors how is replaced by a sterile plaza of milling kids on smart phones with nothing better to do.

    Who knew that modern life could be so cruel? Do not despair, as there are many other plazas for purse selling, pickpocketing and general street capitalism in Paris. London and Rome will have to find their own amusements.

    Read More
  31. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    Explain again how Islam first spread through all the Christian Middle East? Was that by plebiscite where the yes votes were indicated by purple fingers like the Iraqi’s use for voters today? I wonder how the no’s got recorded.

    Read More
  32. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    In an interview with CNN last summer, Karl Lagerfeld, the creative director of the quintessential Parisian brand Chanel, said, “This is not the most glamorous moment in Paris.” “Paris by night is a nightmare now. It is not a cliché anymore.” “I must say, in my whole life I never saw Paris that gloomy.”

    Lagerfeld has worked in Paris since the 1950s. He says he’s seen drastic changes since the times when Paris “looked like an old French movie.” “It was another world. There was no feeling of danger, and not even a boy of 16 years old could walk in the street,” he explains. “Things are changing, but I have the feeling I lived in a world that no longer exists.”

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/11/fashion/karl-lagerfeld-chanel-haute-couture-cnn-style-tv/

    Read More
    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @Clyde
    As far as old French movies go, go see Bob Le Flambeur. 1956.
  33. @IndieRafael
    Decades ago, when driving in Washington, DC you could swing into the US Capitol east parking lot entrance (right in front of the building) just to make a casual u-turn. No longer. After various overseas terror attacks, the planters and barriers went up. In recent years, the US Capitol Police (separate from the DC Metro Police) seem to take another block every year, expanding the perimeter. All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary.

    Thinking of threatened public monuments, it's worth remembering what Senator Moynihan said on TV within hours after 9/11 attacks. Essentially, that they could knock down the Capitol and the republic would endure. It would help if Congress enacted some of the recommendations of the continuity-of-government commission offered some years ago.

    ” All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary. Necessary for what ? To preserve the cesspool that “our” gov’t has become . The sooner this rotten structure collapses in on itself the better . The Mehicans will head for the border , and I don’t mean Taco Bell , the Negroes will devour each other once the checks stop arriving and public transport breaks down . And those of us who are armed , quite a few I imagine , can compete for a prize for most Somalis , Afghans , and various other Allahu snack bars killed as they scurrying from their dens . Now some of you will disapprove but I will take a bloody triumph with guilt over submission and shame any day .

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  34. @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"

    “A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say…”See, we can do things like this!””

    Still, that’s better than the New Labour abomination commissioned for the 2012 London Olympics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArcelorMittal_Orbit

    It had no other purpose but to say “British people can’t do anything, so give us any old crap and we’ll say it’s great (and London is a World City!)”, was ‘designed’ by a Sri Lankan and a Jewish Indian, paid for by an Indian billionaire, and is just as ugly close up as it is in the picture (more so as the red effect is just floodlighting that only changes the look at night).

    (Since the Olympics it’s been improved by adding a helter-skelter)

    Read More
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    Truly, almost unbelievably, hideous.
    , @Anon
    Cecil Balmond is one fellow we don't mind getting flushed down the brain drain. Imagine something like that going up in Colombo! Or worse, Kandy! Though if it were near Kandy we might be lucky enough to have it wrecked by a mudslide ...

    Honestly, though, he's probably at least half English (Burgher or Anglo-Ceylonese), so there's that going for him among you Brits.
  35. @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    It’s a case of bombing the wrong people. It’s Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates we should be bombing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I don't see your justification to bomb them. Please explain.
    , @Parbes
    You forgot Qatar, Kuwait, and Erdogan.
  36. @KM'
    There's something amazing about the Eiffel Tower up close. It has a steam punk/Victorian vibe and reminds you of a time when European and European-derived civilizations were proud and confident.

    There was movie with Clooney, Hugh Laurie and others directed by Brad Bird (Iron Giant, The Incredibles) where they cross pollinated Eiffel /Verne Tech with 60′s atomic tech , The problem with the movie was it took those two very optimistic ages and claimed they led to sterile dead end make the science the villain and Diversity the savior. I can only assume that Damon Lindlehof and the studio had to fit a moral for this decade in what could have been a great adventure. You can only have people who are not relativists in animation now days. even adventure movies based on Walt Disney mid century amusement have to kowtow to women and PC. I think it killed the movie, but i may be wrong

    The point of the above ramble is the fin de Siecle and the late 50′s early 60′s were similar ages, when there was sufficient belief in the science, something they lost in WW1 and we lost to the damn dirty hippies.
    that is what pisses so many off about trump is he is a builder, a corrupted version of the Paris of the boulevards or the post WW2 visionaries, and not a” well on one hand” fellow.

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  37. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Eiffel Tower of Babel.

    This is sort of like losing the army but saving the flag.

    Lose the Nation but save the Tower.

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  38. @MikeTB
    If they put up a barrier along their borders, then perhaps all these other, smaller barriers within their borders would be unnecessary.

    I remember thinking similarly after the Belgium airport attack, when “experts” suggested moving the security perimeter outside of the airport… I commented, “why not all the way to, I don’t know, the border?”

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    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Great comment, Mr. the Hammer. If you don't mind me borrowing that from you, I will.
  39. @European-American
    We should not be building glass walls, but glass bridges, to our glass houses

    https://youtu.be/EK9HfyGUf18

    I really loathe the Louvre pyramid, to the point I wouldn’t mind if they blew that atrocity to smithereens. It really spoils the view.

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    • Agree: vinteuil, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @scrivener3
    Absolutely. I visited the Louvre before Pei and I lived the problems of having thousands of visitors enter a building designed as a monarch's palace. Had to arrive an hour before opening on a weekday and then wait two hours in line to get in.

    Still they could have created the underground reception area with no above ground architectural protrusion. Just one of the old doors take the crowed to two down escalators and you were in a nice artificially lighted underground plaza with ticket booths and connections to the wings.

    As for the tower, it was one of those things considered ugly at first like the Audi giant front grille the grew on people. At night in Paris anywhere in sight range of it, it is hard not to like. Paris was really fun twenty years ago but now. . . My last visit I got canned corn in my salad. Used to be details were important, if you ordered a coke, you got a silver platter with a fresh white dolly. They were poor but they really knew how to live.

    Most memorable visits: the Louvre, the British Museum (stand before the Rosetta stone and Hammurabi's Code, plus other antiquities), the Philadelphia Art Museum (modern art that the more staid places would not accept and now could never acquire).
    , @Parbes
    So you "wouldn’t mind" if Muslim terrorists "blew to smithereens" a major landmark of a major European city, merely because you don't like how it looks architecturally???

    Are you crazy, stupid, or just plain evil?
  40. @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    Sacre Coeur

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  41. @Louis Renault
    Explain again how Islam first spread through all the Christian Middle East? Was that by plebiscite where the yes votes were indicated by purple fingers like the Iraqi's use for voters today? I wonder how the no's got recorded.

    Why would that be relevant?

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  42. @BB753
    It's a case of bombing the wrong people. It's Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates we should be bombing.

    I don’t see your justification to bomb them. Please explain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Well, I meant it's those sunni states that are really causing trouble and financing muslim terrorism. Those are the countries we should have invaded 15 years ago, not Iraq or Afghanistan.
  43. @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"

    “A magnificent piece of steel…”

    The Eiffel Tower is not made of steel. It is made of iron (and was constructed just before steel began to replace iron), which I would guess is why it looks so steampunk.

    …it was not only the greatest edifice ever built of iron, but also the last of significant size…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    HA, Picky, Picky. I was an iron worker and we erected steel, not iron. So I my world the terms are interchangeable.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    Maybe the French couldn't get the steel and had to keep on with the wrought iron because they'd sold it all to the Scots, who were already using vast quantities of the stuff to knock up trifles like the Forth Rail Bridge (55,000 tonnes)

    The steel was produced by Frederick and William Siemens (England) and Pierre and Emile Martin (France), following advances in the furnace designs by the Siemens brothers and improvements on this design by the Martin brothers, the process of manufacture was thus that it enabled high quality steel to be produced very quickly.
     
    http://www.edinburgharchitecture.co.uk/images/jpgs/forth_rail_bridge_s280512.jpg
  44. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    re: “Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence”

    How the Arabs feel after Jewish and Western invasions? For the most part, current Arab countries are sitting on invaded Western territory, and, up to 1948, some were on invaded Jewish territory as well.

    Current middle eastern zones of conflict, “Iraq” and “Syria” and “Libya,” were Roman, then Byzantine, well within recorded history. The “Iraqi” descendants of Sumerians, the possible originators of civilization, may be called “marsh arabs” by some, but they are distinct from real Arabs, and have been victims of Arab violence and attempted genocide, recently under Saddam Hussein. The descendants of the pyramid builders in Egypt, the Copts, have been similarly marginalized in the land their ancestors built. Their language (“Coptic”) was a stage of Egyptian language, and thus far and away the oldest living language until turned into a dead language by Arab rulers from approx. 1300 to 1600 AD. The Arabs are the invaders, and particularly vicious and deadly invaders at that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    Even more galling is that Turks get cast as victims almost as much as the Arabs. The Turks are a history of conquest and assimilation like no other current group.
    , @Clyde
    And Islam is the worlds most long lasting (1400+ years) and successful imperialism. Whatever Jews do in Israel is like a gnat on an elephant.
    , @greysquirrell
    There isn't any archaeological or genetic evidence, found as of yet, to support the assumption or perception by some that the Marsh Arabs are descended from the Sumerians. Sumerians went extinct long ago, absorbed by the Semitic colonists.
  45. @Opinionator
    Is the Tour Eiffel really considered by the natives to be an eyesore?

    Some people think the Sacré Cœur basilica in Montmartre is an eyesore.

    http://www.margotdarby.com/news/2014/09/why-sacre-coeur-is-so-ugly/

    Its history is certainly less playful than the Eiffel Tower’s.

    The reaction to the communes of Paris and Lyon were triumphalist monuments, the Sacré-Cœur of Montmartre and the basilica of Fourvière, dominating both cities. These buildings were erected using private funds, as gigantic ex-votos, thanking God for the victory over the socialists and in expiation of the sins of modern France.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris

    Maupassant claimed the Eiffel Tower made staying in Paris unbearable.

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maupassant_vie_errante.JPG

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  46. @Chrisnonymous

    France puts Eiffel Tower behind 8ft high glass wall
     
    Wow. The Eiffel Tower is much smaller than I thought.

    Can terrorists bypass the wall by going through Belgium?

    I wonder if tourists and 20 somethings will still be able to lie around on the lawn nearby and drink. Plenty of entrepreneurs selling wine and beer from ice buckets when we were there. Lots of Africans selling trinkets. All these people were really nice.

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  47. @HA
    "A magnificent piece of steel..."

    The Eiffel Tower is not made of steel. It is made of iron (and was constructed just before steel began to replace iron), which I would guess is why it looks so steampunk.


    ...it was not only the greatest edifice ever built of iron, but also the last of significant size...
     

    HA, Picky, Picky. I was an iron worker and we erected steel, not iron. So I my world the terms are interchangeable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @HA
    "Picky, Picky."

    You're free to your opinion. But for reasons already noted in the comment you replied to, it is arguably that very distinction between steel and the more archaic iron -- however interchangeable those words may be to you -- that makes the tower so distinctively retro today.

  48. @Doc

    re: "Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence"

     

    How the Arabs feel after Jewish and Western invasions? For the most part, current Arab countries are sitting on invaded Western territory, and, up to 1948, some were on invaded Jewish territory as well.

    Current middle eastern zones of conflict, "Iraq" and "Syria" and "Libya," were Roman, then Byzantine, well within recorded history. The "Iraqi" descendants of Sumerians, the possible originators of civilization, may be called "marsh arabs" by some, but they are distinct from real Arabs, and have been victims of Arab violence and attempted genocide, recently under Saddam Hussein. The descendants of the pyramid builders in Egypt, the Copts, have been similarly marginalized in the land their ancestors built. Their language ("Coptic") was a stage of Egyptian language, and thus far and away the oldest living language until turned into a dead language by Arab rulers from approx. 1300 to 1600 AD. The Arabs are the invaders, and particularly vicious and deadly invaders at that.

    Even more galling is that Turks get cast as victims almost as much as the Arabs. The Turks are a history of conquest and assimilation like no other current group.

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  49. @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    “What do you think would be Paris’s icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn’t been built?”

    Easy – L’arc de Triomphe de l’Étoile.

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  50. @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    >>I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London’s ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?<<

    What nonsense are you talking? The Eiffel Tower is a magnificent structure. A beautiful architectural masterpiece.

    Read More
    • Replies: @vinteuil
    Have to agree - seeing it in person pretty much silences all doubts. It's not just "a magnificent structure" and "a beautiful architectural masterpiece" - it's an expression of cultural confidence with few parallels.
  51. @Opinionator
    Would Muslims be justified in retaliating against France for France's role in the destruction of Libya?

    Would Muslims be justified in retaliating against France for France’s role in the destruction of Libya?

    Would Americans be justified in retaliating against Mexico for Mexico’s role in the destruction of California?

    Read More
    • Replies: @for-the-record

    Would Americans be justified in retaliating against Mexico for Mexico’s role in the destruction of California?
     
    Not a very apt comparison. France cynically played a major role in launching a military attack against Libya. Mexico did nothing against the US. If you're against Mexican immigration to the US -- and I can understand why you might be -- it's the US government that's to blame, not the Mexican one.
  52. @Buffalo Joe
    HA, Picky, Picky. I was an iron worker and we erected steel, not iron. So I my world the terms are interchangeable.

    “Picky, Picky.”

    You’re free to your opinion. But for reasons already noted in the comment you replied to, it is arguably that very distinction between steel and the more archaic iron — however interchangeable those words may be to you — that makes the tower so distinctively retro today.

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  53. @Anon
    Probably this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris, or else of course Notre Dame.

    Sacré-Cœur is really pretty, but it’s just too recent to serve as an appropriate icon for this ancient city. It’s actually newer than the Eiffel Tower – not finished until 1914. It’s kind of the Parisian equivalent of St Petersburg’s equally “retro” Church of the Savior on Blood.

    As for Notre-Dame de Paris, it suffers from the comparison with Rheims & Chartres. Anything that’s to be the icon of Paris had better be greater than anything in the surrounding countryside.

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  54. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @JerryC
    We stop bombing them and they stop immigrating here. Deal.

    Hmm, maybe. Let me go and ask the boss…

    Read More
  55. @European-American
    Some people think the Sacré Cœur basilica in Montmartre is an eyesore.

    http://www.margotdarby.com/news/2014/09/why-sacre-coeur-is-so-ugly/

    Its history is certainly less playful than the Eiffel Tower's.

    The reaction to the communes of Paris and Lyon were triumphalist monuments, the Sacré-Cœur of Montmartre and the basilica of Fourvière, dominating both cities. These buildings were erected using private funds, as gigantic ex-votos, thanking God for the victory over the socialists and in expiation of the sins of modern France.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacr%C3%A9-C%C5%93ur,_Paris

    Maupassant claimed the Eiffel Tower made staying in Paris unbearable.
    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maupassant_vie_errante.JPG

    Thanks

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  56. @Daniel H
    >>I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London’s ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?<<

    What nonsense are you talking? The Eiffel Tower is a magnificent structure. A beautiful architectural masterpiece.

    Have to agree – seeing it in person pretty much silences all doubts. It’s not just “a magnificent structure” and “a beautiful architectural masterpiece” – it’s an expression of cultural confidence with few parallels.

    Read More
  57. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    This is like architectural condom.

    Let foreigners penetrate our nation but don’t let them ‘come’ on our treasures.

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  58. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    That’s the thing that kills me. Trump immigration ban was “playing into the hands of ISIS” and “giving them a propaganda victory.” Well, Europe bent over and bit the pillow. A fat lot of good it’s done them…

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  59. @Anonymous
    In an interview with CNN last summer, Karl Lagerfeld, the creative director of the quintessential Parisian brand Chanel, said, "This is not the most glamorous moment in Paris." "Paris by night is a nightmare now. It is not a cliché anymore." "I must say, in my whole life I never saw Paris that gloomy."

    Lagerfeld has worked in Paris since the 1950s. He says he's seen drastic changes since the times when Paris "looked like an old French movie." "It was another world. There was no feeling of danger, and not even a boy of 16 years old could walk in the street," he explains. "Things are changing, but I have the feeling I lived in a world that no longer exists."

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/11/fashion/karl-lagerfeld-chanel-haute-couture-cnn-style-tv/

    As far as old French movies go, go see Bob Le Flambeur. 1956.

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    • Replies: @hark, hark...the snark
    Jacque Demy's "Lola" (black & white, 1961) depicts a simple, sweet life in La Belle France that will make your heart weep, knowing that those days are gone forever. After that, enjoy the transcendent "Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (Colour, 1964) starring the young Catherine Deneuve.
  60. @Doc

    re: "Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence"

     

    How the Arabs feel after Jewish and Western invasions? For the most part, current Arab countries are sitting on invaded Western territory, and, up to 1948, some were on invaded Jewish territory as well.

    Current middle eastern zones of conflict, "Iraq" and "Syria" and "Libya," were Roman, then Byzantine, well within recorded history. The "Iraqi" descendants of Sumerians, the possible originators of civilization, may be called "marsh arabs" by some, but they are distinct from real Arabs, and have been victims of Arab violence and attempted genocide, recently under Saddam Hussein. The descendants of the pyramid builders in Egypt, the Copts, have been similarly marginalized in the land their ancestors built. Their language ("Coptic") was a stage of Egyptian language, and thus far and away the oldest living language until turned into a dead language by Arab rulers from approx. 1300 to 1600 AD. The Arabs are the invaders, and particularly vicious and deadly invaders at that.

    And Islam is the worlds most long lasting (1400+ years) and successful imperialism. Whatever Jews do in Israel is like a gnat on an elephant.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Judaism, even rabbinical Judaism, has been around longer than Islam.
  61. @Anonymous Nephew
    "A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say…”See, we can do things like this!”"


    Still, that's better than the New Labour abomination commissioned for the 2012 London Olympics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArcelorMittal_Orbit

    It had no other purpose but to say "British people can't do anything, so give us any old crap and we'll say it's great (and London is a World City!)", was 'designed' by a Sri Lankan and a Jewish Indian, paid for by an Indian billionaire, and is just as ugly close up as it is in the picture (more so as the red effect is just floodlighting that only changes the look at night).

    (Since the Olympics it's been improved by adding a helter-skelter)

    Truly, almost unbelievably, hideous.

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  62. @Doc

    re: "Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence"

     

    How the Arabs feel after Jewish and Western invasions? For the most part, current Arab countries are sitting on invaded Western territory, and, up to 1948, some were on invaded Jewish territory as well.

    Current middle eastern zones of conflict, "Iraq" and "Syria" and "Libya," were Roman, then Byzantine, well within recorded history. The "Iraqi" descendants of Sumerians, the possible originators of civilization, may be called "marsh arabs" by some, but they are distinct from real Arabs, and have been victims of Arab violence and attempted genocide, recently under Saddam Hussein. The descendants of the pyramid builders in Egypt, the Copts, have been similarly marginalized in the land their ancestors built. Their language ("Coptic") was a stage of Egyptian language, and thus far and away the oldest living language until turned into a dead language by Arab rulers from approx. 1300 to 1600 AD. The Arabs are the invaders, and particularly vicious and deadly invaders at that.

    There isn’t any archaeological or genetic evidence, found as of yet, to support the assumption or perception by some that the Marsh Arabs are descended from the Sumerians. Sumerians went extinct long ago, absorbed by the Semitic colonists.

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  63. Years ago I was surprised to learn that the Eiffel Tower was originally intended as a temporary structure, built as the entrance to the 1889 World’s Fair. It was to stand for 20 years, when its ownership would revert to the City of Paris, which planned to tear it down. (Part of the original contest rules for designing a tower was that it should be easy to dismantle.)

    The Eiffel Tower was the tallest man-made structure in the world until the Chrysler Building was finished in 1930.

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  64. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Its been said one of the reasons why the French stopped fighting Germans in WWII was they feared their treasures getting smashed real good.
    They were willing to be invaded to save the treasures.

    This time, French had the means to stop the invasion, but due to May 68 legacy, PC, Afromania, Algerian War guilt, Holocaust guilt, globalism, and chauvinism(our culture is so great that foreigners will come to France, admire our culture, and respect us — looks like foreigners are more into Hollywood and rap these days), they lost the Will to say NO.

    French feel guilty for not having resisted the Nazis hard enough. So, they believe they must atone by resisting the Nazis… except THERE ARE NO MORE NAZIS(who totally lost in 45). But in their resistance against imaginary Nazis, French have conflated everything white as ‘nazi’ and everything non-white as ‘progressive’. The result is predictable.

    But old habits remain. The TREASURES must be saved. During WWII, French treasures had priority over French honor, so the French surrendered and minimized the damage to Paris and other places(that actually got damaged more by Allied Invasion).
    Today, the French see the the current invasions as enrichment for both French and newcomers. French get North African cuisine(because French don’t know food, right?) and Afropop while the newcomers get Descartes and Racine(when they’re not listening to rap and watching Hollywood movies).
    Yeah, what an ideal and equal exchange of goods and ideas… except Paris isn’t looking very pretty these days and things sometimes go kaboom for some reason. There must still be Nazi soldiers in hiding from WWII. French must unite with Africans, Algerians, and Vietnamese to hunt out those old Nazi soldiers who must now be in their 90s. But those hardy Germans, they fight to the very end. Yep, that is the ONLY way to save the great treasures of France. Unite with third worlders against the Nazis who are still trying to steal art works to ship to the Nazi underground in Berlin.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kuyme-U9-es

    The 60s were a truly nutty time for France, and its repercussions are still being felt. After WWII, with the steady decline of France as an empire & capital of arts & culture and the rapid rise of the Anglo-American Empire(that later become the Anglo-Zionist Empire), the French were filled with resentment. If the French Right and French Left had one thing in common, it was anti-Americanism. French Right saw American culture as vulgar and stupid, a threat to glory of French culture. And the French Left saw America culture as capitalist, consumerist, crass, and materialistic. French Right lost much of its moral capital due to WWII collaboration with Germany. It lost even more legitimacy as France began to lose its imperial holdings one by one. Vietnam was a big loss but Algeria was the final nail in the coffin. The success of DeGaulle indicates that broad swathes of Frenchmen still felt closer to the center-right than to the Left, but the Left dominated academia, media, and culture, and it would define the future of France.
    It was anti-American but couldn’t stand for French patriotism since, being leftist, it was anti-nationalist too. What resulted was a crazy nihilism and radical vision that predictably failed… but this vacuum was filled by rampant American-style consumerism. Some might argue that the rise of PC is a kind of French triumph since the new leftism has French, as well as German-Jewish, roots. Boomers who cooked up PC took some ideas from French Deconstruction, if only indirectly as the original texts could be understood only by a few. (I wonder if Anglo and Jewish academics really took French philosophy seriously OR if they just cherrypicked some stuff that was useful in justifying their own less-than-noble agendas, which might seem fancier if scented with French intellectual cologne.) But PC, in destroying roots and national sovereignty, just made the world into one big gladiatorial stadium for globalist oligarchs and demographic imperialists.

    Godard’s combination of anti-Americanism and anti-French-nationalism in WEEKEND portended what was to come. The social experiment in France was nowhere near as drastic as what happened in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, but it led to a spiritual death and paralysis from which the French still haven’t recovered.
    Godard railed at France as whore of US empire, but his prescription wasn’t to save France but to destroy it totally so that a new order could be built from the rubble.

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  65. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Now, here’s an idea.

    http://s312.photobucket.com/user/ilbonitwo/media/arg/concorde_condom_1.jpg.html

    I believe Mona Lisa is also behind a glass wall. That’s more understandable as a painting can easily be damaged.

    But an entire tower made of steel having to be protected.

    That’s just loony or loonois.

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  66. @IndieRafael
    Decades ago, when driving in Washington, DC you could swing into the US Capitol east parking lot entrance (right in front of the building) just to make a casual u-turn. No longer. After various overseas terror attacks, the planters and barriers went up. In recent years, the US Capitol Police (separate from the DC Metro Police) seem to take another block every year, expanding the perimeter. All tastefully done (in my opinion), and necessary.

    Thinking of threatened public monuments, it's worth remembering what Senator Moynihan said on TV within hours after 9/11 attacks. Essentially, that they could knock down the Capitol and the republic would endure. It would help if Congress enacted some of the recommendations of the continuity-of-government commission offered some years ago.

    In Washington Goes to War by David Brinkley he describes getting a flat in 1942 while on the way to work. He pulled off the road and drove into the White House entry way where he proceeded to change his tire.

    Read More
  67. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Can’t happen. The same people pushing the U.S. into destroying Iraq, Libya, Syria, Iran, … are the same people manipulating to bring in the third world and Muslims. As they hyperventilate about the borders and security of their parasitic pseudo-state.

    Read More
  68. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    I remember thinking similarly after the Belgium airport attack, when "experts" suggested moving the security perimeter outside of the airport... I commented, "why not all the way to, I don't know, the border?"

    Great comment, Mr. the Hammer. If you don’t mind me borrowing that from you, I will.

    Read More
  69. @BB753
    I really loathe the Louvre pyramid, to the point I wouldn't mind if they blew that atrocity to smithereens. It really spoils the view.

    Absolutely. I visited the Louvre before Pei and I lived the problems of having thousands of visitors enter a building designed as a monarch’s palace. Had to arrive an hour before opening on a weekday and then wait two hours in line to get in.

    Still they could have created the underground reception area with no above ground architectural protrusion. Just one of the old doors take the crowed to two down escalators and you were in a nice artificially lighted underground plaza with ticket booths and connections to the wings.

    As for the tower, it was one of those things considered ugly at first like the Audi giant front grille the grew on people. At night in Paris anywhere in sight range of it, it is hard not to like. Paris was really fun twenty years ago but now. . . My last visit I got canned corn in my salad. Used to be details were important, if you ordered a coke, you got a silver platter with a fresh white dolly. They were poor but they really knew how to live.

    Most memorable visits: the Louvre, the British Museum (stand before the Rosetta stone and Hammurabi’s Code, plus other antiquities), the Philadelphia Art Museum (modern art that the more staid places would not accept and now could never acquire).

    Read More
  70. @Buffalo Joe
    KM,Well stated, especially the steampunk reference. A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say..."See, we can do things like this!"

    Steampunk represents that Victorian confidence and brashness that was lost in 1914……

    Read More
  71. @Opinionator
    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.

    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Yes.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/sweden-sends-troops-help-fight-against-islamic-state-group-iraq-1876284

    https://www.rt.com/news/sweden-aided-us-iraq-299/

    But Sweden is not a member of NATO (and technically it is arguably not an ally) and it has not rained near the amount of violence onto the Middle Eastern peoples that France and the United States have.

    As a result, unlike France and the United States, Sweden has largely been spared from major retaliatory attacks by Muslim resistance fighters. Apparently ISIS does discriminate.
  72. @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Why waste your time asking Americans to stop the U.S. from bombing the Middle East. You have to talk to our boss in Tel Aviv.

    Read More
  73. @Opinionator
    Is the Tour Eiffel really considered by the natives to be an eyesore?

    When it was brash and new, it was disliked by people of a conservative temperament. Our commentator European-American links to Maupassant saying that he finally left Paris because he was so tired of the Eiffel Tower. Before he did so, it was noticed that he frequented one of the Eiffel Tower restaurants, and when asked to explain, he said it was the only place in town where he couldn’t see the thing.

    But time has vindicated Eiffel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Smokestack Lightning
    That's what they say of the Tour Montparnasse today. The viewing terrace on the top of the Tour Montparnasse offers the most beautiful view of Paris, because that is the only place in Paris where the Tour Montparnasse can't be seen.
  74. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    Very true. This all started after 1967 when Israel attacked the neighboring ArAb countries. Ever since then, the Ziofascists have demonized them in US and world media to turn everyone against the Arabs and massively pro Zionist! It’s a long term plan and it’s still working. They have used and abused the west for their dastardly purposes and people are asleep to their truly feeling towards Europeans and European stock!

    Read More
  75. @Opinionator
    Each gets their own place on this planet to exist in relative security and live life as they deem best for their posterity.

    Wrong. Each fights to gain control of their own place on this planet to exist in relative security and live life as they deem best for their posterity if they can continue to hold others off of their little plot of land.

    The way that it has always been. The way that it will always be. Indeed, the way that it should be. Whites have forgotten that lesson. Maybe we’ll remember it before it’s too late; maybe not.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Not inconsistent with what I wrote.

    Define "hold others off their" land.
  76. All of Europe is in deep trouble – the old order is breaking up – yet surrounded by chaos Israel is thriving.

    Israel is the only country in the so called western sphere that is flourishing – Hmm!

    Peace — Art

    Read More
  77. One thing that always strikes me when I walk around
    Paris, the city I love, is that the French, with their thin arms and
    thin legs (especially striking, looking at women) look so delicate,
    and then you wonder how did they manage all these
    centuries to defend themselves? You go east
    to Germany or Poland, and people are taller and built like
    heavy artillery.

    I’m not the only one who made this observation. Arthur Rubinstein, the
    Polish pianist, who probably spent more time womanizing than practicing
    the piano, famously complained, “French women’s legs are too thin, there
    is nothing to grab!” A young French woman of my acquaintance who works
    at an art gallery (of course – what else would you expect a young Parisian woman
    to do?) fits this description to a tee, and because of her body type she’s effortlessly
    elegant. It’s a body type you often see in artists, which befits a city where it’s
    almost too easy to overdose on beauty.

    France is to Europe what California is to the United States: the beautiful West Coast.
    France is blessed in that, except for the border with Germany (and let’s hope the
    Germans finally learned their lesson not to invade other white countries on a whim),
    she has all natural borders. Moreover, France is protected from earthquakes, hurricanes,
    and tornadoes, and even major fires and floods are very rare. Truly, God’s chosen country.
    My idea of heaven would be to divide my time between California and France.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    France is blessed in that, except for the border with Germany (and let’s hope the
    Germans finally learned their lesson not to invade other white countries on a whim)


    France declared war on Germany in WWII.
    , @Ivy
    French dietary policy has been to restrict calorie intake so kids would be healthier, if slighter, adults and to curtail potential obesity. That also helped weather the lean years post-WWII and stretch resources, bien sûr.
  78. @Neuday

    Would Muslims be justified in retaliating against France for France’s role in the destruction of Libya?
     
    Would Americans be justified in retaliating against Mexico for Mexico's role in the destruction of California?

    Would Americans be justified in retaliating against Mexico for Mexico’s role in the destruction of California?

    Not a very apt comparison. France cynically played a major role in launching a military attack against Libya. Mexico did nothing against the US. If you’re against Mexican immigration to the US — and I can understand why you might be — it’s the US government that’s to blame, not the Mexican one.

    Read More
  79. @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East? Is/was Germany? Finland? Norway? You have no answer so don’t bother anyone with your silly arse guilt complex.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Yes, Germany, Sweden, France, and Norway have participated in the United States invasion and bombing of Iraq. France, Sweden, Norway, and the United States waged war together against Libya.

    Finland, Sweden, and Norway have not been subject to a major attack by Muslim resistance fighters. This is likely a reflection of their minor to nonexistent role--relative to the United States, France, and Germany--in hostilities against the Middle Eastern peoples.
  80. @Clyde
    And Islam is the worlds most long lasting (1400+ years) and successful imperialism. Whatever Jews do in Israel is like a gnat on an elephant.

    Judaism, even rabbinical Judaism, has been around longer than Islam.

    Read More
  81. @Anon 2
    One thing that always strikes me when I walk around
    Paris, the city I love, is that the French, with their thin arms and
    thin legs (especially striking, looking at women) look so delicate,
    and then you wonder how did they manage all these
    centuries to defend themselves? You go east
    to Germany or Poland, and people are taller and built like
    heavy artillery.

    I'm not the only one who made this observation. Arthur Rubinstein, the
    Polish pianist, who probably spent more time womanizing than practicing
    the piano, famously complained, "French women's legs are too thin, there
    is nothing to grab!" A young French woman of my acquaintance who works
    at an art gallery (of course - what else would you expect a young Parisian woman
    to do?) fits this description to a tee, and because of her body type she's effortlessly
    elegant. It's a body type you often see in artists, which befits a city where it's
    almost too easy to overdose on beauty.

    France is to Europe what California is to the United States: the beautiful West Coast.
    France is blessed in that, except for the border with Germany (and let's hope the
    Germans finally learned their lesson not to invade other white countries on a whim),
    she has all natural borders. Moreover, France is protected from earthquakes, hurricanes,
    and tornadoes, and even major fires and floods are very rare. Truly, God's chosen country.
    My idea of heaven would be to divide my time between California and France.

    France is blessed in that, except for the border with Germany (and let’s hope the
    Germans finally learned their lesson not to invade other white countries on a whim)

    France declared war on Germany in WWII.

    Read More
  82. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East?

    Yes.

    http://www.ibtimes.com/sweden-sends-troops-help-fight-against-islamic-state-group-iraq-1876284

    https://www.rt.com/news/sweden-aided-us-iraq-299/

    But Sweden is not a member of NATO (and technically it is arguably not an ally) and it has not rained near the amount of violence onto the Middle Eastern peoples that France and the United States have.

    As a result, unlike France and the United States, Sweden has largely been spared from major retaliatory attacks by Muslim resistance fighters. Apparently ISIS does discriminate.

    Read More
  83. @Clyde

    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?
     
    Is Sweden bombing the Middle East? Is/was Germany? Finland? Norway? You have no answer so don't bother anyone with your silly arse guilt complex.

    Yes, Germany, Sweden, France, and Norway have participated in the United States invasion and bombing of Iraq. France, Sweden, Norway, and the United States waged war together against Libya.

    Finland, Sweden, and Norway have not been subject to a major attack by Muslim resistance fighters. This is likely a reflection of their minor to nonexistent role–relative to the United States, France, and Germany–in hostilities against the Middle Eastern peoples.

    Read More
  84. @Anon 2
    One thing that always strikes me when I walk around
    Paris, the city I love, is that the French, with their thin arms and
    thin legs (especially striking, looking at women) look so delicate,
    and then you wonder how did they manage all these
    centuries to defend themselves? You go east
    to Germany or Poland, and people are taller and built like
    heavy artillery.

    I'm not the only one who made this observation. Arthur Rubinstein, the
    Polish pianist, who probably spent more time womanizing than practicing
    the piano, famously complained, "French women's legs are too thin, there
    is nothing to grab!" A young French woman of my acquaintance who works
    at an art gallery (of course - what else would you expect a young Parisian woman
    to do?) fits this description to a tee, and because of her body type she's effortlessly
    elegant. It's a body type you often see in artists, which befits a city where it's
    almost too easy to overdose on beauty.

    France is to Europe what California is to the United States: the beautiful West Coast.
    France is blessed in that, except for the border with Germany (and let's hope the
    Germans finally learned their lesson not to invade other white countries on a whim),
    she has all natural borders. Moreover, France is protected from earthquakes, hurricanes,
    and tornadoes, and even major fires and floods are very rare. Truly, God's chosen country.
    My idea of heaven would be to divide my time between California and France.

    French dietary policy has been to restrict calorie intake so kids would be healthier, if slighter, adults and to curtail potential obesity. That also helped weather the lean years post-WWII and stretch resources, bien sûr.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    It's not that the French are generally not overweight, although for
    a visitor from the U.S., the land of walruses, walking around Paris
    truly is a surreal experience - everybody is slim (and everybody smokes,
    although less than they used to). It's that their bone structure is
    different which has nothing to do with diet. But in terms of slimness,
    for those of us who remember America in the 1960s, as I do, going
    to France (forget about the Muslims for a moment) is like traveling
    back in time to the 1967 Summer of Love in California, the time
    before the obesity epidemic began to hit the U.S. in the late '70s.,
    and the sense of what America has lost is something that really hits you in
    the gut. Young people can see what the U.S. was like by looking at
    clips of old game shows, like "What's My Line?", and paying attention
    to the audience
  85. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Wrong. Each fights to gain control of their own place on this planet to exist in relative security and live life as they deem best for their posterity if they can continue to hold others off of their little plot of land.

    The way that it has always been. The way that it will always be. Indeed, the way that it should be. Whites have forgotten that lesson. Maybe we'll remember it before it's too late; maybe not.

    Not inconsistent with what I wrote.

    Define “hold others off their” land.

    Read More
  86. @Clyde
    As far as old French movies go, go see Bob Le Flambeur. 1956.

    Jacque Demy’s “Lola” (black & white, 1961) depicts a simple, sweet life in La Belle France that will make your heart weep, knowing that those days are gone forever. After that, enjoy the transcendent “Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (Colour, 1964) starring the young Catherine Deneuve.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anon 2
    • Replies: @Escher
    The young Catherine Deneuve was achingly beautiful, and even now holds her own against women many years younger.
  87. Despite its recent problems, my best piece
    of advice for anyone who wants to become a writer
    is still the same – if you’re young, give yourself 2-3 years,
    and spend them in Paris, or wandering around France.
    It worked for Hemingway, Henry Miller, and might
    have worked for Jim Morrison had it not been for the
    unfortunate incident (?) in 1971 that ended his life at 27.
    Just walking around the Quartier Latin, and thinking how
    this area has hosted students from all over Europe for 900
    years is mind blowing. Thomas Aquinas himself was
    a professor here in the 13th century. If you can’t become
    a writer in Paris, then God help you, you ought to try another
    profession.

    Henry Miller in his Quiet Days in Clichy gives an amusing anecdote
    showing the sort of respect that writers got in Paris in the 1930s.
    Like much of Miller’s writing, this is based on actual events. He and
    his friend rented an apartment in Clichy just beyond the Périphérique.
    Both were men in their mid-to-late thirties. Miller’s friend invited a girl
    of 15, a runaway, to move in with them. Not to impugn her virtue in any
    way, but the girl would walk around the apartment in various states
    of undress, not caring if anything was showing. Not being made of stone,
    Miller’s friend yielded to temptation and things began to happen. Then
    the girl left, and one day showed up with her mother and a lawyer. Even
    in France, they could’ve gotten 10 years behind bars. But then the visitors saw
    the typewriters, Proust on the shelves, plus his friend introduced Miller
    as a famous American writer. This apparently did the trick, the visitors
    became very deferential, said “the girl could’ve done worse,” asked them
    to stay away from the girl, and left. In the 1970 movie version, the 15-year-old
    (Colette) is played by a 23-year-old. Apparently, the filmmakers didn’t want
    to get involved in a Lolita-type of scandal. The moral of the story is that
    France is still, at least culturally, a Catholic country, and Catholic countries,
    with their cultural center in the mediterranean Italy, are generally very
    forgiving toward people’s sexual foibles

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    It seems Genius T. Coates has followed your advice. I hear he's writing the Great American Novel in Paree. The working title is " Black Bodies", a book about the fate of Black Bodies in America.
  88. @Opinionator
    I don't see your justification to bomb them. Please explain.

    Well, I meant it’s those sunni states that are really causing trouble and financing muslim terrorism. Those are the countries we should have invaded 15 years ago, not Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Read More
  89. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    Maybe the United States should stop bombing the Middle East?

    Maybe Middle Easterners should stop slaughtering their local Christians?

    Read More
  90. @Ivy
    French dietary policy has been to restrict calorie intake so kids would be healthier, if slighter, adults and to curtail potential obesity. That also helped weather the lean years post-WWII and stretch resources, bien sûr.

    It’s not that the French are generally not overweight, although for
    a visitor from the U.S., the land of walruses, walking around Paris
    truly is a surreal experience – everybody is slim (and everybody smokes,
    although less than they used to). It’s that their bone structure is
    different which has nothing to do with diet. But in terms of slimness,
    for those of us who remember America in the 1960s, as I do, going
    to France (forget about the Muslims for a moment) is like traveling
    back in time to the 1967 Summer of Love in California, the time
    before the obesity epidemic began to hit the U.S. in the late ’70s.,
    and the sense of what America has lost is something that really hits you in
    the gut. Young people can see what the U.S. was like by looking at
    clips of old game shows, like “What’s My Line?”, and paying attention
    to the audience

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Anon 2:

    Also take a look at US workers in the 1930s. A prime example being the famous poster of steelworkers sitting on a steel beam at vertigo-inducing heights. These men were relatively skinny compared to present-day Americans and they worked at a very physically-demanding job.
  91. @Front toward enemy
    Well the 238 remain dead but by golly we will protect the steel. Steel structures matter.

    What will Muslims do to the glass wall and tower when they become the majority, finally and forever, dominant and vengeful and triumphant? Destroy the wall and then the tower and build a mosque? What symbolism!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Maybe they could use they Eiffel Tower as a minaret? A great platform from which the muezzin can announce the prayer to worshippers.
  92. It occurred to me that in recent years in many
    ways Paris has become like Israel: 283,000 French
    Jews living in Paris, surrounded by 1.7 million angry
    Muslims living in the banlieus beyond the Périphérique
    – an incendiary combination that doesn’t exist anywhere
    else in Europe

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    Is France going to build a wall around Paris
    to protect it from the 1.7 million Muslims
    living beyond the beltway (Bd Périphérique)?
    Well, if Le Pen gets elected (which is unlikely),
    it's still improbable but with everyone building walls
    it feels like we're going back to Le Moyen Âge
    , @anon
    it's a shame the french who used to live in the banlieues were cleansed by their own government / media
  93. @Anon 2
    It occurred to me that in recent years in many
    ways Paris has become like Israel: 283,000 French
    Jews living in Paris, surrounded by 1.7 million angry
    Muslims living in the banlieus beyond the Périphérique
    - an incendiary combination that doesn't exist anywhere
    else in Europe

    Is France going to build a wall around Paris
    to protect it from the 1.7 million Muslims
    living beyond the beltway (Bd Périphérique)?
    Well, if Le Pen gets elected (which is unlikely),
    it’s still improbable but with everyone building walls
    it feels like we’re going back to Le Moyen Âge

    Read More
  94. @BB753
    It's a case of bombing the wrong people. It's Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates we should be bombing.

    You forgot Qatar, Kuwait, and Erdogan.

    Read More
  95. @hark, hark...the snark
    Jacque Demy's "Lola" (black & white, 1961) depicts a simple, sweet life in La Belle France that will make your heart weep, knowing that those days are gone forever. After that, enjoy the transcendent "Umbrellas of Cherbourg" (Colour, 1964) starring the young Catherine Deneuve.

    The young Catherine Deneuve was achingly beautiful, and even now holds her own against women many years younger.

    Read More
  96. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anon 2
    It occurred to me that in recent years in many
    ways Paris has become like Israel: 283,000 French
    Jews living in Paris, surrounded by 1.7 million angry
    Muslims living in the banlieus beyond the Périphérique
    - an incendiary combination that doesn't exist anywhere
    else in Europe

    it’s a shame the french who used to live in the banlieues were cleansed by their own government / media

    Read More
  97. @Anon 2
    It's not that the French are generally not overweight, although for
    a visitor from the U.S., the land of walruses, walking around Paris
    truly is a surreal experience - everybody is slim (and everybody smokes,
    although less than they used to). It's that their bone structure is
    different which has nothing to do with diet. But in terms of slimness,
    for those of us who remember America in the 1960s, as I do, going
    to France (forget about the Muslims for a moment) is like traveling
    back in time to the 1967 Summer of Love in California, the time
    before the obesity epidemic began to hit the U.S. in the late '70s.,
    and the sense of what America has lost is something that really hits you in
    the gut. Young people can see what the U.S. was like by looking at
    clips of old game shows, like "What's My Line?", and paying attention
    to the audience

    Anon 2:

    Also take a look at US workers in the 1930s. A prime example being the famous poster of steelworkers sitting on a steel beam at vertigo-inducing heights. These men were relatively skinny compared to present-day Americans and they worked at a very physically-demanding job.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    UCLA film schoolHas amazing archives. One I saw was a film the navy made of the late 1940's atomic bomb blasts in the Pacific islands
    There were hundreds of sailors on the ships. Granted they were very young but they were so thin. They were probably
    5'8 130 pounds, 6 ft 145, really thin.
  98. @SMK
    What will Muslims do to the glass wall and tower when they become the majority, finally and forever, dominant and vengeful and triumphant? Destroy the wall and then the tower and build a mosque? What symbolism!

    Maybe they could use they Eiffel Tower as a minaret? A great platform from which the muezzin can announce the prayer to worshippers.

    Read More
  99. @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    I recall reading that some old Frenchmen called it, “The oil derrick”.

    Read More
  100. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.

    the biggest problems of mass muslim immigration are
    - low IQ / high genetic diseases
    - clan-based morality leading to massive amounts of white collar criminality
    - the gradual cleansing of the native population within expanding enclaves
    - the creation of police no-go zones (to protect the criminality)
    - eventual civil war
    - mass ongoing sexual violence focused on the youngest / poorest

    (nb the sexual violence aspect is a permanent feature as long as there is a mixed population as Muslims keep girls at home leading to a gender imbalance among teenagers that leads to gang and sexual violence as both muslim and non-muslim males chase after the non-muslim girls)

    terrorism isn’t the biggest problem by far – it’s simply the only problem the media can’t hide

    #

    I agree the wars in the middle-east were (intended) for the benefit of Israel and those wars have made the terrorism aspect worse and a lot of the people behind the wars are the same people behind opening the borders of the West to Muslim immigration.

    However those two things have focused attention on details of Islamic culture and that focus has revealed things which are sub optimal – certainly for the West but also for themselves.

    So – big exclusionary wall followed by science based cultural imperialism (at least).

    #

    Muslims who are hostile to the West often justify their hostility on two centuries of western imperialism so we can certainly justify reciprocal hostility on the twelve centuries of Islamic imperialism if we want but there are two moral cases – the other being Islam is sub-optimal for getting into space.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?
  101. @anon
    the biggest problems of mass muslim immigration are
    - low IQ / high genetic diseases
    - clan-based morality leading to massive amounts of white collar criminality
    - the gradual cleansing of the native population within expanding enclaves
    - the creation of police no-go zones (to protect the criminality)
    - eventual civil war
    - mass ongoing sexual violence focused on the youngest / poorest

    (nb the sexual violence aspect is a permanent feature as long as there is a mixed population as Muslims keep girls at home leading to a gender imbalance among teenagers that leads to gang and sexual violence as both muslim and non-muslim males chase after the non-muslim girls)

    terrorism isn't the biggest problem by far - it's simply the only problem the media can't hide

    #

    I agree the wars in the middle-east were (intended) for the benefit of Israel and those wars have made the terrorism aspect worse and a lot of the people behind the wars are the same people behind opening the borders of the West to Muslim immigration.

    However those two things have focused attention on details of Islamic culture and that focus has revealed things which are sub optimal - certainly for the West but also for themselves.

    So - big exclusionary wall followed by science based cultural imperialism (at least).

    #

    Muslims who are hostile to the West often justify their hostility on two centuries of western imperialism so we can certainly justify reciprocal hostility on the twelve centuries of Islamic imperialism if we want but there are two moral cases - the other being Islam is sub-optimal for getting into space.

    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    The West did much better for most of the last 1400 years - it only reversed after WWII when the West was betrayed from within for various stupid, short-term reasons.

    what other metric is more important?
     
    quite, hence the capacity to expand into space is the key metric
    , @Karl
    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?
    , @Karl
    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?
    , @Karl
    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?
  102. Meanwhile, over in Germany:

    Haven’t they learnt a thing? Merkel’s government ‘hoping to bring in 12 MILLION migrants’

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/765919/Angela-Merkel-Germany-European-Migrant-Crisis-12-million

    A leaked report from Mrs Merkel’s government said Germany would need to take in 12m migrants over the next four decades to keep Germany’s population size stable.

    Locally, Mrs Merkel’s government is coming under pressure after it was deemed that 345,000 new homes have to be built each year to house those travelling to the country to live.

    Just last week the under-fire German Chancellor placed a ban on the families of as many as three million people who arrived in Germany during the migrant crisis joining their relatives.

    The ban, which also applies to women and children and elderly relatives from war torn countries, has been put in place for two years after the country revealed the crisis will cost £37bn this year.

    Surely if the issue were just Germany’s (allegedly) low population, it wouldn’t cost £37bn per year to incentivize higher birth rates among young German couples. What’s the endgame here, really?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    quite

    given the costs of mass immigration, logically the motive can only be
    - oligarchs wanting to drive wages to subsistence
    or
    - intentionally destroying the various European nations for one reason or another*

    (*whether it's SJW anti-nationalism, oligarch divide and rule, revenge etc)
  103. @Chrisnonymous
    I have a sneaking suspicion that the Eiffel Tower is just ugliness we have gotten used to. How about London's ferris wheel? Is it iconic or a travesty?

    I haven't been to Paris. What do you think would be Paris's icon today if the Eiffel Tower hadn't been built?

    Agree that the Eiffel Tower is ugly.

    The medieval Tour St Jacques is infinitely more beautiful. It’s a stage on the pilgrimage to St James of Compostella.

    Or Notre Dame.

    Read More
  104. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    31 Opinionator > Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Imagine how the Berbers, the Copts and the Judeans would feel if the Arabs went back to Arabia

    Read More
  105. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    31 Opinionator > Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Imagine how the Berbers, the Copts and the Judeans would feel if the Arabs went back to Arabia

    Read More
  106. @San Fernando Curt
    France has the highest Muslim population outside the Mideast and South Asia. OF COURSE there will be more attacks. France is losing a simple numbers game.

    France has the highest Muslim population outside the Mideast and South Asia.

    Actually not even close!

    Indonesia is in the far east and has north of 200 million Muslims. A bit north of Indonesia is China, also in the far East, which has around 30 million Muslims. Between the 2 is the Philippines, which has about 6 million Muslims.

    Then there is Africa. Nigeria, replete with 100 Million Muslims – there are perhaps a quarter of a billion Muslims in Sub Saharan Africa and of course North Africa- Algeria has 40 million alone…then there is Tunisia, Chad, Libya etcetera.

    Read More
  107. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    The West did much better for most of the last 1400 years – it only reversed after WWII when the West was betrayed from within for various stupid, short-term reasons.

    what other metric is more important?

    quite, hence the capacity to expand into space is the key metric

    Read More
    • Replies: @EdwardM
    Well, then: http://gulfnews.com/news/uae/general/uae-to-build-first-city-on-mars-by-2117-1.1978549
  108. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @King Baeksu
    Meanwhile, over in Germany:

    Haven't they learnt a thing? Merkel’s government 'hoping to bring in 12 MILLION migrants'
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/765919/Angela-Merkel-Germany-European-Migrant-Crisis-12-million


    A leaked report from Mrs Merkel's government said Germany would need to take in 12m migrants over the next four decades to keep Germany’s population size stable.

    Locally, Mrs Merkel's government is coming under pressure after it was deemed that 345,000 new homes have to be built each year to house those travelling to the country to live.

    Just last week the under-fire German Chancellor placed a ban on the families of as many as three million people who arrived in Germany during the migrant crisis joining their relatives.

    The ban, which also applies to women and children and elderly relatives from war torn countries, has been put in place for two years after the country revealed the crisis will cost £37bn this year.
     

    Surely if the issue were just Germany's (allegedly) low population, it wouldn't cost £37bn per year to incentivize higher birth rates among young German couples. What's the endgame here, really?

    quite

    given the costs of mass immigration, logically the motive can only be
    - oligarchs wanting to drive wages to subsistence
    or
    - intentionally destroying the various European nations for one reason or another*

    (*whether it’s SJW anti-nationalism, oligarch divide and rule, revenge etc)

    Read More
  109. @Opinionator
    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    Read More
  110. @Opinionator
    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    Read More
  111. @Opinionator
    I agree with some of these points. However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    In the Prisoner's Dilemma, people vote with their feet. Do they end up better off?
    , @Johann Ricke

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?
     
    Never mind Christians. How about Muslims? How about anyone?
  112. @BB753
    I really loathe the Louvre pyramid, to the point I wouldn't mind if they blew that atrocity to smithereens. It really spoils the view.

    So you “wouldn’t mind” if Muslim terrorists “blew to smithereens” a major landmark of a major European city, merely because you don’t like how it looks architecturally???

    Are you crazy, stupid, or just plain evil?

    Read More
  113. @Anon 2
    Despite its recent problems, my best piece
    of advice for anyone who wants to become a writer
    is still the same - if you're young, give yourself 2-3 years,
    and spend them in Paris, or wandering around France.
    It worked for Hemingway, Henry Miller, and might
    have worked for Jim Morrison had it not been for the
    unfortunate incident (?) in 1971 that ended his life at 27.
    Just walking around the Quartier Latin, and thinking how
    this area has hosted students from all over Europe for 900
    years is mind blowing. Thomas Aquinas himself was
    a professor here in the 13th century. If you can't become
    a writer in Paris, then God help you, you ought to try another
    profession.

    Henry Miller in his Quiet Days in Clichy gives an amusing anecdote
    showing the sort of respect that writers got in Paris in the 1930s.
    Like much of Miller's writing, this is based on actual events. He and
    his friend rented an apartment in Clichy just beyond the Périphérique.
    Both were men in their mid-to-late thirties. Miller's friend invited a girl
    of 15, a runaway, to move in with them. Not to impugn her virtue in any
    way, but the girl would walk around the apartment in various states
    of undress, not caring if anything was showing. Not being made of stone,
    Miller's friend yielded to temptation and things began to happen. Then
    the girl left, and one day showed up with her mother and a lawyer. Even
    in France, they could've gotten 10 years behind bars. But then the visitors saw
    the typewriters, Proust on the shelves, plus his friend introduced Miller
    as a famous American writer. This apparently did the trick, the visitors
    became very deferential, said "the girl could've done worse," asked them
    to stay away from the girl, and left. In the 1970 movie version, the 15-year-old
    (Colette) is played by a 23-year-old. Apparently, the filmmakers didn't want
    to get involved in a Lolita-type of scandal. The moral of the story is that
    France is still, at least culturally, a Catholic country, and Catholic countries,
    with their cultural center in the mediterranean Italy, are generally very
    forgiving toward people's sexual foibles

    It seems Genius T. Coates has followed your advice. I hear he’s writing the Great American Novel in Paree. The working title is ” Black Bodies”, a book about the fate of Black Bodies in America.

    Read More
  114. @Parbes
    So you "wouldn’t mind" if Muslim terrorists "blew to smithereens" a major landmark of a major European city, merely because you don't like how it looks architecturally???

    Are you crazy, stupid, or just plain evil?

    Just the pyramid.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Parbes
    You are a reprehensible knave, and a perfect example of what is wrong with the West today.
  115. @Karl
    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    In the Prisoner’s Dilemma, people vote with their feet. Do they end up better off?

    Read More
  116. @Weltanschauung
    When it was brash and new, it was disliked by people of a conservative temperament. Our commentator European-American links to Maupassant saying that he finally left Paris because he was so tired of the Eiffel Tower. Before he did so, it was noticed that he frequented one of the Eiffel Tower restaurants, and when asked to explain, he said it was the only place in town where he couldn't see the thing.

    But time has vindicated Eiffel.

    That’s what they say of the Tour Montparnasse today. The viewing terrace on the top of the Tour Montparnasse offers the most beautiful view of Paris, because that is the only place in Paris where the Tour Montparnasse can’t be seen.

    Read More
  117. @BB753
    Just the pyramid.

    You are a reprehensible knave, and a perfect example of what is wrong with the West today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    You Sir, have very bad taste to like the Louvre pyramid.
  118. @Karl
    105 Opinionator > However, judged on the basis of continuity of culture and people, of family formation, they are doing much better than the West. It is arguably a superior culture, for what other metric is more important?

    the way I measure is: when people vote with their feet, which direction are they going?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    I mean, where ==are== all these Christians who want to immigrate to Pakistan to enjoy the strong family values there?

    Never mind Christians. How about Muslims? How about anyone?

    Read More
  119. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Roughly how the non-Muslim world (and the remnant minorities in what were formerly non-Muslim regions in the Middle East, North Africa, Central Asia and South Asia), feels after a thousand years of Muslim invasions and violence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Not really. To be aware of "Muslim invasions" we must consult history books.
  120. @Parbes
    You are a reprehensible knave, and a perfect example of what is wrong with the West today.

    You Sir, have very bad taste to like the Louvre pyramid.

    Read More
  121. @Opinionator
    But our lives are warped by “this constant, unending, low-level threat of sudden violence.”

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.

    Our public discourse is dominated by terrorism, counter-terrorism, and introspection on how we deal with terrorism. Our public spaces are warped by security checks and armed police. Islamic terrorism is an existential threat fulfilled. It has changed our peaceful existence to something more turbulent.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    If there were no Islamic threat, the Zionists would have to invent one.

    It appears you don’t like Jews. Even if Jews were the enemies of the West, it is possible to have more than one set of enemies at the same time. It wasn’t Jews who invaded Spain and occupied it for almost 800 years. It wasn’t Jews who fought Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours. And it wasn’t Jews who laid siege to Vienna, twice. Even the Chinese had their far western provinces rolled up by Muslim invaders.

    Read More
  122. @Johann Ricke

    Imagine how the Arabs feel after a century of Jewish and Western invasions and violence.
     
    Roughly how the non-Muslim world (and the remnant minorities in what were formerly non-Muslim regions in the Middle East, North Africa, Central Asia and South Asia), feels after a thousand years of Muslim invasions and violence.

    Not really. To be aware of “Muslim invasions” we must consult history books.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Neither the Copts, nor the Maronites, nor the Armenians, etc. etc. need do this.
  123. @HA
    "A magnificent piece of steel..."

    The Eiffel Tower is not made of steel. It is made of iron (and was constructed just before steel began to replace iron), which I would guess is why it looks so steampunk.


    ...it was not only the greatest edifice ever built of iron, but also the last of significant size...
     

    Maybe the French couldn’t get the steel and had to keep on with the wrought iron because they’d sold it all to the Scots, who were already using vast quantities of the stuff to knock up trifles like the Forth Rail Bridge (55,000 tonnes)

    The steel was produced by Frederick and William Siemens (England) and Pierre and Emile Martin (France), following advances in the furnace designs by the Siemens brothers and improvements on this design by the Martin brothers, the process of manufacture was thus that it enabled high quality steel to be produced very quickly.

    http://www.edinburgharchitecture.co.uk/images/jpgs/forth_rail_bridge_s280512.jpg

    Read More
  124. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    Not really. To be aware of "Muslim invasions" we must consult history books.

    Neither the Copts, nor the Maronites, nor the Armenians, etc. etc. need do this.

    Read More
  125. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anonymous Nephew
    "A magnificent piece of steel work that serves no purpose other than to say…”See, we can do things like this!”"


    Still, that's better than the New Labour abomination commissioned for the 2012 London Olympics.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ArcelorMittal_Orbit

    It had no other purpose but to say "British people can't do anything, so give us any old crap and we'll say it's great (and London is a World City!)", was 'designed' by a Sri Lankan and a Jewish Indian, paid for by an Indian billionaire, and is just as ugly close up as it is in the picture (more so as the red effect is just floodlighting that only changes the look at night).

    (Since the Olympics it's been improved by adding a helter-skelter)

    Cecil Balmond is one fellow we don’t mind getting flushed down the brain drain. Imagine something like that going up in Colombo! Or worse, Kandy! Though if it were near Kandy we might be lucky enough to have it wrecked by a mudslide …

    Honestly, though, he’s probably at least half English (Burgher or Anglo-Ceylonese), so there’s that going for him among you Brits.

    Read More
  126. @Dan Hayes
    Anon 2:

    Also take a look at US workers in the 1930s. A prime example being the famous poster of steelworkers sitting on a steel beam at vertigo-inducing heights. These men were relatively skinny compared to present-day Americans and they worked at a very physically-demanding job.

    UCLA film schoolHas amazing archives. One I saw was a film the navy made of the late 1940′s atomic bomb blasts in the Pacific islands
    There were hundreds of sailors on the ships. Granted they were very young but they were so thin. They were probably
    5’8 130 pounds, 6 ft 145, really thin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Another type of photo to show differences is from an elementary school classroom. Looking at my cohort and that of my kids shows how skinny we were by comparison, with virtually nobody at all overweight. Kids now look less skinny, generally healthy, and few overweight.
  127. @Anon
    Neither the Copts, nor the Maronites, nor the Armenians, etc. etc. need do this.

    I speak for men of the West.

    Read More
  128. What I have noticed about French men is
    1 excellent posture.
    2 absolutely flat stomachs even in the older men and that they tuck their shirts into their pants instead of sloppy 3 sizes too large T shirts

    Read More
  129. @Opinionator
    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.

    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.

    Oh please stop.

    France has generally had pretty good relations with the Arab world since leaving Algeria. And France hasn’t generally been running around intervening everywhere in the Middle East.

    Furthermore, there isn’t some unitary “Arab people” that the West–much less France–is going around and bombing.

    The side France took in the Libyan Civil War was if anything the Islamist side. Gaddafi’s removal was a benefit to ISIS.

    Likewise Western meddling in Syria was actually a boon to rebel groups and allowed ISIS to get rolling. Though once they were up and rolling, then the West was actively engaged in attacking them. There i’ll give you that that’s at least a solid casus belli with respect to ISIS. So you could more accurately say “France should stop bombing ISIS, if it doesn’t want ISIS terrorist attacks”. All right.

    But what about say … Germany. They haven’t bombed anyone in 70+ years. Why blow their shit up? Or rape their women?

    Because they can.

    That’s the deeper reality than “France is bombing Muslims!” What JerryC said–”cultural enrichment”. The Muslims have been allowed–very stupidly–to be there. To exist in the West. To feel their own inferiority with respect to westerners up close and personal.

    ISIS is just the latest excuse and provocateur. Essentially filling the Soros\BLM role of ginning up the grievance level to get more and more dramatic violence and political drama.

    Before France was bombing anyone, before ISIS existed, their Muslims were regularly rioting and having carbeques. Or “Swedish” Muslims raping western women, turning Malmo into the rape capital of Europe.

    And after the Russians help the Syrian army roll back the new caliphate, and ISIS is yesterday’s news and France isn’t bombing anyone … France’s Muslims, Europe’s Muslims will still be generating riot, rape and disorder. And they’ll be some new club, some new nominal cause for launching terror.

    Diversity==conflict. Muslims==extra conflict.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Likewise Western meddling in Syria was actually a boon to rebel groups and allowed ISIS to get rolling. Though once they were up and rolling, then the West was actively engaged in attacking them. There i’ll give you that that’s at least a solid casus belli with respect to ISIS. So you could more accurately say “France should stop bombing ISIS, if it doesn’t want ISIS terrorist attacks”. All right.

    A rather significant concession.

    Other background on France:

    https://mises.org/blog/long-history-french-military-intervention-middle-east-and-africa

    But what about say … Germany. They haven’t bombed anyone in 70+ years. Why blow their shit up? Or rape their women?

    Germany is a belligerent party in Iraq, presumably against ISIS.
  130. @AnotherDad

    Maybe France and its allies should stop bombing the Middle East.
     
    Oh please stop.

    France has generally had pretty good relations with the Arab world since leaving Algeria. And France hasn't generally been running around intervening everywhere in the Middle East.

    Furthermore, there isn't some unitary "Arab people" that the West--much less France--is going around and bombing.

    The side France took in the Libyan Civil War was if anything the Islamist side. Gaddafi's removal was a benefit to ISIS.

    Likewise Western meddling in Syria was actually a boon to rebel groups and allowed ISIS to get rolling. Though once they were up and rolling, then the West was actively engaged in attacking them. There i'll give you that that's at least a solid casus belli with respect to ISIS. So you could more accurately say "France should stop bombing ISIS, if it doesn't want ISIS terrorist attacks". All right.

    But what about say ... Germany. They haven't bombed anyone in 70+ years. Why blow their shit up? Or rape their women?

    Because they can.

    That's the deeper reality than "France is bombing Muslims!" What JerryC said--"cultural enrichment". The Muslims have been allowed--very stupidly--to be there. To exist in the West. To feel their own inferiority with respect to westerners up close and personal.

    ISIS is just the latest excuse and provocateur. Essentially filling the Soros\BLM role of ginning up the grievance level to get more and more dramatic violence and political drama.

    Before France was bombing anyone, before ISIS existed, their Muslims were regularly rioting and having carbeques. Or "Swedish" Muslims raping western women, turning Malmo into the rape capital of Europe.

    And after the Russians help the Syrian army roll back the new caliphate, and ISIS is yesterday's news and France isn't bombing anyone ... France's Muslims, Europe's Muslims will still be generating riot, rape and disorder. And they'll be some new club, some new nominal cause for launching terror.

    Diversity==conflict. Muslims==extra conflict.

    Likewise Western meddling in Syria was actually a boon to rebel groups and allowed ISIS to get rolling. Though once they were up and rolling, then the West was actively engaged in attacking them. There i’ll give you that that’s at least a solid casus belli with respect to ISIS. So you could more accurately say “France should stop bombing ISIS, if it doesn’t want ISIS terrorist attacks”. All right.

    A rather significant concession.

    Other background on France:

    https://mises.org/blog/long-history-french-military-intervention-middle-east-and-africa

    But what about say … Germany. They haven’t bombed anyone in 70+ years. Why blow their shit up? Or rape their women?

    Germany is a belligerent party in Iraq, presumably against ISIS.

    Read More
  131. Someone needs to tell the French that what we need is bridges, not walls.

    PS – Walls don’t work.

    Read More
  132. @anon
    The West did much better for most of the last 1400 years - it only reversed after WWII when the West was betrayed from within for various stupid, short-term reasons.

    what other metric is more important?
     
    quite, hence the capacity to expand into space is the key metric
    Read More
  133. @Alden
    UCLA film schoolHas amazing archives. One I saw was a film the navy made of the late 1940's atomic bomb blasts in the Pacific islands
    There were hundreds of sailors on the ships. Granted they were very young but they were so thin. They were probably
    5'8 130 pounds, 6 ft 145, really thin.

    Another type of photo to show differences is from an elementary school classroom. Looking at my cohort and that of my kids shows how skinny we were by comparison, with virtually nobody at all overweight. Kids now look less skinny, generally healthy, and few overweight.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Is there any objective data to indicate which elementary school build is healthier? Given the trend of those current elementary schoolers to grow up overweight or obese I would guess skinny at that age was better, but I am willing to consider other views (e.g. increasing adult height is a counterargument). Another thing to mention is how calibrated we become to whatever is around us currently (and tend to view that as normal). One of the reasons travel abroad can be so jarring--though I suppose now that obesity is spreading worldwide that aspect is less noticeable.
  134. @Ivy
    Another type of photo to show differences is from an elementary school classroom. Looking at my cohort and that of my kids shows how skinny we were by comparison, with virtually nobody at all overweight. Kids now look less skinny, generally healthy, and few overweight.

    Is there any objective data to indicate which elementary school build is healthier? Given the trend of those current elementary schoolers to grow up overweight or obese I would guess skinny at that age was better, but I am willing to consider other views (e.g. increasing adult height is a counterargument). Another thing to mention is how calibrated we become to whatever is around us currently (and tend to view that as normal). One of the reasons travel abroad can be so jarring–though I suppose now that obesity is spreading worldwide that aspect is less noticeable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    There are probably international comparisons about height, weight and various health markers like body mass index. Perhaps EducationRealist or another commenter involved in the Ed world could weigh in.
  135. @res
    Is there any objective data to indicate which elementary school build is healthier? Given the trend of those current elementary schoolers to grow up overweight or obese I would guess skinny at that age was better, but I am willing to consider other views (e.g. increasing adult height is a counterargument). Another thing to mention is how calibrated we become to whatever is around us currently (and tend to view that as normal). One of the reasons travel abroad can be so jarring--though I suppose now that obesity is spreading worldwide that aspect is less noticeable.

    There are probably international comparisons about height, weight and various health markers like body mass index. Perhaps EducationRealist or another commenter involved in the Ed world could weigh in.

    Read More

Comments are closed.

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