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From the New York Times:

Stanley Fischer, Fed’s No. 2 Official, Is Stepping Down
By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM SEPT. 6, 2017

WASHINGTON — Stanley Fischer, the vice chairman of the Federal Reserve, said Wednesday that he would resign in mid-October, an unexpected decision that gives President Trump greater leverage over central bank policy.

Mr. Fischer, 73, cited “personal reasons” in a brief letter addressed to Mr. Trump. His four-year term was to have ended next June. …

Mr. Fischer spent two decades as a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his students included Mario Draghi, now president of the European Central Bank, and Ben S. Bernanke, Ms. Yellen’s predecessor as Fed chief.

Then, in the late 1980s, he embarked on a second career in public service, first as chief economist at the World Bank, then as a senior official at the International Monetary Fund and as governor of the Bank of Israel.

Fed vice-chairman Stanley Fischer became an Israeli citizen in 2005 to become head of the state Bank of Israel upon appointment by prime minister Ariel Sharon upon the recommendation of Finance Minister Bibi Netanyahu.

But it’s not like Ariel and Bibi were nationalists or anything, so that’s okay.

 
    []
  1. utu says:

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kaz
    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn't very compelling nowadays.
    , @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    , @Marie
    And anyone who keeps track of (((tribal))) fantasies is more than aware that they are just SALIVATING with glee over the envisioned, upcoming, slo-mo White genocide.

    Israeli Jewish genocide on Arab, Jewish Ashkenazi 'American' on White Actual American... fun and games for the whole tribe! Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Mizrahi...Jews of the world unite!

    , @Matthew Kelly
    I don't think that's off-topic.
    , @Tiny Duck
    Hallelujah!

    Goodbye racists! You will not be missed!
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  2. Maj. Kong says:

    I’ve previously thought that Mitt Romney would be a good choice for Fed Chairman, before he threatened a coup, which makes him unpalatable now. The Senate isn’t going to confirm Rand Paul, regrettably. 2012 candidate Herman Cain was in charge of a regional Fed bank in the 90s. I would not be surprised to see Neel Kashkari be nominated, even though he would be the amongst the worst possible picks, Larry Summers would be less bad. The options are not good given the disloyalty among GOP Senators coupled with the narrow majority.

    In addition to its primary power of creating money out of thin air, the Fed has a secondary power of bank regulation. That may be a place to extract some leverage, given the leftist leanings of their management.

    We should look into re-creating something like the Bretton Woods system, speculators like Soros should not be allowed to wreck economies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    It was a failed attempt to fix the pound that made Soros his initial fortune. Long term government attempts to fix exchange rates have never worked.

    The French government also made billions off of the US attempt to overvalue its currency by asking us to pay our gold for dollars at the unsustainable fixed $35/oz rate.
    , @Neoconned
    Romney led a coup?
    , @guest
    The only good aspect of Bretton Woods was that under it we at least pretended our money was ultimately tied to something real, i.e. gold. Otherwise, it's just a price-fixing conspiracy amongst governments. What could possibly go wrong?
  3. Mr. Yellen herself is not very popular with the Zerohedge crowd. Then again, nobody in an organization like the Federal Reserve bank would be. The next guy can’t do anything different anyway – let the rates go up, then you really bust the US Feral Gov’t budget as interest becomes 1/3 of the national budget AND what’s left of the economy brakes to a screeching halt, as business is used to almost free money.

    What does the number 2 guy do anyway? There’s only one or two things TO do – keep the rates down by feeding the big banks cheap money, and keep the Global Express running and ready to take the Board of Governors out of the country at a moment’s notice; it’s not rocket surgery.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    let the rates go up, then you really bust the US Feral Gov’t budget as interest becomes 1/3 of the national budget
     
    I like to think that a higher interest rate is a signal to borrow less by spending less, but gov't spending seems to be in a bipolar world of spend or face riots.
  4. Amazing. Is there any other nation in the world that is so directly wired into the government of the United States?

    It’s like when you have two light switches, one at each end of a hallway, both controlling the same ceiling light. You can flip one and the light goes on, but if your “greatest ally” at the other end wants to turn off your light, all he has to do is flip his switch.

    This is that bad. Sovereignty my ass. We have none.

    If Trump doesn’t appoint a white gentile, he’s a schmuck — in the worst Yiddish sense of the word.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Read "The Creature from Jekyll Island" sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a "hunting trip" on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.

    My analogy, if we're going to stick to light switches, is that the US Government has an on/off switch, but the FED has a dimmer switch in series with it.

    Those 3-way wirings are fun to play with with your kid, BTW. It's like an electrical version of odds/evens.
    , @helena
    ha! I have that in my long thin sitting room - at one end I can turn on both lights but at the other end only one!
    , @LondonBob
    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.
  5. Kaz says:
    @utu
    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of 'unaffiliated' Americans - just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn’t very compelling nowadays.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Samuel Skinner
    I used to believe that, but then I realized compelling has little to do with it. If you punish people for doubting Marxism, society will be filled with committed communists, if you punish people for doubting blank slate, society will be filled with SJWs, etc. People worship power above all else, either because of the halo effect or fear.

    Needless to say accepting 'freedom of conscience' dooms religion, unless the nons are so dysfunctional that they get breed out of the population (which is possible thanks to the invention of cheap birth control).
    , @Opinionator
    Define what you mean by "religion," please.
    , @Bill
    I agree with Opinionator. People who "aren't religious" mostly fill the religion-sized hole in their souls with one ersatz religion or another. Reflexology, crystals, leftism, consumerism, etc. It seems to be mostly people who "aren't religious" who think that there are a lot of people who aren't religious.
    , @advancedatheist
    Back around 2000 I saw stories on the news about how children would get their parents to take them to bookstores and wait in line at midnight to buy the newest Harry Potter novels. I also read that in families where the parents didn't approve of the Potter stories, say, for religious reasons, the kids would defy their parents and read these novels furtively.

    Not to mention how much these youngsters must have talked about the stories with their friends, in person and online.

    I bet these kids would show nowhere near that kind of enthusiasm for learning about Jesus.
  6. @Buzz Mohawk
    Amazing. Is there any other nation in the world that is so directly wired into the government of the United States?

    It's like when you have two light switches, one at each end of a hallway, both controlling the same ceiling light. You can flip one and the light goes on, but if your "greatest ally" at the other end wants to turn off your light, all he has to do is flip his switch.

    This is that bad. Sovereignty my ass. We have none.

    If Trump doesn't appoint a white gentile, he's a schmuck -- in the worst Yiddish sense of the word.

    Read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a “hunting trip” on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.

    My analogy, if we’re going to stick to light switches, is that the US Government has an on/off switch, but the FED has a dimmer switch in series with it.

    Those 3-way wirings are fun to play with with your kid, BTW. It’s like an electrical version of odds/evens.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a “hunting trip” on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.
     
    As a great many (most recently, I recall, it was the late Edgar Steele) have pointed out, the Federal Reserve Bank is not a bank, has no reserves, and is not federal. Much like the Holy Roman Empire, which was not an empire, was in no way Roman, and most very certainly was not holy.
    , @advancedatheist
    A lot of early Americans didn't like the Creature from the Pennsylvania State House in 1787, either. The ones who suspected the authors' motives had a point, in that the new Constitution included a bailout scheme for holders of bad paper debts that the central government under the Articles of Confederation couldn't honor (Article VI).

    Time has a funny way of changing the reputations of people who died long ago. A century from now Americans, however defined in the early 22nd Century, might view the founders of the Fed the way today's white conservatives view the Framers of the original Constitution.
  7. @utu
    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of 'unaffiliated' Americans - just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.

    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married “at the vineyards” and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife’s old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Yeah, it's nuts.

    My mother, who's been to church every Sunday of her life, was beaming ear to ear as she told me that my sister had found some SJW non-minister to officiate her wedding in a fancy hotel downtown.

    , @Pericles
    "And what promises did they make to the grape vines?"

    That reminds me, all these crappy self-made vows you hear about. Ugh.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I understand, but actually, there is no reason for Christians to be married by a minister. Marriage is part of the natural order, not part of the godly work of the church.
    , @Barnard
    I would assume part of the appeal of a location like a vineyard is that it can host the reception and the bridal party and guests don't have to move to another location after the ceremony in order to get liquored up. You have to assume a Napa vineyard wedding would be very expensive, much more so than a church one.

    I read a quote somewhere that said young women today want the wedding and not the marriage. They don't want a pastor telling them they are making a promise before God, they just want a celebration focused on them. For some of them, it must be like a sweet 16 birthday party on steroids. Given the emotional pain divorce causes, I don't understand why anyone would discourage engaged couples from going through pre-marriage counseling sessions and talking to someone who would emphasize the seriousness of marriage.
    , @Olorin

    I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God.
     
    I thought "God" was omnipresent?

    (Huh. I always thought that true believers didn't truly believe that. Besides which they deported themselves as though they didn't....)

    As for getting married in a church today, I should think that since "God" was driven out for social justice and more and more extreme faggotry and degeneracy and genocide, anywhere BUT church would be a better place to encounter the eternal divine and witness in its presence to a lifelong commitment to the love of one's life.

    Particularly a church in SF if my experience there was any guide.
  8. Ron Paul.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    How about Patri Friedman, Milton's polyamorous living, libertarian sea platform building, Peter Thiel-funded, grandson.
    , @anonymous
    We're being ironic, right?
    , @The Alarmist
    Yep, if there would be any justice, it would be Ron Paul.
  9. Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer’s performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you’ve got?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Do you have anything to say about the fact that in a country of some 320 million people, the only suitable person for the job of Deputy Fed Chairman was a foreign national, and that for the last thirty years, no gentile has held the job of Fed Chairman? There is not a single gentile in the land who can do that job?
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    Yeah, it's not like money is the life blood of nations and a prime mover of history or anything. It's perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they're good at it.

    Maybe we should ask Vlad Putin to volunteer for the Fed. He's a good manager I hear. Or how about one of those great financial wizards from China. Yeah, that's the ticket. They're kicking our financial ass, so let's hire one to manage our funds! After all, they're good at it.

    Fisher might very well be an angel from heaven who loves America and apple pie and can square a circle in his sleep, but that's not the point.

    Besides, the Fed is loaded up with Fishers. It's time for a few Smiths and Joneses. Identity politics? You bet! We've been backed into it.

    , @anon
    No, Steve was concerned about Fischer's enduring loyalty to Zambia (nee Northern Rhodesia), his birth country. But Sharon and Netanyahu were cool with it, so it's all good.
    , @AndrewR
    Do you have any comments that aren't just snarky complaints about goyim pointing out Jewish Supremacy in action?
    , @Lurker
    And today's Breathtaking Chutzpah Award goes to *opens blue & white envelope* . . . International Jew!
    , @Dmitry134564
    He's just an internet blogger, whose main interest is race and Jewish conspiracies.

    Fischer did a good job when he was in Israel during the financial crisis. His role at the Fed is less clear, and there is not much they can do beyond raising and lowering interest rates.

    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Scratch the surface of any of the insane policies, ideas, movements, etc that has turned the USA into the FUSA and you will find a Jew prominently involved. Every single one.

    So why don't you tell us Goy suckers how your tribe has been an overall blessing to the FUSA.
  10. helena says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Amazing. Is there any other nation in the world that is so directly wired into the government of the United States?

    It's like when you have two light switches, one at each end of a hallway, both controlling the same ceiling light. You can flip one and the light goes on, but if your "greatest ally" at the other end wants to turn off your light, all he has to do is flip his switch.

    This is that bad. Sovereignty my ass. We have none.

    If Trump doesn't appoint a white gentile, he's a schmuck -- in the worst Yiddish sense of the word.

    ha! I have that in my long thin sitting room – at one end I can turn on both lights but at the other end only one!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Ah, there you have a good analogy. One end of your sitting room is Israel, and the other is the United States.

    Guess which is which...
  11. Marie says:
    @utu
    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of 'unaffiliated' Americans - just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    And anyone who keeps track of (((tribal))) fantasies is more than aware that they are just SALIVATING with glee over the envisioned, upcoming, slo-mo White genocide.

    Israeli Jewish genocide on Arab, Jewish Ashkenazi ‘American’ on White Actual American… fun and games for the whole tribe! Ashkenazi, Sephardic, Mizrahi…Jews of the world unite!

    Read More
  12. @Kaz
    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn't very compelling nowadays.

    I used to believe that, but then I realized compelling has little to do with it. If you punish people for doubting Marxism, society will be filled with committed communists, if you punish people for doubting blank slate, society will be filled with SJWs, etc. People worship power above all else, either because of the halo effect or fear.

    Needless to say accepting ‘freedom of conscience’ dooms religion, unless the nons are so dysfunctional that they get breed out of the population (which is possible thanks to the invention of cheap birth control).

    Read More
  13. Mr. Anon says:
    @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    Do you have anything to say about the fact that in a country of some 320 million people, the only suitable person for the job of Deputy Fed Chairman was a foreign national, and that for the last thirty years, no gentile has held the job of Fed Chairman? There is not a single gentile in the land who can do that job?

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Jimi Shmendrix
    "foreign national"?

    No, when he was here in Israel, he was a "foreign national".
  14. @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    Yeah, it’s not like money is the life blood of nations and a prime mover of history or anything. It’s perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they’re good at it.

    Maybe we should ask Vlad Putin to volunteer for the Fed. He’s a good manager I hear. Or how about one of those great financial wizards from China. Yeah, that’s the ticket. They’re kicking our financial ass, so let’s hire one to manage our funds! After all, they’re good at it.

    Fisher might very well be an angel from heaven who loves America and apple pie and can square a circle in his sleep, but that’s not the point.

    Besides, the Fed is loaded up with Fishers. It’s time for a few Smiths and Joneses. Identity politics? You bet! We’ve been backed into it.

    Read More
    • Agree: Bubba, Randal, reiner Tor
    • Replies: @KArl
    14 Buzz Mohawk > It’s perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they’re good at it.


    I'm telling you that Stan Fischer never displayed any particular "loyalty" to the State of Israel, either.

    He did leave when he got bored here.

    He never moved his household here, either. He probably still has a condo in north Tel Aviv; lots of people have lots of condos in lots of the world's big cities.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    I dunno about you, but I'm totally for Vlad Putin.
    , @bored identity
    The one and only Fisher whose hook, line and sinker bored identity could have swallowed was late Bobby.



    The chess genius denied he was a Jew, but the Lubavitcher Rebbe disagreed. Who was right?

    http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/books/121737/bobby-fischer-vs-the-rebbe

     

    How about this one, Tablet Magazine:

    Jewish Billionaire denied he was a Male, but biggoted bored identity disagreed. Who was right?
  15. Bubba says:

    OK, to break the 30 year streak of Ivy League Jews running the Federal Reserve I think Alcee Hastings would be the most logical choice. Since we are the most broke & indebted nation in the history of the world (with nothing to show for it), good old Alcee would continue the reckless spending party without impunity. Though he’s not an Ivy League grad like the previous Fed Chairmen, he sure knows how to spend the goyim’s money! Plus he really likes to spend lots of money on Ethiopian Jews rather than his own decrepit district!

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    I second the nomination. The gentleman from Florida should be given a life term.
  16. @helena
    ha! I have that in my long thin sitting room - at one end I can turn on both lights but at the other end only one!

    Ah, there you have a good analogy. One end of your sitting room is Israel, and the other is the United States.

    Guess which is which…

    Read More
  17. @Kaz
    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn't very compelling nowadays.

    Define what you mean by “religion,” please.

    Read More
  18. LondonBob says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Amazing. Is there any other nation in the world that is so directly wired into the government of the United States?

    It's like when you have two light switches, one at each end of a hallway, both controlling the same ceiling light. You can flip one and the light goes on, but if your "greatest ally" at the other end wants to turn off your light, all he has to do is flip his switch.

    This is that bad. Sovereignty my ass. We have none.

    If Trump doesn't appoint a white gentile, he's a schmuck -- in the worst Yiddish sense of the word.

    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.
     
    According to the jewish commenters on here, you're a conspiracy nut and an anti-semitic bigot. :)
    , @Randal
    Did any member of the great and the good complain, to general approval amongst his peers, about the discussion being "hideously jewish"?
  19. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli, but if you’re looking for international talent, I think he’d be available.

    For an American gentile, Andy Beal or John Hussman, if they’d take it, with the understanding they’d get a shot at being Fed Chair after Yellen.

    Hussman is a Buddhist I think, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli

    Formally, as in does he possess a passport? Probably not. But Israel is his country. "Jewish State" and all that.
    , @a reader

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli, but if you’re looking for international talent, I think he’d be available.
     
    News of his financial talent didn't reach you, did they?
    , @a reader

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli
     
    « Je me lève chaque matin en me demandant comment je pourrai être utile à Israël »

    «I wake up every morning asking myself how I could be useful to Israel»
  20. Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Why weaken your argument by throwing in an outrageous straw man at the end? Makes me skeptical of the entire thing.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    A fair point.

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.

    Would be interesting if Mugabe offered Fischer a position.
    , @Opinionator
    On the other hand, while no one here is proposing an unorthodox nominee, who's to say Rand Paul or Bannon wouldn't serve the country well in the position.
    , @Polynikes
    That's one way to look at it, and by far the most generous to Mr. Fischer. Maybe you're right. Maybe you're playing devils advocate. Or maybe you have an agenda.

    Is hard to deny Sailer brings up a fair point about Fischer's priorities. Upon closer examination, his roots into America are a little more shallow than you would lead us to believe. Raised as the son of a Jewish colonialist in Africa. Educated in Isreal. Then the UK. Then MIT where he settled as an east coast academic. Then into globalist NGOs like the world Bank and IMF. Then off to Israel again. Before finally being appointed back in the USA to the fed by Obama.

    Ben Franklin, he ain't. In fact his resume is hardly an ode to american loyalty and almost screams international opportunist.

    So why shouldn't Americans be allowed to value loyalty again?
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    You would think a crackerjack central banker ...
     
    OK, stop right there. You've got me rolling on the floor with this stuff. Crackerjack ... Central Banker?? Is that like "He was a dynamite executioner back in his day.", "As far as tyrants go, that Chairman Mao was best-in-class.", "That Kazynski, he was a crackerjack mail-bomber.", or "She was number 4 prostitute in all Kazakhstan."

    Do you think it takes some kind of skill and intellect to decide how much money to print each month? Do you really think the economy would grind to a halt if the FED were eliminated tomorrow?

    Oh, this guy was Ben Bernanke's supervisor? Put that on your resume, and see how far it'll get you in any productive job.

    The FED and all Central Banks should have been killed in the womb. We need Andy Jackson II for President.

    So many people on here see the problems in American society, but don't seem to know anything about the flow of the money as much of the root cause.
  21. @Dave Pinsen
    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn't Israeli, but if you're looking for international talent, I think he'd be available.

    For an American gentile, Andy Beal or John Hussman, if they'd take it, with the understanding they'd get a shot at being Fed Chair after Yellen.

    Hussman is a Buddhist I think, though.

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli

    Formally, as in does he possess a passport? Probably not. But Israel is his country. “Jewish State” and all that.

    Read More
  22. @Ali Choudhury
    Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    Why weaken your argument by throwing in an outrageous straw man at the end? Makes me skeptical of the entire thing.

    Read More
  23. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Ali Choudhury
    Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    A fair point.

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.

    Would be interesting if Mugabe offered Fischer a position.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    How do we know Fischer didn't check the African American box for diversity purposes?

    Really for Trump I just want him or even better Pence to be reelected. For that he needs soft money gushing through the economy.

    He can get this either from a soft money leftist or a loyal political hack. So Yellen's husband or Ivanka. But not a Wall Streeter or respectable conservative academic.

    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.
     
    Aha! I knew he looked kind of funny at those Senate hearings. Since, to quote you, Mr. Pinson, "She was a woman", do you have a link to any articles on the cost of this expensive addictomy to the American taxpayer? Or, did he just Control-Pee the funds out of her ... thin air. Oh, yeah, expect a subpoena, Mr. Pinson - this is slanderous and egregious!
  24. @Ali Choudhury
    Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    On the other hand, while no one here is proposing an unorthodox nominee, who’s to say Rand Paul or Bannon wouldn’t serve the country well in the position.

    Read More
  25. Anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    Despite the usual cliches about ‘equality’, the West is essentially hierarchical and not just in actual power/privilege but in mindset. It’s about shooting to the top. Those on top are winners, and they define the essence of what America is all about.

    Our mental view of America is a pyramid. Higher-up the better. And in some ways, this makes good sense. After all, we like to admire the best at something. Best businessmen, best politician, best athlete, best singer, best actor, best writer, and etc.

    True, the best is admirable. But in focusing on the best, we lose sight of something more important. The thing itself. In a way, athleticism is about health and fitness. So,the best athletes are best at activities of health and fitness. But more important than being best at something is that very something. So, a good society has a culture of health and fitness for most people. After all, a society without sports but lots of healthy and fit people is preferable to a society with sports that admires athletes but neglects the health and fitness of most people. Americans love best people in sports, but so many are out of shape and unfit and unhealthy. We have too many obese couchpotatoes glues to TV watching athletes. We let the best define the essence of health and fitness but neglect it on the basic level for the masses.

    So, our minds need to think more in terms of core-ism than hierarchy-ism. After all, the core meaning of health and fitness is that EVERYONE should try to be fit and healthy. It’s not about focusing only on those who are best at it.

    [MORE]

    A society can admire the best at something, but the main emphasis should be placed on that something itself. That way, instead of people just looking up at the best and neglecting their own needs, people will tend to their own needs and responsibilities.

    Because of the pyramid-ian way of thinking, Americans tend to outsource everything to the ‘best’ and neglect to involve themselves in that something. They just leave it up to the ‘best’ or the ‘experts’.
    In music, the focus is on the ‘hottest’ hits and ‘biggest’ acts. It’s as if music culture belongs only to the select few. The rest of Americans exist only to consume this ‘best’(at the moment) music.

    As such, people fail to develop a folk culture in music at the personal or local level. For many people, there is no sense of music beyond what is ‘hot’. They fail to grasp that the importance of music is much deeper than billboard charts.

    This is a kind of idolism, and it’s a worldwide problem. Instead of human relationships, people prefer the ‘best’ or ‘ideal’ image of romance in movies, soap operas, or even something as sleazy as 50 SHADES OF GREY. It’s as if romance or love has value only in such idealized or sensationalized fantasies. With such powerful idols lodged in their minds, they neglect real world relations and life. Their minds are fixated on the lifestyles of the ‘gods’ and neglect real human needs.

    So maybe people should think more in terms of the core value of a thing than the best of the thing. Of course, people can do both, but core should trump the best, which often is not really the best but a lot of hype. In the current US, homomania managed to become the ‘best’ of spirituality. Homos came to be seen as the best of everything to such an extent that people became more obsessed about cheering for ‘gay marriage’ than trying to find love for themselves and real marriage. IN pop culture, ‘gay marriage’ is the cream of the crop of marriage. Who needs to think about getting married when one is blessed by revering and cheering ‘gay marriage’?

    For a person, is life more meaningful by focusing on aristocrats with fancy stuff or on the basic meaning of life revolving around family, love,loyalty, moral culture, and etc? Sure, aristocrats have fancy stuff of value, and such should be appreciated, but is fanciness of life more important than life itself?

    Consider the guy in UGETSU who gets drawn into this aristocratic ghost world where all things are beautiful and enchanting. A world of luxury and privilege. All very nice, but in his obsession with this ‘best’ world, he forgets all about his wife and kid. Nice things are nice, but the thing itself is more important. People prefer fantasy over reality cuz fantasy seems the ‘best’.

    One of the reasons why the black community collapsed in so many places is they came to prefer the ‘bling’ over the thing. That mother in RAISIN IN THE SUN had a feeling for the thing. Now, we have single mothers with daughters as single mothers raising kids to ‘twerk’ and looking up to rappers with ‘bling’. To depraved minds, this is what passes for the ‘best’. When the basic moral essence of life is neglected, even the notion of the ‘best’ gets perverted in the minds of morons.

    But we see it in white community too. Globalism is all about hierarchy and pyramid. It’s about who gets to the very top. They are best and experts. In terms of merit, many of the successful are indeed very good at what they do. But they have no sense of the common national good, the idea that a community of people thrive together with shared values that apply to all. Since the white elites are into themselves, they neglect everyone else in the white community. Most people tend to stagnate without inspired leadership. Leadership used to mean people on top doing what is good for the people. Now, it means those on top favoring their own kind and neglecting their own people. To cover up their negligence, they ‘leapfrog’ and virtue-signal about their concern for the Other. This doesn’t cost them anything since they have no contact with the Other(except as serfs). The Other is a prop. It’s like Jane Fonda and North Vietnamese. If she was really concerned about them, why didn’t she devote her whole life to helping the victims of war in Vietnam? Of course, it was really about her, garnering attention as a woman of ‘conscience’ before the camera. And when she tired of the whole thing, she later turned to making aerobic exercise videos.

    After all, it was a great challenge for Moses to lead the Hebrews, his own people. But it would have been easy for him to virtue-signal about how much he cares about some other tribe and admonish Hebrews for lacking the same ‘compassion’. It’s no wonder leaders prefer foreign policy over domestic policy. They cannot run from people at home. If they fail, they must do something else that works because the people are always there. But in foreign policy, the leader can just make a lot of noise about ‘human rights’. And if he messes up with intervention, he can just abandon the crisis and forget about it, like Reagan could just walk away from Lebanon.
    Current leadership in America doesn’t seem to be concerned with Americans. Since it is a challenge to fix the problems of Americans, leaders just get ‘new Americans’. It’s like a kid who gets bored and tired with taking care of his current pet, so he gets newer and newer pets to love.. while his earlier pets get neglected and forgotten. IT’s easier to go from task to task half-finished than finish a task and see it to its end.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Excellent comment. I have tried to make that athleticism point and analogy before, but never so well. And the rest was of similar quality.

    I think this has viral possibilities: "they came to prefer the ‘bling’ over the thing"
    , @Anon
    We no longer have leaders. We have leapers.

    Leader means to lead those who are behind.

    Today's 'leaders' just wanna flood those below with tide of foreigners. All very useful in acting as Leapers who leap over everyone else.

    As for patriots, they are now lepers. Leapers and Lepers. That's globalism.
  26. @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    Yeah, it’s nuts.

    My mother, who’s been to church every Sunday of her life, was beaming ear to ear as she told me that my sister had found some SJW non-minister to officiate her wedding in a fancy hotel downtown.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    In this day and age, she was probably just happy that your sister was marrying a guy.
    , @Opinionator
    Maybe she was just happy your sister had taken one more step toward marriage?
  27. Our fault, not Israel’s

    We allow dual citizenship, triple citizenship whatever. We allow foreigners to vote this way – openly.
    We actually have no concept of “foreigner” beyond “Russian” (at the moment) and even that small distinction would be dropped if Marxists only ruled them again.

    In any event, any remaining distinction between an American and someone standing in our geography or someone who wants to stand in our geography will soon be erased by the federal courts on the grounds that the distinction is motivated by racism and therefore invalid.

    That is the real legal theory behind the Zeroeth Amendment

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    I agree, dual citizenship should not be allowed. Especially for immigrants to the USA, who should be required to renounce their foreign citizenship.

    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.
    , @AndrewR

    We actually have no concept of “foreigner” beyond “Russian” (at the moment) and even that small distinction would be dropped if Marxists only ruled them again.
     
    This may be the best line in the history of this website
  28. Ben Kurtz says: • Website

    Steve, don’t you mean the “Zambian” High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer’s actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    Read More
    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Randal
    LOL! Can't fault the effort, I suppose.

    The US government is notorious for being packed with Zambian dual loyalty types.
    , @Randal

    Steve, don’t you mean the “Zambian” High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer’s actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.
     
    Just to further highlight the sheer mendacity of Ben Kurtz's attempt to divert attention from the real issue here, here's Wikipedia on Fischer:

    Fischer was born into a Jewish family in Mazabuka, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). When he was 13, his family moved to Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), where he became active in the Habonim Zionist youth movement. In 1960, he visited Israel as part of a winter program for youth leaders, and studied Hebrew at kibbutz Ma'agan Michael. He had originally planned to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, but went to the United Kingdom to study after receiving a scholarship from the London School of Economics, and obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in economics from 1962–1966. Fischer then moved to the United States to study at MIT, and earned a Ph.D. in economics in 1969 with a thesis titled Essays on assets and contingent commodities written under the supervision of Franklin M. Fisher.[22][23] He became an American citizen in 1976.
     
    Obviously Fischer is exactly what Kurtz tries to imply he is - a bona fide Zambian-American US patriot with no connection with or loyalty to Israel beyond just accepting citizenship there in order to qualify for a job. Not.

    Worth bearing in mind in considering any other comments from this commenter that relate to the topic on which he is evidently quite prepared to lie.
    , @anon
    Yes, long before he was forced to take an Israeli citizenship, he was a reluctant member of Habonim while still a teen in Rhodesia, and was dragged kicking and screaming to a kibutz in Israel where made him learn Hebrew. After that, he married a blonde shiksa, chose a goyishe kop as a mentor for his PhD thesis, and only took goyim as PhD students. Oh wait...
    , @PV van der Byl
    I prefer to think of it as the Northern Rhodesia seat. After all, that is what it was called when he lived there.
  29. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @LondonBob
    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.

    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.

    According to the jewish commenters on here, you’re a conspiracy nut and an anti-semitic bigot. :)

    Read More
  30. @utu
    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of 'unaffiliated' Americans - just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    I don’t think that’s off-topic.

    Read More
  31. Randal says:
    @LondonBob
    The BBC had a post Trump election debate about the state of America, the British host and all the US commentators were Jewish, it was bizarre.

    Did any member of the great and the good complain, to general approval amongst his peers, about the discussion being “hideously jewish“?

    Read More
  32. Randal says:
    @Ben Kurtz
    Steve, don't you mean the "Zambian" High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer's actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    LOL! Can’t fault the effort, I suppose.

    The US government is notorious for being packed with Zambian dual loyalty types.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ben Kurtz
    Well, maybe Zambians are a bit rare, but if you read enough Steve Sailer you'd know that Democratic administrations tend to be packed with Barbadian dual-loyalty types!
    , @Hunsdon
    Zambian Occupied Government!
  33. Lot says:
    @Maj. Kong
    I've previously thought that Mitt Romney would be a good choice for Fed Chairman, before he threatened a coup, which makes him unpalatable now. The Senate isn't going to confirm Rand Paul, regrettably. 2012 candidate Herman Cain was in charge of a regional Fed bank in the 90s. I would not be surprised to see Neel Kashkari be nominated, even though he would be the amongst the worst possible picks, Larry Summers would be less bad. The options are not good given the disloyalty among GOP Senators coupled with the narrow majority.

    In addition to its primary power of creating money out of thin air, the Fed has a secondary power of bank regulation. That may be a place to extract some leverage, given the leftist leanings of their management.

    We should look into re-creating something like the Bretton Woods system, speculators like Soros should not be allowed to wreck economies.

    It was a failed attempt to fix the pound that made Soros his initial fortune. Long term government attempts to fix exchange rates have never worked.

    The French government also made billions off of the US attempt to overvalue its currency by asking us to pay our gold for dollars at the unsustainable fixed $35/oz rate.

    Read More
  34. Lot says:
    @Cwhatfuture
    Our fault, not Israel's

    We allow dual citizenship, triple citizenship whatever. We allow foreigners to vote this way - openly.
    We actually have no concept of "foreigner" beyond "Russian" (at the moment) and even that small distinction would be dropped if Marxists only ruled them again.

    In any event, any remaining distinction between an American and someone standing in our geography or someone who wants to stand in our geography will soon be erased by the federal courts on the grounds that the distinction is motivated by racism and therefore invalid.

    That is the real legal theory behind the Zeroeth Amendment

    I agree, dual citizenship should not be allowed. Especially for immigrants to the USA, who should be required to renounce their foreign citizenship.

    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cwhatfuture
    In that case (citizenship conferred on you at birth) you should choose at age 18, before you vote. Any voter should have one allegiance.
    , @Opinionator
    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    Couldn't this person be forced to choose once they reach 18 for example? Or citizenship simply denied at birth in cases where the baby is a citizen of another country?
  35. Lot says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    A fair point.

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.

    Would be interesting if Mugabe offered Fischer a position.

    How do we know Fischer didn’t check the African American box for diversity purposes?

    Really for Trump I just want him or even better Pence to be reelected. For that he needs soft money gushing through the economy.

    He can get this either from a soft money leftist or a loyal political hack. So Yellen’s husband or Ivanka. But not a Wall Streeter or respectable conservative academic.

    Read More
  36. Polynikes says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    That’s one way to look at it, and by far the most generous to Mr. Fischer. Maybe you’re right. Maybe you’re playing devils advocate. Or maybe you have an agenda.

    Is hard to deny Sailer brings up a fair point about Fischer’s priorities. Upon closer examination, his roots into America are a little more shallow than you would lead us to believe. Raised as the son of a Jewish colonialist in Africa. Educated in Isreal. Then the UK. Then MIT where he settled as an east coast academic. Then into globalist NGOs like the world Bank and IMF. Then off to Israel again. Before finally being appointed back in the USA to the fed by Obama.

    Ben Franklin, he ain’t. In fact his resume is hardly an ode to american loyalty and almost screams international opportunist.

    So why shouldn’t Americans be allowed to value loyalty again?

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  37. Neoconned says:
    @Maj. Kong
    I've previously thought that Mitt Romney would be a good choice for Fed Chairman, before he threatened a coup, which makes him unpalatable now. The Senate isn't going to confirm Rand Paul, regrettably. 2012 candidate Herman Cain was in charge of a regional Fed bank in the 90s. I would not be surprised to see Neel Kashkari be nominated, even though he would be the amongst the worst possible picks, Larry Summers would be less bad. The options are not good given the disloyalty among GOP Senators coupled with the narrow majority.

    In addition to its primary power of creating money out of thin air, the Fed has a secondary power of bank regulation. That may be a place to extract some leverage, given the leftist leanings of their management.

    We should look into re-creating something like the Bretton Woods system, speculators like Soros should not be allowed to wreck economies.

    Romney led a coup?

    Read More
  38. Lot says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Ron Paul.

    How about Patri Friedman, Milton’s polyamorous living, libertarian sea platform building, Peter Thiel-funded, grandson.

    Read More
  39. TheJester says:

    What needs to be recognized is that the United States has had its special “Jewish Laws” and other legal benefits expressly reserved for Jewish and Jewish/Israeli citizens for some time.

    Although the long tradition of “Jewish Laws” in Europe were restrictive and intended to limit Jewish control over economic sectors and restrict where they could live, the “Jewish Laws” in the United States have tended, on the other hand, to legally establish special privileges for the Jewish American community.

    Examples:

    The law allowing dual citizenship for American citizens was passed to allow Jews to become dual American/Israeli citizens. This has permitted Israeli citizens such as Fisher and others to retain a special relationship with Israel while attaining the highest reaches of our political establishment without anyone questioning their loyalty.

    In the military, after years of pressing, regulations were changed to allow Jews to wear the yarmulke (skullcap) with their uniforms … under the cover of allowing all faiths to wear traditional religious accouterments. Guess what, no traditional religious accouterments such as crosses were recognized for the Christian faith. Indeed, only the yarmulke was recognized as “traditional”.

    There are Jewish communities in New Jersey that systematically discriminate against WASPS and racial minorities to keep their communities exclusively “Jewish”. The New Jersey and Federal governments systematically ignore fair housing laws and other disparate impacts in these communities. In short, anti-discrimination laws do not apply to Jews.

    Jewish Hasidic communities in New York receive financial subsidies for their religious schools and other community functions that not extended to other ethnic/religious communities. The same applies to the development and assignment of Section 8 housing in New York boroughs.

    Historically, immigration laws have expressly benefited Jewish immigration while banning other faith-based immigration as discrimination.

    Specific groups of Jews have Federal Income Tax exemptions not extended to the general population.

    The list could go on and on. Perhaps other commenters can add to the list. P.S. Apologies for not citing references. The above comes from decades of “noticing”.

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  40. Pericles says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    “And what promises did they make to the grape vines?”

    That reminds me, all these crappy self-made vows you hear about. Ugh.

    Read More
  41. KArl says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Yeah, it's not like money is the life blood of nations and a prime mover of history or anything. It's perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they're good at it.

    Maybe we should ask Vlad Putin to volunteer for the Fed. He's a good manager I hear. Or how about one of those great financial wizards from China. Yeah, that's the ticket. They're kicking our financial ass, so let's hire one to manage our funds! After all, they're good at it.

    Fisher might very well be an angel from heaven who loves America and apple pie and can square a circle in his sleep, but that's not the point.

    Besides, the Fed is loaded up with Fishers. It's time for a few Smiths and Joneses. Identity politics? You bet! We've been backed into it.

    14 Buzz Mohawk > It’s perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they’re good at it.

    I’m telling you that Stan Fischer never displayed any particular “loyalty” to the State of Israel, either.

    He did leave when he got bored here.

    He never moved his household here, either. He probably still has a condo in north Tel Aviv; lots of people have lots of condos in lots of the world’s big cities.

    Read More
  42. Anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    People wanna enter best Ivy League schools because there’s the sense of winner-takes-all, especially as A’s are handed out so easily in colleges now.

    In the past, even if you entered Ivy League school, many got C’s and only really good students got A’s. So, there was a chance that an A student from a less prestigious college might be looked upon more favorably than a C student from Ivy League college.

    But with AffAct and ‘progressive’ educational theory, getting A’s got easier.
    With so many A students from Ivy League schools, top companies go with them and overlook students from other colleges.

    So, everyone feels it’s Ivy League or nothing.
    It’s like in GLENGARRY GLENROSS.
    First prize is a Cadillac, second prize is a set of steak knives.

    Maybe the solution to this problem is to pressure companies and government to hire more people from less prestigious universities, state universities, and etc.
    Especially since Ivy League recruits blacks and others on AA, there’s a good chance that much better students are actually in less prestigious colleges.

    So, instead of focusing on making admission to Ivy League fairer, maybe the focus should be on making hiring more ‘fair’ by not favoring Ivy League graduates so much.

    Too many people in gov are harvardites, Yalies, princetonies.

    Let’s have some college-diversity in hiring.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cwhatfuture
    I do already. From recent experience Ivy grads range from utterly mediocre to great and State flagship grads from poor to great. But the overlap is huge and as the number of really mediocre Ivy grads is large, effectively I see no difference at all when I hire. I went to an Ivy so this is nothing personal. I am sure others see what I see.
  43. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Read "The Creature from Jekyll Island" sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a "hunting trip" on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.

    My analogy, if we're going to stick to light switches, is that the US Government has an on/off switch, but the FED has a dimmer switch in series with it.

    Those 3-way wirings are fun to play with with your kid, BTW. It's like an electrical version of odds/evens.

    Read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a “hunting trip” on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.

    As a great many (most recently, I recall, it was the late Edgar Steele) have pointed out, the Federal Reserve Bank is not a bank, has no reserves, and is not federal. Much like the Holy Roman Empire, which was not an empire, was in no way Roman, and most very certainly was not holy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Thanks. I have heard that said of both these "organizations" before, but you've got the wording right.
    , @Hibernian
    At its inception it was an empire; it involved into a bunch of independent principalities nominally ruled by the Hapsburgs, who eventually deveoped a real empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
  44. The suggestions for Fisher replacements that have been offered here so far seem to indicate to me that the commentariat doesn’t care about economics and the economy. Here is a better one:
    Danielle DiMartino Booth
    ( I would have expected Dave Pinsen to come up with her name)
    And since somebody plugged a bad book in this thread, I feel compelled to counterbalance that with a recommendation of DiMartino’s recent “FedUp”.

    Read More
  45. Ben Kurtz says: • Website
    @Randal
    LOL! Can't fault the effort, I suppose.

    The US government is notorious for being packed with Zambian dual loyalty types.

    Well, maybe Zambians are a bit rare, but if you read enough Steve Sailer you’d know that Democratic administrations tend to be packed with Barbadian dual-loyalty types!

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    Ah, that Pesky Barbadian Lobby that runs banking, media, and sports & entertainment industry.

    bored identity applauds your moxie to discuss this issue in broad daylight.
  46. Randal says:
    @Ben Kurtz
    Steve, don't you mean the "Zambian" High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer's actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    Steve, don’t you mean the “Zambian” High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer’s actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    Just to further highlight the sheer mendacity of Ben Kurtz’s attempt to divert attention from the real issue here, here’s Wikipedia on Fischer:

    Fischer was born into a Jewish family in Mazabuka, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia). When he was 13, his family moved to Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), where he became active in the Habonim Zionist youth movement. In 1960, he visited Israel as part of a winter program for youth leaders, and studied Hebrew at kibbutz Ma’agan Michael. He had originally planned to study at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, but went to the United Kingdom to study after receiving a scholarship from the London School of Economics, and obtained his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in economics from 1962–1966. Fischer then moved to the United States to study at MIT, and earned a Ph.D. in economics in 1969 with a thesis titled Essays on assets and contingent commodities written under the supervision of Franklin M. Fisher.[22][23] He became an American citizen in 1976.

    Obviously Fischer is exactly what Kurtz tries to imply he is – a bona fide Zambian-American US patriot with no connection with or loyalty to Israel beyond just accepting citizenship there in order to qualify for a job. Not.

    Worth bearing in mind in considering any other comments from this commenter that relate to the topic on which he is evidently quite prepared to lie.

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  47. @Mr. Anon
    Do you have anything to say about the fact that in a country of some 320 million people, the only suitable person for the job of Deputy Fed Chairman was a foreign national, and that for the last thirty years, no gentile has held the job of Fed Chairman? There is not a single gentile in the land who can do that job?

    “foreign national”?

    No, when he was here in Israel, he was a “foreign national”.

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  48. @Dave Pinsen
    A fair point.

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.

    Would be interesting if Mugabe offered Fischer a position.

    Also worth noting he was more qualified than Yellen, who was hired in part because she was a woman.

    Aha! I knew he looked kind of funny at those Senate hearings. Since, to quote you, Mr. Pinson, “She was a woman”, do you have a link to any articles on the cost of this expensive addictomy to the American taxpayer? Or, did he just Control-Pee the funds out of her … thin air. Oh, yeah, expect a subpoena, Mr. Pinson – this is slanderous and egregious!

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  49. @Ali Choudhury
    Stanley Fischer lived and worked in the US for close to forty years and became a US citizen well before he took on the job at the Bank of Israel. Before proving himself to be one of the best central bankers in the world, he was a pivotal senior member of the IMF leadership dealing with the Asian crisis of the late 90s and the Mexican peso crisis of the mid-90s. Before that he was an academic and the PhD supervisor of Ben Bernanke and Greg Mankiw among others.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker with decades of experience in dealing with severe financial crises might have something of value to contribute to the country he willingly became a citizen of. He may have even felt a sense that he owed his country something like Sailer often suggests American Jews ought to do more of. No one would have held it against him if he retired or took on a cushy private sector job at the age of 70. But no, he held Israeli citizenship for a period of nine years so obviously that meant his loyalty was suspect and Steve Bannon and Rand Paul should have been appointed in his stead.

    You would think a crackerjack central banker …

    OK, stop right there. You’ve got me rolling on the floor with this stuff. CrackerjackCentral Banker?? Is that like “He was a dynamite executioner back in his day.”, “As far as tyrants go, that Chairman Mao was best-in-class.”, “That Kazynski, he was a crackerjack mail-bomber.”, or “She was number 4 prostitute in all Kazakhstan.”

    Do you think it takes some kind of skill and intellect to decide how much money to print each month? Do you really think the economy would grind to a halt if the FED were eliminated tomorrow?

    Oh, this guy was Ben Bernanke’s supervisor? Put that on your resume, and see how far it’ll get you in any productive job.

    The FED and all Central Banks should have been killed in the womb. We need Andy Jackson II for President.

    So many people on here see the problems in American society, but don’t seem to know anything about the flow of the money as much of the root cause.

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  50. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Ok, now let me get this straight: The vice-chairman of the Federal Reserve, which was designed to monitor the financial health of the US of A, has dual citizenship eh? And with ISRAEL no less!

    This gives new meaning to the word “farce.”

    Nah…can’t make this stuff up anymore, just can’t.

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  51. bomag says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Mr. Yellen herself is not very popular with the Zerohedge crowd. Then again, nobody in an organization like the Federal Reserve bank would be. The next guy can't do anything different anyway - let the rates go up, then you really bust the US Feral Gov't budget as interest becomes 1/3 of the national budget AND what's left of the economy brakes to a screeching halt, as business is used to almost free money.

    What does the number 2 guy do anyway? There's only one or two things TO do - keep the rates down by feeding the big banks cheap money, and keep the Global Express running and ready to take the Board of Governors out of the country at a moment's notice; it's not rocket surgery.

    let the rates go up, then you really bust the US Feral Gov’t budget as interest becomes 1/3 of the national budget

    I like to think that a higher interest rate is a signal to borrow less by spending less, but gov’t spending seems to be in a bipolar world of spend or face riots.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Sure, whether meant to be, by some FED edict, or let to naturally rise to the actual market price of money, that is the signal - it's more costly to borrow, so borrowing must be curtailed.

    The first part of my sentence was to explain that it takes a lot of money to pay off interest on $20,000,000,000,000, even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates. The money has been lent by people who own the treasury bonds/bills, is the gist of it. If interest rates are let to wander up to a more natural level, let's just say 5-6%, then the interest on the debt, instead of being under 10% of the national budget, could go up to 1/3 or at least 1/4. This would make it much more apparent to the lenders of this money that maybe there is really no way out of this hole.

    Keep in mind, that those lenders are the holders of the treasury bonds, and they are everyone - people in pension plans, people with investment funds, municipalities. It's not just a few faraway people in China and the Middle East for whom we wouldn't care if they don't get their money back. Almost all of us, though not usually aware of it, are counting on treasury bonds remaining solvent. These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it's not like you can honor only some of them; that's the same as 100 dollar bills there.

    The thing is, no matter what executive administration, the Feral Gov't seems to be accumulating from 1/2 to 1 trillion dollars in debt each year. Were the interest to be paid just on current debt a much bigger chunk of the budget, that leaves even less remaining for the rest of the red-inked budge. From there, well, again, it's psychology. Once a few quit believing they'll ever see their money, the rest will want to get out.

    Default followed by major financial pain or slowly, then quickly increasing vacation with concordant levels of financial pain are the 2 ways out. I am Dr. A.E. Newman, M.D., specialist in Financial Reconstruction - I've got some bad news, and I've got some really bad news. Which would you like to hear first? Well, actually, on 2nd thought, fill out those insurance forms, or I've got nothing to say to you.

    Opinionator - this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn't forget.
  52. Hunsdon says:
    @Randal
    LOL! Can't fault the effort, I suppose.

    The US government is notorious for being packed with Zambian dual loyalty types.

    Zambian Occupied Government!

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  53. @Lot
    I agree, dual citizenship should not be allowed. Especially for immigrants to the USA, who should be required to renounce their foreign citizenship.

    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    In that case (citizenship conferred on you at birth) you should choose at age 18, before you vote. Any voter should have one allegiance.

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  54. OT

    “Why is Bulgaria’s population falling off a cliff?” asks the BBC. Because they’ve all gone to serve in London coffee bars and Venetian pizzerias?

    I must say the politicians there have the right stuff in them.

    “The government is introducing a number of measures to try to tackle depopulation by increasing the birth rate: offering help with the costs of fertility treatment, giving childcare, and mortgage support. It is also encouraging ethnic Bulgarians who live abroad to return to the country, but no-one else.

    “Bulgaria doesn’t need uneducated refugees,” says Deputy Prime Minister Valeri Simeonov, a leader of the United Patriots, an anti-immigrant grouping forming part of the coalition government. Nor would Bulgarian society accept educated and skilled migrants, Mr Simeonov says.

    “They have a different culture, different religion, even different daily habits,” he says. “And thank God Bulgaria so far is one of the most-well defended countries from Europe’s immigrant influx.”

    Mr Simeonov is referring to a razor-wire fence that Bulgaria has been building across its 260km (160 mile) border with Turkey to discourage immigrants from trying to enter the country.”

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  55. Bill says:
    @Kaz
    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn't very compelling nowadays.

    I agree with Opinionator. People who “aren’t religious” mostly fill the religion-sized hole in their souls with one ersatz religion or another. Reflexology, crystals, leftism, consumerism, etc. It seems to be mostly people who “aren’t religious” who think that there are a lot of people who aren’t religious.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Veritatis
    Couldn't agree more. And yet there is often a malicious intent in this "God is now overwhelmingly, scientifically, surely, really, dead", which is aimed at discouraging young or believers.

    "You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in Thee."
  56. Tucker Carlson literally WN talking points on Fox News.

    View post on imgur.com

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Alt-light but that's better than full cuck.
    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    Tucker is far more popular than his official ratings suggest.

    What is funny is that millennials and Gen-Z are not following Tucker on FNC, they are watching him on his official Fox and various fan channels on Youtube and assorted other video hosting sites like Vid-me. The DailyStormer hosts best of highlights of TC daily.

    So when the day comes that the SJWs and TWMNBN kick TC off of FNC and I believe it will be sometime this year before the Republican Cucks can announce for the mid-terms, TC will simply be poised to relaunch on the web.

    FNC losing TC will be equivalent to when CNN fired Lou Dobbs. Remember Dobbs was one of original dozen or so founding members of CNN. When Dobbs left CNN dozens of other employees who came up under him were out the door in the next year or so. CNN rapidly moved far far left.

    For a couple of year FNC really benefited from the shift of Lou Dobbs viewership over it. Those days are now long gone.

    So losing TC will mean the complete collapse of FNC into total CUCKDUMB!!! TC will take want ever un-cucked FNC staff with him over to the DailyCaller and the Web.

    Only aging Boomers and folks in assisted living like my 91 year old father will still be watching FNC but less so. My Dad will admit to only watching reruns of TC because TC is on past his bed time.
    , @Opinionator
    What's the date of this one?
    , @res
    Link to the video (much of it is Trump speech clips making similar points) and transcript: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2017/07/07/tucker_carlson_trump_criticized_for_defending_western_values_elites_teach_us_to_hate_ourselves_our_culture.html
    The bullet points about Defending the West at 3:35 are similarly good.
  57. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    No, Steve was concerned about Fischer’s enduring loyalty to Zambia (nee Northern Rhodesia), his birth country. But Sharon and Netanyahu were cool with it, so it’s all good.

    Read More
    • LOL: Opinionator
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Lol, yeah you'd think Fischer's background as a white Southern African would win him some admirers here, but the Jewish angle has swamped that.

    I wish I could reply to every know-nothing economics-ignorant bozo here who doesn't realize that before, during and after he took the job in Israel, Fischer was regarded by his colleagues in the economics profession as an American economist, and a damn good one. Ironically, in Israel there were people who complained about hiring a foreigner to head their central bank.
  58. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Ben Kurtz
    Steve, don't you mean the "Zambian" High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer's actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    Yes, long before he was forced to take an Israeli citizenship, he was a reluctant member of Habonim while still a teen in Rhodesia, and was dragged kicking and screaming to a kibutz in Israel where made him learn Hebrew. After that, he married a blonde shiksa, chose a goyishe kop as a mentor for his PhD thesis, and only took goyim as PhD students. Oh wait…

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  59. @Desiderius
    Yeah, it's nuts.

    My mother, who's been to church every Sunday of her life, was beaming ear to ear as she told me that my sister had found some SJW non-minister to officiate her wedding in a fancy hotel downtown.

    In this day and age, she was probably just happy that your sister was marrying a guy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    No, she was fine there either way - she's very proud of my brother's homosexuality. You'd just think that if you spend your life committed to something you'd care enough to pass it on to your kids.

    Whatever the opposite of fatalism is, the Boomers have it.
  60. @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    I understand, but actually, there is no reason for Christians to be married by a minister. Marriage is part of the natural order, not part of the godly work of the church.

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  61. AndrewR says:
    @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    Do you have any comments that aren’t just snarky complaints about goyim pointing out Jewish Supremacy in action?

    Read More
  62. AndrewR says:
    @Cwhatfuture
    Our fault, not Israel's

    We allow dual citizenship, triple citizenship whatever. We allow foreigners to vote this way - openly.
    We actually have no concept of "foreigner" beyond "Russian" (at the moment) and even that small distinction would be dropped if Marxists only ruled them again.

    In any event, any remaining distinction between an American and someone standing in our geography or someone who wants to stand in our geography will soon be erased by the federal courts on the grounds that the distinction is motivated by racism and therefore invalid.

    That is the real legal theory behind the Zeroeth Amendment

    We actually have no concept of “foreigner” beyond “Russian” (at the moment) and even that small distinction would be dropped if Marxists only ruled them again.

    This may be the best line in the history of this website

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  63. AndrewR says:
    @27 year old
    Tucker Carlson literally WN talking points on Fox News.

    https://m.imgur.com/KjLFQHy

    Alt-light but that’s better than full cuck.

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    As far as I can see the only reason to call it "light" is he's not naming the Jew, or using the word White. Those are classic WN themes, toned down for normie consumption. It's not like he has a "elites are opposed to Israel, our greatest ally" up there.
    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    Willing to grade Tucker on a curve given how fully soulless bugman FNC has been for the past year and a half and is only with the exception of TC getting worse by the day.

    Still on a daily basis Tucker routinely tips his cap to the Alt-right and has been outspoken in regards to the censorship of the Dailystormer post-Charlottesvile.

    I predict TPTB will force Tucker out at FNC sometime soon, by early spring at the latest Youtube will also try to de-platform him. This will give the endangered Republican Cucks one last chance to hold onto their seats in 2018. That way the TWMNBN can launch a Rubio/Flake/Ryan challenge to Trump in 2020 and or push for impeachment in 2019.

    Remember back in the fall of 2009 TPTB, launched an unprecedented campaign spearheaded by the ADL, SPLC and Media Matters for America to get Lou Dobbs fired from CNN???

    This helped allow the then Republican Cucks a chance to co-opt the Tea Party movement away from making immigration an issue just in time for the 2010 midterms. It allowed for example John McCain to get reelected.

    Tucker is going to face the same fate as Dobbs but hopefully Tucker will help anchor the rapidly developing Alt-Tech movement.
  64. @27 year old
    Tucker Carlson literally WN talking points on Fox News.

    https://m.imgur.com/KjLFQHy

    Tucker is far more popular than his official ratings suggest.

    What is funny is that millennials and Gen-Z are not following Tucker on FNC, they are watching him on his official Fox and various fan channels on Youtube and assorted other video hosting sites like Vid-me. The DailyStormer hosts best of highlights of TC daily.

    So when the day comes that the SJWs and TWMNBN kick TC off of FNC and I believe it will be sometime this year before the Republican Cucks can announce for the mid-terms, TC will simply be poised to relaunch on the web.

    FNC losing TC will be equivalent to when CNN fired Lou Dobbs. Remember Dobbs was one of original dozen or so founding members of CNN. When Dobbs left CNN dozens of other employees who came up under him were out the door in the next year or so. CNN rapidly moved far far left.

    For a couple of year FNC really benefited from the shift of Lou Dobbs viewership over it. Those days are now long gone.

    So losing TC will mean the complete collapse of FNC into total CUCKDUMB!!! TC will take want ever un-cucked FNC staff with him over to the DailyCaller and the Web.

    Only aging Boomers and folks in assisted living like my 91 year old father will still be watching FNC but less so. My Dad will admit to only watching reruns of TC because TC is on past his bed time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    My Dad will admit to only watching reruns of TC because TC is on past his bed time.
     
    Haha! Seriously, though, all these TV networks that broadcast infotainment 24/7 probably only have the loyalty of the old folks.

    Great comment in general, AA. I have never seen Tucker Carlson on TV at all. Everything I've seen, and embedded on my blog is from youtube. Now if youtube decides to censor this guy, I will find out where to watch him. However, I don't know much about embedding videos from anywhere but youtube. They are a BIG repository of video data obviously; that's the service they provide for whatever money they get (nothing from me so far), and I don't think I could put too many videos on some other company's server.

    Oh, one small spelling mistake - shouldn't it be "CUCKDOM", or is that one of those "I didn't see what you did there" things?
  65. @Desiderius
    Yeah, it's nuts.

    My mother, who's been to church every Sunday of her life, was beaming ear to ear as she told me that my sister had found some SJW non-minister to officiate her wedding in a fancy hotel downtown.

    Maybe she was just happy your sister had taken one more step toward marriage?

    Read More
  66. @27 year old
    Tucker Carlson literally WN talking points on Fox News.

    https://m.imgur.com/KjLFQHy

    What’s the date of this one?

    Read More
  67. @Lot
    I agree, dual citizenship should not be allowed. Especially for immigrants to the USA, who should be required to renounce their foreign citizenship.

    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    Couldn’t this person be forced to choose once they reach 18 for example? Or citizenship simply denied at birth in cases where the baby is a citizen of another country?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    I don't know of that would be legal. Renounce your citizenship of France, which has economic value, on pain of losing your American citizenship? I do not know if the Fifth Amendment would allow that. Not with the current Supreme Court for sure.

    Except in cases of fraud, for instance lying on a citizenship application, it is very hard to deprive someone of US citizenship.
  68. Tiny Duck says:
    @utu
    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of 'unaffiliated' Americans - just four decades after they were 80 percent

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4858552/Survey-White-Christians-minority-US-population.html#ixzz4rxvPBmUD

    Hallelujah!

    Goodbye racists! You will not be missed!

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    • Troll: IHTG
    • Replies: @anonymous
    The meds, Duckie! The meds! Thorazine works best in the morning I believe.
  69. @Lot
    How about Patri Friedman, Milton's polyamorous living, libertarian sea platform building, Peter Thiel-funded, grandson.

    Patri is a transhumanist and cryonicist as well.

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  70. Many libertarians advocate trying to acquire multiple passports and splitting your legal identity among several countries to try to evade taxes. They call this strategy living as a “sovereign individual.”

    If Fischer, our Israeli colonial overseer, has done something like this, I think the IRS should audit his finances.

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  71. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yeah, it's not like money is the life blood of nations and a prime mover of history or anything. It's perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they're good at it.

    Maybe we should ask Vlad Putin to volunteer for the Fed. He's a good manager I hear. Or how about one of those great financial wizards from China. Yeah, that's the ticket. They're kicking our financial ass, so let's hire one to manage our funds! After all, they're good at it.

    Fisher might very well be an angel from heaven who loves America and apple pie and can square a circle in his sleep, but that's not the point.

    Besides, the Fed is loaded up with Fishers. It's time for a few Smiths and Joneses. Identity politics? You bet! We've been backed into it.

    I dunno about you, but I’m totally for Vlad Putin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Okay, install Putin at the Fed.

    Then put Victor Orban at Immigration, and fill the federal courts with loyal members of his Hungarian party.

    Stuff Congress with neo-Confederates from down South. I will personally pay to move some here to Connecticut so they can run, as long as they promise to bring their guns. The first thing they can do is break up the Mainstream Media Monopoly.

    I love playing Fantasy Government!

  72. Stanley Fischer is jumping off the Federal Reserve Bank boat? Janet Yellen on her way out?

    President Trump has my blessing to nominate another Jew to run the Federal Reserve Bank. I authorized this action way back in August of 2017:

    President Trump has my support if he selects another Jew for the position of Chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank. But only if it is Peter Schiff.

    Schiff would immediately raise the federal funds rate to 25 percent. Paul Volcker raised it to above 20 percent in 1981. Schiff would have to top him by going to 25 percent. The asset bubbles in stocks, bonds and real estate would pop in two days.

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  73. @Kaz
    All developed nations have trended towards agnosticism. Religion just isn't very compelling nowadays.

    Back around 2000 I saw stories on the news about how children would get their parents to take them to bookstores and wait in line at midnight to buy the newest Harry Potter novels. I also read that in families where the parents didn’t approve of the Potter stories, say, for religious reasons, the kids would defy their parents and read these novels furtively.

    Not to mention how much these youngsters must have talked about the stories with their friends, in person and online.

    I bet these kids would show nowhere near that kind of enthusiasm for learning about Jesus.

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    • Replies: @Veritatis
    Then I bet you haven't been around a lot of children.
  74. I hereby nominate Emma Lazarus as engraved mug shot fetish for the $2.99 bill.

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  75. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Bubba
    OK, to break the 30 year streak of Ivy League Jews running the Federal Reserve I think Alcee Hastings would be the most logical choice. Since we are the most broke & indebted nation in the history of the world (with nothing to show for it), good old Alcee would continue the reckless spending party without impunity. Though he's not an Ivy League grad like the previous Fed Chairmen, he sure knows how to spend the goyim's money! Plus he really likes to spend lots of money on Ethiopian Jews rather than his own decrepit district!

    I second the nomination. The gentleman from Florida should be given a life term.

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  76. Lurker says:
    @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    And today’s Breathtaking Chutzpah Award goes to *opens blue & white envelope* . . . International Jew!

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  77. jacobsson says:

    Steve I really hope you’re working up a post on Genius Coates’ latest,

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/10/the-first-white-president-ta-nehisi-coates/537909/?utm_source=atltw

    Please read it so we don’t have to

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  78. @Achmed E. Newman
    Read "The Creature from Jekyll Island" sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a "hunting trip" on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.

    My analogy, if we're going to stick to light switches, is that the US Government has an on/off switch, but the FED has a dimmer switch in series with it.

    Those 3-way wirings are fun to play with with your kid, BTW. It's like an electrical version of odds/evens.

    A lot of early Americans didn’t like the Creature from the Pennsylvania State House in 1787, either. The ones who suspected the authors’ motives had a point, in that the new Constitution included a bailout scheme for holders of bad paper debts that the central government under the Articles of Confederation couldn’t honor (Article VI).

    Time has a funny way of changing the reputations of people who died long ago. A century from now Americans, however defined in the early 22nd Century, might view the founders of the Fed the way today’s white conservatives view the Framers of the original Constitution.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I understand your concept of time changing the reputations and all, but I don't see this particular comparison.

    A) Yes, some may have been right to be against having any Constitution (hence, any Federal Government). However, these erudite men of that era wanted a common defense, but did one hell of a job to keep limits on the power of this body they created. It was just later Americans who let it all go to hell. We still remember the founders and have disdain for the people that did not keep up their end of the bargain - eternal vigilance.

    B) I don't know anyone besides Big Bankers, Big Finance people, and Governments, who have EVER had any liking for central banks, including the "Federal" "Reserve". How could their reputation get any better? Are our new residents from Central America big fans of fractional-reserve lending, economic manipulation, and Quantitive Easing? They don't know what these words mean, I don't know how to spell one of them (thanks for no help, Microsoft!), and worse yet, none of us want to know!

    So, no I don't think so.
  79. Is Harpo Marx available?

    That way tribe still keeps the spot, while The Orangutan from Queens gets a new opportunity to prove to his voters that buffoonery is art of deal meant to be exercised daily.

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  80. @Ben Kurtz
    Steve, don't you mean the "Zambian" High Government Official Seat?

    That is Mr. Fischer's actual country of origin, after all.

    He only took Israeli citizenship late in life, as a precondition for accepting the Bank of Israel job he had already been offered.

    I prefer to think of it as the Northern Rhodesia seat. After all, that is what it was called when he lived there.

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  81. a reader says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn't Israeli, but if you're looking for international talent, I think he'd be available.

    For an American gentile, Andy Beal or John Hussman, if they'd take it, with the understanding they'd get a shot at being Fed Chair after Yellen.

    Hussman is a Buddhist I think, though.

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli, but if you’re looking for international talent, I think he’d be available.

    News of his financial talent didn’t reach you, did they?

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  82. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    As the debt climbs it will be harder to get good people at the fed.

    Trump threw in the towel on debt issue. Gold going higher and interest rates stay near zero. Savers get killed and the massive wealth transfer to the top 10% continues.

    We can’t make America great again with these low interest rates. It does not compute. Trump revolution is a giant scam.

    No new sheriff in town. New boss is the same as the old boss.

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  83. @AndrewR
    Alt-light but that's better than full cuck.

    As far as I can see the only reason to call it “light” is he’s not naming the Jew, or using the word White. Those are classic WN themes, toned down for normie consumption. It’s not like he has a “elites are opposed to Israel, our greatest ally” up there.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    So he is a standard nationalist conservative like 40-45% of the US voting population, not a Nazi weirdo? What a novel concept!

    -- Trigger warning --


    http://twitter.com/TuckerCarlson/status/898346743229579265
  84. Barnard says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    I would assume part of the appeal of a location like a vineyard is that it can host the reception and the bridal party and guests don’t have to move to another location after the ceremony in order to get liquored up. You have to assume a Napa vineyard wedding would be very expensive, much more so than a church one.

    I read a quote somewhere that said young women today want the wedding and not the marriage. They don’t want a pastor telling them they are making a promise before God, they just want a celebration focused on them. For some of them, it must be like a sweet 16 birthday party on steroids. Given the emotional pain divorce causes, I don’t understand why anyone would discourage engaged couples from going through pre-marriage counseling sessions and talking to someone who would emphasize the seriousness of marriage.

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  85. a reader says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn't Israeli, but if you're looking for international talent, I think he'd be available.

    For an American gentile, Andy Beal or John Hussman, if they'd take it, with the understanding they'd get a shot at being Fed Chair after Yellen.

    Hussman is a Buddhist I think, though.

    Dominique Strauss-Khan isn’t Israeli

    « Je me lève chaque matin en me demandant comment je pourrai être utile à Israël »

    «I wake up every morning asking myself how I could be useful to Israel»

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  86. res says:
    @Anon
    Despite the usual cliches about 'equality', the West is essentially hierarchical and not just in actual power/privilege but in mindset. It's about shooting to the top. Those on top are winners, and they define the essence of what America is all about.

    Our mental view of America is a pyramid. Higher-up the better. And in some ways, this makes good sense. After all, we like to admire the best at something. Best businessmen, best politician, best athlete, best singer, best actor, best writer, and etc.

    True, the best is admirable. But in focusing on the best, we lose sight of something more important. The thing itself. In a way, athleticism is about health and fitness. So,the best athletes are best at activities of health and fitness. But more important than being best at something is that very something. So, a good society has a culture of health and fitness for most people. After all, a society without sports but lots of healthy and fit people is preferable to a society with sports that admires athletes but neglects the health and fitness of most people. Americans love best people in sports, but so many are out of shape and unfit and unhealthy. We have too many obese couchpotatoes glues to TV watching athletes. We let the best define the essence of health and fitness but neglect it on the basic level for the masses.

    So, our minds need to think more in terms of core-ism than hierarchy-ism. After all, the core meaning of health and fitness is that EVERYONE should try to be fit and healthy. It's not about focusing only on those who are best at it.



    A society can admire the best at something, but the main emphasis should be placed on that something itself. That way, instead of people just looking up at the best and neglecting their own needs, people will tend to their own needs and responsibilities.

    Because of the pyramid-ian way of thinking, Americans tend to outsource everything to the 'best' and neglect to involve themselves in that something. They just leave it up to the 'best' or the 'experts'.
    In music, the focus is on the 'hottest' hits and 'biggest' acts. It's as if music culture belongs only to the select few. The rest of Americans exist only to consume this 'best'(at the moment) music.

    As such, people fail to develop a folk culture in music at the personal or local level. For many people, there is no sense of music beyond what is 'hot'. They fail to grasp that the importance of music is much deeper than billboard charts.

    This is a kind of idolism, and it's a worldwide problem. Instead of human relationships, people prefer the 'best' or 'ideal' image of romance in movies, soap operas, or even something as sleazy as 50 SHADES OF GREY. It's as if romance or love has value only in such idealized or sensationalized fantasies. With such powerful idols lodged in their minds, they neglect real world relations and life. Their minds are fixated on the lifestyles of the 'gods' and neglect real human needs.

    So maybe people should think more in terms of the core value of a thing than the best of the thing. Of course, people can do both, but core should trump the best, which often is not really the best but a lot of hype. In the current US, homomania managed to become the 'best' of spirituality. Homos came to be seen as the best of everything to such an extent that people became more obsessed about cheering for 'gay marriage' than trying to find love for themselves and real marriage. IN pop culture, 'gay marriage' is the cream of the crop of marriage. Who needs to think about getting married when one is blessed by revering and cheering 'gay marriage'?

    For a person, is life more meaningful by focusing on aristocrats with fancy stuff or on the basic meaning of life revolving around family, love,loyalty, moral culture, and etc? Sure, aristocrats have fancy stuff of value, and such should be appreciated, but is fanciness of life more important than life itself?

    Consider the guy in UGETSU who gets drawn into this aristocratic ghost world where all things are beautiful and enchanting. A world of luxury and privilege. All very nice, but in his obsession with this 'best' world, he forgets all about his wife and kid. Nice things are nice, but the thing itself is more important. People prefer fantasy over reality cuz fantasy seems the 'best'.

    One of the reasons why the black community collapsed in so many places is they came to prefer the 'bling' over the thing. That mother in RAISIN IN THE SUN had a feeling for the thing. Now, we have single mothers with daughters as single mothers raising kids to 'twerk' and looking up to rappers with 'bling'. To depraved minds, this is what passes for the 'best'. When the basic moral essence of life is neglected, even the notion of the 'best' gets perverted in the minds of morons.

    But we see it in white community too. Globalism is all about hierarchy and pyramid. It's about who gets to the very top. They are best and experts. In terms of merit, many of the successful are indeed very good at what they do. But they have no sense of the common national good, the idea that a community of people thrive together with shared values that apply to all. Since the white elites are into themselves, they neglect everyone else in the white community. Most people tend to stagnate without inspired leadership. Leadership used to mean people on top doing what is good for the people. Now, it means those on top favoring their own kind and neglecting their own people. To cover up their negligence, they 'leapfrog' and virtue-signal about their concern for the Other. This doesn't cost them anything since they have no contact with the Other(except as serfs). The Other is a prop. It's like Jane Fonda and North Vietnamese. If she was really concerned about them, why didn't she devote her whole life to helping the victims of war in Vietnam? Of course, it was really about her, garnering attention as a woman of 'conscience' before the camera. And when she tired of the whole thing, she later turned to making aerobic exercise videos.

    After all, it was a great challenge for Moses to lead the Hebrews, his own people. But it would have been easy for him to virtue-signal about how much he cares about some other tribe and admonish Hebrews for lacking the same 'compassion'. It's no wonder leaders prefer foreign policy over domestic policy. They cannot run from people at home. If they fail, they must do something else that works because the people are always there. But in foreign policy, the leader can just make a lot of noise about 'human rights'. And if he messes up with intervention, he can just abandon the crisis and forget about it, like Reagan could just walk away from Lebanon.
    Current leadership in America doesn't seem to be concerned with Americans. Since it is a challenge to fix the problems of Americans, leaders just get 'new Americans'. It's like a kid who gets bored and tired with taking care of his current pet, so he gets newer and newer pets to love.. while his earlier pets get neglected and forgotten. IT's easier to go from task to task half-finished than finish a task and see it to its end.

    Excellent comment. I have tried to make that athleticism point and analogy before, but never so well. And the rest was of similar quality.

    I think this has viral possibilities: “they came to prefer the ‘bling’ over the thing”

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  87. President Trump has been made aware of my recommendation of Peter Schiff for chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank to replace Janet Yellen. Steve Sailer reports that Stanley Fischer is leaving his position of vice chairman at the Fed as well. I hereby recommend that President Trump install David Hackett Fischer as a replacement for Stanley Fischer.

    I have yet to read David Hackett Fischer’s “The Great Wave: Price Revolutions And The Rhythm Of History,” but I am quite sure Mr. David Hackett Fischer can give the orders to continue electronically conjuring up dollars out of thin air.

    We do not have global capitalism anymore, we have Globalized Central Bank Shysterism.

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    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    My wife and I are both half German in our ancestry, mine being Pennsylvania Deutsch, and hers being of more recent immigrant stock. The fact of the ubiquity of German ancestry in the U.S. has been made awkward by the two world wars, and the U.S. siding with the British and French. But our people have made enormous contributions to the U.S.
  88. @Daniel Chieh
    I dunno about you, but I'm totally for Vlad Putin.

    Okay, install Putin at the Fed.

    Then put Victor Orban at Immigration, and fill the federal courts with loyal members of his Hungarian party.

    Stuff Congress with neo-Confederates from down South. I will personally pay to move some here to Connecticut so they can run, as long as they promise to bring their guns. The first thing they can do is break up the Mainstream Media Monopoly.

    I love playing Fantasy Government!

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    • Agree: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @Veritatis
    Ah no! I want Orban for President of Mexico, then Franco for Interior, you can keep your confederates if I get Benedict XVI for Education. Abolish robber Congress for 30 year minimum.

    And yet, here's a little bit from the "Ballad of the White Horse" that sounds absurdly more realistic:

    "I tell you naught for your comfort,
    Yea, naught for your desire,
    Save that the sky grows darker yet
    And the sea rises higher.
    Night shall be thrice night over you,
    And heaven an iron cope.
    Do you have joy without a cause,
    Yea, faith without a hope?"
  89. @bomag

    let the rates go up, then you really bust the US Feral Gov’t budget as interest becomes 1/3 of the national budget
     
    I like to think that a higher interest rate is a signal to borrow less by spending less, but gov't spending seems to be in a bipolar world of spend or face riots.

    Sure, whether meant to be, by some FED edict, or let to naturally rise to the actual market price of money, that is the signal – it’s more costly to borrow, so borrowing must be curtailed.

    The first part of my sentence was to explain that it takes a lot of money to pay off interest on $20,000,000,000,000, even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates. The money has been lent by people who own the treasury bonds/bills, is the gist of it. If interest rates are let to wander up to a more natural level, let’s just say 5-6%, then the interest on the debt, instead of being under 10% of the national budget, could go up to 1/3 or at least 1/4. This would make it much more apparent to the lenders of this money that maybe there is really no way out of this hole.

    Keep in mind, that those lenders are the holders of the treasury bonds, and they are everyone – people in pension plans, people with investment funds, municipalities. It’s not just a few faraway people in China and the Middle East for whom we wouldn’t care if they don’t get their money back. Almost all of us, though not usually aware of it, are counting on treasury bonds remaining solvent. These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them; that’s the same as 100 dollar bills there.

    The thing is, no matter what executive administration, the Feral Gov’t seems to be accumulating from 1/2 to 1 trillion dollars in debt each year. Were the interest to be paid just on current debt a much bigger chunk of the budget, that leaves even less remaining for the rest of the red-inked budge. From there, well, again, it’s psychology. Once a few quit believing they’ll ever see their money, the rest will want to get out.

    Default followed by major financial pain or slowly, then quickly increasing vacation with concordant levels of financial pain are the 2 ways out. I am Dr. A.E. Newman, M.D., specialist in Financial Reconstruction – I’ve got some bad news, and I’ve got some really bad news. Which would you like to hear first? Well, actually, on 2nd thought, fill out those insurance forms, or I’ve got nothing to say to you.

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

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    • Replies: @bomag

    ...even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates
     
    Isn't this roughly the rate of inflation? Isn't that part of the "trick" here; if interest rates are at or below the rate of inflation, you can deficit spend with a clear conscience? Even negative interest rates(?!) under which you are compelled to spend?

    Isn't inflation the "easy" way out of this deal? My favorite quote is from Alan Greenspan, when being quizzed about the future of massive sovereign debt, "we can guarantee a payment; we can't guarantee buying power."

    Future of everyone

    , @Opinionator
    These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them;

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

    Thank you. I look forward to reading it.

    (Did you intend to use the word "vacation" in your post?)
  90. res says:
    @27 year old
    Tucker Carlson literally WN talking points on Fox News.

    https://m.imgur.com/KjLFQHy

    Link to the video (much of it is Trump speech clips making similar points) and transcript: https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2017/07/07/tucker_carlson_trump_criticized_for_defending_western_values_elites_teach_us_to_hate_ourselves_our_culture.html
    The bullet points about Defending the West at 3:35 are similarly good.

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  91. Sam Shama says:

    Gary Cohn not a contender anymore. Janet Yellen continues Or Kevin Warsh. 70/30

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  92. @advancedatheist
    A lot of early Americans didn't like the Creature from the Pennsylvania State House in 1787, either. The ones who suspected the authors' motives had a point, in that the new Constitution included a bailout scheme for holders of bad paper debts that the central government under the Articles of Confederation couldn't honor (Article VI).

    Time has a funny way of changing the reputations of people who died long ago. A century from now Americans, however defined in the early 22nd Century, might view the founders of the Fed the way today's white conservatives view the Framers of the original Constitution.

    I understand your concept of time changing the reputations and all, but I don’t see this particular comparison.

    A) Yes, some may have been right to be against having any Constitution (hence, any Federal Government). However, these erudite men of that era wanted a common defense, but did one hell of a job to keep limits on the power of this body they created. It was just later Americans who let it all go to hell. We still remember the founders and have disdain for the people that did not keep up their end of the bargain – eternal vigilance.

    B) I don’t know anyone besides Big Bankers, Big Finance people, and Governments, who have EVER had any liking for central banks, including the “Federal” “Reserve”. How could their reputation get any better? Are our new residents from Central America big fans of fractional-reserve lending, economic manipulation, and Quantitive Easing? They don’t know what these words mean, I don’t know how to spell one of them (thanks for no help, Microsoft!), and worse yet, none of us want to know!

    So, no I don’t think so.

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  93. George says:

    Dudley!!! It’s Dudley’s moment.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_C._Dudley

    Did Fischer quit because he didn’t want to work for a Fascist?

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    • Replies: @Lot
    Dudley is a tight money Bushie and ex Goldman Sachs. He would be very bad for Trump. He is exactly who we want the least. Best bet, being serious now, is one of Trump's real estate pals from NYC who understands the importance of low rates.
  94. Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Like Teresa Heinz Kerry, Fischer is African-American. How many boxes can he check?
  95. Lot says:
    @27 year old
    As far as I can see the only reason to call it "light" is he's not naming the Jew, or using the word White. Those are classic WN themes, toned down for normie consumption. It's not like he has a "elites are opposed to Israel, our greatest ally" up there.

    So he is a standard nationalist conservative like 40-45% of the US voting population, not a Nazi weirdo? What a novel concept!

    – Trigger warning –

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  96. @AndrewR
    Alt-light but that's better than full cuck.

    Willing to grade Tucker on a curve given how fully soulless bugman FNC has been for the past year and a half and is only with the exception of TC getting worse by the day.

    Still on a daily basis Tucker routinely tips his cap to the Alt-right and has been outspoken in regards to the censorship of the Dailystormer post-Charlottesvile.

    I predict TPTB will force Tucker out at FNC sometime soon, by early spring at the latest Youtube will also try to de-platform him. This will give the endangered Republican Cucks one last chance to hold onto their seats in 2018. That way the TWMNBN can launch a Rubio/Flake/Ryan challenge to Trump in 2020 and or push for impeachment in 2019.

    Remember back in the fall of 2009 TPTB, launched an unprecedented campaign spearheaded by the ADL, SPLC and Media Matters for America to get Lou Dobbs fired from CNN???

    This helped allow the then Republican Cucks a chance to co-opt the Tea Party movement away from making immigration an issue just in time for the 2010 midterms. It allowed for example John McCain to get reelected.

    Tucker is going to face the same fate as Dobbs but hopefully Tucker will help anchor the rapidly developing Alt-Tech movement.

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  97. Also OT (why do my comments always need approval?)

    “Microsoft aims to lie to their AI to reduce sexist bias”

    “One of humanities greatest strengths is the ability to navigate the world using only limited data, relying to a large part on our experience built up over years of personal exposure, education and media.

    This, for example, means we drive slower around schools because we suspect there may be children around, or offer a seat to the elderly because we reasonably suspect they will be weaker than the average person.

    The dark side of these assumptions are of course racist and sexist biases, where our beliefs are poorly substantiated, unfairly extrapolated from a few to a whole population, or do not allow for exceptions to the rule.”

    It’s that dark side which makes me lock the doors while driving at night in certain parts of London, and tell my wife to lock them at all times in all parts of London.

    Also, Lee Jussim, summarised by Steve Stuart Williams

    “Stereotypes of the sexes tend to be quite accurate” – pdf file.

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  98. Veritatis says:
    @Bill
    I agree with Opinionator. People who "aren't religious" mostly fill the religion-sized hole in their souls with one ersatz religion or another. Reflexology, crystals, leftism, consumerism, etc. It seems to be mostly people who "aren't religious" who think that there are a lot of people who aren't religious.

    Couldn’t agree more. And yet there is often a malicious intent in this “God is now overwhelmingly, scientifically, surely, really, dead”, which is aimed at discouraging young or believers.

    “You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our hearts are restless until they rest in Thee.”

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  99. Veritatis says:
    @advancedatheist
    Back around 2000 I saw stories on the news about how children would get their parents to take them to bookstores and wait in line at midnight to buy the newest Harry Potter novels. I also read that in families where the parents didn't approve of the Potter stories, say, for religious reasons, the kids would defy their parents and read these novels furtively.

    Not to mention how much these youngsters must have talked about the stories with their friends, in person and online.

    I bet these kids would show nowhere near that kind of enthusiasm for learning about Jesus.

    Then I bet you haven’t been around a lot of children.

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    • Replies: @advancedatheist
    I didn't care for Jesus when I grew up, and I lived in a generally Southern Baptist environment.
  100. guest says:
    @Maj. Kong
    I've previously thought that Mitt Romney would be a good choice for Fed Chairman, before he threatened a coup, which makes him unpalatable now. The Senate isn't going to confirm Rand Paul, regrettably. 2012 candidate Herman Cain was in charge of a regional Fed bank in the 90s. I would not be surprised to see Neel Kashkari be nominated, even though he would be the amongst the worst possible picks, Larry Summers would be less bad. The options are not good given the disloyalty among GOP Senators coupled with the narrow majority.

    In addition to its primary power of creating money out of thin air, the Fed has a secondary power of bank regulation. That may be a place to extract some leverage, given the leftist leanings of their management.

    We should look into re-creating something like the Bretton Woods system, speculators like Soros should not be allowed to wreck economies.

    The only good aspect of Bretton Woods was that under it we at least pretended our money was ultimately tied to something real, i.e. gold. Otherwise, it’s just a price-fixing conspiracy amongst governments. What could possibly go wrong?

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  101. Lot says:

    I support greater US Israeli ties. It is already our Crusader-State protectorate. Israel should declare English a co-official language and support the settlement of Christian Zionists in the West Bank. We should also set up a second protectorate in a partitioned Christian majority part of Lebanon.

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  102. Lot says:
    @George
    Dudley!!! It's Dudley's moment.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_C._Dudley

    Did Fischer quit because he didn't want to work for a Fascist?

    Dudley is a tight money Bushie and ex Goldman Sachs. He would be very bad for Trump. He is exactly who we want the least. Best bet, being serious now, is one of Trump’s real estate pals from NYC who understands the importance of low rates.

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  103. @Chrisnonymous
    In this day and age, she was probably just happy that your sister was marrying a guy.

    No, she was fine there either way – she’s very proud of my brother’s homosexuality. You’d just think that if you spend your life committed to something you’d care enough to pass it on to your kids.

    Whatever the opposite of fatalism is, the Boomers have it.

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    • Replies: @3g4me
    @104 Desiderius: "You’d just think that if you spend your life committed to something you’d care enough to pass it on to your kids."

    With all due respect, and I mean that quite legitimately, if she's "quite proud" of your brother's homosexuality, then genuine Christianity was never particularly important to her, and thus her disinterest in passing a belief system on to her children which she never followed herself. She may have gone through the motions of attending church and probably enjoyed the related social activities and virtue-signalling/moral posturing she could then bring to justify, to herself and others, her social and political opinions , but that's not Christianity at all. At best it's churchianity.
  104. Veritatis says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Okay, install Putin at the Fed.

    Then put Victor Orban at Immigration, and fill the federal courts with loyal members of his Hungarian party.

    Stuff Congress with neo-Confederates from down South. I will personally pay to move some here to Connecticut so they can run, as long as they promise to bring their guns. The first thing they can do is break up the Mainstream Media Monopoly.

    I love playing Fantasy Government!

    Ah no! I want Orban for President of Mexico, then Franco for Interior, you can keep your confederates if I get Benedict XVI for Education. Abolish robber Congress for 30 year minimum.

    And yet, here’s a little bit from the “Ballad of the White Horse” that sounds absurdly more realistic:

    “I tell you naught for your comfort,
    Yea, naught for your desire,
    Save that the sky grows darker yet
    And the sea rises higher.
    Night shall be thrice night over you,
    And heaven an iron cope.
    Do you have joy without a cause,
    Yea, faith without a hope?”

    Read More
  105. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer


    Best bet, being serious now, is one of Trump’s real estate pals from NYC who understands the importance of low rates.

    Low rates are a disaster. The rotten banks are sucking on our economy like a giant tick. Real estate benefits but only certain sectors. The overall effect is impoverishment and more debt for 90% of the country.

    The bad banks were flushed in the mayhem of 1990-91 and that is what we desperately need today.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    What the country really needs is a Paul Volcker, but this is said in the same way that a doctor would tell the patient: You need to go set up on the chemotherapy treatments ASAP.

    It took only a few years to get out of the woods in the early 1980's, but the country is nowhere near that strong now. Therefore, the FED will keep the rates low, just as the patient will keep taking the pain meds, and act like everything will be fine. No, it won't. Prepping, bitchez!

  106. It’s too bad Steve wasn’t around to advise George Washington—he could have told Washington not to employ untrustworthy foreigners like “Baron” von Steuben and the Marquis de Lafayette in senior positions in the American armed forces. I mean, the US would go on to fight a quasi-war with France only ~25 years later, what more do you want?

    Or how about that Wernher von Braun? He was not only a foreign national, he actually worked for a government that declared war on the US—surely it would be a mistake to trust him with a position of responsibility in a sensitive and complicated area relevant to his technical expertise? (In addition to, more broadly, all the German scientific/technical experts recruited to work for the US government by Operation Paperclip.)

    And what about all those non-American national Jewish physicists like Leo Szilard, Niels Bohr and Edward Teller who worked on the Manhattan Project? It’s too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.

    Sure, Stanley Fisher lived in America and held US citizenship for 30-40 years, Israel is a relatively small country in the global economy in terms of its absolute GDP and it’s difficult to specify any non-trivial way that US and Israeli interests would interact, let alone conflict, in the realm of monetary policy. But, come on, can we really trust Fisher to serve America’s best interests with his technical expertise the way we trusted a life-long American patriot like Wernher von Braun?

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    • Replies: @guest
    Your argument would be appropriate had the senior military and scientific positions in government or (non-governmental legal cartels like the Fed) been given to the people of the various national or ethnic groups you mention in perpetuity. But no, their status was based on their individual merit. Not to say Fischer's merit isn't sufficient, but it would be an awfully big coincidence if his co-ethnics were forevermore most qualified to run what is perhaps the nation's most powerful institution. (So long as we don't have a Caesar take over the military.)

    By the way, as I recall the Manhattan Project was run by a natural-born American. Jewish, true, and a pinko, but American. You think that might've been for a reason?

    , @Art

    It’s too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.
     
    Hmm - think about it.

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity - PERIOD.

    Think Peace --- Art

  107. @Veritatis
    Then I bet you haven't been around a lot of children.

    I didn’t care for Jesus when I grew up, and I lived in a generally Southern Baptist environment.

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  108. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon
    Despite the usual cliches about 'equality', the West is essentially hierarchical and not just in actual power/privilege but in mindset. It's about shooting to the top. Those on top are winners, and they define the essence of what America is all about.

    Our mental view of America is a pyramid. Higher-up the better. And in some ways, this makes good sense. After all, we like to admire the best at something. Best businessmen, best politician, best athlete, best singer, best actor, best writer, and etc.

    True, the best is admirable. But in focusing on the best, we lose sight of something more important. The thing itself. In a way, athleticism is about health and fitness. So,the best athletes are best at activities of health and fitness. But more important than being best at something is that very something. So, a good society has a culture of health and fitness for most people. After all, a society without sports but lots of healthy and fit people is preferable to a society with sports that admires athletes but neglects the health and fitness of most people. Americans love best people in sports, but so many are out of shape and unfit and unhealthy. We have too many obese couchpotatoes glues to TV watching athletes. We let the best define the essence of health and fitness but neglect it on the basic level for the masses.

    So, our minds need to think more in terms of core-ism than hierarchy-ism. After all, the core meaning of health and fitness is that EVERYONE should try to be fit and healthy. It's not about focusing only on those who are best at it.



    A society can admire the best at something, but the main emphasis should be placed on that something itself. That way, instead of people just looking up at the best and neglecting their own needs, people will tend to their own needs and responsibilities.

    Because of the pyramid-ian way of thinking, Americans tend to outsource everything to the 'best' and neglect to involve themselves in that something. They just leave it up to the 'best' or the 'experts'.
    In music, the focus is on the 'hottest' hits and 'biggest' acts. It's as if music culture belongs only to the select few. The rest of Americans exist only to consume this 'best'(at the moment) music.

    As such, people fail to develop a folk culture in music at the personal or local level. For many people, there is no sense of music beyond what is 'hot'. They fail to grasp that the importance of music is much deeper than billboard charts.

    This is a kind of idolism, and it's a worldwide problem. Instead of human relationships, people prefer the 'best' or 'ideal' image of romance in movies, soap operas, or even something as sleazy as 50 SHADES OF GREY. It's as if romance or love has value only in such idealized or sensationalized fantasies. With such powerful idols lodged in their minds, they neglect real world relations and life. Their minds are fixated on the lifestyles of the 'gods' and neglect real human needs.

    So maybe people should think more in terms of the core value of a thing than the best of the thing. Of course, people can do both, but core should trump the best, which often is not really the best but a lot of hype. In the current US, homomania managed to become the 'best' of spirituality. Homos came to be seen as the best of everything to such an extent that people became more obsessed about cheering for 'gay marriage' than trying to find love for themselves and real marriage. IN pop culture, 'gay marriage' is the cream of the crop of marriage. Who needs to think about getting married when one is blessed by revering and cheering 'gay marriage'?

    For a person, is life more meaningful by focusing on aristocrats with fancy stuff or on the basic meaning of life revolving around family, love,loyalty, moral culture, and etc? Sure, aristocrats have fancy stuff of value, and such should be appreciated, but is fanciness of life more important than life itself?

    Consider the guy in UGETSU who gets drawn into this aristocratic ghost world where all things are beautiful and enchanting. A world of luxury and privilege. All very nice, but in his obsession with this 'best' world, he forgets all about his wife and kid. Nice things are nice, but the thing itself is more important. People prefer fantasy over reality cuz fantasy seems the 'best'.

    One of the reasons why the black community collapsed in so many places is they came to prefer the 'bling' over the thing. That mother in RAISIN IN THE SUN had a feeling for the thing. Now, we have single mothers with daughters as single mothers raising kids to 'twerk' and looking up to rappers with 'bling'. To depraved minds, this is what passes for the 'best'. When the basic moral essence of life is neglected, even the notion of the 'best' gets perverted in the minds of morons.

    But we see it in white community too. Globalism is all about hierarchy and pyramid. It's about who gets to the very top. They are best and experts. In terms of merit, many of the successful are indeed very good at what they do. But they have no sense of the common national good, the idea that a community of people thrive together with shared values that apply to all. Since the white elites are into themselves, they neglect everyone else in the white community. Most people tend to stagnate without inspired leadership. Leadership used to mean people on top doing what is good for the people. Now, it means those on top favoring their own kind and neglecting their own people. To cover up their negligence, they 'leapfrog' and virtue-signal about their concern for the Other. This doesn't cost them anything since they have no contact with the Other(except as serfs). The Other is a prop. It's like Jane Fonda and North Vietnamese. If she was really concerned about them, why didn't she devote her whole life to helping the victims of war in Vietnam? Of course, it was really about her, garnering attention as a woman of 'conscience' before the camera. And when she tired of the whole thing, she later turned to making aerobic exercise videos.

    After all, it was a great challenge for Moses to lead the Hebrews, his own people. But it would have been easy for him to virtue-signal about how much he cares about some other tribe and admonish Hebrews for lacking the same 'compassion'. It's no wonder leaders prefer foreign policy over domestic policy. They cannot run from people at home. If they fail, they must do something else that works because the people are always there. But in foreign policy, the leader can just make a lot of noise about 'human rights'. And if he messes up with intervention, he can just abandon the crisis and forget about it, like Reagan could just walk away from Lebanon.
    Current leadership in America doesn't seem to be concerned with Americans. Since it is a challenge to fix the problems of Americans, leaders just get 'new Americans'. It's like a kid who gets bored and tired with taking care of his current pet, so he gets newer and newer pets to love.. while his earlier pets get neglected and forgotten. IT's easier to go from task to task half-finished than finish a task and see it to its end.

    We no longer have leaders. We have leapers.

    Leader means to lead those who are behind.

    Today’s ‘leaders’ just wanna flood those below with tide of foreigners. All very useful in acting as Leapers who leap over everyone else.

    As for patriots, they are now lepers. Leapers and Lepers. That’s globalism.

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  109. J.Ross says: • Website

    Off-topic, apologies if you’ve seen this already, but I think you’re going to love this.
    Maktoob Hookah Bar in Flagstaff, Arizona, claims to have been vandalized by Neo-Nazis.
    Early this morning /pol/ identified several interesting items in the news story photos and other sources:
    There was no evidence of a break-in and no damage to furniture or fixtures; the owner speculates that the lock was picked, but
    We’ll never know, because there is no security camera footage.
    The Neo-Nazis drew swastikas “correctly,” but forgot which way they should be oriented in National Socialism, so they drew several swastikas *going both ways*.
    The Neo-Nazis did not knock over or steal any hookahs, but they did take care to obtain and *burn business documents*.
    The handwriting of the vandals is very odd: it’s not all caps or all block letters. It’s a mix of upper and lower case letters, with proper flourishes of serifs. In fact the vandals’ handwriting looks *exactly* like the distinctive handwriting on the signs and menus around Maktoob.
    Yelp reviews suggest that Maktoob was going out of business.
    Original thread is archived here:

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/140569814

    Current thread is here:

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/140652740

    I despise some Jew glomming attention, sympathy and insurance money by implicitly defaming his neighbors, but the fact of the matter is that as long as hate hoaxing is just somebody’s lonely aunt Hadassah getting wierd every so often, we — and the insurance companies — can afford it. With “invite the world,” we have the potential for every single nonwhite group that runs into some business difficulty all claiming Phantom Brownshorts, all at the same time. For purely financial reasons, normies must be woken up to the consistently obvious falsehood of hate hoaxes.

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  110. Lot says:
    @Opinionator
    It may not be completely avoidable, for instance a baby born in the USA to an American father and foreign mother who might have dual citizenship at birth.

    Couldn't this person be forced to choose once they reach 18 for example? Or citizenship simply denied at birth in cases where the baby is a citizen of another country?

    I don’t know of that would be legal. Renounce your citizenship of France, which has economic value, on pain of losing your American citizenship? I do not know if the Fifth Amendment would allow that. Not with the current Supreme Court for sure.

    Except in cases of fraud, for instance lying on a citizenship application, it is very hard to deprive someone of US citizenship.

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  111. @Anon
    People wanna enter best Ivy League schools because there's the sense of winner-takes-all, especially as A's are handed out so easily in colleges now.

    In the past, even if you entered Ivy League school, many got C's and only really good students got A's. So, there was a chance that an A student from a less prestigious college might be looked upon more favorably than a C student from Ivy League college.

    But with AffAct and 'progressive' educational theory, getting A's got easier.
    With so many A students from Ivy League schools, top companies go with them and overlook students from other colleges.

    So, everyone feels it's Ivy League or nothing.
    It's like in GLENGARRY GLENROSS.
    First prize is a Cadillac, second prize is a set of steak knives.

    https://youtu.be/elrnAl6ygeM?t=2m34s

    Maybe the solution to this problem is to pressure companies and government to hire more people from less prestigious universities, state universities, and etc.
    Especially since Ivy League recruits blacks and others on AA, there's a good chance that much better students are actually in less prestigious colleges.

    So, instead of focusing on making admission to Ivy League fairer, maybe the focus should be on making hiring more 'fair' by not favoring Ivy League graduates so much.

    Too many people in gov are harvardites, Yalies, princetonies.

    Let's have some college-diversity in hiring.

    I do already. From recent experience Ivy grads range from utterly mediocre to great and State flagship grads from poor to great. But the overlap is huge and as the number of really mediocre Ivy grads is large, effectively I see no difference at all when I hire. I went to an Ivy so this is nothing personal. I am sure others see what I see.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    I do already. From recent experience Ivy grads range from utterly mediocre to great and State flagship grads from poor to great. But the overlap is huge and as the number of really mediocre Ivy grads is large, effectively I see no difference at all when I hire. I went to an Ivy so this is nothing personal. I am sure others see what I see.
     
    The lack of merit-based scholarships cuts a doughnut hole in their classes. If you're a smart kid from a solidly middle class family that nevertheless can't afford to write $60K+ checks per annum chances are you'll wind up somewhere other than an Ivy.

    FWIW, I always assumed/believed that whatever the origins of the policy originally, during the period of grade inflation it became a feature rather than a bug in producing a high-low elite in incoming classes. Legacy admits, networkers, kids of foreign potentates and rich but smart white kids at the top paying full freight, and the AA and diversity admits and some of the athletes at the bottom getting near full tuition/fees/room/board. This is just my surmise though.
  112. @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    He’s just an internet blogger, whose main interest is race and Jewish conspiracies.

    Fischer did a good job when he was in Israel during the financial crisis. His role at the Fed is less clear, and there is not much they can do beyond raising and lowering interest rates.

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    • Replies: @International Jew
    Yeah, but he's a smart guy, so I expect better from him.
  113. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Tiny Duck
    Hallelujah!

    Goodbye racists! You will not be missed!

    The meds, Duckie! The meds! Thorazine works best in the morning I believe.

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  114. @jacobsson
    Steve I really hope you're working up a post on Genius Coates' latest,

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/10/the-first-white-president-ta-nehisi-coates/537909/?utm_source=atltw

    Please read it so we don't have to

    That’s some fine Tennessee’s Sipping Effluent.

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  115. @Cwhatfuture
    I do already. From recent experience Ivy grads range from utterly mediocre to great and State flagship grads from poor to great. But the overlap is huge and as the number of really mediocre Ivy grads is large, effectively I see no difference at all when I hire. I went to an Ivy so this is nothing personal. I am sure others see what I see.

    I do already. From recent experience Ivy grads range from utterly mediocre to great and State flagship grads from poor to great. But the overlap is huge and as the number of really mediocre Ivy grads is large, effectively I see no difference at all when I hire. I went to an Ivy so this is nothing personal. I am sure others see what I see.

    The lack of merit-based scholarships cuts a doughnut hole in their classes. If you’re a smart kid from a solidly middle class family that nevertheless can’t afford to write $60K+ checks per annum chances are you’ll wind up somewhere other than an Ivy.

    FWIW, I always assumed/believed that whatever the origins of the policy originally, during the period of grade inflation it became a feature rather than a bug in producing a high-low elite in incoming classes. Legacy admits, networkers, kids of foreign potentates and rich but smart white kids at the top paying full freight, and the AA and diversity admits and some of the athletes at the bottom getting near full tuition/fees/room/board. This is just my surmise though.

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  116. guest says:
    @the Supreme Gentleman
    It's too bad Steve wasn't around to advise George Washington---he could have told Washington not to employ untrustworthy foreigners like "Baron" von Steuben and the Marquis de Lafayette in senior positions in the American armed forces. I mean, the US would go on to fight a quasi-war with France only ~25 years later, what more do you want?

    Or how about that Wernher von Braun? He was not only a foreign national, he actually worked for a government that declared war on the US---surely it would be a mistake to trust him with a position of responsibility in a sensitive and complicated area relevant to his technical expertise? (In addition to, more broadly, all the German scientific/technical experts recruited to work for the US government by Operation Paperclip.)

    And what about all those non-American national Jewish physicists like Leo Szilard, Niels Bohr and Edward Teller who worked on the Manhattan Project? It's too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.

    Sure, Stanley Fisher lived in America and held US citizenship for 30-40 years, Israel is a relatively small country in the global economy in terms of its absolute GDP and it's difficult to specify any non-trivial way that US and Israeli interests would interact, let alone conflict, in the realm of monetary policy. But, come on, can we really trust Fisher to serve America's best interests with his technical expertise the way we trusted a life-long American patriot like Wernher von Braun?

    Your argument would be appropriate had the senior military and scientific positions in government or (non-governmental legal cartels like the Fed) been given to the people of the various national or ethnic groups you mention in perpetuity. But no, their status was based on their individual merit. Not to say Fischer’s merit isn’t sufficient, but it would be an awfully big coincidence if his co-ethnics were forevermore most qualified to run what is perhaps the nation’s most powerful institution. (So long as we don’t have a Caesar take over the military.)

    By the way, as I recall the Manhattan Project was run by a natural-born American. Jewish, true, and a pinko, but American. You think that might’ve been for a reason?

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    • Replies: @the Supreme Gentleman

    Not to say Fischer’s merit isn’t sufficient, but it would be an awfully big coincidence if his co-ethnics were forevermore most qualified to run what is perhaps the nation’s most powerful institution.
     
    It isn't a coincidence; Ashkenazic Jews have long been highly overrepresented in the economics field, in terms of e.g. Nobel laureates, Clark medalists and distinguished professorships. (For whatever mixture of cultural, genetic, historical and institutional factors one wants to point to.) So the high representation of Jews in Federal Reserve chairmanships isn't produced by anti-Gentile bias in the selection process, since the "pipeline" to get to that point has similar proportions.

    To make an analogy that I imagine many iSteve commenters will like, consider the "disproportionate" representation of men as computer programmers at companies like Google. Feminists argue that this must be the result of anti-female bias by those hateful cis white men at Google, because why wouldn't they favor their in-group over their out-group in the hiring process? (There are actually obvious reasons why they wouldn't, and other proofs that they don't, but let's table that for now.)

    But some basic research shows that this clearly isn't the case; AP computer science students, college CS majors, programming competition winners and CS Ph.D.s are similarly highly male-skewed. So obviously, whatever the causes of the disparity, it long predates the Google hiring process.


    By the way, as I recall the Manhattan Project was run by a natural-born American. Jewish, true, and a pinko, but American. You think that might’ve been for a reason?
     
    Sure, but both the Manhattan Project and the Apollo Program, two of America's greatest achievements, drew heavily on foreign as well as domestic talent. (I learned in Charles Murray's book on the latter that Canadians actually played a notable role in the space race.) So it's hardly without precedent, contra Steve's suggestion in the OP, for the US to take advantage of the technical expertise of foreigners in matters of national import.
  117. @International Jew
    Steve, do you have anything worth saying about Fischer's performance on the job? Or is the perfidious-Jew angle all you've got?

    Scratch the surface of any of the insane policies, ideas, movements, etc that has turned the USA into the FUSA and you will find a Jew prominently involved. Every single one.

    So why don’t you tell us Goy suckers how your tribe has been an overall blessing to the FUSA.

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  118. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Tucker is far more popular than his official ratings suggest.

    What is funny is that millennials and Gen-Z are not following Tucker on FNC, they are watching him on his official Fox and various fan channels on Youtube and assorted other video hosting sites like Vid-me. The DailyStormer hosts best of highlights of TC daily.

    So when the day comes that the SJWs and TWMNBN kick TC off of FNC and I believe it will be sometime this year before the Republican Cucks can announce for the mid-terms, TC will simply be poised to relaunch on the web.

    FNC losing TC will be equivalent to when CNN fired Lou Dobbs. Remember Dobbs was one of original dozen or so founding members of CNN. When Dobbs left CNN dozens of other employees who came up under him were out the door in the next year or so. CNN rapidly moved far far left.

    For a couple of year FNC really benefited from the shift of Lou Dobbs viewership over it. Those days are now long gone.

    So losing TC will mean the complete collapse of FNC into total CUCKDUMB!!! TC will take want ever un-cucked FNC staff with him over to the DailyCaller and the Web.

    Only aging Boomers and folks in assisted living like my 91 year old father will still be watching FNC but less so. My Dad will admit to only watching reruns of TC because TC is on past his bed time.

    My Dad will admit to only watching reruns of TC because TC is on past his bed time.

    Haha! Seriously, though, all these TV networks that broadcast infotainment 24/7 probably only have the loyalty of the old folks.

    Great comment in general, AA. I have never seen Tucker Carlson on TV at all. Everything I’ve seen, and embedded on my blog is from youtube. Now if youtube decides to censor this guy, I will find out where to watch him. However, I don’t know much about embedding videos from anywhere but youtube. They are a BIG repository of video data obviously; that’s the service they provide for whatever money they get (nothing from me so far), and I don’t think I could put too many videos on some other company’s server.

    Oh, one small spelling mistake – shouldn’t it be “CUCKDOM”, or is that one of those “I didn’t see what you did there” things?

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  119. Ivy says:

    Stanley Fischer’s impending departure calls to mind another departure episode. Recall Men In Black, when news of the Arquillian Cruiser motivated aliens to flee Manhattan to do a warp jump, (even ones with pregnant wives – “Congratulations, Reg, it’s a squid”).

    When other Fed execs have departed, I wondered what they knew that was not being said. Maybe Greenspan finally listened to colleagues and did the world a favor by leaving. Maybe Bernanke was afraid of what he had screwed up with Geithner and set in motion after 2007 and wanted a decent interval between the graceful exit and SHTF. Maybe Yellen was a patsy forced on the group as evidence to support another GoGrrrl Hillary run, and her time is winding down. With Fischer, at not quite the Fed Chair level but by accounts a stellar central banker, perhaps the personal reasons for exit include choice of abode. In any event, such transitions are like elections and coronations, with much speculation and occasional market moves.

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  120. @Anonymous

    Best bet, being serious now, is one of Trump’s real estate pals from NYC who understands the importance of low rates.


    Low rates are a disaster. The rotten banks are sucking on our economy like a giant tick. Real estate benefits but only certain sectors. The overall effect is impoverishment and more debt for 90% of the country.

    The bad banks were flushed in the mayhem of 1990-91 and that is what we desperately need today.

    What the country really needs is a Paul Volcker, but this is said in the same way that a doctor would tell the patient: You need to go set up on the chemotherapy treatments ASAP.

    It took only a few years to get out of the woods in the early 1980′s, but the country is nowhere near that strong now. Therefore, the FED will keep the rates low, just as the patient will keep taking the pain meds, and act like everything will be fine. No, it won’t. Prepping, bitchez!

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  121. 3g4me says:
    @Desiderius
    No, she was fine there either way - she's very proud of my brother's homosexuality. You'd just think that if you spend your life committed to something you'd care enough to pass it on to your kids.

    Whatever the opposite of fatalism is, the Boomers have it.

    @104 Desiderius: “You’d just think that if you spend your life committed to something you’d care enough to pass it on to your kids.”

    With all due respect, and I mean that quite legitimately, if she’s “quite proud” of your brother’s homosexuality, then genuine Christianity was never particularly important to her, and thus her disinterest in passing a belief system on to her children which she never followed herself. She may have gone through the motions of attending church and probably enjoyed the related social activities and virtue-signalling/moral posturing she could then bring to justify, to herself and others, her social and political opinions , but that’s not Christianity at all. At best it’s churchianity.

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  122. Olorin says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    OT: White Christians are now 43 percent of the U.S. population thanks to immigration and a growing number of ‘unaffiliated’ Americans – just four decades after they were 80 percent.
     
    OT Another sign of the times: A couple we know from San Francisco recently visited us. They said church weddings are becoming uncommon there and around that part of California. People are getting married "at the vineyards" and places like that.

    The way they smiled when they told us irked me. I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God. That feeling kind of sticks with you. Then we did it again at my wife's old church in Europe, just to make it really work, and that felt even more serious!

    I rarely go to church, but I got married in one. The preacher really made us feel like we were making a promise in front of God.

    I thought “God” was omnipresent?

    (Huh. I always thought that true believers didn’t truly believe that. Besides which they deported themselves as though they didn’t….)

    As for getting married in a church today, I should think that since “God” was driven out for social justice and more and more extreme faggotry and degeneracy and genocide, anywhere BUT church would be a better place to encounter the eternal divine and witness in its presence to a lifelong commitment to the love of one’s life.

    Particularly a church in SF if my experience there was any guide.

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  123. @Ben Kurtz
    Well, maybe Zambians are a bit rare, but if you read enough Steve Sailer you'd know that Democratic administrations tend to be packed with Barbadian dual-loyalty types!

    Ah, that Pesky Barbadian Lobby that runs banking, media, and sports & entertainment industry.

    bored identity applauds your moxie to discuss this issue in broad daylight.

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  124. Art says:

    Fed vice-chairman Stanley Fischer became an Israeli citizen in 2005 to become head of the state Bank of Israel upon appointment by prime minister Ariel Sharon upon the recommendation of Finance Minister Bibi Netanyahu.

    You can lead them to water, but cannot make them drink.

    By ever expanding debt, in the last thirty years, Greenspan, Bernanke, and Yellen have engineered the transfer of wealth from America’s middleclass to the top five percent. The figures do not lie.

    Who are these people and why do we refuse to acknowledge their deeds?

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  125. Art says:
    @the Supreme Gentleman
    It's too bad Steve wasn't around to advise George Washington---he could have told Washington not to employ untrustworthy foreigners like "Baron" von Steuben and the Marquis de Lafayette in senior positions in the American armed forces. I mean, the US would go on to fight a quasi-war with France only ~25 years later, what more do you want?

    Or how about that Wernher von Braun? He was not only a foreign national, he actually worked for a government that declared war on the US---surely it would be a mistake to trust him with a position of responsibility in a sensitive and complicated area relevant to his technical expertise? (In addition to, more broadly, all the German scientific/technical experts recruited to work for the US government by Operation Paperclip.)

    And what about all those non-American national Jewish physicists like Leo Szilard, Niels Bohr and Edward Teller who worked on the Manhattan Project? It's too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.

    Sure, Stanley Fisher lived in America and held US citizenship for 30-40 years, Israel is a relatively small country in the global economy in terms of its absolute GDP and it's difficult to specify any non-trivial way that US and Israeli interests would interact, let alone conflict, in the realm of monetary policy. But, come on, can we really trust Fisher to serve America's best interests with his technical expertise the way we trusted a life-long American patriot like Wernher von Braun?

    It’s too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.

    Hmm – think about it.

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity – PERIOD.

    Think Peace — Art

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    • Replies: @the Supreme Gentleman

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity – PERIOD.

    Think Peace — Art
     
    How do you figure? Atomic weapons have been used only twice in wartime in the 70 odd years since their conception (i.e. on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.) They certainly caused a great deal of death on those occasions, but that toll pales in comparison to the total number of people killed by bullets, conventional bombs, automobiles, spears, etc. throughout history. Had they not been deployed, there's at least a good chance that the US-Japanese conflict would have ended with as many or more people dying, through some combination of conventional bombing, a ground invasion, starvation deaths from a blockade, etc.

    This is obviously a very complicated issue, but there are some who would go even further and say that atomic weapons prevented a third world war, by finally making the cost of war between great powers so prohibitive that the US and USSR were incentivized to compete and resolve their differences in less extreme ways than previous great power competitors.

    So I don't see that it's obvious that the creation of the atomic bomb was "one of the worst things ever to happen to humanity---PERIOD". (This all seems rather orthogonal to the Jewish role in the Manhattan Project to me, incidentally.)
  126. bomag says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Sure, whether meant to be, by some FED edict, or let to naturally rise to the actual market price of money, that is the signal - it's more costly to borrow, so borrowing must be curtailed.

    The first part of my sentence was to explain that it takes a lot of money to pay off interest on $20,000,000,000,000, even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates. The money has been lent by people who own the treasury bonds/bills, is the gist of it. If interest rates are let to wander up to a more natural level, let's just say 5-6%, then the interest on the debt, instead of being under 10% of the national budget, could go up to 1/3 or at least 1/4. This would make it much more apparent to the lenders of this money that maybe there is really no way out of this hole.

    Keep in mind, that those lenders are the holders of the treasury bonds, and they are everyone - people in pension plans, people with investment funds, municipalities. It's not just a few faraway people in China and the Middle East for whom we wouldn't care if they don't get their money back. Almost all of us, though not usually aware of it, are counting on treasury bonds remaining solvent. These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it's not like you can honor only some of them; that's the same as 100 dollar bills there.

    The thing is, no matter what executive administration, the Feral Gov't seems to be accumulating from 1/2 to 1 trillion dollars in debt each year. Were the interest to be paid just on current debt a much bigger chunk of the budget, that leaves even less remaining for the rest of the red-inked budge. From there, well, again, it's psychology. Once a few quit believing they'll ever see their money, the rest will want to get out.

    Default followed by major financial pain or slowly, then quickly increasing vacation with concordant levels of financial pain are the 2 ways out. I am Dr. A.E. Newman, M.D., specialist in Financial Reconstruction - I've got some bad news, and I've got some really bad news. Which would you like to hear first? Well, actually, on 2nd thought, fill out those insurance forms, or I've got nothing to say to you.

    Opinionator - this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn't forget.

    …even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates

    Isn’t this roughly the rate of inflation? Isn’t that part of the “trick” here; if interest rates are at or below the rate of inflation, you can deficit spend with a clear conscience? Even negative interest rates(?!) under which you are compelled to spend?

    Isn’t inflation the “easy” way out of this deal? My favorite quote is from Alan Greenspan, when being quizzed about the future of massive sovereign debt, “we can guarantee a payment; we can’t guarantee buying power.”

    Future of everyone

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm not sure if this is what you mean, Bomag, but I used to be under the mistaken impression that interest rates SHOULD = the inflation rate. That is completely bogus, because interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time). If the inflation rate = interest rates, then people who invest in anything returning those rates are just breaking even, and the borrowers are basically getting the money early for free.

    I also don't think inflation is anywhere near as low as is broadcast by the BLS or whoever in the US government. I have eyes, and I buy stuff. Shadowstats is a site that has good info on this.

    Anyway, inflation at a low rate is not going to get us out of this, when you figure how much the $20,000,000,000,000 (and then to really scare oneself, about 10 times that much in future obligations - pension plans, SS, medicare, etc.) divided by the number of ACTUALLY PAYING taxpayer families. You'll get a coupla hundred thousand owed per family. That money will not be found anywhere. Imagine, just on a 20-year plan, enough to satisfy the bondholders and not counting the 10X in obligations. That's 10 large (OK, medium nowadays) per family additional money to be somehow earned and paid to the Feral government yearly. That's a lot to inflate away.

    Things would have to go up 10x before the burden would be reasonable - of course it means the bondholders, most of us, would lose most of the value saved in whatever "instruments" contain these bonds - pensions. There's no painless way out of this hole.

    One more thing, and sorry, this is not all in reply to you Bomag: There may become a time when people really lose faith in the value of the US dollar to represent value. That's when hyperinflation will happen. If history rhymes well, this time it may be Bernie Sanders types and the Antifa Commies against an offshoot of the alt-right that is ready to kick some well-deserved ass. Bring your popcorn, as they only show these Wiemar movies once a century. 2020's showing has the working title: "Wiemar 2.0: The Stupidity Strikes Back".
  127. @bomag

    ...even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates
     
    Isn't this roughly the rate of inflation? Isn't that part of the "trick" here; if interest rates are at or below the rate of inflation, you can deficit spend with a clear conscience? Even negative interest rates(?!) under which you are compelled to spend?

    Isn't inflation the "easy" way out of this deal? My favorite quote is from Alan Greenspan, when being quizzed about the future of massive sovereign debt, "we can guarantee a payment; we can't guarantee buying power."

    Future of everyone

    I’m not sure if this is what you mean, Bomag, but I used to be under the mistaken impression that interest rates SHOULD = the inflation rate. That is completely bogus, because interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time). If the inflation rate = interest rates, then people who invest in anything returning those rates are just breaking even, and the borrowers are basically getting the money early for free.

    I also don’t think inflation is anywhere near as low as is broadcast by the BLS or whoever in the US government. I have eyes, and I buy stuff. Shadowstats is a site that has good info on this.

    Anyway, inflation at a low rate is not going to get us out of this, when you figure how much the $20,000,000,000,000 (and then to really scare oneself, about 10 times that much in future obligations – pension plans, SS, medicare, etc.) divided by the number of ACTUALLY PAYING taxpayer families. You’ll get a coupla hundred thousand owed per family. That money will not be found anywhere. Imagine, just on a 20-year plan, enough to satisfy the bondholders and not counting the 10X in obligations. That’s 10 large (OK, medium nowadays) per family additional money to be somehow earned and paid to the Feral government yearly. That’s a lot to inflate away.

    Things would have to go up 10x before the burden would be reasonable – of course it means the bondholders, most of us, would lose most of the value saved in whatever “instruments” contain these bonds – pensions. There’s no painless way out of this hole.

    One more thing, and sorry, this is not all in reply to you Bomag: There may become a time when people really lose faith in the value of the US dollar to represent value. That’s when hyperinflation will happen. If history rhymes well, this time it may be Bernie Sanders types and the Antifa Commies against an offshoot of the alt-right that is ready to kick some well-deserved ass. Bring your popcorn, as they only show these Wiemar movies once a century. 2020′s showing has the working title: Wiemar 2.0: The Stupidity Strikes Back.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    ... interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time)
     
    Yes, but it also reflects the ability of money customers to pay it back. If your women are in burkas, and your men are vocationally maxed out running a leaf blower, then you have to cut your price to get any business.
  128. @Anonymous

    Read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a “hunting trip” on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.
     
    As a great many (most recently, I recall, it was the late Edgar Steele) have pointed out, the Federal Reserve Bank is not a bank, has no reserves, and is not federal. Much like the Holy Roman Empire, which was not an empire, was in no way Roman, and most very certainly was not holy.

    Thanks. I have heard that said of both these “organizations” before, but you’ve got the wording right.

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  129. @Charles Pewitt
    President Trump has been made aware of my recommendation of Peter Schiff for chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank to replace Janet Yellen. Steve Sailer reports that Stanley Fischer is leaving his position of vice chairman at the Fed as well. I hereby recommend that President Trump install David Hackett Fischer as a replacement for Stanley Fischer.

    I have yet to read David Hackett Fischer's "The Great Wave: Price Revolutions And The Rhythm Of History," but I am quite sure Mr. David Hackett Fischer can give the orders to continue electronically conjuring up dollars out of thin air.

    We do not have global capitalism anymore, we have Globalized Central Bank Shysterism.

    https://twitter.com/AlbionsSeed/status/881368772476588033

    My wife and I are both half German in our ancestry, mine being Pennsylvania Deutsch, and hers being of more recent immigrant stock. The fact of the ubiquity of German ancestry in the U.S. has been made awkward by the two world wars, and the U.S. siding with the British and French. But our people have made enormous contributions to the U.S.

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  130. @Art

    It’s too bad we let those traitorous international Jews play critical roles in developing atomic weapons for the US; it would have been better to deport all of them to the Jew controlled USSR, where they could have worked for their Jewish-Bolshevik co-ethnics instead.
     
    Hmm - think about it.

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity - PERIOD.

    Think Peace --- Art

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity – PERIOD.

    Think Peace — Art

    How do you figure? Atomic weapons have been used only twice in wartime in the 70 odd years since their conception (i.e. on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.) They certainly caused a great deal of death on those occasions, but that toll pales in comparison to the total number of people killed by bullets, conventional bombs, automobiles, spears, etc. throughout history. Had they not been deployed, there’s at least a good chance that the US-Japanese conflict would have ended with as many or more people dying, through some combination of conventional bombing, a ground invasion, starvation deaths from a blockade, etc.

    This is obviously a very complicated issue, but there are some who would go even further and say that atomic weapons prevented a third world war, by finally making the cost of war between great powers so prohibitive that the US and USSR were incentivized to compete and resolve their differences in less extreme ways than previous great power competitors.

    So I don’t see that it’s obvious that the creation of the atomic bomb was “one of the worst things ever to happen to humanity—PERIOD”. (This all seems rather orthogonal to the Jewish role in the Manhattan Project to me, incidentally.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art
    So I don’t see that it’s obvious that the creation of the atomic bomb was “one of the worst things ever to happen to humanity—PERIOD”. (This all seems rather orthogonal to the Jewish role in the Manhattan Project to me, incidentally.)

    Here are the facts.

    Einstein put the US on the path to building nuclear arms.

    Robert Oppenheim built the first atomic bombs.

    The Rosenbergs gave the secrets to the commie Russians.

    How can someone say that nukes are not a curse on humanity.

    We all would be better off if there were ZERO nukes on this planet --- PERIOD!

    Think Peace --- Art

  131. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous

    Read “The Creature from Jekyll Island” sometime. This beast was created by a bunch of big wigs on a “hunting trip” on this sea island of Georgia 104 years back. The bill to create this (non)Federal Reserve was passed on the day before Christmas of 1913.
     
    As a great many (most recently, I recall, it was the late Edgar Steele) have pointed out, the Federal Reserve Bank is not a bank, has no reserves, and is not federal. Much like the Holy Roman Empire, which was not an empire, was in no way Roman, and most very certainly was not holy.

    At its inception it was an empire; it involved into a bunch of independent principalities nominally ruled by the Hapsburgs, who eventually deveoped a real empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

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  132. @guest
    Your argument would be appropriate had the senior military and scientific positions in government or (non-governmental legal cartels like the Fed) been given to the people of the various national or ethnic groups you mention in perpetuity. But no, their status was based on their individual merit. Not to say Fischer's merit isn't sufficient, but it would be an awfully big coincidence if his co-ethnics were forevermore most qualified to run what is perhaps the nation's most powerful institution. (So long as we don't have a Caesar take over the military.)

    By the way, as I recall the Manhattan Project was run by a natural-born American. Jewish, true, and a pinko, but American. You think that might've been for a reason?

    Not to say Fischer’s merit isn’t sufficient, but it would be an awfully big coincidence if his co-ethnics were forevermore most qualified to run what is perhaps the nation’s most powerful institution.

    It isn’t a coincidence; Ashkenazic Jews have long been highly overrepresented in the economics field, in terms of e.g. Nobel laureates, Clark medalists and distinguished professorships. (For whatever mixture of cultural, genetic, historical and institutional factors one wants to point to.) So the high representation of Jews in Federal Reserve chairmanships isn’t produced by anti-Gentile bias in the selection process, since the “pipeline” to get to that point has similar proportions.

    To make an analogy that I imagine many iSteve commenters will like, consider the “disproportionate” representation of men as computer programmers at companies like Google. Feminists argue that this must be the result of anti-female bias by those hateful cis white men at Google, because why wouldn’t they favor their in-group over their out-group in the hiring process? (There are actually obvious reasons why they wouldn’t, and other proofs that they don’t, but let’s table that for now.)

    But some basic research shows that this clearly isn’t the case; AP computer science students, college CS majors, programming competition winners and CS Ph.D.s are similarly highly male-skewed. So obviously, whatever the causes of the disparity, it long predates the Google hiring process.

    By the way, as I recall the Manhattan Project was run by a natural-born American. Jewish, true, and a pinko, but American. You think that might’ve been for a reason?

    Sure, but both the Manhattan Project and the Apollo Program, two of America’s greatest achievements, drew heavily on foreign as well as domestic talent. (I learned in Charles Murray’s book on the latter that Canadians actually played a notable role in the space race.) So it’s hardly without precedent, contra Steve’s suggestion in the OP, for the US to take advantage of the technical expertise of foreigners in matters of national import.

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  133. @3g4me
    @104 Desiderius: "You’d just think that if you spend your life committed to something you’d care enough to pass it on to your kids."

    With all due respect, and I mean that quite legitimately, if she's "quite proud" of your brother's homosexuality, then genuine Christianity was never particularly important to her, and thus her disinterest in passing a belief system on to her children which she never followed herself. She may have gone through the motions of attending church and probably enjoyed the related social activities and virtue-signalling/moral posturing she could then bring to justify, to herself and others, her social and political opinions , but that's not Christianity at all. At best it's churchianity.

    Yes, that is what I am lamenting.

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  134. @anon
    No, Steve was concerned about Fischer's enduring loyalty to Zambia (nee Northern Rhodesia), his birth country. But Sharon and Netanyahu were cool with it, so it's all good.

    Lol, yeah you’d think Fischer’s background as a white Southern African would win him some admirers here, but the Jewish angle has swamped that.

    I wish I could reply to every know-nothing economics-ignorant bozo here who doesn’t realize that before, during and after he took the job in Israel, Fischer was regarded by his colleagues in the economics profession as an American economist, and a damn good one. Ironically, in Israel there were people who complained about hiring a foreigner to head their central bank.

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  135. @Dmitry134564
    He's just an internet blogger, whose main interest is race and Jewish conspiracies.

    Fischer did a good job when he was in Israel during the financial crisis. His role at the Fed is less clear, and there is not much they can do beyond raising and lowering interest rates.

    Yeah, but he’s a smart guy, so I expect better from him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry134564
    Witty, but not necessarily smart - at least to the extent of understanding anything about economics, or other academic or scientific fields.
  136. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yeah, it's not like money is the life blood of nations and a prime mover of history or anything. It's perfectly all right to let anybody from anywhere with any loyalties at all do important work for you, just as long as they're good at it.

    Maybe we should ask Vlad Putin to volunteer for the Fed. He's a good manager I hear. Or how about one of those great financial wizards from China. Yeah, that's the ticket. They're kicking our financial ass, so let's hire one to manage our funds! After all, they're good at it.

    Fisher might very well be an angel from heaven who loves America and apple pie and can square a circle in his sleep, but that's not the point.

    Besides, the Fed is loaded up with Fishers. It's time for a few Smiths and Joneses. Identity politics? You bet! We've been backed into it.

    The one and only Fisher whose hook, line and sinker bored identity could have swallowed was late Bobby.

    The chess genius denied he was a Jew, but the Lubavitcher Rebbe disagreed. Who was right?

    http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/books/121737/bobby-fischer-vs-the-rebbe

    How about this one, Tablet Magazine:

    Jewish Billionaire denied he was a Male, but biggoted bored identity disagreed. Who was right?

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  137. @International Jew
    Yeah, but he's a smart guy, so I expect better from him.

    Witty, but not necessarily smart – at least to the extent of understanding anything about economics, or other academic or scientific fields.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    What does Fischer "understand" about economics that we don't? Or that we couldn't understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don't mean that as a personal attack against him.

    , @International Jew
    I've taught economics to MBA students. Steve has an MBA, and it's clear to me that he learned a lot more than the average student I taught.
  138. Art says:
    @the Supreme Gentleman

    Making the BOMB was one of the worst things to ever happen to humanity – PERIOD.

    Think Peace — Art
     
    How do you figure? Atomic weapons have been used only twice in wartime in the 70 odd years since their conception (i.e. on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.) They certainly caused a great deal of death on those occasions, but that toll pales in comparison to the total number of people killed by bullets, conventional bombs, automobiles, spears, etc. throughout history. Had they not been deployed, there's at least a good chance that the US-Japanese conflict would have ended with as many or more people dying, through some combination of conventional bombing, a ground invasion, starvation deaths from a blockade, etc.

    This is obviously a very complicated issue, but there are some who would go even further and say that atomic weapons prevented a third world war, by finally making the cost of war between great powers so prohibitive that the US and USSR were incentivized to compete and resolve their differences in less extreme ways than previous great power competitors.

    So I don't see that it's obvious that the creation of the atomic bomb was "one of the worst things ever to happen to humanity---PERIOD". (This all seems rather orthogonal to the Jewish role in the Manhattan Project to me, incidentally.)

    So I don’t see that it’s obvious that the creation of the atomic bomb was “one of the worst things ever to happen to humanity—PERIOD”. (This all seems rather orthogonal to the Jewish role in the Manhattan Project to me, incidentally.)

    Here are the facts.

    Einstein put the US on the path to building nuclear arms.

    Robert Oppenheim built the first atomic bombs.

    The Rosenbergs gave the secrets to the commie Russians.

    How can someone say that nukes are not a curse on humanity.

    We all would be better off if there were ZERO nukes on this planet — PERIOD!

    Think Peace — Art

    Read More
  139. @Achmed E. Newman
    Sure, whether meant to be, by some FED edict, or let to naturally rise to the actual market price of money, that is the signal - it's more costly to borrow, so borrowing must be curtailed.

    The first part of my sentence was to explain that it takes a lot of money to pay off interest on $20,000,000,000,000, even at low 1.5-2% treasury bond rates. The money has been lent by people who own the treasury bonds/bills, is the gist of it. If interest rates are let to wander up to a more natural level, let's just say 5-6%, then the interest on the debt, instead of being under 10% of the national budget, could go up to 1/3 or at least 1/4. This would make it much more apparent to the lenders of this money that maybe there is really no way out of this hole.

    Keep in mind, that those lenders are the holders of the treasury bonds, and they are everyone - people in pension plans, people with investment funds, municipalities. It's not just a few faraway people in China and the Middle East for whom we wouldn't care if they don't get their money back. Almost all of us, though not usually aware of it, are counting on treasury bonds remaining solvent. These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it's not like you can honor only some of them; that's the same as 100 dollar bills there.

    The thing is, no matter what executive administration, the Feral Gov't seems to be accumulating from 1/2 to 1 trillion dollars in debt each year. Were the interest to be paid just on current debt a much bigger chunk of the budget, that leaves even less remaining for the rest of the red-inked budge. From there, well, again, it's psychology. Once a few quit believing they'll ever see their money, the rest will want to get out.

    Default followed by major financial pain or slowly, then quickly increasing vacation with concordant levels of financial pain are the 2 ways out. I am Dr. A.E. Newman, M.D., specialist in Financial Reconstruction - I've got some bad news, and I've got some really bad news. Which would you like to hear first? Well, actually, on 2nd thought, fill out those insurance forms, or I've got nothing to say to you.

    Opinionator - this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn't forget.

    These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them;

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

    Thank you. I look forward to reading it.

    (Did you intend to use the word “vacation” in your post?)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?
     
    That would be like coming out with an executive order, better yet a law, that "all hundred dollar bills with serial numbers starting with odd numbers will not be honored." See, first, honored by whom? With bonds, too, you could not say this, as the bonds have been traded/exchanged will-nilly, about like 100 dollar bills. Everyone would just lose (unless his luck is really bad, which is why I don't play dollar serial-number poker unless I keep a ringer in my pocket) on average 1/2 his money.

    Now, it'd really be banks that have the actual pieces of paper, if any at all, but either way, they don't really lose - you lose.* This would screw savers to the point that no one would trust holding US money any more, making the dollar go down to nothing. Any foreigners, pension funds, etc. unwillingly propping up the US government by having funds in US Treasury bonds would have lost their butts, and the investors would say "no mas!"

    * for 2 reasons: 1) it has been "established" that you haven't really "put" your money into the bank - you have "invested" in the bank. If they lose, you lose. As usual, Matt Parker and Trey Stone of South Park can explain this much better than I ever could:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGwZVGKG30s

    2) The big banks have the pull with our Feral Government to where they won't be the losers - all the taxpayers will.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    (Did you intend to use the word “vacation” in your post?)
     
    Ha! What a weird typo - I mean "inflation". You know what, maybe I do need an inflation, I mean vacation!
    , @FPD72
    The major impediment to defaulting on treasury issued bonds is the 14th Amendment, which prohibits the "questioning" of the validity of any Federal debt, which is understood by all jurists to prohibit a default.
  140. @Dmitry134564
    Witty, but not necessarily smart - at least to the extent of understanding anything about economics, or other academic or scientific fields.

    What does Fischer “understand” about economics that we don’t? Or that we couldn’t understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don’t mean that as a personal attack against him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew

    What does Fischer “understand” about economics that we don’t? Or that we couldn’t understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don’t mean that as a personal attack against him.
     
    And I'm sure Fischer wouldn't take it that way, if he read this blog. Because what you admit about your ignorance, in that first paragraph, is practically a personal attack on yourself!
  141. bomag says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    I'm not sure if this is what you mean, Bomag, but I used to be under the mistaken impression that interest rates SHOULD = the inflation rate. That is completely bogus, because interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time). If the inflation rate = interest rates, then people who invest in anything returning those rates are just breaking even, and the borrowers are basically getting the money early for free.

    I also don't think inflation is anywhere near as low as is broadcast by the BLS or whoever in the US government. I have eyes, and I buy stuff. Shadowstats is a site that has good info on this.

    Anyway, inflation at a low rate is not going to get us out of this, when you figure how much the $20,000,000,000,000 (and then to really scare oneself, about 10 times that much in future obligations - pension plans, SS, medicare, etc.) divided by the number of ACTUALLY PAYING taxpayer families. You'll get a coupla hundred thousand owed per family. That money will not be found anywhere. Imagine, just on a 20-year plan, enough to satisfy the bondholders and not counting the 10X in obligations. That's 10 large (OK, medium nowadays) per family additional money to be somehow earned and paid to the Feral government yearly. That's a lot to inflate away.

    Things would have to go up 10x before the burden would be reasonable - of course it means the bondholders, most of us, would lose most of the value saved in whatever "instruments" contain these bonds - pensions. There's no painless way out of this hole.

    One more thing, and sorry, this is not all in reply to you Bomag: There may become a time when people really lose faith in the value of the US dollar to represent value. That's when hyperinflation will happen. If history rhymes well, this time it may be Bernie Sanders types and the Antifa Commies against an offshoot of the alt-right that is ready to kick some well-deserved ass. Bring your popcorn, as they only show these Wiemar movies once a century. 2020's showing has the working title: "Wiemar 2.0: The Stupidity Strikes Back".

    … interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time)

    Yes, but it also reflects the ability of money customers to pay it back. If your women are in burkas, and your men are vocationally maxed out running a leaf blower, then you have to cut your price to get any business.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Supply and Demand law works with money as well as any other product or service. For what I think you mean, that our economy is crap and you are still trying to get the investment "business" (people buying Treasury bonds), then it's the opposite in terms of rates. If people don't like our economic prospects, and why the hell should they right now, the rates must be RAISED, not LOWERED. Interest rates must go UP to increase demand for bonds, when it is lower than the supply.

    That is different from buying of bonds, as each has an interest rate built into it, or guaranteed (hahaha... hoho, until it's not!), so a higher interest bond is worth more. When rates are raised on the new bonds being issued, the existing ones get cheaper on average, as the newer ones are more competitive. That's why you hear "higher-interest rates = lower bond prices" and vice-versa.
    It's confusing, but that doesn't concern me too much, because I don't want anything to do with any of it. I would like to understand it, though, and Zerohedge has really helped me in the long run to get the concepts of what crazy shit goes on in the finance world.
  142. Brutusale says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    https://twitter.com/vdare/status/905852991114285058

    Like Teresa Heinz Kerry, Fischer is African-American. How many boxes can he check?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    First African-American Vice Fed Chair? You don't see that trumpeted much anywhere.
  143. @Brutusale
    Like Teresa Heinz Kerry, Fischer is African-American. How many boxes can he check?

    First African-American Vice Fed Chair? You don’t see that trumpeted much anywhere.

    Read More
  144. @Opinionator
    What does Fischer "understand" about economics that we don't? Or that we couldn't understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don't mean that as a personal attack against him.

    What does Fischer “understand” about economics that we don’t? Or that we couldn’t understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don’t mean that as a personal attack against him.

    And I’m sure Fischer wouldn’t take it that way, if he read this blog. Because what you admit about your ignorance, in that first paragraph, is practically a personal attack on yourself!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Well try us then. What is something Fischer understands about economics--for purposes of chairing the Fed is what I intend to mean--that we couldn't understand with a five minute explanation? Or an hour long one?
  145. bjondo says:

    Shed a few tears for Stanley. Ship back to Israel.
    Pack Yellen to go along. Don’t forget Bernanke.

    Since the house is being cleaned,
    now would be the time to shutter the Fed.

    Read More
  146. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    In the mid 20th century Mexican nationals were explicitly barred from dual nationality. I guess Jews were the thin end of the wedge. Now I know of a Mexican Jew, an associate of Kissinger, who has Mexican, Israeli and American citizenship.

    Read More
  147. @Opinionator
    These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them;

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

    Thank you. I look forward to reading it.

    (Did you intend to use the word "vacation" in your post?)

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    That would be like coming out with an executive order, better yet a law, that “all hundred dollar bills with serial numbers starting with odd numbers will not be honored.” See, first, honored by whom? With bonds, too, you could not say this, as the bonds have been traded/exchanged will-nilly, about like 100 dollar bills. Everyone would just lose (unless his luck is really bad, which is why I don’t play dollar serial-number poker unless I keep a ringer in my pocket) on average 1/2 his money.

    Now, it’d really be banks that have the actual pieces of paper, if any at all, but either way, they don’t really lose – you lose.* This would screw savers to the point that no one would trust holding US money any more, making the dollar go down to nothing. Any foreigners, pension funds, etc. unwillingly propping up the US government by having funds in US Treasury bonds would have lost their butts, and the investors would say “no mas!”

    * for 2 reasons: 1) it has been “established” that you haven’t really “put” your money into the bank – you have “invested” in the bank. If they lose, you lose. As usual, Matt Parker and Trey Stone of South Park can explain this much better than I ever could:

    2) The big banks have the pull with our Feral Government to where they won’t be the losers – all the taxpayers will.

    Read More
  148. @Opinionator
    These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them;

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

    Thank you. I look forward to reading it.

    (Did you intend to use the word "vacation" in your post?)

    (Did you intend to use the word “vacation” in your post?)

    Ha! What a weird typo – I mean “inflation”. You know what, maybe I do need an inflation, I mean vacation!

    Read More
  149. @International Jew

    What does Fischer “understand” about economics that we don’t? Or that we couldn’t understand with the benefit of a five minute explanation?

    I don’t mean that as a personal attack against him.
     
    And I'm sure Fischer wouldn't take it that way, if he read this blog. Because what you admit about your ignorance, in that first paragraph, is practically a personal attack on yourself!

    Well try us then. What is something Fischer understands about economics–for purposes of chairing the Fed is what I intend to mean–that we couldn’t understand with a five minute explanation? Or an hour long one?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry134564
    You can read his textbook for free here:

    http://tabesh.edu.af/Books/economic/macro.pdf
    , @International Jew
    Ok, describe how the money supply, interest rates and exchange rates interact in an open economy.
  150. @bomag

    ... interest rates represent the time value of money (how much it is worth to people to be able to buy assets ahead in time)
     
    Yes, but it also reflects the ability of money customers to pay it back. If your women are in burkas, and your men are vocationally maxed out running a leaf blower, then you have to cut your price to get any business.

    Supply and Demand law works with money as well as any other product or service. For what I think you mean, that our economy is crap and you are still trying to get the investment “business” (people buying Treasury bonds), then it’s the opposite in terms of rates. If people don’t like our economic prospects, and why the hell should they right now, the rates must be RAISED, not LOWERED. Interest rates must go UP to increase demand for bonds, when it is lower than the supply.

    That is different from buying of bonds, as each has an interest rate built into it, or guaranteed (hahaha… hoho, until it’s not!), so a higher interest bond is worth more. When rates are raised on the new bonds being issued, the existing ones get cheaper on average, as the newer ones are more competitive. That’s why you hear “higher-interest rates = lower bond prices” and vice-versa.
    It’s confusing, but that doesn’t concern me too much, because I don’t want anything to do with any of it. I would like to understand it, though, and Zerohedge has really helped me in the long run to get the concepts of what crazy shit goes on in the finance world.

    Read More
  151. @Opinionator
    Well try us then. What is something Fischer understands about economics--for purposes of chairing the Fed is what I intend to mean--that we couldn't understand with a five minute explanation? Or an hour long one?

    You can read his textbook for free here:

    http://tabesh.edu.af/Books/economic/macro.pdf

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    If the Fed does X, then Y will do Z.

    Fill in a causal relationship that we wouldn't be able to understand.
    , @International Jew
    Fat chance he'll read it. He wants someone to teach him economics while he stands on one foot.
  152. @Dmitry134564
    You can read his textbook for free here:

    http://tabesh.edu.af/Books/economic/macro.pdf

    If the Fed does X, then Y will do Z.

    Fill in a causal relationship that we wouldn’t be able to understand.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry134564
    You have access to his textbook now - so if you are an interested person, you shouldn't want to hear any distortions of his views from me (I'm not Mr. Fisher). Fisher directly states his views on monetary policy in chapter 14.
  153. @Dmitry134564
    You can read his textbook for free here:

    http://tabesh.edu.af/Books/economic/macro.pdf

    Fat chance he’ll read it. He wants someone to teach him economics while he stands on one foot.

    Read More
  154. @Opinionator
    Well try us then. What is something Fischer understands about economics--for purposes of chairing the Fed is what I intend to mean--that we couldn't understand with a five minute explanation? Or an hour long one?

    Ok, describe how the money supply, interest rates and exchange rates interact in an open economy.

    Read More
  155. @Dmitry134564
    Witty, but not necessarily smart - at least to the extent of understanding anything about economics, or other academic or scientific fields.

    I’ve taught economics to MBA students. Steve has an MBA, and it’s clear to me that he learned a lot more than the average student I taught.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry134564
    MBAs are not degrees, they're decoration. He's a witty blogger, who is into Jewish conspiracies and so on (which makes him slightly more interesting than the average journalist) - I haven't seen any evidence of his understanding academic or scientific disciplines, pretensions and primitive attempts at doing statistics aside.
  156. FPD72 says:
    @Opinionator
    These bonds are fungible, as Mr. Yellen might put it, so it’s not like you can honor only some of them;

    Are you sure there is no feasible way to selectively default?

    Opinionator – this is my start of my answer to your question from a few days back. I didn’t forget.

    Thank you. I look forward to reading it.

    (Did you intend to use the word "vacation" in your post?)

    The major impediment to defaulting on treasury issued bonds is the 14th Amendment, which prohibits the “questioning” of the validity of any Federal debt, which is understood by all jurists to prohibit a default.

    Read More
  157. @International Jew
    I've taught economics to MBA students. Steve has an MBA, and it's clear to me that he learned a lot more than the average student I taught.

    MBAs are not degrees, they’re decoration. He’s a witty blogger, who is into Jewish conspiracies and so on (which makes him slightly more interesting than the average journalist) – I haven’t seen any evidence of his understanding academic or scientific disciplines, pretensions and primitive attempts at doing statistics aside.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Hey Dmitry, what kind of background do you have in mathematical statistics?
  158. @Opinionator
    If the Fed does X, then Y will do Z.

    Fill in a causal relationship that we wouldn't be able to understand.

    You have access to his textbook now – so if you are an interested person, you shouldn’t want to hear any distortions of his views from me (I’m not Mr. Fisher). Fisher directly states his views on monetary policy in chapter 14.

    Read More
  159. @Dmitry134564
    MBAs are not degrees, they're decoration. He's a witty blogger, who is into Jewish conspiracies and so on (which makes him slightly more interesting than the average journalist) - I haven't seen any evidence of his understanding academic or scientific disciplines, pretensions and primitive attempts at doing statistics aside.

    Hey Dmitry, what kind of background do you have in mathematical statistics?

    Read More
  160. @International Jew
    Hey Dmitry, what kind of background do you have in mathematical statistics?

    I did a couple courses on statistical mechanics.

    Read More
  161. bartok says:

    John Allison of CATO and BB&T Bank has been floated for next Fed Chairman.

    He would be the first Randian Fed Chairman since Alan Greenspan (Allison is orthodox Randian, as in Ayn Rand Institute). He would be the first Gentile Fed Chairman since Volcker.

    Read More
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