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I’ve long been struck by how little criticism there is outside Mexico of Mexican telecom monopolist Carlos Slim, who for the last 8 years or so has been in contention for the title of World’s Richest Man. Obviously, Slim’s bailing out the New York Times in early 2009 helps, but there are other trends at work as well. As I wrote in T aki’s Magazine in 2014:

The left has lost most of its former interest in anti-cartel activism. For example, [Thomas] Piketty, the paladin of the 21st century left, mentions the word “monopoly” only twice in his 685-page Capital in the Twenty-First Century. And one of those appearances is on a page that’s devoted to sniping at criticism of Mexican monopolist Carlos Slim. …

Now, you might think that there is something unseemly about a regular contender for the title of World’s Richest Man making his fortune off the relatively small Mexican economy. We’re constantly told that Mexicans have to be allowed to flock to America to escape starvation in their own land. Yet one well-connected monopolist is permitted to pile up an enormous trove by charging exorbitant fees for the lifeblood of any economy, communications. …

Piketty, however, is offended by how Slim

… is often described in the Western press as one who owes his great wealth to monopoly rents obtained through (implicitly corrupt) government favors…

… Piketty, in his inimitable prose style, explains that criticizing Slim is a mistake, if not downright racist:

Rather than indulge in constructing a moral hierarchy of wealth, which in practice often amounts to an exercise in Western ethnocentrism, I think it is more useful to try to understand the general laws that govern the dynamics of wealth—leaving individuals aside and thinking instead about modes of regulation, and in particular taxation, that apply equally to everyone, regardless of nationality.

In other words, rather than the citizens of Mexico using the rule of law to break up Slim’s monopoly, as Americans did with Rockefeller’s, the important thing is for readers of Capital to take global control.

And yet … while Mexico’s PRI isn’t the world’s most admirable political party, even the latest version of the PRI can figure out that a good way to appeal to Mexican voters is to not let Slim make quite such exorbitant profits off them. From Forbes on March 7, 2014:

Mexico Cracks Down On Billionaires Carlos Slim’s And Emilio Azcarraga’s Telecom Monopolies

Dolia Estevez , CONTRIBUTOR

In an unprecedented blow to billionaires Carlos Slim and Emilio Azcarraga, Mexico’s Federal Telecommunications Institute (IFT), declared phone companies Telmex and Telcel, as well as television giant Televisa, dominant in their respective markets and ordered them to open up to domestic and foreign competitors.

The ruling by the newly created IFT imposes tough anti-monopoly measures on the companies which will force them to share their infrastructure, increase competition, lower prices and expand access to services such as broadband and pay television to decrease their power.

América Móvil (NYE:AMX), Slim’s telecom conglomerate and largest asset, currently controls 80% of Mexico’s landline phone market through Telmex, and 70% of the wireless market, through affiliate Telcel. Azcarraga’s Televisa has 70% of the broadcast television market and around 56% of cable and satellite television combined. The law sets a market share cap for both telephones and TV of no higher than 50%.

The Mexican stock market initially assumed that the government couldn’t really be serious about cracking down on Slim, with Slim retaking the World’s Richest Man title from Bill Gates in July 2014 and his net worth rising to around $85 billion. But, now, from Bloomberg:

Carlos Slim Is Biggest Loser in World’s Top 400 Richest People
Patricia Laya
December 21, 2015 — 10:00 PM PST

Carlos Slim had a tough year, the worst among the wealthiest people of the world.

Since the start of 2015, the Mexican executive’s fortune has declined almost $20 billion, or about the size of Honduras’s economy, to $52.8 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The shares of his America Movil SAB telecommunications giant are heading for their biggest decline since 2008. The company has suffered under regulatory pressures in Mexico, where it’s now forced to share the infrastructure that allowed it to dominate the mobile and fixed-line market for more than a decade.

Slim, now the fifth-richest person in the world — down from third earlier this year — owns 57 percent of the company. …

The telecommunications company has relied on Brazil, Austria and the U.S. to expand, as regulation weakens the competitive advantage America Movil has enjoyed in Mexico, where it controls about 70 percent of all mobile phones and 62 percent of fixed lines. On top of that, AT&T Inc. bought two rival businesses in Mexico — NII Holdings Inc.’s Nextel Mexico business and Grupo Iusacell SA — pressuring prices and increasing the battle for users in its home market.

Mexico’s profit margin shrank to 40.3 percent in the last quarter from 44.8 percent a year earlier, based on earnings before interest, taxes, amortization and depreciation, and is estimated to fall again next year, according to a Credit Suisse Group AG report in December.

Even after this example of the power of old-fashioned trust-busting, Slim will probably get by okay with his 50% market share, 40% profit margin, and $50 billion net worth. But the 1890s notion that consumers benefit from competition apparently isn’t completely obsolete after all.

Speaking of billionaires, that reminds me that I’m not one. And that reminds me of my year-end fundraising drive.

I now have seven ways for you to send me encouragement, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. Fee 2.9%.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA
91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Make sure you click the button for “Steve Sailer.” If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold because the instructions are kind of verbose. It’s actually pretty simple, though.



Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
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  1. My phone bill has improved dramatically. I’m a Telcel customer and long distance and international calling has gone from twenty cents a minute to five cents a minute and now even lower. (all figures in US dollars)

    Back in the 1990s, the Clinton administration ruled that Slim’s monopolies on interconnect fees were illegal. They demanded a drop in rates that had been well over forty cents a minute. Similar fees to the UK and Japan at the time were two cents. The resulting somewhat cheaper rates held until the (2012-2018) Peña Nieto administration cracked down two years ago. Now we have a real and affordable telecom system.

    I wasn’t much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he’s pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy. Education and telecom are improving. He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. — seriously, google her.). If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he’ll be a complete success.

    Slim has invested in a lot of nice real estate projects and built some good museums. He’s much better at spending his monopolistic lucre than, for example, Bill Gates. But I still don’t want to be robbed by him anymore.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/making-american-teachers-unions-look/?highlight=elba+esther
    , @Reg Cæsar

    He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. — seriously, google her.).
     
    I did. She looks like Caitlyn Jenner fell asleep in the tanning booth.
    , @Pepe

    He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther
     
    Elba Gordillo is corrupt as they come, but so is the entire ruling class in Mexico. She was only arrested as punishment for breaking with PRI and backing PAN in 2006 and then joining the PANAL party.

    I wasn’t much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he’s pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy.
     
    The energy reforms, privatizing Pemex, were a good idea, but divine justice has intervened and lowered world oil prices to levels not seen in a decade. This is happening just as Pemex is beginning the auction process. The "PRI" energy reforms passed in 2013 were the same reforms PAN and Calderón pushed in 2007. Back then PRI blocked the reforms, not wanting to allow PAN to take credit for the changes.

    There's been no advances to speak of regarding corruption, narco violence and human rights abuses. The movement is in reverse, really.

    If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he’ll be a complete success.
     
    Sure, Tamaulipas and other northern border states remain quite violent, but without a doubt the most violent state in Mexico right now is Guerrero, along the S.W. Pacific coast. Michoacán and Jalisco also have murder rates similar to northern border states.

    In fact, the State of Mexico and Mexico City have seen big increases in murders and other violent crimes in the last few years. One of the big stories in Mexico this year is the appearance of narco-style violence in Mexico City. Mexico City's murder rate for 2015 is the highest since 1996.

    The only good thing to happen in Mexico this year was the victory of several independent candidates in the June mid-term elections. But the established parties, particularly PRI, are doing everything possible to stop future independent candidates from winning.
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  2. Lot says:

    The 40% isn’t profit margin, it is EBIDTA. It is sloppy for the reporter to call it this, even if it is clarified later.

    Here are the profit margins (in percent) of some major world telecoms:

    America Movil 5.4
    China Mobil 17.0
    Verizon 7.6
    AT&T 4.6
    Sprint -9.7
    British Telecom 11.8
    Vodafone 13.5
    Orange 2.6
    Telecom Italia 6.3
    Nippon Telg & Tel 4.7
    Deutsche Telekom 4.6
    Telefonica (Spain and much of Latin America) 5.6

    So the problem here doesn’t seem to be current pricing, but that the Mexican government sold its state telephone monopoly in 1990 at an undervalued price to Slim, France Telecom, and Southwestern Bell (now AT&T). The proper way to privatize a huge national monopoly is not an auction, but to have an IPO where only a small portion is sold initially, and then gradually sell off the rest.

    While he’s no doubt corrupt since he got rich in Mexico, he also seems to have had very good timing, buying companies, not just from the government, during downturns, and saving his profits while waiting for the next one. He also adopted the Buffet strategy of using steady but low-margin life insurance businesses to fund higher margin businesses.

    This doesn’t mean that Slim wasn’t gouging Mexicans before, just that it doesn’t look that way for the past few years. In 2011 the profit margin was 12% for example, and likely even higher before.

    Read More
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  3. 5371 says:

    Here’s to the Real Salim Shady losing some more in 2016.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Here’s to the Real Salim Shady losing some more in 2016."

    Here is to that gordo puto mayate losing some more in 2016. Anyone who gets politically in bed with The New York Times is disgusting.
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  4. @(((Owen)))
    My phone bill has improved dramatically. I'm a Telcel customer and long distance and international calling has gone from twenty cents a minute to five cents a minute and now even lower. (all figures in US dollars)

    Back in the 1990s, the Clinton administration ruled that Slim's monopolies on interconnect fees were illegal. They demanded a drop in rates that had been well over forty cents a minute. Similar fees to the UK and Japan at the time were two cents. The resulting somewhat cheaper rates held until the (2012-2018) Peña Nieto administration cracked down two years ago. Now we have a real and affordable telecom system.

    I wasn't much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he's pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy. Education and telecom are improving. He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. -- seriously, google her.). If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he'll be a complete success.

    ---

    Slim has invested in a lot of nice real estate projects and built some good museums. He's much better at spending his monopolistic lucre than, for example, Bill Gates. But I still don't want to be robbed by him anymore.

    Read More
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  5. Lot says:

    Mexico’s timing was also really bad, and Slim’s good.

    1990 was a horrible time to sell a company, as it was right before a huge worldwide bull market started.

    In 1990, the S&P 500 traded in low 300′s. Ten years later it broke 1500. Most people who made very large leveraged investments into the private sector in 1990 ended up making a lot of money.

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  6. Lot says:

    will force them to share their infrastructure

    The USA has been doing this for decades, and Europe for as long as I remember.

    Lately in Europe the thinking is they’ve been going too far in making the old telecom monopolies accommodate competitors. The idea is that the old monopolies still should be making large investments in things like 4G wireless service, but they won’t bother if they have to share most of the upside.

    Read More
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  7. The U.S. has had two approaches to telecom over the last 150 years:

    - Regulated utility

    - Or broken up competition

    Both have advantages and disadvantages, but neither is just selling the government monopoly to a major campaign contributor and letting him charge what he likes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @tbraton
    The old AT&T, which was clearly a monopoly, also had Bell Labs, one of the greatest incubators of intellectual discovery in the 20th century, made possible by the parent company's monopoly profits. With the court ordered breakup of AT&T in 1984, those profits were lost, and, while Bell Labs continued for a number of years thereafter, it was no longer the major force in technological innovation it had once been. A national treasure was lost.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. @(((Owen)))
    My phone bill has improved dramatically. I'm a Telcel customer and long distance and international calling has gone from twenty cents a minute to five cents a minute and now even lower. (all figures in US dollars)

    Back in the 1990s, the Clinton administration ruled that Slim's monopolies on interconnect fees were illegal. They demanded a drop in rates that had been well over forty cents a minute. Similar fees to the UK and Japan at the time were two cents. The resulting somewhat cheaper rates held until the (2012-2018) Peña Nieto administration cracked down two years ago. Now we have a real and affordable telecom system.

    I wasn't much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he's pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy. Education and telecom are improving. He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. -- seriously, google her.). If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he'll be a complete success.

    ---

    Slim has invested in a lot of nice real estate projects and built some good museums. He's much better at spending his monopolistic lucre than, for example, Bill Gates. But I still don't want to be robbed by him anymore.

    He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. — seriously, google her.).

    I did. She looks like Caitlyn Jenner fell asleep in the tanning booth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Hay-zoos Christo! She is the object lesson about bad plastic surgery on a mestizo!
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  9. Anonym says:

    If the customers of the monopoly are overseas, what is the issue? More a feature than a bug IMO.

    Read More
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  10. Stogumber says:

    It’s interesting that Bloomberg frames America Movil’s state-given monopoly as “competitive advantage”, whereas the loss of that monopoly is framed as a consequence of “regulatory pressure” (and surely not “deregulation”).
    It’s “freedom” and “competition”, if it’s good for big business.

    Read More
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  11. Bettega says:

    Piketty is really a nasty guy who isn’t even subtle about how his whole gig is about asking for more political and economical power for his fellow intellectual and bureaucrats, specially if they come from “Grande écoles”.

    Read More
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  12. My wealth grew by 22% this year (minus inflation). So I’m doing better than Carlos Slim!

    Wait.. Hmm..

    Actually, the biggest loser this year, as in every year since like 1970, was straight white regular guys.

    I wish I had 70 billion to lose 25% of…

    Read More
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  13. neutral says:

    Answering the question of the title, the biggest loser of 2015 surely is Jeb Bush.

    Read More
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  14. Brutusale says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. — seriously, google her.).
     
    I did. She looks like Caitlyn Jenner fell asleep in the tanning booth.

    Hay-zoos Christo! She is the object lesson about bad plastic surgery on a mestizo!

    Read More
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  15. in january, california is going to slap a %15 surcharge on prepaid phone service. carlos slim is envious.

    Read More
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  16. tbraton says:
    @Steve Sailer
    The U.S. has had two approaches to telecom over the last 150 years:

    - Regulated utility

    - Or broken up competition

    Both have advantages and disadvantages, but neither is just selling the government monopoly to a major campaign contributor and letting him charge what he likes.

    The old AT&T, which was clearly a monopoly, also had Bell Labs, one of the greatest incubators of intellectual discovery in the 20th century, made possible by the parent company’s monopoly profits. With the court ordered breakup of AT&T in 1984, those profits were lost, and, while Bell Labs continued for a number of years thereafter, it was no longer the major force in technological innovation it had once been. A national treasure was lost.

    Read More
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  17. tbraton says:

    When I saw your headline, I was certain I knew who your choice for biggest loser of 2015 was: Jeb!!! But I’m not terribly surprised to see he lost out on that honor too. Well, I think you should create a new category: Top Loser of the Biggest Loser of 2015 Award. And to think Jeb!!! was considered to be the brightest of the Bush brothers.

    Read More
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  18. I don’t get it. The (so-called) left, you say, has abandoned antitrust. Then how is it that “breaking up the banks” is a major campaign issue of the Bernie Sanders camp?

    On the other hand, these days you almost never hear demands for nationalizing the banks; never (in mainstream politics) for expropriating the bankers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @a Newsreader
    The Obama Administration has had the ability to attack monopolies for 7 years and hasn't done a thing. The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots, and 2. he is going to lose the nomination to Hillary Clinton.
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  19. @Stephen R. Diamond
    I don't get it. The (so-called) left, you say, has abandoned antitrust. Then how is it that "breaking up the banks" is a major campaign issue of the Bernie Sanders camp?

    On the other hand, these days you almost never hear demands for nationalizing the banks; never (in mainstream politics) for expropriating the bankers.

    The Obama Administration has had the ability to attack monopolies for 7 years and hasn’t done a thing. The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots, and 2. he is going to lose the nomination to Hillary Clinton.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots…
     
    The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class "grassroots", that is.
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  20. Luke Lea says: • Website

    I will say this in behalf of Piketty: what is the world’s total stock of capital if not the accumulated crime and sacrifice of centuries, plus interest? Those who might be inclined to disagree with this statement should notice that it is a tautology. Besides crime and voluntary sacrifice, interest represents the growth in previously accumulated capital brought about by businessmen who invest and reinvest it in productive ways before passing much of it on to the next generation.

    But before capitalism there was what Marx called primitive accumulation: an essential ingredient originally, going back to the very dawn of civilization and continuing right up into modern times (no need to rehearse that unhappy history). More recently still we have witnessed the Savings-and-Loan mega-scandal here in the US, Slim’s dealings in Mexico, the looting of Russia, daily horrors in China, and no doubt other instances too numerous to mention.

    Crime is no longer the major source of capital accumulation (clearly return on investment is) but it should not be ignored when it comes to the issue of how the fruits of capital should be distributed among working people (including businessmen) in this and succeeding generations. Capital is a gift that has be bequeathed to us. A terrible human price was paid to build the modern world.

    Read More
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  21. Carlos Slim appears to have accepted his own propaganda. This Summer he bought a large stake in Telekom Austria (TKA.VI). I was able to part with my remaining shares for 7 Euros apiece.

    Telecommunications is just bits and bytes nowadays. This is a highly competitive low margin business. The only way to make a healthy profit would come from favorable regulation and government subsidies. This is how Slim made his fortune. But the tight-knit political class in Austria isn’t going to do him any favors. Even if he could bribe them somehow, the political cost of favoring some foreign Mexican plutocrat would be enormous.

    If he understands that, then he apparently seems to believe that he is really some kind of telecommunications genius.

    Read More
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  22. Jefferson says:
    @5371
    Here's to the Real Salim Shady losing some more in 2016.

    “Here’s to the Real Salim Shady losing some more in 2016.”

    Here is to that gordo puto mayate losing some more in 2016. Anyone who gets politically in bed with The New York Times is disgusting.

    Read More
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  23. Pepe says:
    @(((Owen)))
    My phone bill has improved dramatically. I'm a Telcel customer and long distance and international calling has gone from twenty cents a minute to five cents a minute and now even lower. (all figures in US dollars)

    Back in the 1990s, the Clinton administration ruled that Slim's monopolies on interconnect fees were illegal. They demanded a drop in rates that had been well over forty cents a minute. Similar fees to the UK and Japan at the time were two cents. The resulting somewhat cheaper rates held until the (2012-2018) Peña Nieto administration cracked down two years ago. Now we have a real and affordable telecom system.

    I wasn't much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he's pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy. Education and telecom are improving. He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther (q.v. -- seriously, google her.). If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he'll be a complete success.

    ---

    Slim has invested in a lot of nice real estate projects and built some good museums. He's much better at spending his monopolistic lucre than, for example, Bill Gates. But I still don't want to be robbed by him anymore.

    He even dethroned and jailed the hated Elba Esther

    Elba Gordillo is corrupt as they come, but so is the entire ruling class in Mexico. She was only arrested as punishment for breaking with PRI and backing PAN in 2006 and then joining the PANAL party.

    I wasn’t much of a fan of Peña Nieto when he was running for president, but he’s pushed a few good reforms through the congress and bureaucracy.

    The energy reforms, privatizing Pemex, were a good idea, but divine justice has intervened and lowered world oil prices to levels not seen in a decade. This is happening just as Pemex is beginning the auction process. The “PRI” energy reforms passed in 2013 were the same reforms PAN and Calderón pushed in 2007. Back then PRI blocked the reforms, not wanting to allow PAN to take credit for the changes.

    There’s been no advances to speak of regarding corruption, narco violence and human rights abuses. The movement is in reverse, really.

    If he can just undermine some of the the Gringo drug violence along the northern border, he’ll be a complete success.

    Sure, Tamaulipas and other northern border states remain quite violent, but without a doubt the most violent state in Mexico right now is Guerrero, along the S.W. Pacific coast. Michoacán and Jalisco also have murder rates similar to northern border states.

    In fact, the State of Mexico and Mexico City have seen big increases in murders and other violent crimes in the last few years. One of the big stories in Mexico this year is the appearance of narco-style violence in Mexico City. Mexico City’s murder rate for 2015 is the highest since 1996.

    The only good thing to happen in Mexico this year was the victory of several independent candidates in the June mid-term elections. But the established parties, particularly PRI, are doing everything possible to stop future independent candidates from winning.

    Read More
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  24. Veritas says:

    And that reminds me of my year-end fundraising drive

    Hey Steve,

    Just curious, but why do you have such a problem mentioning the word Christmas one your blog when you solicit money, or, for that matter, anytime else?

    I mean, for the last couple of years you have been wearing that Santa hat,
    so it’s plainly obvious you’re making an oblique, indirect, euphemistic allusion to Christmas, and Christians by extension I suppose, without showing the respect to their most sacred holiday by not mentioning it by name.

    Perhaps it would just be easier if henceforth Christmas should, in a Harry Potter-esque kinda way, just be referred to as *The-Holiday-That-Shall-Not-Be-Named*

    *You’ll probably get a lot more donations if you simply say to your blogging audience Merry Christmas

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Because I intend to go on past Christmas to New Year's.
    , @tbraton
    Well, the answer is obvious. Steve Sailer, like Barack Hussein Obama, is a secret Muslim.

    BTW there is a hilarious piece by Harold Meyerson in today's Washington Post in which he castigates Republicans with violating the "spirit of Christmas" by opposing the entry of "Syrian refugees." As support for his argument, he cites the tale in the Gospel of Mathew (ch. 2) about how Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus had to flee Judea and seek refuge in Egypt to escape the edict of Herod to have all children the age of two and under "in Bethlehem and its neighborhood" slaughtered. There is nothing in the historical record indicating any such edict was issued by Herod, and there is nothing in the Gospel of Mark, supposedly the first gospel written of the four comprising the New Testament and the one which served as the model for the other two synoptic gospels, to substantiate the account in Mathew. In fact, none of the other Gospels has a word to say about the circumstances of Jesus' birth. The Gospel of Luke does state that Jesus was circumcised 8 days after he was born and thereafter his parents "brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord" and thereafter "they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth," which seems totally inconsistent with a flight into Egypt to escape Herod's edict, as set forth in the Gospel of Mathew. That does raise the question what other accounts in the New Testament Mr. Meyerson accepts as true, and. if he accepts them all as true, why he is not a Christian. I wonder what he makes of this line in the same chapter of Mathew: "They [the astrologers or wise men] set out at the king's bidding; and the star which they had seen at its rising went ahead of them until it stopped above the place where the child lay."

    BTW I apologize for being so churlish on the day before Christmas. I wish everybody on Steve Sailer's blog, including nonbelievers, a Merry Christmas. And that includes the secret Muslim, Steve Sailer himself.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. @Veritas
    And that reminds me of my year-end fundraising drive

    Hey Steve,

    Just curious, but why do you have such a problem mentioning the word Christmas one your blog when you solicit money, or, for that matter, anytime else?

    I mean, for the last couple of years you have been wearing that Santa hat,
    so it's plainly obvious you're making an oblique, indirect, euphemistic allusion to Christmas, and Christians by extension I suppose, without showing the respect to their most sacred holiday by not mentioning it by name.

    Perhaps it would just be easier if henceforth Christmas should, in a Harry Potter-esque kinda way, just be referred to as *The-Holiday-That-Shall-Not-Be-Named*

    *You'll probably get a lot more donations if you simply say to your blogging audience Merry Christmas

    Because I intend to go on past Christmas to New Year’s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Veritas
    Very well Steve, that yes, it's a year end appeal to new years, but you still could mention the Christmas holiday by name .. otherwise, it kinda comes across as an Orwellian avoidance, and, as I mentioned before, a Lord Voldermort equation.

    As tbraton pointed out, one does not necessarily need to be a Christian to celebrate Christmas. Christmas is also a profoundly Western holiday, and as Sam Francis has so eloquently and persistently pointed out over the years, in his article dealing with Christmas and the National Question: the War on Christmas is a War on the West .. and the other excellent article: War on Holidays is a War on (White) America

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/war-on-christmas-is-a-war-on-the-west

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/war-on-holidays-is-war-on-america


    *Dear readers - 'choose this day whom you will serve'
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Since people can gift $14,000 / year / spouse, tax free to themselves — why does Steve have to pay tax on funds given to him in donations less than $14,000?

    Its not like we are paying per unique article on a contractor basis.

    Come on tax pro’s, tell me why I am wrong or let’s get Steve on to the tax free Gift economy.

    Merry Christmas

    Read More
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  27. @a Newsreader
    The Obama Administration has had the ability to attack monopolies for 7 years and hasn't done a thing. The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots, and 2. he is going to lose the nomination to Hillary Clinton.

    The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots…

    The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class “grassroots”, that is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jesse
    "The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class “grassroots”, that is."

    You say that like they're a bad group to (1) be and (2) have on side.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. tbraton says:
    @Veritas
    And that reminds me of my year-end fundraising drive

    Hey Steve,

    Just curious, but why do you have such a problem mentioning the word Christmas one your blog when you solicit money, or, for that matter, anytime else?

    I mean, for the last couple of years you have been wearing that Santa hat,
    so it's plainly obvious you're making an oblique, indirect, euphemistic allusion to Christmas, and Christians by extension I suppose, without showing the respect to their most sacred holiday by not mentioning it by name.

    Perhaps it would just be easier if henceforth Christmas should, in a Harry Potter-esque kinda way, just be referred to as *The-Holiday-That-Shall-Not-Be-Named*

    *You'll probably get a lot more donations if you simply say to your blogging audience Merry Christmas

    Well, the answer is obvious. Steve Sailer, like Barack Hussein Obama, is a secret Muslim.

    BTW there is a hilarious piece by Harold Meyerson in today’s Washington Post in which he castigates Republicans with violating the “spirit of Christmas” by opposing the entry of “Syrian refugees.” As support for his argument, he cites the tale in the Gospel of Mathew (ch. 2) about how Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus had to flee Judea and seek refuge in Egypt to escape the edict of Herod to have all children the age of two and under “in Bethlehem and its neighborhood” slaughtered. There is nothing in the historical record indicating any such edict was issued by Herod, and there is nothing in the Gospel of Mark, supposedly the first gospel written of the four comprising the New Testament and the one which served as the model for the other two synoptic gospels, to substantiate the account in Mathew. In fact, none of the other Gospels has a word to say about the circumstances of Jesus’ birth. The Gospel of Luke does state that Jesus was circumcised 8 days after he was born and thereafter his parents “brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord” and thereafter “they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth,” which seems totally inconsistent with a flight into Egypt to escape Herod’s edict, as set forth in the Gospel of Mathew. That does raise the question what other accounts in the New Testament Mr. Meyerson accepts as true, and. if he accepts them all as true, why he is not a Christian. I wonder what he makes of this line in the same chapter of Mathew: “They [the astrologers or wise men] set out at the king’s bidding; and the star which they had seen at its rising went ahead of them until it stopped above the place where the child lay.”

    BTW I apologize for being so churlish on the day before Christmas. I wish everybody on Steve Sailer’s blog, including nonbelievers, a Merry Christmas. And that includes the secret Muslim, Steve Sailer himself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Veritas
    tbraton,

    You know the funny thing about Muslims when it comes to Christmas, is that most are not in any way "offended" by a Christmas holiday salutation (most Muslims anyway, perhaps not the uber-left wing entitlement queens over at CAIR, or others who have assimilated a very anti-White, anti-Western attitude).

    Traditional Muslims (not the fanatics or the Western intelligence assets) view Jesus (Issa) as a Holy prophet, born of the Virgin Maryam (Mary) who will
    come to earth again.

    As a matter-of-fact, many Muslims show much greater respect to Jesus and Mary than do most "Christians" - with the whole 19th chapter of the Koran devoted to Mary.

    So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*.
    , @tbraton
    Well, it turns out that Harold Meyerson of the Washington Post is not the only one trying to play on Christians' feelings and beliefs to make them more accepting of asylum seekers. Here is something I found over at Rod Dreher's blog on The American Conservative pertaining to the situation in Germany:

    "The most interesting comment I saw on this blog today was the following remark by a German reader, on the Roger Scruton post thread. Excerpt:

    Read Scruton’s lecture, not convinced at all by it. Anybody who thinks more Christianity could help stem the current tide of mostly Islamic mass migration doesn’t understand what’s going on. At least here in Germany the “refugee” influx is justified explicitly in Christian terms by politicians of all stripes, from the Christian Democrats to the Greens and even the Linke (the successors of the East German communists). Bishops and other church leaders make explicitly pro-Islamic statements of the sort “Islamic culture will be enriching” and even try to downplay reports of Muslim asylum seekers bullying Christian ones. For me the lesson is clear…Christianity is part of the problem, not of the solution. Whatever happens, the part played by Christian elites in the mess we’re in now won’t be forgotten or forgiven."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. AndrewR says:

    This year I had a girl knock at my door asking for donations to an organization that provides assistance to poor children in various countries. The model is pretty much the same as what most people remember from those old TV ads: you pay a certain donation per month and you get to “sponsor” one child who supposedly sends you letters and photos, etc.

    I initially signed up to sponsor a Mexican child because it wouldn’t break my bank and the solicitor was cute and sweet.

    But then I did the math.

    Carlos Slim alone could give 30 dollars a month to every poor Mexican child (according to Mexican officials, this would be approximately 20 million minors) for years. Literally years.

    And that’s to say nothing of all the other Mexican plutocrats.

    So why the hell should I, as a working class American, be guilted into sponsoring children in Mexico who live in poverty largely due to the policies of Mexican plutocrats? This is on top of all the countless costs of Mexican immigration both legal and illegal into the US.

    I called up the company that day and canceled my donations.

    Let’s build the wall and ban all Mexican plutocrats from entering the US. Let Mexico deal with its own problems.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  30. Veritas says:
    @tbraton
    Well, the answer is obvious. Steve Sailer, like Barack Hussein Obama, is a secret Muslim.

    BTW there is a hilarious piece by Harold Meyerson in today's Washington Post in which he castigates Republicans with violating the "spirit of Christmas" by opposing the entry of "Syrian refugees." As support for his argument, he cites the tale in the Gospel of Mathew (ch. 2) about how Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus had to flee Judea and seek refuge in Egypt to escape the edict of Herod to have all children the age of two and under "in Bethlehem and its neighborhood" slaughtered. There is nothing in the historical record indicating any such edict was issued by Herod, and there is nothing in the Gospel of Mark, supposedly the first gospel written of the four comprising the New Testament and the one which served as the model for the other two synoptic gospels, to substantiate the account in Mathew. In fact, none of the other Gospels has a word to say about the circumstances of Jesus' birth. The Gospel of Luke does state that Jesus was circumcised 8 days after he was born and thereafter his parents "brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord" and thereafter "they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth," which seems totally inconsistent with a flight into Egypt to escape Herod's edict, as set forth in the Gospel of Mathew. That does raise the question what other accounts in the New Testament Mr. Meyerson accepts as true, and. if he accepts them all as true, why he is not a Christian. I wonder what he makes of this line in the same chapter of Mathew: "They [the astrologers or wise men] set out at the king's bidding; and the star which they had seen at its rising went ahead of them until it stopped above the place where the child lay."

    BTW I apologize for being so churlish on the day before Christmas. I wish everybody on Steve Sailer's blog, including nonbelievers, a Merry Christmas. And that includes the secret Muslim, Steve Sailer himself.

    tbraton,

    You know the funny thing about Muslims when it comes to Christmas, is that most are not in any way “offended” by a Christmas holiday salutation (most Muslims anyway, perhaps not the uber-left wing entitlement queens over at CAIR, or others who have assimilated a very anti-White, anti-Western attitude).

    Traditional Muslims (not the fanatics or the Western intelligence assets) view Jesus (Issa) as a Holy prophet, born of the Virgin Maryam (Mary) who will
    come to earth again.

    As a matter-of-fact, many Muslims show much greater respect to Jesus and Mary than do most “Christians” – with the whole 19th chapter of the Koran devoted to Mary.

    So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jesse
    "So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*."

    *snorts*

    I'd rather not get acid through in my face, thanks.

    IME, most Jews enjoy being wished a Merry Christmas.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. Veritas says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Because I intend to go on past Christmas to New Year's.

    Very well Steve, that yes, it’s a year end appeal to new years, but you still could mention the Christmas holiday by name .. otherwise, it kinda comes across as an Orwellian avoidance, and, as I mentioned before, a Lord Voldermort equation.

    As tbraton pointed out, one does not necessarily need to be a Christian to celebrate Christmas. Christmas is also a profoundly Western holiday, and as Sam Francis has so eloquently and persistently pointed out over the years, in his article dealing with Christmas and the National Question: the War on Christmas is a War on the West .. and the other excellent article: War on Holidays is a War on (White) America

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/war-on-christmas-is-a-war-on-the-west

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/war-on-holidays-is-war-on-america

    *Dear readers – ‘choose this day whom you will serve’

    Read More
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  32. Jesse says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The difference with Bernie Sanders is that: 1. he is favored by the traditional leftist grassroots…
     
    The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class "grassroots", that is.

    “The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class “grassroots”, that is.”

    You say that like they’re a bad group to (1) be and (2) have on side.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You say that like they’re a bad group to (1) be and (2) have on side.
     
    Some of them, when they grow out of their Occupy phase, might be useful someday. But I live in a state capital, so I'm not keeping my hopes up.

    By the way, they've been invited to our side for years. How many have showed up?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  33. Jesse says:
    @Veritas
    tbraton,

    You know the funny thing about Muslims when it comes to Christmas, is that most are not in any way "offended" by a Christmas holiday salutation (most Muslims anyway, perhaps not the uber-left wing entitlement queens over at CAIR, or others who have assimilated a very anti-White, anti-Western attitude).

    Traditional Muslims (not the fanatics or the Western intelligence assets) view Jesus (Issa) as a Holy prophet, born of the Virgin Maryam (Mary) who will
    come to earth again.

    As a matter-of-fact, many Muslims show much greater respect to Jesus and Mary than do most "Christians" - with the whole 19th chapter of the Koran devoted to Mary.

    So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*.

    “So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*.”

    *snorts*

    I’d rather not get acid through in my face, thanks.

    IME, most Jews enjoy being wished a Merry Christmas.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Veritas
    Not true.

    Christmas in Damascus: RT crew feels hope in air as Christians, Muslims join to celebrate

    https://www.rt.com/news/327064-christmas-celebrate-syria-damascus
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. tbraton says:
    @tbraton
    Well, the answer is obvious. Steve Sailer, like Barack Hussein Obama, is a secret Muslim.

    BTW there is a hilarious piece by Harold Meyerson in today's Washington Post in which he castigates Republicans with violating the "spirit of Christmas" by opposing the entry of "Syrian refugees." As support for his argument, he cites the tale in the Gospel of Mathew (ch. 2) about how Joseph, Mary and baby Jesus had to flee Judea and seek refuge in Egypt to escape the edict of Herod to have all children the age of two and under "in Bethlehem and its neighborhood" slaughtered. There is nothing in the historical record indicating any such edict was issued by Herod, and there is nothing in the Gospel of Mark, supposedly the first gospel written of the four comprising the New Testament and the one which served as the model for the other two synoptic gospels, to substantiate the account in Mathew. In fact, none of the other Gospels has a word to say about the circumstances of Jesus' birth. The Gospel of Luke does state that Jesus was circumcised 8 days after he was born and thereafter his parents "brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord" and thereafter "they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth," which seems totally inconsistent with a flight into Egypt to escape Herod's edict, as set forth in the Gospel of Mathew. That does raise the question what other accounts in the New Testament Mr. Meyerson accepts as true, and. if he accepts them all as true, why he is not a Christian. I wonder what he makes of this line in the same chapter of Mathew: "They [the astrologers or wise men] set out at the king's bidding; and the star which they had seen at its rising went ahead of them until it stopped above the place where the child lay."

    BTW I apologize for being so churlish on the day before Christmas. I wish everybody on Steve Sailer's blog, including nonbelievers, a Merry Christmas. And that includes the secret Muslim, Steve Sailer himself.

    Well, it turns out that Harold Meyerson of the Washington Post is not the only one trying to play on Christians’ feelings and beliefs to make them more accepting of asylum seekers. Here is something I found over at Rod Dreher’s blog on The American Conservative pertaining to the situation in Germany:

    “The most interesting comment I saw on this blog today was the following remark by a German reader, on the Roger Scruton post thread. Excerpt:

    Read Scruton’s lecture, not convinced at all by it. Anybody who thinks more Christianity could help stem the current tide of mostly Islamic mass migration doesn’t understand what’s going on. At least here in Germany the “refugee” influx is justified explicitly in Christian terms by politicians of all stripes, from the Christian Democrats to the Greens and even the Linke (the successors of the East German communists). Bishops and other church leaders make explicitly pro-Islamic statements of the sort “Islamic culture will be enriching” and even try to downplay reports of Muslim asylum seekers bullying Christian ones. For me the lesson is clear…Christianity is part of the problem, not of the solution. Whatever happens, the part played by Christian elites in the mess we’re in now won’t be forgotten or forgiven.”

    Read More
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  35. Veritas says:
    @Jesse
    "So, interestingly enough, you can probably wish most Muslims a very *Merry Christmas*."

    *snorts*

    I'd rather not get acid through in my face, thanks.

    IME, most Jews enjoy being wished a Merry Christmas.

    Not true.

    Christmas in Damascus: RT crew feels hope in air as Christians, Muslims join to celebrate

    https://www.rt.com/news/327064-christmas-celebrate-syria-damascus

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  36. @Jesse
    "The lilywhite, overeducated, upper-middle-class “grassroots”, that is."

    You say that like they're a bad group to (1) be and (2) have on side.

    You say that like they’re a bad group to (1) be and (2) have on side.

    Some of them, when they grow out of their Occupy phase, might be useful someday. But I live in a state capital, so I’m not keeping my hopes up.

    By the way, they’ve been invited to our side for years. How many have showed up?

    Read More
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  37. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    Read More
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  38. Biggest Loser = Angela Merkel , for creating future societal strife and problems for Germans by importing a people (Muslims) who are known for taking over other cultures.

    Read More
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  39. ic1000 says:

    OT (Though I hope that Sabrina Rubin Erdely turns out to be one of 2015′s big losers).

    Via Robert Ford’s Twitter feed, Subject of discredited U.Va. gang-rape article fights efforts to access her email, texts, from the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

    As legal wrangling in the aftermath of a discredited Rolling Stone exposé of rape culture at the University of Virginia escalates, court records show that the woman at the center of the 9,000-word feature is not cooperating.

    “Jackie,” the former U.Va. student who was the subject of the piece, has yet to turn reams of correspondence over to lawyers who represent a university dean they say was cast as the “villain” of the story.

    [snip]

    “I do not plan to do any interviews because they would be counterproductive and while the reporters are promising to ‘let my voice be heard’ I know that I cannot trust that to happen,” Erdely wrote.

    No hits returned by the search string “Monahan”.

    Read More
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  40. […] of Mexico finally pushed through anti-monopoly legislation that has knocked, last I checked, about $20 billion off Slim’s net […]

    Read More

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