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Why Freddie Mercury Wasn't an SJW
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In my new Taki’s Magazine review of the biopic Bohemian Rhapsody about Queen’s lead singer Freddie Mercury, I mentioned:

Queen came back more in fashion with a fine set at the 1985 Live Aid benefit for starving Ethiopians, which provides the climax of the film.

Despite the movie concluding at that orgy of celebrity self-congratulation, the biopic makes almost no effort to depict Freddie as a humanitarian … . Mercifully, Mercury was seldom a social justice scold.

Freddie’s royalism was reflected in his naming the band Queen. That wasn’t just a gay joke, it was also a tribute to the British Empire’s monarchical system under which his Parsi ancestors had prospered so remarkably (e.g., two Parsis represented London constituencies in the British Parliament under Queen Victoria). Here’s Mercury’s design for Queen’s logo, with each member represented by his astrological sign, such as Leo and Cancer, and Freddie by two fairy Virgos:

Freddie’s reticence in interviews is usually attributed to his trying to cover up his gayness (although if that were really a priority for him, he probably shouldn’t have named the band “Queen”). But it’s possible he was also cautious about talking to journalists for fear of saying something politically incorrect.

Freddie and his family had had to flee Zanzibar’s bloody 1964 black-power revolution, so perhaps he had personal reasons for not giving a damn about the racial obsessions of the age. For example, Bob Geldof almost didn’t invite Queen to Live Aid because in 1984 they’d violated the U.N.’s boycott of apartheid South Africa by playing Sun City.

Freddie’s Parsi parents had been born in India outside of Bombay and moved to Zanzibar for his father’s career with the British Colonial Office. Freddie was born in Zanzibar in 1946. He mostly attended a veddy English upscale boarding school back in India, where he was a Little Richard fan and formed his first rock ‘n’ roll band in the late 1950s.

Multiethnic Zanzibar was granted its independence from Britain in 1963, with an Arab sultan as constitutional monarch. But the black party won 54% of the vote, but was angered when that failed to translate into control of the government (sound familiar?). So a black power coup in early 1964 murdered not more than 20,000 Arabs, Indians, and Parsis. Zanzibar was eventually merged into Tanzania.

Commenter Almost Missouri points out this seven minute clip from the Italian 1966 mondo-documentary Africa Addio that is history’s only video from the 1964 massacre by black power revolutionaries of non-blacks, like Freddie, on Freddie’s native Zanzibar:

Roger Ebert practically blew a gasket denouncing Africa Addio in 1967:

“Africa Addio” is a brutal, dishonest, racist film. It slanders a continent and at the same time diminishes the human spirit. And it does so to entertain us.

It claims to be a documentary of what has happened in Africa since colonialism ended. It shows us sadism and tells us we must not fear to see the truth — but the sadism itself has been staged for the cameras. … If “Africa Addio” is to be believed, Africans have engaged in an orgy of bloodletting and pillage since the Europeans left.

In this era when 23 year old interns churn out countless op-eds about how racist everybody must have been before they, personally, were born, it’s amusing to look back 51 years and see how wokely naive a mainstream voice like Ebert was about Africa in 1967.

 

My impression is that American conventional wisdom was extremely optimistic about newly independent Africa in the 1960s. For example, movies and TV shows set in contemporary Africa were popular in the 1960s, such as Born Free and Daktari, both in 1966.

Then over the course of the 1970s, American opinion turned more skeptical. For example, John Updike’s 1978 African novel The Coup, about an African dictator who was a cross between Gaddafi and Amin in politics but with the prose style of Updike in his memoirs, was a sizable bestseller. Today, the book is almost entirely forgotten, even though it was written by America’s most talented novelist near the peak of his career and is a refreshing break from his usual exurban adultery themes.

21st Century Americans just don’t want to think about Africa.

But Ebert had to admit:

Some of the footage, notably aerial shots of the Arab massacre [i.e., massacre of Arabs, Indians, and Parsis] in Zanzibar, is doubtless truthful.

Freddie no doubt believed it. Seventeen-year-old Freddie and the rest of his Parsi nuclear family, the Bulsaras, fled Zanzibar in early 1964 — whether before or after the massacres, I can’t tell for sure — to avoid black rule and as British citizens found a new home in England. The formerly independent island of Zanzibar was incorporated into rule by the Tanzanian mainland.

Freddie, despite all of his globe-trotting, never returned to visit his native island.

 
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  1. Anon[263] • Disclaimer says:

    I wonder if Floyd’s THE WALL was (anti-)inspired by Queen. It is their most flamboyant, theatrical, and outlandish work.

    Interestingly enough, Buchanan used ‘We will rock you’ for his campaign. If there is ever fash-rock, the Queen song set the template. It’s like homo-fash-marching-song.

    https://www.nytimes.com/1992/02/19/us/1992-campaign-man-patrick-joseph-buchanan-mutineer-rocking-gop-boat.html

    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Blodgie
  2. Lot says:

    The Last King of Scotland also despicts post colonial oppression of Indian minorities, in Uganda.

    If you want a real treat, watch these three excellent interrelated and true action movies in order: Baader Meinhof Complex, then Last King, then 7 Days in Entebbe.

  3. I wonder, though, whether this is just making the Left’s case for them concerning the “Diversity is our Strength” trope. A flaming gay Parsi who makes his way to England by way of Zanzibar has got to have a pretty high Pokemon level, notwithstanding the fact that he remains a staunch monarchist and goes on to be eulogized by the internet’s premier White Identitarian.

    For someone with a simple sense of right and wrong who just wants to protect his country from being invaded by immigrant hordes, this is getting complicated.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @BB753
  4. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    Could Ebert’s over-the -top denunciations and vituperations been influenced in no small part by the fact that his wife, Chaz, was black?

  5. syonredux says:
    @Lot

    The Last King of Scotland also despicts post colonial oppression of Indian minorities, in Uganda.

    Black men really want access to non-Black women….

    But Amin’s decision was not such a shock to anyone who had read the mood of Uganda. In October the previous year he had harangued leaders of the Asian community, telling them that in the 70 years they had been in Uganda only six Asian women had married Ugandan men.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/short-sighted-demagogue-who-played-the-race-card-idi-amin-expelled-the-asians-20-years-ago-richard-1538196.html

  6. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    If Ernst Rohm had won.

  7. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Intelligent Dasein

    No, the relevant trope is Orwell. Mercury was maligned as a politically tone-deaf privileged white boy when he was alive and kicking. If they want to make their case for themselves they do so on the buried and denied body of their own previous case.
    >for a person who wants to protect his country from invasion
    >I just don’t see where the Zanzibar liberation massacre fits in
    Okay, dude.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  8. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dan Hayes

    The review is from 1967.

    It was just Ebert being a libby-dib back then.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  9. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    LAST KING isn’t as entertaining as the other Amin movie.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Lot
  10. vinteuil says: • Website

    Roger Ebert practically blew a gasket denouncing Africa Addio in 1967

    Cognitive dissonance will do that to you.

  11. BB753 says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Pre-Internet days, nobody knew that Freddie Mercury was a Parsi fresh from Zanzibar. Everybody assumed he was just English. An odd-looking one for sure, a Londoner with some exotic grandparent, perhaps Maltese, Greek (actress Melina Mercouri was famous then) or Italian? Those were my guesses as a youngster.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Lot
  12. @BB753

    Pre-Internet days, nobody knew that Freddie Mercury was a Parsi fresh from Zanzibar.

    I knew he was a Parsi from Zanzibar. I didn’t know much about the 1964 revolution in Zanzibar, though, or at least I didn’t connect the two.

    • Replies: @BB753
  13. @Dan Hayes

    Could be. Though he only married in ’92, whereas the review was from ’67. Before Chaz, Ebert dated Oprah Winfrey, so … you know.

    I don’t recall anything in Africa Addio being particularly controversial truth-wise, though there was much that was unpalatable. Indeed, it struck me that the moviemakers were trying to be as upbeat about Africa as they could despite the ugly reality they found.

    It was one of those projects that set out to be woke and ended up being based.

    If “Africa Addio” is to be believed, Africans have engaged in an orgy of bloodletting and pillage since the Europeans left.

    Uh, Roger, I hate to break it to you, but …

    • LOL: bomag
  14. Bill P says:

    So Roger Ebert was an Africanist like Ross Douthat. I don’t really get that, but I’d be interested in seeing an explanation. Why is it that so many dweeby white guys identify so strongly with sub-Saharan Africans?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anon
    , @Stan d Mute
  15. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:

    He seems like a ‘gay’ Roosh.

    Queen had some good songs but they had something in common with lamo bands of the era like Styx, Journey, Foreigner, Scoobie-doobie Brothers, Supertramp, the Knack, ELO, Van Halen, Blondie, Aerosmith, etc.

    Now, some of these bands had some good(even great) songs, but there was something silly or hammy about them that made it difficult to take them seriously. Van Halen had 2 great songs but was mostly a circus. Blondie(fav of critics unlike most mentioned) had few three killer songs but was otherwise a gimmick.

    Rock had turned into a parody of itself. It became almost like Broadway. In a way, Queen should have teamed up with Andrew Dice Webber.

    A queen-like movie:

  16. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_(band)#Discography

    Night at the Opera. Day at the Races. Marx Brothers fans?

  17. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    Why is it that so many dweeby white guys identify so strongly with sub-Saharan Africans?

    And Rush Limbaugh and Conservatives are addicted to NFL and happy to cuck.

  18. Is Ebert more specific about what he claims was staged for the camera in Africa Addio?

    Is he referring specifically to the killing of the animals?

    The scene where the zebras get their legs mangled out from underneath them by the sadistic White hunters in jeeps who run a rope between their jeeps and take out the zebras in that way, is spectacularly brutal and extremely difficult to watch.

    The other scene where the elephant is brought down slowly with dozens of spears and in its eyes, by black hunters who do an encircling maneuver and then close in and get everything within.

    Those scenes likely were staged in the sense that they were scheduled to be done so that the crew could film them.

    Ebert’s remarks as presented in this post, make him sound like a low level idiot.

    As readers here know, he didn’t fare well in his later years in his health. Nor in his middle years for that matter.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @meh
    , @Curmudgeon
  19. Andy says:

    It was probably more than a traumatic event for a teenager like Mercury to have to flee with all his family from a massacre that cost 20,000 lives (according to Wikipedia). But Mercury was also smart enough to know than talking about barely surviving being massacred by black Africans wouldn’t grant him what Steve calls pokemon points

  20. istevefan says:

    Freddie’s reticence in interviews is usually attributed to his trying to cover up his gayness (although if that were really a priority for him, he probably shouldn’t have named the band “Queen”). But it’s possible he was also cautious about talking to journalists for fear of saying something politically incorrect.

    I thought he was embarrassed about his buck teeth.

    • Replies: @Bragadocious
  21. Anon[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill P

    There’s a certain type of white guy who identifies with blacks because blacks are violent, self-serving, and break the law more than whites. Beta males who feel contempt for their own weaknesses admire those traits. Those are ‘real men’ being men blah blah blah.

    • Replies: @Bill
  22. @syonredux

    Where I used to work a Black woman told me that African men consider White women to be their ideal of a women should look like. Guess that explains the Black female hatred of Beckys.

  23. Dan Hayes says:
    @Anon

    Anon[313]:

    You are referred to Comment #17 (@ Almost Missouri).

  24. “Mercifully, Mercury was seldom a social justice scold. ”

    Neither was Elton John, but the last 10 years the guy has turned into an insufferable nag fag.

    I don’t want it to be true about Freddie, but men are often men of their time.

    In a similar sense, people are convinced MLK would have never gone full race baiting con man like his apostle Jesse Jackson did, had he lived on to present day. Given the seductive power grievance has obtained, I could see him making the shift fairly easy.

  25. “Seventeen-year-old Freddie and the rest of his Parsi nuclear family, the Bulsaras, fled Zanzibar in early 1964 — whether before or after the massacres, I can’t tell for sure “

    In order to be before the massacre, they would have had to have fled very early in 1964: the massacre started January 12th, at 3AM, so you’d have to have been out by January 11th to be unscathed. This was only a month after British decolonization, so there wasn’t much time to prepare, even if you knew what was coming, which almost no one did.

  26. Queen sucks. Horrible, ugly music. Muzak for PCP-heads.

    And, of course, this gay hero of yours must be stupid because he is “black” according to your definition (even though Persians and Indians are white according to intelligent people’s definitions).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @syonredux
    , @Bill
  27. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Suburban_elk_15

    Ebert’s remarks as presented in this post, make him sound like a low level idiot.
    I’ve read the original review, I do not recall him sounding any less shrill or any more specific; the key is him resorting early on to the logic-dismissing word “racist.” When Nadine Strossen was fighting Andrea Dworkin over porn, Strossen got so tired of Dworkin accusing her of out-of-context quotes that she published an entire page from one of Dworkin’s books (misattributed, perhaps deliberately) in Defending Pornography. It’s funny because Dworkin wrote in a context-nullifying stream of consciousness style anyway.

  28. @Dan Hayes

    Ebert being a Jew explains the over-the-top denunciations and vituperations much better than his being an oil-driller.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    , @ScarletNumber
  29. rec1man says:
    @syonredux

    No, the correct answer is Indians from a caste society do not wish to marry off their women to blacks

    Globally ( non-muslim ) Indians put blacks and muslims on the Sh*t list

    Unlike sizeable number of low class white women, esp in UK, who dont mind fornicating with blacks

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  30. @Anon

    Hadn’t thought of Phantom of The Paradise in a looooong time. I must have seen it not exactly when it came out (74) but soon thereafter…

  31. Lot says:
    @Anon

    Enjoyed the trailer, but I don’t think I could take 100 minutes of that with 1981 quality film.

    I also can’t take film recs from an anon. For all I know, you are getting residuals.

    • Replies: @Anon
  32. Wokely naive describes what most SJWs are. They seem to have lived sheltered lives.

  33. @J.Ross

    If they want to make their case for themselves they do so on the buried and denied body of their own previous case.

    Which is pretty much Leftist SOP, in case you haven’t noticed.

    >I just don’t see where the Zanzibar liberation massacre fits in

    I didn’t write that. Besides which, it only strengthens the case. The recent waves of immigrants, (e.g. Merkel’s Millions and the Caravan), are all held to be fleeing some disaster or another—massacres, war zones, religious persecution, criminal gangs, etc.

    Freddie Mercury’s life story, his desperate flight, his homosexuality, his loyalty to England, his subsequent success, even his martyrdom to a politically correct disease, now seems like it was tailor made to serve the globalist narrative. The massacre at Zanzibar will not slow down that construction one bit, since it will automatically be subtlized into the idea of brown people fighting a just crusade against colonial oppression, or something like that.

    The only way to make this useful vis-a-vis the immigration issue is to maintain that Freddie Mercury was a subversive influence and we ought not to be letting in people like him. I happen to think that’s true; but given how beloved his music is, it’s going to be a rather tough sell. This is just a variation on the great restaurants theme. If Westerners are willing to trade away their sovereignty for taco trucks, cheap landscapers, and Freddie Mercury, then we’re toast. The battle is lost and we might as well stop arguing about it anymore.

    It’s going to take a truly heroic posture to reverse the tide of immigration, and that will mean criticizing rather than lionizing Mercury and Queen. It will mean saying “Inverted Indian immigrant corrupts youths and spreads deadly disease.” Until this attitude is not only mooted but actually propagated and believed, nothing is going to change.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
    , @bomag
  34. @rec1man

    There are some exceptions.

    Kamala Harris’ mother was a Brahmin caste Indian from Madras in Southern India, studying in Berkeley in the early 1960s, who married Donald Harris, a mulatto Jamaican foreign student. I expect that was a scandal back home.

    • Replies: @rec1man
  35. @istevefan

    You mean, British teeth.

    • Replies: @meh
  36. Anonymous[279] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag

    even though Persians and Indians are white according to intelligent people’s definitions

    XD

    Persians and Hindus are White now? Where do you people come up with this crap?

    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev
  37. Roger Ebert practically blew a gasket denouncing Africa Addio in 1967:

    Ebert the German was so pretentious. Siskel the Jew was a lot closer to being a regular guy.

    • Replies: @Bill
  38. @Anon

    Queen had some good songs but they had something in common with lamo bands of the era like Styx, Journey, Foreigner, Scoobie-doobie Brothers, Supertramp, the Knack, ELO, Van Halen, Blondie, Aerosmith, etc.

    I think you’re right about that. In fact, I’ve long been of the same opinion. It has always seemed to me like these “rock stars,” apart from their celebrity status, were simply a bunch of dorks. Eddie Van Halen is probably the third biggest dork in rock n’ roll, preceded by Dennis Deyoung at number two and the unquestioned king of dorkiness, Kip Winger, at number one.

    On the other hand, there are some rockers who have shown some real grit from time to time, or some principles, or even just some class. Ray Davies springs to mind, as does Charlie Watts. I wouldn’t necessarily hold them up as paragons of virtue, but they’ve demonstrated an ability to step outside the sphere of pure self-absorption and actually stand up to something.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @Blodgie
  39. meh says:
    @Suburban_elk_15

    Ebert’s remarks as presented in this post, make him sound like a low level idiot.

    So, he sounded like Ebert.

    Ebert sounded like that because he was in denial and suffering from cognitive dissonance.

    This is hardly atypical for Ebert or other NPCs living comfortably within the Blue Pill Narrative, when triggered.

    Just because he was otherwise intelligent when not triggered doesn’t mean that he is being quoted out of context here.

  40. meh says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    In a similar sense, people are convinced MLK would have never gone full race baiting con man like his apostle Jesse Jackson did, had he lived on to present day. Given the seductive power grievance has obtained, I could see him making the shift fairly easy.

    Implying that MLK wasn’t a full race baiting con man throughout his entire time in public life.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  41. meh says:
    @Bragadocious

    You mean, British teeth.

    No, he means buck teeth. Google it.

    • LOL: Matra
  42. In this era when 23 year old interns churn out countless op-eds about how racist everybody must have been before they, personally, were born, it’s amusing to look back 51 years and see how wokely naive a mainstream voice like Ebert was about Africa in 1967

    Ebert himself was 24 at the time of the review and had spent a year at the University of Cape Town while in grad school.

    BTW this movie was called Africa Blood and Guts in the US

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  43. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anon

    Now, some of these bands had some good(even great) songs, but there was something silly or hammy about them that made it difficult to take them seriously.

    They’re not supposed to be taken seriously. They’re rock-and-roll bands.

    Van Halen had 2 great songs but was mostly a circus.

    They had a lot of really good songs. Eddie Van Halen is an oustanding musician. Likewise the Doobies and Supertramp (especially Supertramp). Foreigner I don’t think is as good as those aforementioned groups, but they were pretty good.

    • Replies: @Anon
  44. syonredux says:
    @obwandiyag

    Another parody account? It’s hard to tell these days….

  45. Rapparee says:

    Africa Addio, if I’m not mistaken, also had footage of Mike Hoare’s crazy mercenary force during the 1964 Simba Rebellion. I read Col. Hoare’s book Congo Mercenary a couple of times, and concluded that it could make for a wonderfully insane film adaptation filled with Sailer-y black humour and cynicism (not all of it directed against black Africans, but a little bit against the white mercs, too). That sort of thing would be far too much fun for the Current Year, though.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  46. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @syonredux

    …only six Asian women had married Ugandan men.”

    Wonder how many were raped or sexually harassed in that same 70-year period.

  47. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:

    Looks like Ebert was very early into the SJW & PC thing. Either that or he really was a blind fool.

    • Replies: @Anon
  48. @MikeatMikedotMike

    MLK’s family was/is notorious for cashing in the King legacy. This rankles even some black people who are honest enough to admit that it happens. The King family was left without a breadwinner after he was shot, so much of this can be forgiven – up to a point. (Having to chunk down six-figures to put quotes on King’s statue in the National Mall is a disgrace).

    My point is there’s no way to know if King would have outhustled Jesse Jackson and the like, but with his family being the way they are, I don’t those apples fell far from the tree.

  49. @Intelligent Dasein

    Freddie Mercury’s life story, his desperate flight, his homosexuality, his loyalty to England, his subsequent success, even his martyrdom to a politically correct disease, now seems like it was tailor made to serve the globalist narrative.

    That last part was retconned. I’m not sure for how long. I’m going from memory, but I remember reading AIDS activists reasoning for not elevating Mercury’s plight was that he was bi-sexual. Meaning in that era, AIDS activists knew that homosexuality would weaken their case that AIDS wasn’t just a gay disease (something they’ve now pretty much given up on.). If he had some known medical condition requiring blood transfusions, there would be a stadium or something named after him (or actually, there may be now, now that he’s a gay martyr).

  50. Anon[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    “Queen had some good songs but they had something in common with lamo bands of the era like Styx, Journey, Foreigner, Scoobie-doobie Brothers, Supertramp, the Knack, ELO, Van Halen, Blondie, Aerosmith, etc.”

    I spent that decade listening to all those guys on the radio but wishing there was something better. There were a ton of commercial rock songs in that decade I’d give a B minus to if I had to grade them. They weren’t bad, but they weren’t great, either.

    Then underground rock happened, and I never looked back.

    • Replies: @Anon
  51. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @South Texas Guy

    Freddie Mercury’s life story, his desperate flight, his homosexuality, his loyalty to England, his subsequent success, even his martyrdom to a politically correct disease, now seems like it was tailor made to serve the globalist narrative.

    The problem was Queen was too kitschy. KISS was just silly and could be enjoyed as such. Pink Floyd was really a great band. Queen was silly but wasn’t really fun because of their artsy operatic pretensions(even though Bohemian Rhapsody is a Marx-Brothers-like send up of opera, though an earnest one; an earnest parody?) With Zappa, you knew it was a prankster doing crazy stuff. As ridiculous as Queen was, there was too much earnest diva narcissism on the part of Mercury. Queen had a few great songs and some good songs, but it’s hard to really enjoy them. It’s like a cross between Sha Na Na and Led Zeppelin.

    Now, Cars were silly but so fun and very talented. You Might Think and Tonight She Comes are real uppers. And their great songs, like DRIVE and I’m Not the One, move you in ways Queen songs don’t. Cheap Trick was fun too and had a couple of great songs and several good ones. There was something a bit oily about Mercury.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  52. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Looks like Ebert was very early into the SJW & PC thing. Either that or he really was a blind fool.

    Well, the movie was sensationalist. It mixed real stuff with mockumentary… but then, lots of documentaries do this. I thought PUMPING IRON was a raw look at body builders but Schwarz admitted later that a lot of scenes were staged.

  53. Freddie’s royalism was reflected in his naming the band Queen. That wasn’t just a gay joke

    I was befriended as a kid with one of these little drumming geniuses who had to be disguised with a big suit and a hat, to make him look older. He performed in professional bands from ca. the age of thirteen years on.

    He was absolutely conservative (in his early twenties he started a family and an insurance and financing business – and they both worked, still do – with quite a few kids, too) and: He was an absolute QUEEN fan (he still is – and he still can get pretty excited about QUEEN, not. o n l y .about Freddy Mercury but about Freddy Mercury too).

  54. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    They’re not supposed to be taken seriously. They’re rock-and-roll bands.

    60s set the template for taking Rockers seriously… and Rockers were making some of the best music in the world with Dylan, Beatles, Stones, Who, Motown, etc.
    And singer-songwriter phenom of the early 70s hoped for a New Dylan. (I think Neil Young and Cat Stevens came closest.) But by mid 70s, the Big Acts were like parody of the template… which was one reason why people gravitated to punk as authentic or pushed the campy aspects of rock to its edge — if you can’t beat it, join it. It’s no wonder Disco became fab as conviction in Rock as Art had faded since the 60s ideal. Hippies were nutty but they were earnest in their faith in the music. Queen could have been a fab disco act, but their music was too heavy and hard around the edges to be full disco… though they did adopt some of the glitter and glam of the era.

    Eddie Van Halen is an oustanding musician. Likewise the Doobies and Supertramp

    Yeah, E Van Halen was an excellent musician, but Van Halen was a silly act. But I love JUMP. That is super-fun. Scooby-Doobies had some really good songs, but for some reason, I could never stand them. There was something fake about them…. as with the Eagles and Chicago(though I must say If You Leave Me Now is a real classic). Supertramp was like a talented Air Supply. Real skill but fluff.

    • Replies: @bomag
  55. @Anonymous

    Persians and Hindus are White now?

    Have you met any Persians? They are generally no darker than Greeks or Southern Italians.

  56. Gee, all those years I thought Freddie was an Italian.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  57. @syonredux

    Africa Addio is a shocker but a necessary Red Pill. Apart from Blackhawk Down, there really hasn’t been as stark a film treatment of the dark continent’s mayhem.
    Incidentally, the book by John Cohen which accompanied the film attempted to inject much political correctness, and anti-White narratives. It was especially scathing of white South Africans, describing them as Nazi admirers, etc. This slur despite the fact that over 11,000 South Africans (mostly White) died fighting the Axis powers in World War 2.

    https://www.amazon.com/Africa-addio-John-Cohen/dp/B0006BP4ZO

  58. Mr Fluffy says:

    Bob Geldof almost didn’t invite Queen to Live Aid because in 1984 they’d violated the U.N.’s boycott of apartheid South Africa by playing Sun City

    .

    Robert Geldof – always wins the gold at the Arsehole Olympics.

  59. You don’t tend to come across a lot of explicit left-liberalism from virtuoso stadium rockers (Pink Floyd and Jefferson Starship being notable exceptions) and there a number of virtuous musicians (such as Neil Peart, Eric Clapton, Rick Wakeman, Yngwie Malmsteen and Ritchie Blackmore) who are a bit reactionary or libertarian (Malmsteen is a virtuouso Swedish heavy metal guitarist who thinks “Swedish socialism sucks”).

    Besides the fact that these musicians have to practice like crazy and don’t have much time to dwell on politics, they also probably realise that their fans tend to be more politically conservative than fans of say, the Pixies or Velvet Underground . You’ll get the odd right liberal punk band like The Ramones, but in general low-fi garage sounding rock is more appealing to SJWs and hi fi pomp and prog is apolitical or kinda right liberal.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  60. Dan Hayes says:
    @Rapparee

    Raparree:

    Sounds like Mike Hoare shares some similarities with Evelyn Waugh. Since both served in clandestine military operations and both wrote about the vagaries of Africa. Of course, Waugh’s writing skills and acerbic outlook-on-life were one-of-a-kind.

  61. @The Alarmist

    A lot of people want to be Italian.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  62. @Anon

    He was silly. Bohemian Rhapsody is dumb fun, but what else. We will Rock You, eg. is dreck. He never got the Magic Johnson treatment (rimshot)((double rimshot)) as being a saint due to having a disease mostly caused by recklessness.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  63. @Steve Sailer

    I want to say this comes from “The Choirboys,” but I could be wrong. Two characters were talking and the jist was “Was he a white guy?,” and the other answered “Almost, he was an Italian.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  64. Logan says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Lots of people around this site don’t consider them to be white either.

    I’ve asked lots of times for a definition of who is and is not white, with a logical explanation of why the line should drawn there.

    Never have gotten one.

    However, clearly it doesn’t have a great deal to do with skin color, as you note.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    , @Bill
  65. @South Texas Guy

    Wambaugh’s LAPD novels going back to the first, The New Centurions, around 1970, almost always have a character who is kind of sort of some kind of Latino, but it’s hard to explain exactly. He’s worked an enormous number of variations on this theme of his, which I suspect might be: okay, affirmative action makes sense for blacks, but Latinos aren’t really a lucid category.

  66. @Intelligent Dasein

    Mercury once said that “if anything, we have more in common with Liza Minnelli than Led Zeppelin“. When they first emerged around 1974 the entire band were often photographed in campy shirts or kimonos, and first UK interviews implied that all of them were gay (doubtless the idea of some publicist).

    I’ve posted this before, from Ranulph Fiennes’ Where Soldiers Fear To Tread, on the Zanzibar massacre.

    A six-foot Zanzibari with a handshake that crushed my fingers and a head of fine black fuzz wished to join for original reasons. Recce Platoon had more machine guns per man than the Companies. And Mubarreq Obeid – for that was the big negro’s name – had been unable to have a machine gun in his Company. With such a weapon, he said, his thick lips compressed in a snarl, he could kill many Chinese shooyooen (communists) in Dhofar and that was his desire. I protested that there were no Chinese communists in Arabia let alone Dhofar, but he was adamant.

    You are wrong, Sahb. They are behind all the troubles everywhere. Soon there will be many like locusts in Dhofar. In Zanzibar they talked to the African how he must throw out the Arab. Then, seven years ago, they rose and murdered all they could catch; slitting their throats by night as they slept. Some of us escaped to the dhows but my parents were chased along the beach by a crowd – although my mother was African. They ran into the sea to swim to the boats but some of the crowd followed, caught them by the hair, and drowned them.

    So I, Mubarreq, have no parents because of the Chinese rats.

    When he had gone I looked at the others. All nodded their assent.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  67. @Steve Sailer

    OT But since you had a recent post on Cunanan (sp?), and since you are in the So Cal area (so as to be maybe more in the know), was there any truth that Wambaugh was in Cunanan’s sights?

    His response, from what I could quickly find (from 1997) was that (article noted, probably tongue in cheek) as far as his gayness, “Probably … except for the sex part.”

  68. bomag says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    It’s going to take a truly heroic posture to reverse the tide of immigration, and that will mean criticizing rather than lionizing Mercury and Queen.

    That might be a little too uphill. Another tack might go along the lines of: “yes, we’ve had some talented immigrants in the past; we can keep the talented immigrants we have now; but we have had enough. From now on, we raise up our own and train them to be talented like Queen et al; talented people from elsewhere can thrive elsewhere, and we can import their products, not the people.”

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
  69. Bill says:
    @Anon

    And, despite their protestations to the contrary, they are likely to swoon for over-the-top fascists as well. Very girly.

  70. Bill says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    WTF are you talking about? “Dr” Michael King was as full-on white-hating con man as it is possible to be.

    Your middle school teachers lied to you. Every word they said was a lie, including “a” and “the.”

  71. Bill says:
    @obwandiyag

    He isn’t black according to blacks.

  72. bomag says:
    @Anon

    60s set the template for taking Rockers seriously…

    Sixties rockers engaged in plenty of silliness. Television was still ramping up as a medium, and music was becoming more of a performance art with non-musical elements (costumes, presentation, etc.). The 70′s saw a full maturing of this, with some groups (KISS) being mostly show with modest musicality.

  73. @Logan

    Probably because HBD ≠ Nazi race science. Instead, like the field of non-Human BioDiversity, HBD seeks out, examines and appreciates what is different (diverse) in the human or nonhuman natural world.

    If you want to know this week’s update on which are the good ethnes, you should consult the NY Times editorial board or maybe Elizabeth Warren.

  74. @Lot

    Amin was a bloody tyrant to be sure, but he seems no worse than a dozen or so tinpot African dictators. Of course, I have a theory as to why he alone seems to have been singled out for particular criticism:

    https://www.nytimes.com/1972/09/13/archives/amin-praises-hitler-for-killing-of-jews.html

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Reg Cæsar
  75. Bill says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Huh. I had pretty much the opposite impression. Setting aside the black thing, it seemed to me that The Fat Guy was generally more skeptical of pointless artiness and more accepting of car chases than The Other One. Was a long time ago for me, though, so I could be wrong.

  76. @Peter Akuleyev

    Iranians are very variable in physical appearance. It is true that in the north they tend to be of Mediterranean appearance, or even lighter – I have met Iranians with blue eyes and lighter skin than me, a northern European. As you approach Pakistan, Iranians tend to look much more like Indians.
    It is not known as the Iranian continuum for nothing. Think of Brazil but with Indians rather than negroes.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @syonredux
  77. Flip says:

    Paul Theroux was sort of race realist in “Dark Star Safari” when he went back to Africa after being a teacher there years before and saw how things had fallen apart.

    He wasn’t so much in his later Southern US book “Deep South” where all the blacks were good and the whites were evil and misguided.

  78. @ScarletNumber

    “BTW this movie was called Africa Blood and Guts in the US”

    Yeah, I hate to defend Ebert, but the movie he saw in 1967 was almost certainly Africa: Blood and Guts, which was a re-cut and re-narrated film rather different than the classic Africa Addio.

    Still, 1) Ebert’s review has a bunch of clangers no matter which version he saw, and 2) his website lists his review as “Africa Addio” heedless of the distinction.

    BTW, I went to the a screening of the original Red Dawn rather late: late enough I was almost embarrassed to walk in. I was startled to see Roger Ebert walk in immediately behind me.

    His review appeared in the newspaper the next day, which he must have squeezed out in the wee hours between the end of the screening (10 or 11 PM) and when the presses began to roll (3 AM?). He panned it. I thought, “You saw even less of the movie than I did.”

    He was much shorter and fatter in person than he appeared on TV. Almost a sphere.

  79. @Bill

    I recall Ebert as reacting to movies by how he personally felt about them, sort of a down market Pauline Kael. Siskel was more intellectual, not taking his own feelings so seriously, and weakly trying to nudge some principles out of the thing.

    The show’s producer probably realized their offsetting contrasts had a certain dorky chemistry. After Siskel died, the new Ebert + ____ pair-ups didn’t seem to work as well.

  80. Bill says:
    @Logan

    Words in natural languages have multiple definitions, and which one is in use often has to be inferred from context. “White” can mean anything from Northern European to Caucasoid, depending on context.

    • Replies: @Logan
  81. Anon[387] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    I spent that decade listening to all those guys on the radio but wishing there was something better.

    But there were lots of gems.

    Time Passages and Year of the Cat by Al Stewart.
    Baker’s Street and Right Down the Line bt Gerry Rafferty.
    Brandy by Looking Glass.
    Dancing Queen, Knowing You Knowing Me, and SOS by Abba.
    We’ve Only Just Begun and Superstar by the Carpenters.
    Dreams by Fleetwood Mac.
    Miracles and With Your Love by Jefferson Starship.
    Saturday Night Fever.
    Some songs by Bread, Lobo, Jim Croce, etc.
    Oh Girl by Chil-lites.
    You’ll Never Find by Lou Rawls.
    Midnight Train by Gladys Knight.
    Many more.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Anon
  82. Lot says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Name 5 from the cold war era who killed a similar share of their population then.

    Uganda was also one of the nicer parts of Africa before he took power due to its elevation.

    • Replies: @utu
  83. RobertTS says:

    @Steve,

    Like the Parsis, another exotic grouping to thrive under British Imperial rule were the Sephards.

    Granted, the dovish Ashkenazi -vs- hawkish Mizrahi is a trope of Israeli and Middle Eastern discourse, but how to account for the right-wing tendencies of the British Sephards?

    You had, for example, in mid-20th century politics one Gerald Nunes Nabarro, a resolutely Powellite MP who in 1963 was the first man to use the N-word on British TV, admonishing an audience against “your daughter bringing home a big, buck-toothed …N….”.

    Could it be that many of them were from outposts like Gibraltar, Malta, Cyprus and South Africa, where a veneration of militarism prevailed?

  84. @bomag

    Honestly, that’s not a bad suggestion. I hope somebody with some sway is reading that.

  85. @Bill

    The Fat Guy was generally more skeptical of pointless artiness and more accepting of car chases than The Other One.

    Yeah, but that had the flavor of hipsters waving their cans of PBR. Or Frenchmen and Jerry Lewis.

  86. @Hapalong Cassidy

    He didn’t like Indians, either. Other people’s competence was embarrassing.

  87. @Suburban_elk_15

    Didn’t Ebert call reports of the Mau Mau uprising, racist as well?

    • Replies: @Anon
  88. @Almost Missouri

    I think you mean Iran=Aryan. For that matter, Ireland=Aryanland.

  89. @Dan Hayes

    Ebert’s worse review was for the movie Battle of Britain. Maybe Roger want the Nazis to win that one.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  90. @unpc downunder

    Besides the fact that these musicians have to practice like crazy and don’t have much time to dwell on politics, they also probably realise that their fans tend to be more politically conservative than fans of say, the Pixies or Velvet Underground .

    Or maybe they realize what Michael Jordan said, “Republicans buy sneakers, too”.

  91. jim jones says:

    This chap did a great cover of Bohemian Rhapsody :

  92. BB753 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    To be fair, Freddie Mercury never talked about his origins or sexual orientation. Everybody suspected he was a bit of a poofter, but we weren’t 100% sure. “Don’t ask, don’t tell” used to be the unwritten code for public figures. Of course, he was also slightly exotic-looking but he could have passed for an Englishman. Before Internet, we lacked first-hand information about entertainers. We only knew what reporters chose to write about.

  93. BB753 says:
    @Anon

    I disagree in part. For starters, Queen stood out from the rest. The LPs “A night at the Opera” and “News of the World” were huuuge. At the time, only Pink Floyd could rival Queen in sales and popularity in the UK. Abba, Genesis (Fox Trot, Selling England by the Pound) and Supertramp (check out the album “Crime of the Century”, it’s a real classic) came second close.

    • Replies: @Anon
  94. As a young man, although I never bought any of their albums, I was somewhat gratified by their resolutely non-gay relationship to bicycles.

    I wonder if these will pass the mid-Atlantic ridge?

    • Replies: @BB753
  95. Truth says:

    Well now, as an avowed sodomite, he may not have been a Social Justice Warrior, but one could assume that he was at least a Social Justice Supply Sergeant.

    • LOL: JMcG
  96. Blodgie says:
    @Anon

    The Wall is flamboyant?

    I’ve been listening to it since 1979

    There is nothing flamboyant about The Wall

    • Replies: @Anonym
  97. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753

    For starters, Queen stood out from the rest.

    Well, they were talented, but it was cheesy parody rock. When 60s rocker had long hair, it was to seem natural. By the 70s, it was plastic, a convention. It went from Hair to Hair-dresser.

    There were some new acts in the 70s who carried on with the tradition of 60s Rock as personal expression. Neil Young obviously. Bob Seger and Springsteen. Strangest of all, Steely Dan, a band I never liked but created some of the strangest, most unique and ingenious sounds… and without being being artsy like so many ‘progressive’ bands. It is a special kind of Jewish genius. ‘Do It Again’ is one of a kind, impossible to categorize like the stuff on Blonde on Blonde. It’s like a rock song thru a wormhole.

  98. Blodgie says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Kip Winger is not what I would call a dork by any stretch

    He looked like a male model straight out of GQ in 1988

    How do you get the word dork from that?

    I’m not saying he was cool, but dork is not the word

    Adjectively challenged commenters in this thread

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  99. Anon[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Almost Missouri

    I recall Ebert as reacting to movies by how he personally felt about them, sort of a down market Pauline Kael.

    Ebert was a sucker for drunkard, esp if the wino was a writer. He had a drinking problem.

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/leaving-las-vegas-1995

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/under-the-volcano-1984

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/barfly-1987

    Ebert had a thing for jungle movies.

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-aguirre-the-wrath-of-god-1972

    https://www.clipsoon.com/rDORq8ieAPM/.html

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-apocalypse-now-1979

    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-bring-me-the-head-of-alfredo-garcia-1974 (Not a jungle movie but white man lost in hot Latin America).

  100. Anon[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Aargh. Those are exactly the type of B minus songs I’m talking about. They aren’t bad, but they aren’t great.

  101. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Wambaugh’s LAPD novels going back to the first, The New Centurions, around 1970, almost always have a character who is kind of sort of some kind of Latino, but it’s hard to explain exactly. He’s worked an enormous number of variations on this theme of his, which I suspect might be: okay, affirmative action makes sense for blacks, but Latinos aren’t really a lucid category.

    Yeah, it’s a bit hard to take seriously a category that encompasses Alberto Fujimori, Cheech Marin,Rosie Perez, and Cameron Diaz…..

  102. @South Texas Guy

    Don’t Stop Me Now is a legitimately great song.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  103. @South Texas Guy

    Mercury was bisexual in the sense that he liked both men and boys.

    • LOL: Jim Don Bob
  104. @meh

    Let me put it this way; the veil he wore in the 60′s would have slipped off by the time the OJ trial started, had he lived.

  105. @Bill P

    Why is it that so many dweeby white guys identify so strongly with sub-Saharan Africans?

    Sportsball?

  106. As with the film, this thread contains way too much information, I would prefer not to know. But even the film was more cautious about the content.

  107. BB753 says:
    @Expletive Deleted

    The classic songs “Fat bottomed girls” and “Bycicle race” elicited the first angry feminist public reactions that I can recall. At the time, I was a child and I couldn’t understand what was possibly wrong with the lyrics or the videos. “It must have hurt the feelings of fat-bottomed ladies who can’t ride bycicles!” I surmised.

    • Replies: @BigFire
  108. @Anon

    Okay fine funny . . . I would note however,

    that both Briggette Nielsen and Sandahl Bergman went on to be fine actresses. Though I will admit, that dialogue was the last thing on my mind whenever either woman was on screen.

  109. utu says:
    @Lot

    Idi Amin was Israeli creation.

    https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/idi-amins-israeli-connection

    Uganda’s President at the time, Milton Obote, was a Pan-Africanist who envisioned a united Africa that would challenge the legacy of division and colonialism. Like most African leaders, he condemned Israeli “aggression” against Egypt and wanted to cut off support to the Anyanyas. But Amin, the Ugandan Army’s commander at the time, was a great admirer of Israel. He had briefly enrolled in a paratrooper course there (uncompleted), and was friendly with Colonel Baruch Bar-Lev, Israel’s military attaché in Uganda; Amin’s numerous wives and children even socialized with Bar-Lev’s wife and children. Amin came from an area near the Sudanese border, so was well placed to insure that Israeli arms continued to flow to the Anyanya, against Obote’s wishes.

    Obote soon began to suspect that Amin might be one of those vultures. During a trip to Cairo, according to the Israeli military historian Yehuda Ofer, Amin called Bar-Lev because he was worried that, when he returned, he would be arrested for the murder of an Obote ally. Bar-Lev was eager to help Amin, who was serving Israel’s interests in Sudan, and he advised the Ugandan commander to form a battalion within the Army to protect himself. The Israelis would train it. This unit, consisting of paratroopers, tanks, and armed jeeps, proved instrumental a few months later when, in January, 1971, Amin overthrew the regime while Obote was in Singapore for a meeting of the British Commonwealth.

  110. @ScarletNumber

    Don’t Stop Me Now is a legitimately great song.

    When I reviewed it for the Rice U. newspaper in the 1970s, I said a lot of nice things about it.

  111. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Hindu is a religion, not a race or ethnicity. As for Persians (or Iranians if you prefer) they vary widely in appearance. Some of them can pass for Italians, Greeks, etc. Many of them are much darker. It should be remembered that owing to its history and geographical location, Persia, much like Turkey, is something of a genetic crossroads of peoples.

    • Replies: @Lot
  112. @Almost Missouri

    The opening montage showed us the two movie critics, from competing Chicago newspapers, as the “snob” (the well-organized Siskel, shows up for “work” with a briefcase that pops open to reveal a container of popcorn along with a salt shaker) and the “slob” (disheveled Ebert has to put coins into a vending machine where the metal coil that ordinarily turns to push out a box of Good & Plenty instead dispenses a spiral-bound clutch of paper sheets labeled “Reporter’s Notes”, which in turn plops down into the hopper into which you can stick your hand).

  113. @South Texas Guy

    I’m going from memory, but I remember reading AIDS activists reasoning for not elevating Mercury’s plight was that he was bi-sexual. Meaning in that era, AIDS activists knew that homosexuality would weaken their case that AIDS wasn’t just a gay disease (something they’ve now pretty much given up on.).

    I remember, way back in the early 1990s, how

    1) not supporting HIV/AIDS medical research was evidence of homophobia, because it was a gay disease, but also

    2) considering HIV/AIDS to be a gay disease was proof of scientific ignorance, because “anybody can get it”

    It was a culturally confused, and confusing, time. Things have not improved.

  114. @Anon

    Maybe it’s because they’re woven into my first, happy memories (born in ’69), but most of those songs seem better than B-. Maybe because people just had the radio on back then so it was the ambient sound of the time, whereas today music like so much else has been atomized?

  115. @Blodgie

    This is why he’s remembered as a dork:

  116. @Almost Missouri

    Persia is silent in the pronunciation of Indo-European.

  117. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Given the seductive power grievance has obtained

    That’s not a given if MLK lives.

  118. @Anon

    Paul Williams (!)

    Hadn’t thought of him in 40(?) years? Wasn’t he kind of a big deal mid/late 70s? I was just a kid.

  119. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Brandy is a perfect song.

    Year of the Cat is one of the bestest songs ever.

    Right down the Line. Perfection.

    And though I’m not a fan of disco, Staylin Alive is one of the greatest pop songs. And How Deep is Your Love one of the finest ballads.

  120. Anonymous[297] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    You Can’t Make Shit Up Like This Dep’t:

  121. Lot says:
    @anon

    “Some of them can pass for Italians, Greeks”

    Very light skinned Iranians don’t look at all like Italians to me. They have a kind of exotic look to them Italians don’t.

    Compare:

    • Replies: @rec1man
  122. Olorin says:
    @South Texas Guy

    Mercury was in fact bisexual, having had a deep relationship with a woman to whom he was introduced by Brian May, though they never married.

    Mary Austin he called his common-law wife, leaving her his estate and luxurious London home (which she still occupies), as well as his ashes. They broke up after he admitted a homosexual relationship to her; I seem to recall this being music industry gossip around the time Day at the Races was released. Still they lived together for many years as he rode the cock carousel. IIRC she nursed him through his final illness.

    I’ve always figured he was a reasonably traditional guy who got caught up in the wretched and often forced degeneracy of the music industry. There are several extremely popular albums from that era that I cannot listen to with pleasure, having known people who worked in those sessions and recalling the stories they told, themselves horrified, about the exploitation and sometimes deliberate destruction of the musicians/singers, in the name of eliciting from more merchandizeably primal howls from them.

    One ponders how much of what is considered “classic” rock, e.g., is primal howls of people in the sometimes long, other times swift process of literally being destroyed by those who, for all intents and purposes, owned them to various degrees in various ways. Prince Rogers Nelson was ridiculed for taking a stand against this; Michael Jackson was no doubt badly used for similar reasons of rebellion. The recording industry being easily as violently degenerate as Hollywood.

    There is something specifically demonic about replacing American families’ and youths’ culture as these industries have done, and teaching the youthful masses to feel nostalgic, in their elderhood, for the soundtrack of countless lives destroyed for fame and profit, rather than their ancestors’ songs and stories.

  123. Anonym says:
    @Blodgie

    In places The Wall is flamboyant. It’s also unavoidably intertwined with the constant “poor me” whining of Roger Waters. So your Dad died, your teacher told you off once, get over it! Some great tracks, but between the whine and the sneering class envy/hatred of Waters, Queen is less irritating IMO.

  124. @Anon

    Those songs are pretty damn good. And if we’re going to extend the decade in question to the early ’80s, I have to give a major shout-out to Christopher Cross. Arthur’s Theme, Run Like the Wind, and (especially) Sailing are all pure gold.

    And don’t forget about Toto, either.

  125. @Almost Missouri

    After Siskel died, the new Ebert + ____ pair-ups didn’t seem to work as well

    That’s because Roeper wasn’t a partner in the venture. He was Ebert’s employee. That makes for a totally different dynamic. Siskel and Ebert were 50/50.

    • Replies: @Anon
  126. BigFire says:
    @BB753

    “Fat Bottomed Girls” was written by the guitarist Brian May.

  127. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Actually, Roeper stuck to his guns and spoke freely. He wasn’t a toady of Siskel. But the chemistry was wrong. Generationally and personality-wise, the spark wasn’t there. Also, Roeper was an annoying jerk, the kind of kid who always raises his hand in class and says the most conventional things.

    The real problem with choosing Roeper was it seemed unfair to all the real film critics who auditioned for the show. Worse, if Roeper had ANY class, he would have declined and urged Ebert to choose someone who’d devoted their lives to the field. Maybe Ebert was thinking of the old days when just about all movie critics did NOT have a background in cinema. Siskel was a philosophy major, and Ebert studied journalism. Few colleges offered film programs back then. I suppose Ebert could argue that the TV show was for the general audience, and Roeper was in tune with populist taste in cinema. Also, it’s true that one doesn’t need deep knowledge of cinema to appreciate art/foreign films.

    Anyway, it was pure chemistry. Ebert and Siskel was like Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello, C-3PO and R2D2. A perfect match. Also, unlike so many movie critics, they had real personalities. They both had competitive alpha-personalities trapped in beta-bodies. And there was genuine love/hate between the two. Also, they were entertaining because they weren’t All About Cinema, like some film geeks are. And neither was fanatically ideological. And some of their arguments made for Best of TV.

    Rex Reed was an entertaining fairy, but Bill Harris was a poor match for him. Maybe they should have gotten another homo.

    These two dorks weren’t bad. Gabler was a nice guy, but when Medved took over, he trampled all over Lyons. Medved did have a personality, but he turned the show into too many sermons about family values.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  128. rec1man says:
    @PiltdownMan

    Kamala Harris mother, is a Tamil-Brahmin

    Her marriage to the black created a scandal, similar to if she had married an untouchable

  129. rec1man says:
    @Lot

    This is my son, 100% Tamil Brahmin

    https://pix.sfly.com/KqEmvC

    https://pix.sfly.com/FPSXoo

    Look at the eyes

    • Replies: @Lot
  130. @Anon

    Actually, Roeper stuck to his guns and spoke freely. He wasn’t a toady of Siskel[sic].

    Well he couldn’t be obsequious, but he wasn’t a full equal, either. Plus they worked for the same paper.

    Anyway, it was pure chemistry. Ebert and Siskel was like Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello, C-3PO and R2D2.

    …Bert and Ernie

    Anyway, they both felt that the other was unnecessary, yet they wouldn’t have achieved the fame that they did without the other. Quite the Faustian bargain.

    They were also great together on Howard Stern, since Stern knew how to goad them.

  131. Lot says:
    @rec1man

    He doesn’t look Italian either. I think a small number of Greeks have that “exotic” west-central Asian features.

    Light skinned Indians often look the same to me as Persians.

    It isn’t skin color, but facial structure.

  132. Dan Hayes says:
    @Fred Boynton

    Fred Boynton:

    As a youngster Ebert served as a Roman Catholic altar boy. He once wrote fondly of his youthful interactions with RC priests, refreshingly free of contemporary “I was abused” malarkey!

  133. @MEH 0910

    From the Wikipedia page on John Brunner’s “Stand On Zanzibar”:

    A new technology introduced is “eptification” (education for particular tasks), a form of mental programming.

    This is an interesting idea. It begs the question: what is the particular task for which University humanities departments are mentally programming people?

  134. Andy says:

    Brian May, interestingly, was a voter of the Tory Party – highly unusual for a British rock star. So perhaps it was not so much that Queen was apolitical, but that they knew their politics were totally uncool in that era, so they prefer not to mention them in their songs

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  135. @Andy

    I’d never heard before the Queen song “Hammer to Fall” that they did at Live Aid.

    For we who grew up tall and proud
    In the shadow of the Mushroom Cloud …

    What the hell are we fighting for?
    Just surrender and it won’t hurt at all

    I thought at first that “Just surrender and it won’t hurt at all” was the epitome of the now memoryholed Nuclear Freeze movement, but on second thought it sounded like Brian May parodying the Nuclear Freeze thinking.

  136. Logan says:
    @Bill

    Quite right. But if you wish to say some person or group is “not white,” you need to define the lines around this group, at least in context.

    Here are some of the groups I’ve seen described as “not white.”

    Russians, Persians, Arabs, Armenians, Turks, Greeks, Sicilians, Portuguese, Bulgarians, Serbs (by a Croat!), Poles, Irish (!).

    If you have no definition of what “white” means, then it is simply impossible to say someone does or does not qualify.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    , @Bill
  137. @Logan

    If you have no definition of what “white” means, then it is simply impossible to say someone does or does not qualify.

    Simples!
    If hordes of vicious, insatiable and endlessly complaining foreign beggars and criminals are shouldering their way into your country, then you are most decidedly White.
    Therefore Thailand is White, among others.
    And Ukraine is not.

  138. Bill says:
    @Logan

    You’re just repeating the same mistake. It’s your job, as the reader, to figure out what definition is in use each and every time the word is used. If the speaker/writer shifts definitions mid-argument in a way that matters to the argument, then they are potentially guilty of equivocation, but you have to show that, within-argument, on a case-by-case basis. In general, there is no reason for words to have stable definitions even from sentence to sentence, let alone from conversation to conversation. Even within sentences, words can change definition. Language just doesn’t work the way you want outside narrow, technical discussions.

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