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Tiger parents from China … From Fox News:

In college admissions scandal, families from China reportedly paid the most
Published April 27, 2019 College Planning FOXBusiness

… One Chinese family allegedly paid $6.5 million to Singer, the consultant at the center of the scandal who flipped on the parents and helped the FBI to build the case, according to The Wall Street Journal, which cited a person familiar with the matter. That was the highest amount of money paid by a defendant to secure their child’s acceptance to a top college. The identify of the family is still unknown.

It’s been a huge amount of fun that American TV stars got caught paying to get their kids into colleges, but the bigger phenomenon is East Asian tiger money.

 
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  1. But the media doesn’t care about sneaky Chinamen,they like squashing wealthy goyim!

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @FLgeezer
    , @anony-mouse
  2. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Trump should pardon Lori L0ughlin before the election. The Hallmark Channel is (with a few exceptions) a bastion of implicit white culture, and he could use the votes of her fans.

  3. Well, at least some of that money we spend at Dollar General makes it back to America!

  4. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    Chinese pay idiotic sums for everything from tiger penis and rhino horn to Restrum Erectric audio equipment to….you name it. But where do they get all this money? It’s from stupid white countries that buy all their junk.

    We should be focused on making ourselves go back to making our own consumer goods. Yes, they’ll cost more. Cheap goods are a bug, not a feature.

    Side benefit is they will quit polluting so much.

    • Replies: @Altan Goldman
  5. Thomm says:

    Trump should pardon Lori L0ughlin before the election. The Hallmark Channel is (with a few exceptions) a bastion of implicit white culture, and he could use the votes of her fans.

    er… if paying $500K per kid to get into a Tier 2 school, proving that the slutty girl is so dumb that even with legit tutors and other tools she can’t even get into USC, is ‘white culture’, then we have much bigger problems.

    This is a combination of both systemic corruption and unusually dumb kids.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Endgame Napoleon
  6. Anonymous[667] • Disclaimer says:

    Just shows you the workings of the ‘free market’ and the value attached to brands and exclusivity.
    The main take-away is that Harvard, Yale etc maintain brand value by the simple process of exclusion and selection carried on to the nth degree.
    As Steve has said many a time, it’s just a pity that the nations of the west – who in reality are in the same game as Harvard – don’t seem to have the nous to realise that, ultimately, selectivity of entry will have the final say on ‘market value’.

    But, alas, we live in Economist dominated times.

    • Replies: @bucky
    , @eah
  7. anon[359] • Disclaimer says:

    One Chinese family allegedly paid $6.5 million to Singer, the consultant at the center of the scandal who flipped on the parents and helped the FBI to build the case

    the article doesn’t mention Mr. Singer’s ethnicity and also seeks to try to blame the parents instead of the huckster

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Clyde
  8. nebulafox says:

    In China, the gaokao exam is taken seriously. Like, very seriously. As in, the graders and the test answers are guarded by armed soldiers seriously. You can buy your way to most things in China, and there have been accusations of corruption aimed at the gaokao over the years, but nevertheless… much harder to buy your way to a good gaokao score than buy your way into a middle-tier American university. You can, of course, spend a fortune on tutors and cram schools to stack the odds, but your kid is going to be competing against everybody, including the best from socioeconomic strata that have no choice but to try their luck on the exam. Unless your kid has the mental firepower and work ethic to make that all that extra studying useful (which becomes pretty clear early on), there’s no point. If a poor but brilliant working-class boy from Gansu province, with the kind of mildly autistic photographic memory that makes the gaokao a natural fit, tops the exam and ends up at Tsinghua… he and his descendants have a new life. All it takes is cracking the test. There’s little other choice, though, as his family can’t afford UC Irvine’s fees for foreign students. The pressure is indescribably intense, and always has been. It is no accident that many famous rebels in imperial Chinese history, among them Hong Xiuquan, originator of the second bloodiest conflict in history next to WWII, were failed examination candidates who had nervous breakdowns.

    It’s an utterly ruthless system, but relatively fair, in the same way the old imperial exams were. If China were to adopt American style admissions to their colleges, it’d quickly devolved into being exclusively about guangxi and money. Promising but poor students would be left out. They would have the potential to cause trouble, as they all too often have in Chinese history. Being a Serious Country, unlike the USA, their government knows that.

    Much of China’s noveau riche and upper-middle classes know that that their mentally moderately above-average at best progeny stand no chance whatsoever at that particular game. So, they send them abroad. Those that can afford it usually choose the United States, and there are tons of universities in the US that’ll eagerly take them and their full tuition prices. Of course, because the overriding goal of the US government in recent times is to serve The Diversity Enhanced Market as opposed to national interests writ large, that this dynamic turns American equivalents to the poor but promising young kids in China into debt peons is seen as no great loss by our elites.

  9. Moses says:

    I know an American college admissions consultant here in Asia. She told me Asian parents expect her to write the essays, do everything to get their kid admitted to an American uni. They are flabbergasted she expects a fee just to “advise” their child.

    It’s just the way things work here.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Anon
  10. Anon[903] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    Good post.

    • Agree: Ic1000
  11. This doesn’t exactly fit the trope of the hard-working, high IQ Chinese.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anonymous Jew
  12. Still, it’s chump change compared to what the Clintons, Gore and the DNC received from the Chinese in the ’90s. Remember “No Controlling Legal Authority” ?

  13. George says:

    OK, but why are the Feds investigating Ivy league admissions? I wonder if it started off with the Feds investigating Chinese, but they found nothing, so they tried to come up with other charges to justify their time cards. FWIW, who the Ivies invite to their party is ‘freedom of association’ as per the first amendment, like it or not. The same first amendment that protects Julian … oh oh.

    Now State U might have to obey some sort of state constitution or legislature or something.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @anon
    , @Jack D
  14. In this country, STEM teachers make the same as elementary education teachers, basically social workers with limited knowledge of arithmetic. Too bad we can’t siphon off some of that Chinese moola and find a way to pay math-capable teachers to stay in the profession. 6.5 million USD equates to a $10,000/yr boost for 650 teachers. This would have an impact.

  15. @nebulafox

    Good information and analysis.

    Here in Hong Kong students have to do a high-stakes high school exit exam called the DSE that covers 7-8 subjects examined in a grueling series of sittings that takes over a month; Daughter C will just be finishing it this time next year.

    But it’s still not as scary as the gaokao.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  16. @The Alarmist

    Remember “No Controlling Legal Authority” ?

    Unfortunately, no one does. Or at least not enough people to influence an election.

  17. @nebulafox

    “It’s an utterly ruthless system, but relatively fair, in the same way the old imperial exams were. “

    This also used to be the case in the UK – some 18 year old kid from a working class family could take the Executive Officer exams, pass out high in the list and have a very different life to their siblings.

    The Government abolished it, I think in the 1980s or 1990s, and it’s very hard to find information as to why. I imagine the lack of diversity in successful candidates may have been a contributing factor, but the Conservative and Labour governments of those years took so many poor decisions it’s possible that wasn’t a reason.

  18. Anon[234] • Disclaimer says:

    Trump should pardon Lori L0ughlin before the election.

    This is a brilliant idea.

    Trump pardoned Joe Arpaio, and the Hammonds. He should make a high profile pardon a week, each time with an educational or public relations aim in mind. The idea would be partly to offset the judicial activism taking place.

    Andrew Johnson issued about 8,000 pardons, Clinton about 500, Obama about 2,000, including Chelsey Manning. Trump has only done about 10. He needs to accelerate the pardons, big league.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Hibernian
  19. Anon[234] • Disclaimer says:

    OK, but why are the Feds investigating Ivy league admissions?

    Personally, I wonder why this was even illegal. It seems more like contract or tort law, no concern of the feds. And conspiracy or RICO cases are always a fake way to send people away.

    Do you see admissions officers being arrested by the feds for affirmative action admissions? Now that it’s illegal to use race as a factor in California, but admissions officers obviously A-B test tricks to get blacks in, and make up “parallel construction” stories about it, shouldn’t they be going to jail?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @International Jew
  20. bucky says:
    @Anonymous

    Well, the *real* value of an ivy league degree is that it is an avenue towards controlling wealth. Kleiner Perkins mainly hires from certain schools because it is custom.

    Exclusivity isn’t of much value without an end result. Ellen Pao is almost a perfect example: gets vaulted up from these schools, installed as CEO over numerous worker bees.

  21. @nebulafox

    Very good post. For historical background try Ichisada Miyazaki’s 1963 book China’s Examination Hell, mini-review by me here.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  22. nebulafox says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    Or the CSAT in Korea. Japan’s exam system was no joke, either: the retaking examination candidates there are called “ronin”, a la masterless samurai.

    I felt so bad for the Korean and Japanese teenagers off the base I knew growing up, they never seemed to have any fun. Study, study, study, all day long. Of course, now I’m busy trying to learn some of the stuff I should have learned properly as a teenager (Xenophon and basic proofs, anybody?), yet didn’t in the American educational system…

    I think China’s main issue isn’t that they don’t have good universities: their top ones stack up just fine. But they still need to develop a “middle class” of universities, like you see in the US. That seems to be changing, though, because they are tellingly beginning to attract foreign students to these universities. Many of them seem to be from developing countries that are eager to cultivate as much as talent as possible, as China so successfully did. 40 years ago, you’d be punished in Indonesia if you were caught with a book from the PRC, and the local ethnic Chinese were forbidden to speak the language-with the result being that most of them these days can’t. But nowadays, you’ll find the brightest young Indonesians-bumis and ethnic Chinese alike-studying in China, where they can afford tuition and the science programs offer them learning opportunities they could only dream of back in Indonesia.

    I might be staying with one of them (computer engineering Msc) in Wuhan in June, I’ll see what she has to say about it.

  23. Nathan says:

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Randolph_Hall/publication/323542874_DOD_Research_at_USC/links/5a9b3255a6fdcc3cbacb58f8/DOD-Research-at-USC.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwi0n9WkkPXhAhUIJt8KHVDKCv44ChAWMAd6BAgDEAE&usg=AOvVaw0Qpq6KUoBm3qkWnXPhJ8at

    (Link goes to a PDF)

    In case nobody has thought to wonder what’s at USC that could be worth 1.2 or 6.5 mil to China. DoD conducts research at other schools as well.

    I highly doubt the whole thing is just crazy-rich Asians trying to tiger mother their kid’s way into the upper middle class.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  24. Realist says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Trump should pardon Lori L0ughlin before the election. The Hallmark Channel is (with a few exceptions) a bastion of implicit white culture, and he could use the votes of her fans.

    These asshole ingrates won’t vote for Trump.

  25. @The Alarmist

    Remember “No Controlling Legal Authority” ?

    No, actually.

    But then, I do find it Hard to Guess who paid Rick Singer $6.5 million, so I’m doubly out of the loop.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  26. Could children be saved a lot of pointless trouble if we just switched to a non-knowledge based IQ test for the purposes of university entrance (maybe a knowledge test only in the specific subject)?

    • Replies: @Jon
    , @Hibernian
  27. OT – NYT (picked up via the #ADOS tag – American Descendents Of Slavery i.e. the only people who’d be remotely eligible for reparations or affirmative action outside of Clown World. First time I’ve heard of ‘Akatas’ too – apparently the derogatory word Nigerian immigrants use to describe ADOS people i.e. black Americans.)

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/04/27/upshot/diversity-housing-maps-raleigh-gentrification.html

    “The Neighborhood Is Mostly Black. The Home Buyers Are Mostly White.”

    RALEIGH, N.C. — In the African-American neighborhoods near downtown Raleigh, the playfully painted doors signal what’s coming. Colored in crimson, in coral, in seafoam, the doors accent newly renovated craftsman cottages and boxy modern homes that have replaced vacant lots.

    To longtime residents, the doors mean higher home prices ahead, more investors knocking, more white neighbors.

    Here, and in the center of cities across the United States, a kind of demographic change most often associated with gentrifying parts of New York and Washington has been accelerating. White residents are increasingly moving into nonwhite neighborhoods, largely African-American ones.

    In America, racial diversity has much more often come to white neighborhoods. Between 1980 and 2000, more than 98 percent of census tracts that grew more diverse did so in that way, as Hispanic, Asian-American and African-American families settled in neighborhoods that were once predominantly white.

    But since 2000, according to an analysis of demographic and housing data, the arrival of white residents is now changing nonwhite communities in cities of all sizes, affecting about one in six predominantly African-American census tracts. The pattern, though still modest in scope, is playing out with remarkable consistency across the country — in ways that jolt the mortgage market, the architecture, the value of land itself.

    In city after city, a map of racial change shows predominantly minority neighborhoods near downtown growing whiter, while suburban neighborhoods that were once largely white are experiencing an increased share of black, Hispanic and Asian-American residents.

    As White Suburbs Grow More Diverse, Nonwhite City Centers Grow More White

  28. nebulafox says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Thanks. I particularly want to stress the bit that elite overproduction *really* did not end well for China. Short-term, Taiping Rebellion, long-term, one of many reasons why China underwent over a century-long period of civilizational rot and regression. They’ve only recently fully recovered from it.

    The USA looks like it is going to be facing a similar issue. I’ll hope that we handle it better, but hope dies last. It’s never the peasants who create the idea to make hell on earth, it is always the declassed, people who were expecting better and perceive they have no stake in the current order. Politics is the refuge of the failed burgher… and especially dangerous are the blocked demi-intelligentsia.

    This is sad for me to say, because I genuinely think society would be a better place if most people were smarter, more curious, and knew more stuff. I’m not against more education. But I am against mindless pseudo-education as a way to make the lives of HR goons easier, and you’ve got to have jobs for these people. Pump them out with degrees and expect them to become happy debt peons working in the service sector, never able to achieve bourgeois status, and things will get ugly.

  29. Paul says:

    The college scam is as wily as the Chinese Olympics team steroid scam and their faked birthdates for female gymnasts.

    • Replies: @sb
  30. bomag says:
    @nebulafox

    If a poor but brilliant working-class boy from Gansu province, with the kind of mildly autistic photographic memory that makes the gaokao a natural fit, tops the exam and ends up at Tsinghua… he and his descendants have a new life.

    I’m not sure how much one should encourage rule by the Zuckerbergs of the world.

    Does this test just open doors to the permanent bureaucracy, or does it also open doors to business and culture?

    I’ve been led to believe that, historically, China has not been a well run country relative to its capability. It’s roaring now, but in large part by copying and piggybacking the West.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  31. @Dave Pinsen

    Trump should pardon Lori L0ughlin before the election. The Hallmark Channel is (with a few exceptions) a bastion of implicit white culture, and he could use the votes of her fans.

    On the other hand, the indictments play into his narrative about a corrupt and incompetent ruling class rigging the game in their own favor and subverting the American meritocracy however mythical.

    A third way (and a more accurate placement of guilt) would be to refocus the narrative on how easily the gatekeepers of privilege were corrupted, how ridiculous it is to have a system of taxpayer-subsidized residential country clubs charging the cost of a Ferrari to middle class families for a chance to keep their kids in the middle class, and what he’s going to do to vastly increase transparency, accountability, and control costs of U.S. Colleges and Universities.

    I’m actually sympathetic to Aunt Becky, who didn’t attend college herself, and who seems to have only been doing what many parents would do if they had the means to do it. (We can cavil about actually disciplining her daughters to meet their academic potential and be credible candidates for admission).

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Jack D
  32. Paul says:

    The Chinese also use the birth tourism scam.

  33. Nonsense my good man. I have been assured, assured, that East Asians possess the most impeccable, the most irrefutable, THE most incontrovertible standards of morality and fairness the world has ever seen!

    I read it right here!

  34. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Moses

    Just end visa issuance. Problem solved. The idea that we are educating the children of a hostile military adversary’s elite is absurd on its face. Many, most, are of course directly supported by the ruling dictatorship, Chinese Communist Party. Numerous are outright covert intelligent operators that go onto criminal espionage once present in the United States.

    # mass immigration

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    , @Anon
  35. @YetAnotherAnon

    It’s almost as if the high crime rate of blacks allowed them to colonize real estate that was excellent (except for the high crime rate).

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk
  36. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @bomag

    The Japan model. They cant manage things like Nippon however. Likely targeting a korean level of development for perhaps 300 million people.

    • Replies: @bomag
  37. nebulafox says:

    OT: SailerBait.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/27/opinion/sunday/socialism.html?smtyp=cur&smid=tw-nytopinion

    “To be trapped in the boarding area of a smallish airport in the upper Midwest is, as often as not, to be subjected to that bestial din of fricatives, gutturals, plosives and shrieks of hysterical alarm that constitutes political discussion on Fox News, pouring incessantly from those obnoxious pendulous ceiling televisions. And unless one fancies running the T.S.A.’s gantlet of gropers again, there’s no escape. The experience is especially nasty if one’s wait coincides with the prime-time shows hosted by those two almost indistinguishable fellows with the suety faces, bouffant coiffures and nerve-racking mezzo-castrato voices….

    And I am painfully aware that the male Fox commentariat nurtures its sickly obsession with Ms. Ocasio-Cortez partly because they resent her cleverness, charisma and moral vitality, but mostly because they suspect that in high school she was one of those girls they had no hope of getting a date with (though, really, she comes across as someone who could look past a face of even the purest suet if she thought she glimpsed a healthy soul behind it).

    Just then, however, I was emotionally unprepared for this particular assault on my intelligence. I cast a fond, forlorn glance back in the direction of those T.S.A. agents and their warm inviting paws.”

    Steve, how useless do you have to be in life to un-ironically write like this as an adult?

  38. But when white families move out, it’s because their children have come home crying too often (or similar) – when black families move out (outside of South Central LA, anyway), it’s because someone’s offered them (or perhaps the landlord) a good price for their property.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  39. @Anonymous

    Just end visa issuance. Problem solved. The idea that we are educating the children of a hostile military adversary’s elite is absurd on its face. Many, most, are of course directly supported by the ruling dictatorship, Chinese Communist Party. Numerous are outright covert intelligent operators that go onto criminal espionage once present in the United States.

    I think the plan is that the party princelings will be favorably disposed to the United States after they get a taste for Hamburgers, Chevys, Baseball and Apple Pie.

    I suppose one of the major miscalculations here is that our colleges and Universities take normal American kids and turn them against the United States, so one doubts that Chinese nationals exposed to the same intellectual sewage would fare better.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  40. @Steve Sailer

    It’s almost as if the high crime rate of blacks allowed them to colonize real estate that was excellent (except for the high crime rate).

    It’s funny how proximity to white people is either a right and a blight depending upon the circumstances.

  41. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:

    $6.5 million for which school? Something tells me it’s not to USC. The Chinese worship at the altar of Harvard. But how? And did the kid get in? We need more info.

    • Replies: @Nathan
  42. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    It’ll be interesting to see how this Lori Loughlin case end up. Both she and her husband pleaded not guilty. They said they only broke the rules, not the law.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Jack D
  43. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas

    It’s time to start taxing the returns of private colleges with endowment fund >$1B, except for the portions they spent directly on financial aid.

  44. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I agree. End all F1 visa for China students.

  45. Anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    The corollary is that the rich Chinese send their children in the place where corruption is more common, and bribes more affordable. This confirms everything has been said here on unz.com about American universities.

    OTOH, it’s not all about “corruption” as we understand it. According to another discussion on this board, this can get you into Harvard and Stanford. Harvard had to buy it’s Nobels from all over the place, but at least they will have Olympic records. Do ETH, EMBL/EMBO, or Tsinghua train Olympic runners? Which uni is going to be more selective, Stanford or any random European school with a defined admission exam?

    I would not even a it’s decaying standards. Standards were never there. American universities make money, and will anything it takes to make more money. The runners are brought in due to the outdated idea that people who run fast must have had good nutrition, and therefore more money. It’s likely that Chinese children of limited abilities, whose applications are padded by people like Singer with American-style gibberish, are brought in on purpose, in the hope they could be milked.

    American universities would be more focused on their main task, education, if their students would be tested more often in standardized exams, and their careers would actually depend on those tests. But the people who ran American universities keep their SAT and GRE scores secret for a reason.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  46. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    It’s time for a partition. I’m moving to the Midwest.

  47. sb says:
    @Paul

    Do you really think that China wins more Olympic medals via doping than the US ?

    • Replies: @Paul
  48. Mr. Anon says:
    @The Alarmist

    Still, it’s chump change compared to what the Clintons, Gore and the DNC received from the Chinese in the ’90s. Remember “No Controlling Legal Authority” ?

    No one remembered it in November of 1996.

  49. Alfa158 says:
    @nebulafox

    I suspect this is yet another fabrication by a NYT writer.

    I have never seen anything but CNN on a monitor in an airport. ( I was surprised to learn that one reason is because CNN pays to be carried on the monitors in order to boost their ratings and visibility. )

    Additionally the sound is usually off and you read the closed captions so you wouldn’t be hearing any fricatives.

    Upper Midwest people are GoodWhites who religiously follow the CNN line. They don’t like Fox any more than this vicious little asshat.

    This is just another example of pandering to the mentally and culturally inbred East Coast parochial villagers playing out his fantasies of how those deplorables live.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Jack D
  50. Nathan says:
    @Anon

    The family that paid 1.2 million wanted Yale. Don’t be so sure it isn’t USC. I suspect access to Department of Defense, DARPA, and other industrial research helps explain the amount of money involved.

  51. @Anon

    I was going to press “Agree” but I want to make it clear I agree with both of your paragraphs.

  52. @YetAnotherAnon

    In America, racial diversity has much more often come to white neighborhoods. Between 1980 and 2000, more than 98 percent of census tracts that grew more diverse did so in that way…
    But since 2000…

    Typical journalism: a hard number based on nationwide statistics, followed by an impression formed from a few anecdotes. I suspect the pattern of American “diversification” overall is at least as overwhelmingly white-to-nonwhite as it was in 1980-2000. The aggregate numbers of nonwhite population growth make anything else almost impossible.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  53. anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:

    How many families bribed through Singer? What percentage are white? Other races? Steve is often statistical but not when he wants to excessively blame other races to distract from whites behaving badly.

  54. Paul says:
    @sb

    Do you really have contrary evidence?

    • Replies: @sb
  55. @Anon

    Every single pixel in this comment is wrong. Make Trump Andrew Johnson Again. Yeah, no.

  56. @Dave Pinsen

    She betrayed those fans and what they stand for (in their own minds at least).

  57. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thomm

    er… if paying $500K per kid to get into a Tier 2 school, proving that the slutty girl is so dumb that even with legit tutors and other tools she can’t even get into USC, is ‘white culture’, then we have much bigger problems.

    we know you’re not white

    • Replies: @jbwilson24
  58. @nebulafox

    It is only about once a month that I read a comment which motivates me to click on the user and see what else they have said that I missed. Thank you nebulafox.

  59. Alden says:
    @George

    A Los Angeles financial executive Morris Tobin tipped off the FBI. He’s being investigated for securities fraud. He offered the information that he bribed Yale soccer coach Rudy Meredith to get his daughter into Yale.

    That started the entire thing The media doesn’t care about obscure financial criminals. But White actresses? They went with it mainly to trash all Whites with our evil White privilege

    Had Hoffman and Loughlin been black Hispanic Asian African or Jews, we’d never have heard of their bribes. As per usual the media trashed Whites and buried non Whites involved.

    • Replies: @George
  60. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @George

    FWIW, who the Ivies invite to their party is ‘freedom of association’ as per the first amendment, like it or not.

    i thought we didn’t have Freedom of Association in the U.S. any more

  61. Jack D says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Loughlin is no more deserving of pardon than Jussie Smollett is. Who-whomism is no way to run a railroad even if the other side does it. Once everyone is doing it, say goodbye to rule of law, say goodbye to what made America great and prosperous. Might as well move to China.

  62. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    No matter where you are you are going to have regression to the mean and rich kids are spoiled, so your average son of a Chinese entrepreneur is dumber and less hard working than his dad, same as everywhere else on earth.

  63. @Buzz Mohawk

    It also doesn’t contradict the data suggesting the median Chinese person has a slightly higher IQ than the median White person.

    You can be ruthless and cunning in addition to having a few extra (on average) IQ points. Just like another ethnic group…

    Hopefully this cuts down on blindly handing out testing accommodations in the future. Or better yet just get rid of accommodations altogether. Every test center should have at least two proctors. Maybe it’s time to start recording these tests.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  64. Jack D says:
    @George

    That train left the station a long time ago. The Fed. gov. has jurisdiction over schemes like this because they involve “mail fraud”. Actually this was a national conspiracy – Singer was bribing people all over the country – Yale, USC, etc. and drew his client base from all over inside and outside the US so it makes sense to have 1 Federal case instead of 10 or 12 state law cases.

  65. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @nebulafox

    And I am painfully aware that the male Fox commentariat nurtures its sickly obsession with Ms. Ocasio-Cortez partly because they resent her cleverness, charisma and moral vitality, but mostly because they suspect that in high school she was one of those girls they had no hope of getting a date with (though, really, she comes across as someone who could look past a face of even the purest suet if she thought she glimpsed a healthy soul behind it).

    thanks for the laugh, NYT

  66. Jack D says:
    @Nathan

    If I was the PLA and I had $6.5 million to spend on espionage, using it to bribe some rich guy’s kid into an American U wouldn’t be the best use of it (unless the kid was maybe the son of a PLA general). There are graduate labs (with plenty of Chinese students) that are a lot closer to classified work than what you could expect to get out of an undergrad. What is he going to do – expose the secrets of Sociology 101? You could write a comedy based upon the reports that such a “spy” would send home from Planet USA.

  67. Alden says:

    Most of the elderly boomers don’t realize the extreme, severe, and vicious discrimination faced by White applicants to college.

    T just assume that Hoffman’s and Loighlin’s daughters did not meet the qualifications for admission to USC shows total complete ignorance of the affirmative action admission process.

    Being a private school, USC is exempt from prop 209, the law ending racial preferences in college admissions. That law applies strictly to admission to California state universities and colleges, community colleges and California state county and city employment.

    Prop 209 was upheld by the Supreme Court. But it is totally ignored by every city, country and state agency, the public schools and California state university and colleges.

    Private s hooks like USC can and do, discriminate against White applicants as much as they like.

    I occasionally do a part time job at USC. Every time I go there, the number of Asians Indians Hispanics increases and there are fewer and fewer Whites.

    Prop 309 was never enforced. It was meant to fail as there was no enforcement measure built in. By 1996-98 virtually all anti discrimination state offices were staffed by a vicious anti White Cheka.

    Just because they resorted to bribes, do not ignorantly assume the daughters did not meet every USC requirement.

    All they had to do was check the black or mixed race box and write a poor poor pitiful me essay. Admission guaranteed!!!!!!!

    • Replies: @Alden
  68. Alden says:
    @Alden

    Prop 209, not 309, a law that’s never been enforced.

    • Replies: @res
  69. Jack D says:
    @Alec Leamas

    I’m actually sympathetic to Aunt Becky, who didn’t attend college herself, and who seems to have only been doing what many parents would do if they had the means to do it.

    Only if those parents are completely without a moral compass. On what planet is it ethical to bribe your kids into college by paying off sports coaches? I don’t care how much money you have – doing what Loughlin did is never right.

  70. @Jack D

    If I was the PLA and I had $6.5 million to spend on espionage, using it to bribe some rich guy’s kid into an American U wouldn’t be the best use of it (unless the kid was maybe the son of a PLA general).

    That’s more like corruption rather than espionage lol.

  71. Alden says:
    @Anon

    Does anyone know exactly what laws they broke? Other than some vague RICO conspiracy thing ?

    I’d love to see them be acquitted, or better yet a judge dismiss all charges.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  72. @nebulafox

    Yep. You described the situation in China fairly accurately. Of course I’m a dude who actually did well on the gaokao. I was also a STEM Olympiad dude who got bonus points due to my performance in my competitions even though I wasn’t good enough to compete at national or international level.

    You can, of course, spend a fortune on tutors and cram schools to stack the odds, but your kid is going to be competing against everybody, including the best from socioeconomic strata that have no choice but to try their luck on the exam.

    Yep. Many kids go to cram schools and learn under tutors in order to perform, not to cheat the system.

    It’s an utterly ruthless system, but relatively fair, in the same way the old imperial exams were. If China were to adopt American style admissions to their colleges, it’d quickly devolved into being exclusively about guangxi and money.

    The word is “guanxi”, not “guangxi” but yep your description is accurate.

    People can indeed sneak their kids into top universities through corruption but they generally can’t use the exam route. It is fairly hard to cheat in gaokaos.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
  73. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    Those grad students were once under grads. And they can get married and have an anchor baby as well. That’s the pattern with all the Chinese national women students. So 2 spies have permanent residency.

  74. @Reg Cæsar

    Dollar General is welfare for poor Americans.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Reg Cæsar
  75. @Anon

    The corollary is that the rich Chinese send their children in the place where corruption is more common, and bribes more affordable. This confirms everything has been said here on unz.com about American universities.

    Yep.

    However even these spoilt and academically below-average kids who mostly did not even take regular classes in Chinese high schools (many in fact study at very expensive “international schools” focused on SAT and AP instead of the gaokao) could still do better than most American students. Note that they did not really do better than white European (as in being from Europe) foreign students and Indian students. This implies that education standards in America have been lowered since the 1960s to completely absurd levels due to political correctness.

  76. @Jack D

    Oh I’d say if said rich guy were, say, John Brennan, China might be more than a little suspicious if he bribed his son’s way into certain Chinese institutions.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  77. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    So there are no laws against bribery? This is good to know.

    • Replies: @Anon
  78. @Jack D

    Only if those parents are completely without a moral compass. On what planet is it ethical to bribe your kids into college by paying off sports coaches? I don’t care how much money you have – doing what Loughlin did is never right.

    It may not be ethical but to many people it seems fair.

    We’re on a planet where 1/3 of the admits to elite Universities are reserved for legacies, and 1/3 are reserved for racial and ethnic minorities while the class sizes have not increased relative to the class sizes when the U.S. population was half what it is today.

    We’re on a planet where being the child of a President or Senator is a superior qualification to good grades or high SAT scores at elite Universities.

    We’re on a planet where some people pay $40,000.00 plus per year to “feeder” prep schools to grease their middling kids’ ways into a specific Ivy over better qualified kids is considered normal and ethical.

    We’re on a planet where donating several millions of dollars to an elite University (and deducting it from one’s tax liability) to leapfrog your princelings over truly qualified applicants in the admissions process is considered ethical.

    If all of the above and more is considered “ethical,” by which ethical standard do you draw a line at donating to a charity at the direction of an official at a college or University?

  79. anon[339] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I don’t care how much money you have – doing what Loughlin did is never right.

    its only minor though in the scheme of things

    seems like law enforcement should be making an example of the (((crook))) at the center of this instead

    if the roles were reversed and a bunch of jews were fleeced by a goyim running this scam it wouldn’t surprise me to see media like NYT claiming the jews were the victims – “parents just trying to do everything they can to help their beloved children”

    • Replies: @Jack D
  80. @Thomm

    Other than establishing that she wasn’t a hardcore high school scholar, the incident doesn’t prove anything about her kid. If I had a dollar for all of the poor & average students who did well in life—but not in school—I’d be rich.

    It does prove how desperate people are to get their kids into a few, mostly big, top 1 & 2 tiered colleges. If the mother has not committed other serious crimes, it should not be treated like a crime that really hurt someone. The kid that lost his slot at that university was not at the top of the list of academic contenders, no more than her daughter. That is why the mother could tweak the application a little, pushing her daughter ahead via fictional accomplishments.

    Why are people overlooking the smaller private & public accredited universities? Those colleges often have mostly professors teaching the classes, rather than graduate students in lecture halls with 300 other students. The kids who weren’t top-notch students often do better on smaller campuses, where they get individual attention from the faculty and staff. Smaller universities also often have fewer applicants and fewer distractions, like the big party cultures on the large campuses.

    • Agree: bomag
  81. Jack D says:
    @Alfa158

    How many times are heartlanders forced to listen to Leftist drivel? Why is there no sympathy in the other direction?

    I love that he fantasizes that Occasional Cortex is the kind of girl who would give an ugly but kind hearted man (such as himself?) a chance.

  82. @nebulafox

    Charles Blow is a charming throwback to the time when one took his surname from his occupation.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  83. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    1st of all, no one said that this kid was the child of a Chinese spook – chances are it’s just a rich family. You are assuming facts not in evidence.

    2nd there are hundreds of thousands of Chinese students in the US vs. a handful of US students in China.

    University education, like Boeing jets, are one of our few remaining products that Chinese are willing to pay hard currency for, at full prices. This is a good thing, not something that we should be discouraging. If we give the Chinese a hard time over this (cut back on student visas for example), they are just going to send their kids to other Engrish speaking countries so those countries will end up harvesting the currency (and lifelong connections) instead of US. Also, when the Chinese are exposed to American values (as degraded as they are nowadays), a little bit of it rubs off and in the long run this is going to make China more Western and democratic.

  84. Jack D says:

    Whoever paid $6.5M to Singer got ripped off, probably because he didn’t understand the American system and assumed that it was like China. A $6.5M donation openly given to the development office gets your kid thru the front door and into almost any university in America, including Harvard. You could even get your name on something in addition – an endowed chair or a portion of a building or landscaped area.

    Singer’s other client’s used him because they were too cheap or not rich enough to give mid seven figure donations – 1/2 a million is not going to do it at the development office, even at USC. It will interesting to find out how much of that $6.5 million Singer just pocketed.

  85. Jack D says:
    @Alec Leamas

    our colleges and Universities take normal American kids and turn them against the United States,

    I don’t think that really happens – you have text and meta-text – the lesson your professors want you to draw and the one that you ACTUALLY draw. A “normal” American kid is not going to take a class with a Chomsky acolyte and be transformed into a socialist overnight. In fact, the opposite is likely to happen – he is going to be left with a lifelong contempt for our academic classes. Almost everyone on unz.com has been exposed to academic leftism and it didn’t seem to “take” for most.

    Likewise, a Chinese princeling at an American university is going to hear a professor mouthing off against the professor’s own motherland and the lesson that he is going to draw is not that America is bad like the professor says but that academic freedom is a really bad idea. But Chinese know from birth not to accept political pronouncements by authority figures at face value – they are going to be more concerned about why this dog is biting the hand that feeds him and why he is being allowed to get away with it. Mostly as a lesson in what not to do back home.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @Anon
    , @bomag
  86. @Jack D

    I’m not assuming anything, I’m speculating as you are.

    The $6.5 mil may have been the red flag that spurred the investigation in the first place, then federal prosecutors did what federal prosecutors do and it spiralled from there.

  87. @Jack D

    Likewise, a Chinese princeling at an American university is going to hear a professor mouthing off against the professor’s own motherland and the lesson that he is going to draw is not that America is bad like the professor says but that academic freedom is a really bad idea.

    I don’t think Xi Jinping learned much in that respect from his American sojourn. In the era of titular monarchs, lese majeste was always a capital crime in China, the punishment for which was a gruesome death. Now that China has progressed from de jure to de facto monarchs, the penalty is, at worst, merely a stint in the gulag. But the overriding theme remains l’etat c’est moi, and anyone who presumes to criticize the sovereign is taking his life into his own hands.

  88. @Jack D

    Also, when the Chinese are exposed to American values (as degraded as they are nowadays), a little bit of it rubs off and in the long run this is going to make China more Western and democratic.

    They are also exposed to talent spotters from various intelligence agencies. One high ranking sub flag rank officer may have been recruited during a stint at Harvard. He defected just before (and may have inspired) the April Fool’s EP-3 incident in 2001.

  89. Lot says:
    @Desiderius

    Dollar stores are exploding and hurting Wal-Mart.

    To compete Wal-Mart has added small package $1 price point items, like 4 small rolls of TP for $1, hidden on the bottom shelf usually.

    DG has the cheapest painting supplies I know of, their $1 3 inch brush is very good and you can toss it after 1 use.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  90. Jack D says:
    @anon

    the article doesn’t mention Mr. Singer’s ethnicity

    What “ethnicity” is that and how would it be relevant to the discussion?

    Here is Singer’s bio:

    Singer was a student-athlete at Trinity University and Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio in the mid-1980s. After graduating from Trinity, he coached basketball at MacArthur High School in San Antonio.

    https://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/Man-at-the-center-of-college-admissions-scandal-13686943.php

    While Singer is sometimes a Jooish name, sometimes it ain’t. The above bio doesn’t exactly scream Jooish. If it turns out that Singer is say a Lutheran or German instead of Jooish, does that change anything? Should the press report the ethnicity of all evildoers as a rule or only when they are something other than white Christians?

  91. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    This is very typical in 3rd world countries, which the US is becoming more like. In places like India or Mexico they often sell brand name goods like laundry detergent and biscuits (cookies), even things like cologne, in small packages. You might not be able to afford a whole big box of Tide but you could afford a little packet or a 3 oz. packet of cookies so you can have a taste of “affordable luxury”.

    Of course on a per ounce basis such goods tend to cost more because of the cost of packaging (although not always – you have to shop carefully). At the other extreme, I see tons of Asian-Americans (both E. and S.) at my local Costco because they can afford to stock up and take advantage of bulk discounts to buy 30 rolls of paper towels at once.

  92. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    From Niles in Chicago. Home of first wave to make it out of Rodgers Park etc.

    Massive fro. It doesnt always matter, no, but in this case its important.

    Everything becomes just another racket. There is no idealism, scholarship in search of Universal truths, what University in its real form was.

    Anyone on this site should by now have read Mr. Unz on, ” The myth of American Meritocracy. ” Much of these institutions, at least at the undergrad level, are simply a scam based on crypsis, ethnic networking and coooption.

    https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/william-rick-singer-niles-west-college-admissions-bribery-scandal/

  93. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Almost everyone on unz.com

    makes up a cranky but politically not very significant minority of the real US.

    (Yes, I’m including myself, in case you had to ask.)

  94. Jack D says:
    @International Jew

    Sure for every newly yuppified neighborhood close to downtown, there are probably ten Fergusons – older suburbs or towns that have shifted from white to “diverse” simply because America is running out of white people.

    But this doesn’t mean that the former story is not real or newsworthy. As Steve has often mentioned, blacks ended up sitting on some of the best located real estate in the US after WWII, often situated right next to the downtown business area. In Europe the poor are exiled to distance suburbs (in French suburb is synonymous with ghetto) but we ceded a lot of prime real estate to blacks and they were able to hold onto it in part because of white’s fear of crime. Something has changed to overcome this fear – what is it? Despite the fact that blacks are still plenty violent, crime rates are lower than they once were. Maybe white’s growing familiarity with blacks mean that they don’t fear them as “strangers” as much as they used to?

    • Replies: @res
    , @Steve Sailer
    , @AndrewR
  95. Anon[120] • Disclaimer says:
    @Moses

    This is so outrageous. I am sure Kushner and the Trumps wrote his own essays. If anything was unfair, it’s my suspicion that Donald Sr. wrote all their essays. I have total respect for his very-very-large-a-brain.

  96. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:

    Not sure why the parents went through all that trouble, and paying $6.5m when you can easily buy a fake degree in China from any American university for $11.
    https://www.economist.com/china/2012/07/07/a-quick-study

    Everything is fake in China, from fake degrees to fake baby Formula, fake Colgate toothpaste, fake luxury purses, watches, fake iPhones, entire fake Apple Store, even fake luxury cars. A disgustingly corrupt and crooked culture full of fake people. Nothing is real about China or the Chinese. The last thing we need is more of these people in our country.

  97. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    That’s leftist morality for you. Zero shame, zero guilt, zero integrity. The left is morally bankrupt.

  98. @Jack D

    Of course on a per ounce basis such goods tend to cost more because of the cost of packaging

    Only until you slide deeper into 3rd world poverty, and at that point there’s no more packaging. You get to buy cigarettes one at a time.

  99. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Not buying it. The Chinese (and Indians) aren’t sending their kids here to get an education, they’re sending them here to get a green card, and American universities are aiding and abetting in this body shop scheme, just like the H1b racket.

  100. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Let them go to other English speaking countries. I’m sick of their invasion of the US.

  101. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    A certain demographic is disproportionately represented in white collar crimes.

  102. @Jack D

    Unfortunately that is true. (And when there are 1.4 billion of you, there will be a lot of iterations.)

    [MORE]

    Painfully, I am not as successful as my father, so I think I am an example of the regression to the mean to which you refer. (I always tested high though, which fact reminds me that tests only tell us so much.) I was not spoiled (he refused to pay for college) but I have not done as well as he did.

    Last Friday, I almost took my car to the shop, because I couldn’t do something that was needed. On Saturday I finally figured it out and saved myself several hundred dollars. It was easy. My father did everything on all the cars and machines he owned. He enlisted me as his assistant, and I realize he was teaching me, not just using me for labor. I retained some things, but I can’t do near as many of them as he, a mechanical engineer, coached me through all those years ago.

    One of the last times I saw him, he put me to work fixing the valve on his 30-year-old kitchen faucet. (Why buy a new one?) It was an up-and-down, left-and-right, hot-and-cold thing with a lever, like a lot of us have. The valve was located under the counter somehow.

    Dad was about 83 years old, so he couldn’t get under there and do it himself. What he did was order me under, give me the tools and parts, and talk me through the entire process. Inside was a kind of ball joint with several parts I’d never seen before. He knew everything I would encounter. He had the whole thing in his head and described it as I went along. No manual.

    There was some yelling back and forth, as there often was between us, and when I finished and climbed out, he said to me, “Congratulations. You just passed Plumbing 101.” But the way he said it sounded like, “Any moron can do this.” Dad was a tough coach.

    (Just another story from memory, off-topic, so I put it after the MORE tag.)

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Lagertha
  103. res says:
    @Jack D

    Leaving aside what exactly Loughlin did, what is the law regarding the responsibility of a principal for the actions of an agent? Is the test soliciting a specific (illegal) action, knowledge of that action, or (probably) something more complicated?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  104. Nathan says:
    @Jack D

    “unless the kid was maybe the son of a PLA general”

    Yeah, or some other well connected party member’s kid looking for a sham assignment that would look good to the Party.

    If you have $6.5 million to spend, then spending it all on college is dumb, period. Spending it on espionage…. probably not efficient, but plausible.

  105. res says:
    @Jack D

    Maybe it is goodwhites misjudging the crime rates? And when someone does have a bad experience being afraid to talk much about it among themselves over concern about appearing to be badwhites?

    So we have something like:
    discussed reality < perceived reality < reality
    Any thoughts on the relative magnitude of those two less than signs?

  106. FLgeezer says:
    @Father O'Hara

    >But the media doesn’t care about sneaky Chinese

    I remember that in one of Ron Unz’ “America Pravda “ articles he alluded to the outrageously dis-
    proportionate representation of (((them))) in the Ivies. Yet the MSM devotes all its attention to a
    couple of Hollywood bimbos buying their kids a place there. Haahvaad medical and law schools are
    full of (((them))). Why no media exposure thereof? They don’t care about (((sneaky))) either.

  107. anon[653] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    What “ethnicity” is that and how would it be relevant to the discussion?

    it is relevant if your media is owned and controlled by a certain 2% and they try to shift the blame from the crook at the center of the crime to the parents. Its like blaming everything on the occasional drug user instead the drug dealer, who’s getting rich on the scam and without whom there would be no crime.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  108. @Jack D

    Obviously.

    1.4 Billion is a lot of iterations, too. Do we know if they all get figured into that nice average we read about? Do we know how many of them cheat like this?

  109. @nebulafox

    “how useless do you have to be in life to un-ironically write like this as an adult”

    Well a/c/t wiki he’s an absolute Renaissance man, just like our host – “a prolific essayist, he has written on topics as diverse as art, literature, religion, philosophy, film, baseball, and politics. He is also an author of fiction. Noted for his distinctive, humorous, pyrotechnic and often combative prose style, Hart has been described by one critic as “our greatest living essayist”.

    I wonder who wrote that wiki?

    I must say his snarky, uncharitable, misanthropic piece doesn’t sound much like the product of an Anglican-turned-Russian Orthodox. But a few great Catholic writers have been pretty snarky themselves.

    • Replies: @Anon
  110. anon[653] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Should the press report the ethnicity of all evildoers as a rule or only when they are something other than white Christians?

    the press should report the ethnicities of criminals or potential criminals when odd patterns emerge such as those accused in the “me too” movement. Roughly 100 were accused last i checked and over 75% were jews.

    Very odd for a 2% slice of the population, no?

    If they were Chinese instead of jews surely the (((MSM))) would make of note of it and maybe do some investigation into the morals and ethics of this particular group and how they don’t seem to reflect the values of most Americans

  111. @Jack D

    People don’t go to dollar stores for small packages of brand name goods, they go for packages of off-brand goods that are big enough to make it to the next paycheck.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  112. Jack D says:
    @res

    Principal/agent is a matter of contract law, not criminal law. In criminal law terms, the questions is whether you are part of a “conspiracy”. A conspiracy is an agreement between two or more persons to commit a crime. At least one member of the conspiracy has to commit an “overt act” in furtherance of the conspiracy – it can’t just be all talk. But here’s the kicker – every member of the conspiracy is responsible for the criminal acts of the others taken in furtherance of the conspiracy.

    • Replies: @res
  113. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    This is not true. There are in fact special “dollar store” sizes of name brand products like Cheezit crackers that are small enough to be sold for $1.

    Yes, maybe years ago you were more likely to see a larger box of off brand crackers (maybe imported from Turkey or Egypt or some questionable place) but the major manufacturers have caught on that there is a market for name brand goods in Dollar Stores.

    https://www.dollartree.com/bulk/Cheez-It

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Lot
    , @J.Ross
  114. anon[653] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    i go to Dollar Tree quite a bit and don’t notice too much name brand food stuff worth buying

    quite a few generics are decently priced though, including frozen vegetables, only problem is some of it comes from China and who knows what they’re using for pesticides

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  115. @Dave Pinsen

    It’s still not clear to me what federal laws, if any, were broken by the parents. The parents paid Rick Singer money, of which he kept some, and then bribed coaches to lie and thereby get the students admitted as athletes, which they were not. So the coaches were fired by the universities for not doing their jobs honestly — that seems appropriate. If Singer and the coaches didn’t pay income taxes on the money they received — that seems like tax evasion. But what did the parents do that’s so wrong? College tuitions are outrageously high to begin with, but why should paying extra to assure that your kid gets admitted be illegal?

    See here for an alternative point of view: https://www.lewrockwell.com/2019/04/lew-rockwell/free-lori-loughlin-and-the-other-political-prisoners/

  116. @Steve Sailer

    Except we’re not going full Yamara on the Bantu.

  117. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    The Big Lots in California carry random Eastern European packaged foods. The chocolate cherry cookies from Poland are pretty good.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  118. Jon says:
    @Crypto-Brythonic

    Law schools kind of do that. The LSAT is just reading comp, arguments, and games – no math, no direct testing of vocab, and no specific subject matter.

  119. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    Jews with their refusal to all have Jew only names!

    Antisemitism would be so much easier if they’d all wear yellow star patches on their clothing.

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @anon
  120. Jon says:
    @Jack D

    Should the press report the ethnicity of all evildoers as a rule or only when they are something other than white Christians?

    Haha, that’s pretty much the exact opposite of what the press actually does – you only know of the religion or race of the perp of he is Christian or white. You don’t hang around here much, do you?

  121. Re-Tweeted by Ann Coulter:

  122. Clyde says:
    @anon

    the article doesn’t mention Mr. Singer’s ethnicity and also seeks to try to blame the parents instead of the huckster

    Is Singer Jewish? Don’t be so sure. He might be halfsies or none. I have never seen the reveal on this.

  123. CMC says:

    Journalistic standards pet peeve type complaint:

    The identify of the family is still unknown.

    To you.

    Someone knows. Why not just say something like, ‘we here at Fox News have not yet been able to learn who….’?

  124. BRING BACK THE 1872 CHINESE LEGAL IMMIGRANT EXCLUSION ACT!!!!

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  125. anon[653] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    if they observed their own behaviour they wouldn’t have to worry so much about “anti-semitism”

  126. res says:
    @Alden

    Indeed. If you are interested in a closer look at some of the games played to get around the letter of Prop 209, see this 2005 UC Berkeley report (note it is an archive link because the original disappeared, funny how that works):
    https://web.archive.org/web/20160210192934/https://academic-senate.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/committees/aepe/hout_report_0.pdf
    Along with the discussion in this comment from two years ago:
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/did-the-pc-cause-pc/#comment-1886385

  127. anon[653] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Loughlin is no more deserving of pardon than Jussie Smollett is.

    odd that you would conflate the two

    one was spending her own money to try to get her child into college while the other was willing to slander an entire race to benefit financially

  128. @Jack D

    Hey, I don’t want Mr. Smollett behind bars.

    I just want to see the Osundairo brothers get a tiny bit of respect in the form of a civil judgment giving them monetary compensation for their reputations being besmirched by Mr. Smollett’s smug protestations of innocence.

    I could abide by pardon of Mr. Smollett — what a lot of us are concerned about is how the whole episode was Memory Holed.

  129. @anon

    …only problem is some of it comes from China and who knows what they’re using for pesticides

    Or food.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lagertha
  130. res says:
    @Jack D

    Thanks. So what happens if I pay someone to help get my child admitted to college but don’t have any knowledge of the (potentially illegal) means employed? I think a more common example of this is hiring private detectives to “get information” on someone. If the ostensible ends are legal (e.g. there is a legal way to achieve those ends) and I have no knowledge of the actual means employed what might happen if illegal means are used?

    In other words, is “I don’t even want to know” an effective defense?

    P.S. There are clearly innocent victim and criminal mastermind versions of this possible. Does intent matter?

    • Replies: @keuril
    , @Jack D
  131. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jack D

    There was, briefly, excellent take-and-bake French bread from Netherlands in a Michigan dollar store chain. Not sure how that happened, and evidently they couldn’t keep it going, but an authentic baguette for a buck was the best culinary deal for about a year.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anon
  132. keuril says:
    @res

    I think that’s why the Feds had Singer call up the parents under the pretext of informing them that his non-profit org was being audited. He basically told the parents that if they were contacted by the IRS, they should pretend that their “donations” were for a charitable cause and not the real reason, which was to bribe their kids’ way into school. The FBI affidavit presents a number of these exchanges. Mostly the parents are just replying “Yep,” “Uh-huh,” “Got it,” etc. In the affidavit, nobody contradicts Singer during these phone calls, but they are not outright saying, “Yeah, we sure did a good job bribing those officials!” Presumably those who did not take a plea bargain will argue that they didn’t really know what Singer was talking about.

    That is an extra wrinkle in this case—most of the payments discussed in the affidavit were routed through Singer’s charity, and perhaps some of the parents took a tax write-off.

    • Replies: @res
  133. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    OT:

    Interview: Fab 5 Freddy Told Us Everybody’s High On “Grass Is Greener”
    https://hiphopdx.com/news/id.51213/title.interview-fab-5-freddy-told-us-everybodys-high-on-grass-is-greener

    New York, NY – Pioneering Hip Hop visionary Fab 5 Freddy first exploded into the popular consciousness thanks to an opportune mention in the song, “Rapture,” the hit Blondie track that was a staple in the New York City new wave clubs back in the early 1980s.

    At that time, though, Freddy — born Fred Brathwaite in Brooklyn — was mostly known for his visual arts (better known as, of course, graffiti) than he was for being a patron of the Hip Hop arts.

    Nevertheless, it seemed he was trying to send a message way back when, via a punky blonde white girl named Debbie Harry, who informed the world that “Fab 5 Freddy told [her] everybody’s high.”

    “Did you know that records show that white people smoke marijuana at the same rate as Black and Latino folks?” he asked HipHopDX, rhetorically. “Yet, they’re incarcerated at a much lower rate. You ever wonder why that is?”

    One needn’t think very long to come up with the answer, of course — there is a world of difference between how a black man and a white man are made to answer for the same crimes, even to this day — but in case there are a few people left in the Year of Our Lord, 2019, who are completely unaware of racial disparities in America’s criminal justice system, Fab 5 Freddy is here to spell it out for you in black and white (or, more correctly, green) in the Netflix documentary, Grass is Greener.

    As the name implies, Grass is Greener explores the history of cannabis — weed — pot — the Devil’s Lettuce — marijuana — any name you want to call it — in popular culture. Originally gaining popularity on the American jazz scene in the early 1920s, Freddy shares that lawmakers sought to criminalize marijuana as a result, and ultimately succeeded in doing so thanks to their steady stream of anti-marijuana propaganda.

    “Jack Herer addressed this in his book, The Emperor Wears No Clothes: Hemp and the Marijuana Conspiracy,” he said. “Countless studies concluded that marijuana was not dangerous. At all. But all those studies got swept under the rug. Why? Because they didn’t want black people to make money.”

    Unaddressed is the issue of how many blacks arrested for weed were really arrested for violent behavior but more easily convicted of weed: or the fact that blacks are completely blatant in their public smoking of it.

  134. @anon

    If it wasn’t for users, there wouldn’t be dealers.

  135. @Lot

    Polish dark chocolate is pretty good, too.

  136. @Anonymous Jew

    It also doesn’t contradict the data suggesting the median Chinese person has a slightly higher IQ than the median White person.

    Of course.

    Hopefully this cuts down on blindly handing out testing accommodations in the future. Or better yet just get rid of accommodations altogether. Every test center should have at least two proctors. Maybe it’s time to start recording these tests.

    Agreed.

  137. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Are those dogs? If so it’s amazing they have identical coloring. Do they only eat one specific breed? I figured if you are going to eat dogs, it’d be random mutts, not a purebred dog.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Alden
  138. @Father O'Hara

    At Unz.com, the Chinese are Jewish.

  139. @Clyde

    Lots of Singers who aren’t Jewish:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Singer

    or 1970s pitcher Bill Singer.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    , @Lot
  140. Am i bad to assume the chinese kids i know with the perfect SATs cheated? They are robotic.

  141. @Steve Sailer

    And the singer for The Clash. Oh wait, he actually was.

  142. Hibernian says:
    @Anon

    Andrew Johnson is a poor example because he was in a unique situation, pardoning ex-Confederates to bind the wounds of the War. Clinton and Obama are not examples to follow either. I agree that 10 is a low number, however, remember that pardons tend to come at the end of a President’s last term, be it his first or second.

  143. nebulafox says:
    @EastKekistani

    Ah, sorry for the misspell. I don’t think I’ve seen you on here before. If you are new to Unz, welcome. Be careful, this place can get addictive.

    Yeah, the gaokao gets a lot of flak for screwing over artistic types, but it cuts both ways. I probably would have done better under the gaokao system than in the US, looking back on it. Not Beida or Tsinghua levels-I’m not that smart-but enough to study physics somewhere solid. Preparing for the test over the years is straightforward and blatantly obvious, and it would have been a sole, single thing I could hyper focus on as opposed to being some vague holistic “whole person” as in the US.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  144. Hibernian says:
    @Crypto-Brythonic

    They already do, it’s called the SAT. However, some applicants are done in by their HS grades. Also admission is much more competitive than it was back in the day.

  145. Lot says:
    @Anonymous

    Intensive dog meat consumption is mostly a China and Korea thing, and they mostly raise yellow spitz type dogs.

    From what I can tell, they on average eat about the same amount of dog meat, but in Korea it is declining and in China it is increasing.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  146. Jack D says:
    @anon

    As far as I can tell, Singer ain’t Jewish. He played basketball for a small Catholic college in San Antonio, TX and then stayed in town to coach HS Basketball. This resembles the career of zero Jews that I know of. At unz.com 5 out of ever 3 scammers are accused of being Jewish, often with no evidence.

    • Replies: @anon
    , @Steve Sailer
  147. bomag says:
    @nebulafox

    To be trapped in the boarding area of a smallish airport in the upper Midwest…

    Was he even there? Doubtful.

    I can also tell the difference between Venezuela and today’s Germany, or the Scandinavian states, or France, or Britain, or Australia, or Canada (and so on).

    LOL!

    I wonder if, under “enhanced interrogation”, he would reveal the difference?

  148. @nebulafox

    Ah, sorry for the misspell. I don’t think I’ve seen you on here before. If you are new to Unz, welcome. Be careful, this place can get addictive.

    I have been here for a while. Well I’m from another mostly soc rightist community. Let me introduce myself. I’m an ethnic Chinese born in mainland China, currently living in the States due to the fucking Xi regime, supporter of White Nationalism and Derbyshire’s Arctic Alliance, very wary of tropical peoples from Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, Oceania and Southeast Asia and don’t want any of them in Northeast Asia. I’m particularly against commies’ policy of inviting blacks to China, aiding them in Africa with the money Chinese taxpayers paid and forgiving them the debt owed to us and SE Asian settling of Japan, Taiwan and South Korea.

    Yeah, the gaokao gets a lot of flak for screwing over artistic types

    Yes but there are art exams in China too. I knew someone who took one.

    I probably would have done better under the gaokao system than in the US, looking back on it. Not Beida or Tsinghua levels-I’m not that smart-but enough to study physics somewhere solid. Preparing for the test over the years is straightforward and blatantly obvious, and it would have been a sole, single thing I could hyper focus on as opposed to being some vague holistic “whole person” as in the US.

    Well, different people are different.

    • Replies: @Lot
  149. @Lot

    From what I can tell, they on average eat about the same amount of dog meat, but in Korea it is declining and in China it is increasing.

    I think it is indeed declining in South Korea.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat_consumption_in_South_Korea

    According to some sources, consumption of dog meat is becoming less common in modern-day South Korea, especially among younger people, and the practice is declining. Estimates of the number of animals consumed vary widely. According to the Korean Animal Rights Advocates (KARA), approximately 780,000 to 1 million dogs are consumed per year in South Korea.[2] The declining number is based on estimates of sales from Moran Market, which dominates dog meat sales at 30–40% of the market in the entire nation.[3] Sales at Moran Market have been declining in the past few years and were down to about 20,000 dogs per year in 2017.[4] South Korea’s Statistical Information Service 2015 agriculture census reported a total of 24,671 facilities holding 521,201 dogs, though this figure includes both animals raised for the pet industry and those raised for meat consumption.[5] In 2018, the Taepyeong-dong complex, which served as a slaughterhouse for hundreds of thousands of dogs on a yearly basis, was closed by the South Korean government.[6][7] This move came five years after a vote by the city council of Seongnam, the city where the slaughterhouse was located.[6][7]

    In June 2018, a South Korean municipal court ruled that killing dogs for their meat was illegal, though this does not make it illegal to consume dog meat.

    Are you sure that it is actually increasing in China? Younger folks in China like cats and dogs. We have 狗粉s who vocally criticize people who eat dog meat.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @jim jones
  150. anon[434] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    At unz.com 5 out of ever 3 scammers are accused of being Jewish, often with no evidence.

    in the (((MSM))) 75 out of 100 gropers aren’t named as jewish even when there’s ample evidence

    cry your tears elsewhere

  151. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    German chain Lidl is opening up in the US – so far all stores east of the Appalachians from NJ to GA. Stores have an in store bakery that is insanely good and insanely cheap. Last time I was there, they had real butter croissants on sale for 30 cents each – not minis but full sized croissant. I think the regular price is 60 cents which is still very cheap. French bread is just flour and water but butter is expensive.

    Lidl sort of botched their opening in the US because the stores were too big and not well located and the inventory doesn’t seem well tuned for the US market but there are still some attractive aspects to the stores. Like Aldi, they have specials each week that focus on a different country and they actually bring in goods from that country – I was there a couple of weeks ago and it was Italy’s turn and they had big sacks of Carnaroli (risotto) rice for pennies a lb. and ditto high quality Italian espresso coffee beans. Usually Carnaroli is considered a specialty item in American grocery stores so they sell you a little microscopic bag of it in the gourmet section for like 6 bucks/lb. as if it were T-bone steak and not grain.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  152. Alden says:
    @Anonymous

    Like diary cattle, beef cattle, extra lean pigs for low fat pork, those dogs are farm animals bred for tasty meat.

    They are probably kept in cages and fed a diet that makes them grow fast and plump. They’re probably slaughtered as soon as they reach a certain size, like pork and steers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  153. Jack D says:
    @res

    There has to be an agreement to commit a crime. You don’t have to know or even be aware of all the details of the crimes committed by your co-conspirators once you join in the conspiracy – you are responsible for them anyway as long as they are in furtherance of the goals of the conspiracy. The only way out is to say that you never agreed that any crime would be committed – that you were under the mistaken belief that you were making a legitimate donation to a charity and that Singer had tricked you into believing that he had some legitimate way of getting kids in that did not involve crime at all. In “Wink, wink, nod, nod” type situations where you say things like “here’s half a million $ – make sure my kid gets in – I don’t want to know how you do this” , the jury can infer that you really understood that a crime was going to be involved. In most of these cases the parents were well aware that Singer was submitting false information on applications and getting the kids recruited for sports which they knew their kids did not play, etc.

  154. @Jack D

    Aldi’s does well here, but they’ve also* been sneaking more and more upscale stuff in there with the good values. We’ve been trying to shop local instead of the chains.

    * – haven’t been to a dollar store in awhile but I can assure you they’re still selling bulk goods for the people who need it to get by.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  155. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    Aldi has definitely gone upscale – stores have been remodeled to make them look “fancy”, prices have gone up, a lot fewer markdowns on their rotating specials, more high priced imported cheeses, etc. – going more for the Trader Joe’s market than the food stamp crowd. I liked it better when there were bargains to be had but I have to admit that the pre-renovation stores sometime were a little depressing. I’m not sure that the renovations have really changed their mix of shoppers all that much despite their efforts.

    The Lidl America stores are like Aldi’s on steroids – much bigger footprint, larger assortment of non-food items.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Reg Cæsar
  156. res says:
    @keuril

    Thanks. It will be interesting to see if anyone dodged that trap successfully.

  157. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    There was a Chinese restaurant in Grandview, MO that was serving cat with the full knowledge of the local health department. They looked the other way, didn’t want to bother with a bust. The owner had a relative that worked at the pound. I’m sure I ate it because I used to eat there in that time period and never got sick.

    How common selling cat as beef, chicken, or pork or whatever is in Chinese restaurants in America today is unknown. One Chinese told me that in his experience the Chinese places would kill and prepare cat for the restaurant staff or relatives but not the general public. Who knows?

  158. @Jack D

    a little depressing

    Not if you had a happy childhood in 70’s America.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  159. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    Chicken is 79 cents/lb. No one would bother with substituting cat for other meat – too much work for too little gain. These stories about Chinese serving cat to unsuspecting Westerners go back centuries and they are always false – it’s just fear of the stranger. Cat meat has an unfamiliar, downright strange taste and texture and you would definitely notice that something was wrong.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  160. @FLgeezer

    The media look the other way because they are the (((media))).

  161. @Jack D

    Once everyone is doing it, say goodbye to rule of law, say goodbye to what made America great and prosperous

    You have no appreciation of game theory. Unilateral disarmament is how we got here. Any stick you can use to beat the Left ought to be picked up and wielded mercilessly against them.

  162. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    Aldi stores were (and are) nothing like ’70s America – they were a thing unto themselves with palettes of goods on the floor, cashiers sitting down and throwing your unbagged goods into the previous customer’s shopping cart, coin operated shopping carts, mostly store brand merchandise and other strange un-American practices. They do however resemble other Aldi’s all over the world, with the exception that in a lot of places they sell wine and even booze.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Desiderius
  163. @res

    In the state of Washington, the (D) dominated state legislature just passed a new law nullifying a ban on affirmative action passed by voters 20 years ago. Talk about a blatant, shameless power grab. That’s what the left does these days. Completely shameless.

    https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/washington-lawmakers-pass-initiative-1000-ending-a-2-decade-ban-on-affirmative-action/

  164. @Anonymous

    Nobody knows because food-related scandals are very common in China.

    However in China cats are almost never eaten outside Guangdong and Guangxi except for during famines or cat meat getting fraudulently sold as something else (which is evidence that most Chinese people do not consider cats food). You can travel to Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, Hangzhou, Tianjin etc. You won’t find cat meat in markets or restaurants unless there is fraud.

    It is true that dog eating IS a problem in China. On the other hand cat eating mostly isn’t except for in the provinces in the far south. People from everywhere else in China just tend to assume that it is a unique (and unpleasant) Cantonese phenomenon.

    Some people don’t even believe that cat meat exists.

    https://www.zhihu.com/question/318227328

    This dude is in Sichuan. He pretended to be a cat lover, killed a lot of cats and sold cat meat as rabbit meat. People are outraged.

    https://www.zhihu.com/question/53121736

    • Replies: @keuril
  165. @Redneck farmer

    Illicit drugs is a business where supply creates demand, not the other way around. Drug dealers use kids to give other kids drugs, at high school parties, dorm parties, and get them hooked, then start charging.

    • Replies: @anon
  166. @Anonymous

    Totally made up shit. No one eats cats even in China. It’s inedible.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
    , @Anon
  167. Ibound1 says:
    @Alden

    What law is it that allows a billionaire to give a tax deductible contribution of ten million dollars to a university – (meaning we the tax payers pay 4 million of that) so that his child can get be admitted but one may not pay the tennis coach directly to say one’s child is an ace tennis player he would like to recruit. The crime is competition! The schools want it all directly and no competition from the tennis coach. I mean does everyone enjoy allowing billionaires to take tax deductions for payments they make to universities as “charity” to get their child admitted? It’s an admission fee. Of course the tuition WE all pay is not tax deductible. Tough break losers.

    • Replies: @keuril
  168. eah says:
    @Anonymous

    The main take-away is that Harvard, Yale etc maintain brand value by the simple process of exclusion and selection carried on to the nth degree.

    African-Americans make up 13.9 percent of students admitted early, compared with 12.6 percent last year;…

    As you suggest, Harvard belongs to the elite of the elite — that said, do you really think the fraction of Harvard’s class of 2022 who are black would be (slightly) greater than the total black share of the US population (it does say “African-Americans”) without overt affirmative action for Blacks?

    Perhaps it’s just a matter of opinion if that is “selection carried on to the nth degree” or not — for me, it’s not — but schools like Harvard and Yale are among the ‘too elite to fail’ of elite schools — so it is also of course no surprise that such obvious discrimination in favor of less qualified and accomplished students does not affect their “brand value”.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  169. anon[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @You can't handle the truth

    agree

    not surprised if the same thing works with porn – maybe thats why there’s so much free porn out there

  170. Lot says:
    @EastKekistani

    EK: your recent megaposting has been noticed and appreciated, keep up the good work.

    “Are you sure that it is actually increasing in China? ”

    Not sure, but meat consumption in general there is rising 10% a year as they catch up to Western/S Korean levels. The anecdote about the dog meat festival attendence rising also suggests this.

    Nationalist anti-Western sentiment also would encourage dog eating. The Japanese force their school kids to eat whale meat partly to resist the nosy Westerners who tell them to stop whale hunting.

  171. SFG says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I’m sorry for your loss. Had kind of a similar dynamic with my dad, though in regards to women; he tried to convince me to be manly, but I blew him off because I was too lazy to exercise and, well, he was my dad.

    Reminds me of Hamlet 1:2:186-7: “He was a man. Take him for all in all. I shall not look upon his like again.”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Mr McKenna
  172. @Jack D

    The Singer sewing machine guy had a crazy life, but I see zero evidence he was Jewish.

    Because Jews are overrepresented in the media relative to their population size, there’s a common tendency to assume that anybody in the US with a Germanic-sounding name must be Jewish. But in reality there are lots of gentiles with Germanic names.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  173. @You can't handle the truth

    As I said before, there are Guangdong and Guangxi. I won’t be surprised if the percentage of overseas Chinese who eat cats is much higher than the percentage of mainland or Taiwanese Chinese who eat cats. In Taiwan cat meat is illegal and most Han Chinese there who tend to be Fujianese or Hakkas aren’t from these two cat-eating provinces. In mainland China which has 30+ provinces most people are obviously not from cat-eating ones. However Cantonese are overrepresented in the diaspora. This is why the cat-eating problem may look much worse than it actually is.

    My example of that Sichuanese fraudster is evidence that Sichuanese people don’t eat cat meat, cat lovers are common in Sichuan and that netizens in China don’t like such behavior. In fact a lot of outrageous shit a few Chinese people have done and get posted on /pol/ are on /pol/ precisely because most Chinese netizens get really outraged at this shit and hence talk about it. These aren’t normative. There are some shit that are indeed common though such as commie oppression, littering, jaywalking, etc. Other than commie oppression which really gets worse over time due to Xi (yes Jiang’s and to a less extant Hu’s years were sweet) the rest does improve over time.

    What’s really not improving is actually the West due to Negroids, mestizos, SE Asians, Australoids etc. I’m sorry but as a friend I do want you guys to know that. Your education system is crumbling to accommodate the Negroids to the point that spoilt below-average Chinese undergrads outperform the average American student. Your cities are crumbling due to tropical peoples while NE Asian ones are increasingly amazing. Your public transportation systems have been awful since you got rid of Jim Crow.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  174. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    “They do however resemble other Aldi’s all over the world, with the exception that in a lot of places they sell wine and even booze.”

    I’ve been to both midwest and european Aldi, though not in the past decade. In the former they were the lowest of the low downmarket grocery. In Europe they had the same no barcode system and coin return carts, but the mix was more middle class and more fresh produce.

    The 80 eurocent bottles of red “vin de table” they sold were pretty tasty.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  175. @Jack D

    Armed robbery is way down over the last 40 years. Lots of video cameras in stores now.

  176. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Marty Peretz married a Singer heiress, but she wasn’t Jewish. Her step-grandparents were Marie and Pierre Curie however.

  177. @Jack D

    Singer’s office is in Newport Beach, the most gentile business center of SoCal, and his clientele runs toward the William H. Macy types. And USC isn’t a college that Jews tend to obsess over.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  178. @Jack D

    Cat meat has an unfamiliar, downright strange taste and texture…

    But did you like it?

    • Replies: @Lot
  179. @Jack D

    I bet there are more than a few cases where Junior is a decent high school athlete and then dad surreptitiously writes a big check and so he’s now a benchwarmer on the Princeton team, but there’s a lot of plausible deniability. What I love about some of these cases is when the kid doesn’t even play a sport and suddenly he’s supposed to be USC’s backup placekicker.

  180. @Steve Sailer

    A lot of us who’ve been here since the 19th Century have had to change our names to something less Germanic along the way.

  181. Lot says:
    @EastKekistani

    “SE Asian settling of Japan, Taiwan and South Korea.“

    In SK this is mostly brides. SK also has TFR below 1.0 now.

    Better Korean/Viet mixes than no sex / no babies for all those SK men.

    A steady flow of pretty young Viet/Flip brides also shifts the gender balance back after all the prior sex selective abortions. A woman shortage leads to women taking too long to decide because she has so many options, and ultimately a more careerist, feminist, and low fertility society.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  182. @Lot

    Smart thriftiness is nearly the opposite of low. Downmarket midwest is dollar stores/WalMart. Aldi’s around here are solidly middle-class.

    • Replies: @Lot
  183. keuril says:
    @Ibound1

    Well, for starters if you give a donation to the school there can be no overt quid pro quo. Plenty of ppl will make big donations and their kid doesn’t get in, if the school is selective enough and their kid isn’t close enough to some cutoff. Even the 25th percentile at Harvard is around 95th percentile nationally, based on SAT/ACT. According to this story, 58% of Bigwigs Club members aren’t able to get their kids in to Harvard. https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherrim/2018/10/24/can-you-buy-your-way-into-harvard/#3be76ccf2206

  184. @SFG

    Thank you for reading my comment. I kinda wish I hadn’t posted it, though, because I’ve been telling too many stories like that here lately. That one seems particularly like a non-sequitur where I put it.

    One thing I will say, though, is that the father-son relationship in America was damaged severely by that Baby Boomer, countercultural era we all have been commenting about on another thread. We are paying a dear price for that, and it makes me mad. If you want to destroy a culture or a country, that’s one way to do it.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @anon
  185. @Anonymous

    How common selling cat as beef, chicken, or pork or whatever is in Chinese restaurants in America today is unknown. One Chinese told me that in his experience the Chinese places would kill and prepare cat for the restaurant staff or relatives but not the general public. Who knows?

    I believe exotic meats are premium meats in China. By premium, I mean they cost several times what regular meat (i.e. pork or beef) costs. I think you’re as likely to be served cat or dog meat in a Chinese restaurant as you are to encounter filet mignon at your local burger joint.

    The texture you get in thinly-sliced stir-fried meat at Chinese restaurants comes from a couple of sources. The first is baking soda (one ingredient of baking powder, a key ingredient in cakes and cookies) and the second is corn starch. The baking powder not only provides the texture – it also removes some of the gaminess of the meat. Sesame oil is applied sparingly to remove the rest of the gaminess, all as part of a marinating process completed perhaps 2 hours before the stir-fry. The ingredients are common enough, so the key difficulty here is slicing the meat thin, which is more time consuming than cutting it into cubes. The beauty of this method of preparation, though, is that both chuck steak and pork shoulder come out tender.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  186. @Jack D

    Or, as the Chinese proverb said, “From the earth to the earth in three generations.”

  187. @Steve Sailer

    Newport Beach isn’t very ‘gentile’ anymore, if you ask me.
    But never mind, physiognomy tells all…

  188. Lot says:
    @Desiderius

    I did a store search for locations where I am from and see they’ve gone more upscale in their locations and opened a lot more up generally, which matches what Jack said.

    In the 1990s though, it was definitely below Wal-Mart in its customer base and the hottest item was off-brand blue box mac and cheese, 6 boxes for a dollar.

    Now I am kind of tempted to go to the San Diego Aldi, which is in Chula Vista, a Mexican/SE Asian suburb.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Jack D
  189. @SFG

    Just tell your dad that you want the girl that you marry to have that certain….special….something….

  190. keuril says:
    @EastKekistani

    Dog meat and cat meat sound bad, till you start hearing about human trafficking—kidnaping or tricking young women into going to some remote village and being forced (via violence, drugs, etc) to be a farmers wife. I recently saw a movie about this, 盲山, banned in China. Then I read a Zhihu about a guy who described his own visit to one of these villages with captive women. I don’t know how common the problem is but it’s absolutely shocking. https://www.zhihu.com/question/24748863

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  191. @eah

    Is the freshman class at Harvard is really 13.9% black or is it that Harvard offers admissions to a big number of blacks, but doesn’t get that many because Stanford and Princeton and Yale are also desperate for blacks?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    , @res
  192. @Lot

    In SK this is mostly brides. SK also has TFR below 1.0 now.

    Yep. However migrant workers are arriving too. As NE Asia becomes increasingly depopulated SEAs will come simply because our govs (with the possible exception of commies in China) and the people will both prefer them to Africans.

    Better Korean/Viet mixes than no sex / no babies for all those SK men.

    A steady flow of pretty young Viet/Flip brides also shifts the gender balance back after all the prior sex selective abortions. A woman shortage leads to women taking too long to decide because she has so many options, and ultimately a more careerist, feminist, and low fertility society.

    Well, the half-Filipino Koreans aren’t actually functioning well in South Korea. For example they don’t do well in schools. That’s the problem. SEA genes aren’t intolerable. After all, almost all Chinese and Japanese are 20%-25% SEA. I’m a Wu-speaker. My region is essentially an NE Asian colony that was once populated by SEAs. When colonization happened so did mixed children. However harsh selections these years had already caused this to be OK. On the other hand fresh SEA influx can cause the good traits by thousands of years of evolution to be ruined.

    SEA people are not really like us. They are fairly weird.

    Vietnamese are about 50% NE Asian so they are a borderline case. However even in Vietnam the level of violence is already way above what we can tolerate. Moreover the northern agricultural Malthusian pattern (guys work and feed their wives) already does not hold there. In SEA including Vietnam both men and women are lazy by NE Asian standards. However men are even worse. Women tend to do a lot of work and feed their male family members. This causes the level of sexual infidelity to be high.

    As for Filipinos I actually have experience interacting with them both in the Philippines and in the States. They completely don’t share NE Asian cultural attitudes about work, knowledge or money. I once chatted with a Filipina. She was completely not impressed by my academic credentials probably because they really don’t give a shit about it. She isn’t wealthy. Yet she spent a lot of money..probably as much as she earned. No wonder they got completely pwned by the Chinese minority economically.

    Well these aren’t exactly the people who are likely to do well in ultra-competitive NE Asia. Moreover our societies are particularly ill-equipped to handle random violence which is what they tend to engage in. Maybe Indians and Arabs can handle them without issues but we can’t. This is why their arrival is a problem.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @anon
    , @Lot
  193. @Jack D

    Jack, seriously, what is your problem?

    In the 70s we were thrifty because we had to be. We shopped at, wait for it, Thriftway. It was a lot like Aldi. This is not controversial.

    Store brand merchandise un-American? Are you daft?

    https://www.kroger.com/b/ourbrands

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
    , @Jack D
  194. @Johann Ricke

    I believe exotic meats are premium meats in China. By premium, I mean they cost several times what regular meat (i.e. pork or beef) costs.

    Yes. However in the case of cat meat outside Guangdong and Guangxi that’s just…fraud. Not very different from other forms of fraud. It has to be as cheap as or even cheaper than regular meat because it is fake food.

  195. Lagertha says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Loughlin is a bimbo; an American Bimbo – she needs to be destroyed along with her ingrate daughters, bhwahaahaaaa. No, these Hollywood types who continuously vote for Democrats, deserve no sympathy from anyone – those women are the Cerseis of the current world. Let them suffer.

  196. @Buzz Mohawk

    The KGB shot their shot, but they lost. We’re recovering.

    I’m glad you posted it. The more tag was well-judged.

  197. Lagertha says:
    @Steve Sailer

    they’re all in a race to accept the same black students – this has been the deal for years. This way: they all can say” we accepted 14%……….but the yield is 3-4%. From now on, Uni’s need to cough up their yield. Their target yield is often just 1-3% because, duh, private elite Unis must accept more rich kids ( like 90%) regardless of their skin color.

  198. @Lot

    They showed up around here around 2005. Always been very clean/good service. For some reason the lower classes aren’t into it.

  199. @Mr McKenna

    He looks Vulcan to me.

    Hmm…. Leonard Nimoy was Jewish…

    Nah. He could just as well be a French-German-Neanderthal Man, ready to go skiing.

    • Replies: @Lot
  200. @nebulafox

    Practically every word of the first paragraph is wrong. Cheating on the gaokao is rampant. A good score varies based on the region you’re in. The test isn’t consistent across provinces. There is no one “gaokao”. It’s not a matter of pure meritocracy; points are added if you’re a minority or if you are a particular type of athlete. Note I’m not talking about US points system for admission; they literally add points to your score.

    People who score high on the test aren’t necessarily “brilliant”, because the test doesn’t reward intelligence but just a pure slog of memory.

    I wrote about it here, but a single Wikipedia page would reveal how wrong you are. Some relevant quotes:

    ” For example, the exam in Jiangsu is totally a different from others. ”

    “Moreover, independent proposition covers regional discrimination generated by a huge disparity of cut off scores between different provinces”

    “There are special concessions for members of ethnic minorities, foreign nationals, persons with family origin in Taiwan, and children of military casualties. Students can also receive bonus marks by achieving high results in academic Olympiads, other science and technology competitions, sporting competitions, as well as “political or moral” distinction. ” (although the government is promising to end points for competitions–of course, that was in the page 4 years ago as well.)

    And let’s just go back to the biggest howler in the post, about how tough it is to cheat on the gaokao.

    You know that story about the parents rioting, “there is no fairness if we cannot cheat”?

    Yeah, that was the gaokao

    The current Chinese system is all about guangxi and money. Poor promising students are left out all the time.

    The only thing you have right is that rich and upper middle class parents are sending their kids to American schools, but how long that will last is unknown, as word is getting out that jobs aren’t going to people with American diplomas that aren’t Harvard.

    But hey, a lot of people here at iSteve were really impressed with your wrongness, so that’s something!

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  201. @Mr McKenna

    Newport Beach isn’t very ‘gentile’ anymore, if you ask me.
    But never mind, physiognomy tells all…

    I don’t know; to me he looks a bit like John Updike:

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  202. Lagertha says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Mt father was always like this…but he was perhaps sweeter in his criticism, than maybe your daddy. I hate that I am a perfectionist, because I still must fully complete something to perfection as my dad would have expected me to. I let it go years ago.

  203. @James Speaks

    Math capable teachers are working at schools that need math capable teachers. And putting a math capable teacher into a high poverty inner city school would be a waste of money–and he or she would leave anyway.

    By the way, elementary school teachers have to deal with a lot of pee, shit, and vomit. Plus, parents. And that’s at middle class schools. I do think there should be a split between elementary and high school teacher pay, but only an idiot would think that elementary school teachers are social workers.

    And no, paying math teachers more would have next to no impact.

    • Disagree: James Speaks
  204. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Now we know why Updike always had an easy time of it getting published, not to mention all those glowing reviews in the New Yorker and NYRB!

    I wonder how many N.Y. rhinoplasties were the reverse of L.A. rhinoplasties?

  205. @anon

    no, Thomm is not white. He is an Indian street pooper.

    HOWEVER, this is one of the rare occasions where he makes a cogent point that appears to be true. The fact that whites are having to pay for access to mediocre schools is a very good barometer of how uncompetitive they are.

    Of course, it’s a small sample size, but given that there are far more white kids than Asians or Jews, their under-representation at elite colleges is not just a matter of affirmative action or Jewish/Chinese corruption. Sure, those factors exist, but whites are simply not competitive at all.

  206. @Desiderius

    Store brand merchandise un-American? Are you daft?

    I’m a store brand person myself, although I will buy brand names when they’re on sale at roughly the same price as private labels. But I’ve noticed that most people buy brand names. So I do have the sense that buying private labels is vaguely un-American, in the sense that it is atypical.

  207. anon[383] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    One thing I will say, though, is that the father-son relationship in America was damaged severely by that Baby Boomer, countercultural era we all have been commenting about on another thread. We are paying a dear price for that, and it makes me mad. If you want to destroy a culture or a country, that’s one way to do it.

    likely that was thanks to the media, Frankfurt School, etc

    they waged a war on American values

  208. res says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Is the freshman class at Harvard is really 13.9% black or is it that Harvard offers admissions to a big number of blacks, but doesn’t get that many because Stanford and Princeton and Yale are also desperate for blacks?

    That appears to be a much better question than I realized. For the class of 2022 they actually show 15.2% (!) admitted as “African Americans.” As well as a yield of 81% overall.
    https://college.harvard.edu/admissions/admissions-statistics

    I had more trouble than I expected finding the black proportion of each class. Most hits I got were for Crimson surveys which I don’t trust to be accurate. For Harvard University (includes graduate students) the 2012-2016 numbers are 5% (impressively stable given there are no quotas for blacks ; ).
    https://datausa.io/profile/university/harvard-university/

    This page indicates 6.7% of Harvard undergraduates are black: https://www.collegefactual.com/colleges/harvard-university/student-life/diversity/chart-ethnic-diversity.html

    I’m not sure how much to trust the non-Harvard supplied data, but it seems clear your question hits on something important.

    It would be interesting to see the numbers for Harvard’s yield for blacks only.

    The 2018 Boston Globe article https://www2.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/06/13/harvard-more-black-students-admitted-than-enrolled/kD1suLbBm6ZF7Fo8ej0dfK/story.html
    (if it’s paywalled for you check the Wayback Machine)
    Looks like a great look at all of this.

    Nearly one in six, or 15 percent, of students that Harvard University offered admission to this spring were African-American. But step onto Harvard’s campus, and the student body looks far less diverse.
    In fact, according to the most recent federal data available, just 8 percent of Harvard’s undergraduates are black and just over 9 percent of the incoming freshmen last year were black.
    So what happens between admissions and the first day of classes?

    Harvard is in competition with Stanford University, MIT, Duke University, or a historically black college, such as Howard University, he said.

    Harvard declined to comment for this story because of the ongoing lawsuit. But officials pointed out that the university is getting better at enrolling the black students it admits. So far, almost 76 percent of black students who were admitted in the spring have enrolled as freshmen, up from 75 percent last year. Harvard’s data includes students are black and those who are multi-racial.

    Hard to reconcile those black yield numbers with the admissions and undergraduate numbers unless there is some serious attrition . The yield numbers are only ~7% lower for blacks but somehow the 15% admissions rate turns into less than 10% of freshman?

    There are some good comments. For example:

    user_4429094
    6/13/18 – 1:15PM
    Harvard, along with other universities, has a long history of lumping together Black and bi-racial kids for statistical purposes. This is annoying and should stop. Interestingly, there are barely more Black students (523) than bi-racial students (460). While the information is separated out on the Common Data Set form, the numbers presented for this story are aggregated. Not cool.

    In my first hand experience, bi-racial students experience less bias in our society. Harvard particularly has always had a big population of bi-racial students, few of which are low-income.

    Real data from the comments (see page 3 of the PDF in particular):

    user_4429094
    6/13/18 – 3:37PM
    These categories are accurate, and colleges have solid apples to apples way of categorizing demographics through the Common Data Set:

    https://oir.harvard.edu/files/huoir/files/harvard_cds_2017-18.pdf

  209. @keuril

    Yep. This is real and horrible. It is a consequence of sex-selective abortion. There is human trafficking within China. There are also people trafficking women from Vietnam into China to be wives. Many North Korean women who fled from North Korea are also unfortunately trafficked and sold.

    This IS a real problem.

  210. @Johann Ricke

    These German retailers like Trader Joe’s and Aldi’s are pretty different from traditional American supermarkets, kind of like how Ikea is obviously Swedish.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Desiderius
  211. jim jones says:
    @EastKekistani

    Koreans nowadays find the idea of eating dogs to be repulsive:

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  212. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Around here dollar stores have 1) permanent cheap c–p from China and 2) occasionally something good resulting, one supposes, from some miscalculation in the general world of retail. You can often get some good products this way.

    They do also have “more expensive smaller portions of things”, of course.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  213. sb says:
    @Paul

    This subject is very based on impressions formed over the decades
    There wouldn’t be any US sprinter that I’m over 50% confident is clean
    (Just as there haven’t been virtually any US road cyclists who were clean .In a dirty sport the Americans were the dirtiest )
    In internal US sports doping is extremely common .Moreso I would think than anywhere else anywhere
    Need I add that the US populace is the most doped in the world
    But it’s just an impression.

    • Replies: @Anon
  214. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Johann Ricke

    Midwest normal-grocery chain Kroger’s store brand ice cream and sorbet is better than most brand name frozen confections. They also have excellent seafood. When I briefly lived in California I preferred a lot of Albertson’s stuff including their sugar cookies (properly done sugar cookies are wierdly rare, despite how simple and cheap they are). Generic food used to be for poor people (I remember it coming in a white box with two orange stripes and black bold block capital letters) but some time in the 2000s greater competition was allowed.

    • Replies: @anon
  215. @Steve Sailer

    We love Trader Joe’s. It’s our go-to grocery store every weekend, but we supplement it with other stores. (We’re also lucky enough to have a few small farms nearby, where we buy some meats, dairy, eggs and produce.)

    In Hungary / Romania / Transylvania, they have a small type of store they generically call an ABC (pronounced Ahh-Bay-Tsay in Hungarian). They are excellent at stocking everything a larger supermarket does in the United States, but in a much smaller space. You can find them within walking distance pretty much anywhere if you live in a city. There isn’t quite an equivalent in the US, not even in Manhattan, and I wish there were because they are much more complete and convenient than our American “convenience” stores and bodegas.

    Regarding store brands, my father (once again) was a manufacturer and explained to me how a store brand will often buy from a major brand and then just package the product under its own name. You are getting the same product, because a large manufacturer produces more than it sells under its own brand. His own father had owned a grocery store in San Francisco before becoming the regional sales guy in Northern California for S&W Fine Foods, a quality brand. Granddad’s slogan was “Always go first class. You won’t go as often, but you’ll enjoy it more.” But I wonder, could you get S&W’s stuff in a store label for less?

    Trader Joe’s products are obviously identical or of the same quality as name brands. They must have some amazing purchase contracts and are very good at this. They are not a discount store, but more of a “fun” brand. I laugh because it seems to me that a lot of hipsters and yoga pants women like my wife think it’s a fancy, boutique store somehow, with a health vibe. (My wife knows better though and spies prices like a hawk.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Jim Don Bob
  216. Occam says:

    The University of California Master Plan of 1960 succeeded brilliantly in providing “free college” for middle class students, funded by middle class tax payers. USC was private and expensive, but middle class families managed to afford it.

    No more. In California, the rich pay for the poor. Rich residents pay the most progressive income taxes of any state, and “out of state” UC students subsidize natives with much costlier tuition. In particular, both UC and USC heavily recruit rich students from China.

    Students from China, this year: UCLA 2,992; USC 5,628.

    Most all American colleges are desperate for funding, and they are competing for students from China who can pay full costs. Many colleges would go broke without them.

    The situation with the TV stars’ kids et al. is entertaining but consistent with current admission practices.

    • Replies: @peterike
  217. Anon[213] • Disclaimer says:
    @You can't handle the truth

    Totally made up shit. No one eats cats even in China. It’s inedible

    Lol. The chinese would eat the dicks of insects. A cat would be a banquet.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
    , @Anon
  218. @Jack D

    “when the Chinese are exposed to American values (as degraded as they are nowadays), a little bit of it rubs off and in the long run this is going to make China more Western and democratic”

    Eamon Fingleton thinks the reverse is more likely.

    http://www.fingleton.net/extract-from-in-the-jaws-of-the-dragon/

    The evidence is in: the Confucian values by which China is ruled are not only incompatible with those of the West, they prove strikingly more robust. Far from China changing, Westerners who do business in China are modifying their behavior–often quite troublingly–under Beijing’s influence. Picture a phalanx of chocolate soldiers marching into a blowtorch.

    The most common way Westerners compromise is simply by doing business “the Chinese way.” Writing from Shanghai in 2005, Peter S. Goodman of the Washington Post commented, “American business leaders often describe their China operations idealistically, suggesting that their presence here will compel Chinese competitors to adopt more ethical business practices. But in one key regard, the dynamic operates in reverse, with U.S. companies adopting Chinese-style tactics to secure sales, as they compete in a market in which Communist Party officials routinely control businesses, and purchasing agents consider kickbacks part of their salary.”

    In the words of Carolyn Bartholomew, chairman of the United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission, many American companies have “Faustian bargains” with Beijing. She cites Yahoo!, Google, and Microsoft, which have agreed to abide by China’s censorship rules in serving Chinese Internet users. Yahoo! voluntarily handed over evidence that led to one Chinese Internet user being sentenced to ten years in prison. Bartholomew commented, “Far from capitalism changing the Chinese government, it is the Chinese government changing capitalists. Rather than the birth of freedom with telecommunications and the Internet serving as the handmaiden of democracy, we have the Internet entrepreneurs selling rope to the hangmen.”

    The betting is that China will penetrate American society by stealth in a process best called reverse convergence. Building on the extensive if unobtrusive groundwork laid by earlier East Asian industrializers, China can be expected in the fullness of time to become a major factor in shaping outcomes in Washington. The effect of globalism has been to create a political vacuum in Washington, where an alert eye to the American national interest was once present.

    Top American Internet companies have already reneged on Western values in pursuit of lucrative business in their Chinese subsidiaries. How long before they prove similarly malleable in their domestic operations? Writing for the New York Times on a conference in Shanghai in 2005, Tina Rosenberg recounted how top American business leaders fawned on Chinese Communist Party officials. She added: “Let’s not pretend that foreign investment will make China a democracy. That argument was born out of desperation and self-interest. Because China is too lucrative a market to resist, American and European businessmen have ended up endorsing the party line through their silence–or worse. They are not molding China; China is molding them.”

    But the good news for the US is that there are a few test countries for them to examine – Australia, NZ and Canada. I don’t think it’s looking too good.

    https://www.npr.org/2018/10/02/627249909/australia-and-new-zealand-are-ground-zero-for-chinese-influence

    “When Hamilton, a professor at Charles Sturt University, first tried to publish his new book, Silent Invasion: China’s Influence in Australia, the fear of China’s Communist Party crept in, he says. Hamilton’s original publisher, Allen and Unwin, informed him last November that it was canceling the book’s publication because it feared legal action from what it called “Beijing’s agents of influence.”

    “I was shocked,” remembers Hamilton. “I felt betrayed. We knew this was a difficult subject. We knew that Beijing has some powerful friends in Australia. We knew that the Chinese government would be highly critical of the book and of me. Of course, it was great comfort to have a really good, solid publisher behind me, and all of a sudden I was left out there on the battlefield, looking over my shoulder, saying, ‘Where is my support?’ “”

    • Agree: HammerJack
  219. bomag says:
    @Anonymous

    In the economic realm, I’d say much of Japan’s success is from incorporating parts of Western market economy.

  220. bomag says:
    @Jack D

    A “normal” American kid is not going to take a class with a Chomsky acolyte and be transformed into a socialist overnight.

    I’d say you are underestimating the effect. It is the constant push leftward, with small shifts building up over time.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  221. @EastKekistani

    Well these aren’t exactly the people who are likely to do well in ultra-competitive NE Asia. Moreover our societies are particularly ill-equipped to handle random violence

    Maybe you could hold some compeititons in handling random violence.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  222. @bomag

    It’s shallow but wide.

  223. @EastKekistani

    What’s really not improving is actually the West due to Negroids, mestizos, SE Asians, Australoids etc.

    Thank you for your comments and your observations. I hope you continue to comment here.

    • Agree: Desiderius, JMcG
  224. @Steve Sailer

    Cincinnati is heavily German, so maybe our supermarkets were/are run more along German lines? One secret to Krogers’ success?

  225. @Johann Ricke

    buying private labels is vaguely un-American

    Diversity is our strength!

    Brand names are like bling. If you’ve really got it you don’t need to flaunt it. We’ve got plenty of skinflints too.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  226. Jack D says:
    @Mr McKenna

    You can do Jew sniffing just from photos? The Nazis could have used a man like you.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anon
  227. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    snarky

    Anglican

    uncharitable, misanthropic

    Russian Orthodox

    We RCs get to pick from all three.

  228. @Anon

    Nope. Do you have any evidence of that happening? TCM is bizarre like other trad medicines. However I’m really unaware of eating of insect dicks..

  229. @Desiderius

    LOL.

    Like holding a police competition in Detroit or Kinshasa.

    Yeah. Anyone from my region who has to deal with violent tropical people on a daily basis probably needs to get some special training.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  230. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    Worth visiting if you haven’t been to one. They have definitely moved on from 6 for $1 mac and cheese. Because of their European connections and buying power they have lots of high quality imported items at reasonable prices – imported candy, biscuits, cheese, pasta, etc.

    Their American made store brand stuff (most of the inventory) is comparable to other supermarket’s store brands (which is a mixed bag – some store brand stuff is just as good as name brand, some ain’t) but the prices tend to be significantly better.

  231. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    American supermarkets always sold their store brand alongside the name brand, whereas in an Aldi it’s almost ALL store brand stuff. You want Kellogg’s Corn Flakes and not the store brand? Forget it. It’s a different business model.

  232. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    It really depends on the industry. For things like dairy products, you are not going to set up a separate plant just for store brands. (BTW, every dairy product carries a plant code which you can look up – if you look up Trader Joe’s milk or cottage cheese, etc. it’s usually a major producer like Hood. For things like cookies and cereal, Kellogg or Nabisco don’t make store brands. There are other manufacturers who specialize in private label merchandise and try to reverse engineer the name brand products. Sometimes they get very close and sometimes they fall a little short. Trade Joes seeks out high quality producers, often overseas and for some items (e.g. olive oil) their quality is even better than mainstream name brands. Because of containerization (which can include frozen food) TJs can economically bring in unique items from their country of origin which are sometimes better than their American versions – Thai dumplings that are actually made in Thailand, pasta entrees from Italy, etc. You can’t get some of these things in regular American supermarkets at any price.

  233. Anon[192] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Works about as well as Burgher-sniffing.

    Not as satisfying as burger-sniffing, though.

  234. @jim jones

    Yeah. Young people like animals partly because people are richer and more lonely than ever. Same for China.

  235. @education realist

    Hello!

    Cheating on the gaokao is rampant.

    I took the Gaokao in late 2000s. Not aware of any cheaters.

    A good score varies based on the region you’re in. The test isn’t consistent across provinces.

    Yes. However is that related to cheating? Yep there are national gaokaos and provincial gaokaos.

    It’s not a matter of pure meritocracy; points are added if you’re a minority or if you are a particular type of athlete.

    Yes and in the past also Olympiads etc. I got some extra points from a provincial-level chemistry competition.

    People who score high on the test aren’t necessarily “brilliant”, because the test doesn’t reward intelligence but just a pure slog of memory.

    What? The gaokao isn’t about memorizing stuff other than a part of the Chinese language/Philology exam.

    Why not take a translated version of a math exam in order to see what’s there?

    https://medium.com/@yujia_jo/2016-jiangsu-gaokao-national-higher-education-entrance-exam-mathematics-2beefb93cec7

    And let’s just go back to the biggest howler in the post, about how tough it is to cheat on the gaokao.

    You know that story about the parents rioting, “there is no fairness if we cannot cheat”?

    Yeah, that was the gaokao

    It may be a regional thing. However ironically the fucking Leviathan is making all crimes including cheating in gaokaos harder than ever.

    The current Chinese system is all about guangxi and money. Poor promising students are left out all the time.

    Many students who were studying with me in a Top 10 university in China when we were undergrads aren’t wealthy. How do you think they got in at all? The gaokao, Olympiads, etc. It is harder for people from certain poorer provinces such as Henan but it is not impossible.

    Anyway after the commies are gone we the NE Asian race will just leave the West lol because a democratic China and a democratic North Korea will truly rock. Who wants to deal with Negroids and mestizos every day, live under virtual curfew in urban areas because of violent tropical people and not have awesome public transportation systems again because of violent tropical people? If we are stuck here forever we may eventually be entangled in a situation not very different from Japanese Brazilians.

    • Replies: @res
    , @Peter Lund
  236. Jack D says:
    @Desiderius

    Sometimes the store brand is identical (or at least equivalent) to the name brand item or on rare occasions even superior, sometimes it is clearly inferior. The trick is knowing which is which. Sometimes you get what you pay for and you have to pay extra for quality. Unfortunately, the only way is usually to buy the store brand item and try your luck.

    For example, store brand flour is usually inferior to the better name brands but store brand sugar is identical (as long as it is marked as “cane sugar” – just “sugar” usually means beet sugar which is a slightly inferior product).

    Supermarket A might have a contract with an excellent producer for its store brand ice cream and specify a high quality spec (the easiest way to cheapen ice cream is to whip more air into it since it is sold by volume), Supermarket B might contract with a low end producer and/or specify a low cost spec.

    It’s often hard to know until you get the product home though sometimes there are hints in the ingredient list or the nutrition facts but they can be very subtle – for example cheap flour might have 3g of protein in a “serving” and better flour might have 4g . And it’s a moving target – sometimes the store switches suppliers, sometimes the name brand itself is not what it used to be. Overall the game is rigged and the house usually wins.

    • Replies: @Anon87
  237. @Anonymous

    Who’s going to explain that to those members of Trump’s base who are the biggest media consumers, staunchest supporters of Israel, work at Dollar General (or similar) and with the first salary go and get a loan for the biggest Ford (or similar) truck?

  238. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    When it comes to food it’s very hit or miss. Last time I was in a dollar store they had good quality chocolate (Lindt) that was packaged for the most recently passed holiday (e.g. in heart shaped boxes for Valentine’s Day in March) but still well short of its expiration date – good stuff. And right next to it they had Mexican brand “chocolate” that was really cocoa flavored palm oil and was virtually inedible.

  239. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @EastKekistani

    for quite a while i was convinced you were just a white guy LARPing as an NE Asian but from this post you seem legit

  240. Anon[364] • Disclaimer says:
    @sb

    No way. The most drug-ridden country in the world, at least in the field of sports, is Russia. It must be true, because I heard it on TV.

    Which ties us nicely to the way American universities chose their students, based on their “athletic” achievements.

  241. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Generic food used to be for poor people (I remember it coming in a white box with two orange stripes and black bold block capital letters) but some time in the 2000s greater competition was allowed.

    i was under the impression that a lot of the generic stuff was made by the brand name companies, just under another label. Not sure if true or not

    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    , @Jack D
    , @J.Ross
  242. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @Johann Ricke

    But I’ve noticed that most people buy brand names. So I do have the sense that buying private labels is vaguely un-American, in the sense that it is atypical.

    brand names rely on the (((advertising industry)))

    avoiding them would actually be pro-American

    • Replies: @Jack D
  243. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    LOL, that’s a stark contrast with the Americans, who in 99% of cases, think a dog or a cat is inedible, merely because they wag their tails when you shake their food box. Chicken and probably even molluscs would react in similar, physiological ways, but the Americans haven’t seen the latter, and so they assume only cats and dogs have comprehension abilities and possibly an immortal soul.

    We make fun of antic idol worshipers, but you are worse worshiping cats.

  244. Anon[111] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    But he is not the only one who can smell a Jew from his trolling comments.

  245. res says:
    @EastKekistani

    It’s not a matter of pure meritocracy; points are added if you’re a minority or if you are a particular type of athlete.

    Yes and in the past also Olympiads etc. I got some extra points from a provincial-level chemistry competition.

    Can you give an idea of how many points are added (for different sorts of things) compared to the standard deviation of the test?

  246. LondonBob says:
    @Jack D

    Last time I was in the LSE library, a few years ago, I thought I was in the Orient.

  247. @anon

    Aldi’s tuna fish is “Chicken of the Sea.” I’ve held their check in their hand.

    I was told by the father of someone who made chocolate cake mix that it was sold to just about everyone, including big names.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  248. Lot says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I never had cat or dog, but all the exotic meat I’ve tried wasn’t very good: frog legs, chicken feet, rabbit, gator. The problem is usually too fatty or too many small bones.

    Americans are probably the most squeamish eaters, but that’s OK because we also have the most dogs, who are happy to have dog food made with livestock leftovers. Texas shut down the last horsemeat slaughterhouse a few years ago, it was entirely for export.

  249. Lot says:
    @EastKekistani

    “Moreover our societies are particularly ill-equipped to handle random violence which is what they tend to engage in.”

    I agree on migrant workers, but are there really many of them in SK and Japan?

    And is “random violence” something done by SK/SEA children raised in SK?

    I think SK is better off with hybrids than no babies at all, which is the choice of a very large share of SK women.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @EastKekistani
  250. Jack D says:
    @anon

    Sometimes it is and sometimes it ain’t – it depends upon the product and the economics of the industry (e.g opening a dairy plant is very expensive and regulated, opening a cookie bakery is relatively simple). More often than not, store brand packaged goods are NOT made by the name brand manufacturer – there are separate manufacturers that specialize in the store brand market. They might (0r might not) be just as good but they are not coming out of the same factory in many cases.

    Even if the product is being made by the name brand manufacturer, every product is made to a specification and the private label item might have a lower spec (or it might not). There are some products (e.g. fluid milk) where the store brand and the name brand are literally identical except for the label and are even delivered on the same truck but many other cases where the store brand is different and sometimes inferior.

    So the bottom line is that it’s impossible to say “always buy the store brand” or conversely “never buy the store brand”. It really varies from product to product.

  251. @Buzz Mohawk

    Am I the only one who thinks that yoga pants on women, like the man bun, are a sure sign of civilizational decline?

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  252. Jack D says:
    @anon

    Right on, brother! Buy generic toilet paper and strike a blow against Zionism!

    Of McCann Erickson, which one was the Joo, McCann or Erickson (or both)?

    • Replies: @peterike
    , @anon
  253. peterike says:
    @Occam

    Most all American colleges are desperate for funding, and they are competing for students from China who can pay full costs. Many colleges would go broke without them.

    Which is exactly why Trump should ban all student visas from China. Aside from the obvious insanity of training your enemy, it would strike a blow at colleges, at least half of which ought to be shut down, and essentially all of which provide financial support for an internal enemy cabal.

  254. @War for Blair Mountain

    BRING BACK THE 1872 CHINESE LEGAL IMMIGRANT EXCLUSION ACT!!!!

    Well after the fall of the commies why will we even want to be in the Negroid-infested and mestizo-infested West? Not that many NE Asian people are interested in emigrating to Mexico and Brazil today. If the West goes WN then we will leave since we aren’t white. If the West doesn’t go WN then we will also leave since we can’t handle Negroids and mestizos and because NE Asian countries are increasingly rich. After all the amount of Japan-born and South Korea-born people in America are already not increasing because both countries are increasingly rich. China will reach this level too especially if commies are somehow overthrown.

    Either way we will say good bye within 40 years. Whether you guys want to integrate (and import) Negroids and mestizos is none of our business. I do suggest as a friend that you shouldn’t because I don’t think this works. However it is your decision. Your nation, your choice. The main difference between a white West and an ex-white West to ordinary NE Asian people like me is whether we can continue to take vacations in the West. We can’t handle Mexico-level violence. Of course to our politicians whether an affirmative action=ruined America can protect its own nukes is also a very significant concern. Nobody wants their awesome cities (yes we have them) to be nuked by some drugged Negroid or mestizo president for unknown reasons.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  255. peterike says:
    @Jack D

    Of McCann Erickson, which one was the Joo, McCann or Erickson (or both)?

    How about Harris Diamond, the guy who runs it now?

    • Replies: @anon
  256. @EastKekistani

    Anyway after the commies are gone we the NE Asian race will just leave the West lol because a democratic China and a democratic North Korea will truly rock.

    Will you accept blue-eyed Scandinavians who erhua and have good penmanship?

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  257. J.Ross says: • Website
    @anon

    That’s frequently the case now (I am closing in on identifying the “real” versions of Trader Joe’s “vanity brands”) but like I said it used to be that “generic” was understood to mean inferior, much cheaper, and forbidden from normal marketing practices.
    https://historysdumpster.blogspot.com/2012/08/generic-products-of-80s.html

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @JMcG
  258. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Right on, brother! Buy generic toilet paper and strike a blow against Zionism!

    Of McCann Erickson, which one was the Joo, McCann or Erickson (or both)?

    does it matter?

    i notice (((who))) is attacking me

    if you rather keep your head in the sand while your country is overrun and your culture and history destroyed, by all means

  259. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    Wrong question: because NEA are high-trust, high behavior standard societies, any tomfoolery is skylined.

  260. Lot says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Yeah he looks Gallic to me.

  261. @EastKekistani

    holding a police competition in Detroit or Kinshasa.

    As is regularly done to reasonably good effect, moreso in Detroit than in Kinshasa.

    Yeah. Anyone from my region who has to deal with violent tropical people on a daily basis probably needs to get some special training.

    Alertnatively you could get your nose out of a goddamned book once in awhile.

    • Replies: @EastKekistani
  262. anon[411] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike

    tough call

    jack d will probably say you can’t tell anything from a name

  263. @EastKekistani

    we can’t handle Negroids and mestizos

    Lol. Maybe you can’t. Pretty sure the Han will figure it out when they need to.

  264. @Jim Don Bob

    It depends on who is wearing them.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  265. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    The b&w labels were just a short lived gimmick. It doesn’t cost anything to invent a phony brand name and print a color label. The generics were supposed to be a super low tier below store brands.

  266. Jack D says:
    @Joe Stalin

    Tuna I totally believe – setting up a tuna cannery is no small thing. Cake mix you could make in your garage – low barrier to entry.

  267. George says:
    @Alden

    Is there a link to info about Morris Tobin?

    • Replies: @Alden
  268. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    This, exactly.

    If we were democracyworthy voters would choose non-Ivy League, non-attorney politicians, not the best and the brightest but good solid people. Junior officers and NCOs, engineers, the occasional doctor, the occasional oddball. But we do not. Ivy Leaguers hire other Ivy Leaguers.

    A kid who came out of high school and made it through navy nuke school and got a degree serving on the boat for five years and went to work for a decent company, did okay, is worth much more than most Ivy Leaguers. Same with a guy who built a decent business on the side while working as a railroad engineer. We had guys like this run in Kansas and got their ass shot off in the primary by Ivy League lawyers.

    Harvard is indeed elite if you are a physics Ph.D candidate, but for liberal arts, phooey. Bullshit is bullshit whether the school logo is “Veritas” or a dumb looking blue and yellow bird.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  269. @Buzz Mohawk

    That would be most women and all men.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  270. Anon87 says:
    @Jack D

    I bet the gap closes as brand names get long in the tooth and management genius takes over; aka cheaper ingredients and shrinkflation get applied. Some brand items are superior in quality and flavor many times, but don’t assume it will stay that way.

  271. @Jim Don Bob

    I was only referring to yoga pants. The man bun is indeed universally pathetic.

    The leggings/tights look, now yoga pants, is a classic that has appeared and reappeared over the decades. I remember when it was “leggings” circa 1990. On a slender woman with a dancer-type body, nice legs and ass, it does it for me.

    You’re right that most women don’t have the body for it. Even those who do should combine it with the right top instead of just being slobs about it.

  272. Alden says:
    @George

    It’s all over the news ask google.

  273. @Peter Lund

    Will you accept blue-eyed Scandinavians who erhua and have good penmanship?

    As tourists, researchers and businesspeople? Why not? 🙂

  274. @Lot

    I agree on migrant workers, but are there really many of them in SK and Japan?

    For now, no. However the amount of them is increasing.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Japan#Foreign_residents

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreigners_in_Korea

    And is “random violence” something done by SK/SEA children raised in SK?

    I think SK is better off with hybrids than no babies at all, which is the choice of a very large share of SK women.

    For now nope even though they are statistically underperforming.

    Well, these hybrids are probably going to bring in SEA behaviors at some point. So I’m not really sure which option is worse.

  275. @Desiderius

    As is regularly done to reasonably good effect, moreso in Detroit than in Kinshasa.

    WHAT? Do you dare to enter a ghetto in Detroit?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  276. @Reg Cæsar

    My uncle got caught in the middle of that whole business. He’s now substitute teaching in his late 70s to supplement his SS.

  277. @James Speaks

    Such a rigid outlook, as if everybody’s behavior is preprogrammed to the last nuance.

    It is widely held to be a problem that STEM teachers who truly know their material do not stay in teaching long; they leave as soon a better job offer comes along.

    About elementary school teachers: I was thinking that it would be nice of elementary schools had a full time math coach to “help” and “guide” teachers whose math skills are sub-par. It is these teachers who inculcate rigid rules about arithmetic into the kids minds, and that presents a barrier to teaching flexibility later on.

  278. keuril says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    We’re on a planet where some people pay $40,000.00 plus per year to “feeder” prep schools to grease their middling kids’ ways into a specific Ivy over better qualified kids is considered normal and ethical.

    This is a common misperception, but it’s not how it works. If you don’t have a hook (legacy, race, athletic recruit, socioeconomic), you are actually worse off at a traditional feeder school, if your hope is to get into a top Ivy. Each Ivy will only take a limited number of applicants from a particular school, and from the elite private prep schools the successful applicants will mainly be hooked. Kids without hooks would be better off as standouts coming from a non-elite public school. There are many comments on this subject at College Confidential, from families whose kids have gone through elite schools like Choate. They typically say go to Choate because it’s a great place, but forget about going from Choate to Harvard, etc.

  279. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    It’s long gone already Jack.

  280. @EastKekistani

    Most of them, sure.

    Things are way better than the seventies.

  281. @Jack D

    The Lidl America stores are like Aldi’s on steroids – much bigger footprint, larger assortment of non-food items

    The two chains were founded by brothers. Kind of like the Dorseys, but with less animosity.

  282. JMcG says:
    @J.Ross

    Trader Joe’s is a subsidiary of, wait for it…Aldi!

  283. AndrewR says:
    @Jack D

    Crime rates are half what they were 30 years ago. I assumed all the autists on Unz would know this but I guess facts that don’t fit the anti-black narrative get forgotten

  284. Lagertha says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    dogs – I hate China & Korea. These cuntries need to be boycotted for everything: vehicles, clothes, stuff, vacations. Effin’ let them suffer…they torture dogs so that the meat will be more “maleable” – truth. I hate Asians in general because of the way they treat all animals.

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