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A fungus likely transmitted by scientists studying frogs. Greg Cochran writes in West Hunter:

Plague of Frogs

… It took some time for herpetologists to admit that this chytrid fungus is the main culprit – some are still resisting. First, it was a lot like how doctors resisted Semmelweiss’ discoveries about the cause of puerperal fever – since doctors were the main method of transmission. How did this fungus get to the cloud forests of Costa Rica? On the boots of herpetologists, of course.

It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.

 
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  1. Psychiatrist joke falls … very … flat

    Read More
    • Replies: @JimS
    I am not sure this is a joke. Steve has posted speculation on germ association with similar things before.

    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2012/02/ultimate-tool-in-marketing.html
    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2009/04/breaking-news-your-genes-didnt-evolve.html
    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2008/09/geneticist-cant-find-nuthin.html
    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/10/gregory-cochrans-new-germ-theory.html
    https://isteve.blogspot.com/2005/01/setback-for-gay-germ-theory.html

    At the very least, it's not outside the realm of possibility.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Nah, the joke about shrinks is pretty good. IMO, a shrink is a fraud by definition. Some, at least the ones who have medical degrees, do the most harm by prescribing very harmful drugs. The others who limit their practice to talking, mainly harm their patients through fraud, draining them of money while delivering nothing more than a chance to vent.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Given that the vast majority of non-mooslim mass murderers in the past decade or so were taking or recently coming off prescribed psychiatric medications, I'd disagree with you and say Steve Sailer's humor is spot on.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    No joke. Self-fulfilling prophecy, in this case, Gaslighting.
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    Certainly anybody who has any contact with psychiatrists knows that as a general matter they are crazier than a bag of rabid weasels. And if there are "mental disease germs", that would explain a lot. They are both sources and recipients of these germs.

    From the West Hunter post: "...For a few years the herpetologists were concerned yet happy. Concerned, because many frog populations were crashing and some were going extinct. Happy, because confused puppies in Washington were giving them money, something that hardly ever happens to frogmen. The theory was that amphibians were ‘canaries in a coal mine’, uniquely sensitive to environmental degradation...."

    The theories were (in order) UV radiation due to CFCs (not true), herbicides (not true) and then climate change (not true). Turns out the problem was, like most of our problems, caused by government, which financed activities which directly caused the problem, sending herpetologists out to infect the frogs.
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  2. Steve, why are the previous posts now on the right? The used to be on the left. Temporal axis should always go left/negative to right/positive.

    (hmm, it looks like it is only on the most recent post. Earlier posts have the same/original placement)

    Read More
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  3. Moi, j’ai une autre idee.

    Read More
    • LOL: Realist
    • Replies: @Wally
    Agreed. I too thought he was talking about the French.
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  4. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We’ve been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it’s been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm — those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.

    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I’m not sure I’d feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I’ve visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don’t think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    CBP agents really do tend to be terrible human beings, or at least they generally choose to act as such.

    It's true that, for reasons everyone on this site is well aware of, the median American is an idiot compared to the median inhabitant of other first world countries, but I would chalk CBP awfulness up to pure lack of accountability. There really seems to be no accountability whatsoever for that agency. And of course, even the most cursory analysis of human nature reveals that there is an almost perfect correlation between lack of accountability and abuse of power.

    , @william munny
    Livestock farmers are particularly sensitive to this method of pathogen transmission. Even backyard chicken farmers are warned about their boots.

    I read about a guy who used breeding strategy to develop the perfect rooster tail feathers for use in fly fishing. Millionaire many times over. He has at least two separate facilities isolated by many miles and the staff is strictly sequestered.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, my grand daughter is an equestrian, and often when we visit the stables, they spray our shoes to prevent the spread of equine diseases.
    , @songbird
    I don't know if you can really stop something. Too many smugglers, and I'm just talking about normal people who don't declare that they are carrying stuff. Too few even understand the risks.
    , @Alden
    Government service in the United States is affirmative action for the dumbest and nastiest of our population, the same demographics who populate our prisons and drop out of high school.

    What does one expect of the affirmative action demographic?
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  5. It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??

    Read More
    • Replies: @mobi

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??
     
    Here (?):

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/12/a-new-way-to-be-mad/304671/

    Why do certain psychopathologies arise, seemingly out of nowhere, in certain societies and during certain historical periods, and then disappear just as suddenly? Why did young men in late-nineteenth-century France begin lapsing into a fugue state, wandering the continent with no memory of their past, coming to themselves months later in Moscow or Algiers with no idea how they got there? What was it about America in the 1970s and 1980s that made it possible for thousands of Americans and their therapists to come to believe that two, ten, even dozens of personalities could be living in the same head?
     

    A transient mental illness is a mental illness that is limited to a certain time and place. It finds an ecological niche, as Hacking puts it—an idea that helps to explain how it thrives...Hacking's ecological niches help to explain the conditions that made it possible for multiple-personality disorder to flourish in late-twentieth-century America and the fugue state to flourish in nineteenth-century Bordeaux. If the niche disappears, the mental illness disappears along with it.

     


    He has argued...that psychiatrists and other clinicians helped to create the epidemics of fugue in nineteenth-century Europe and multiple-personality disorder in late-twentieth-century America simply by the way they viewed the disorders—by the kinds of questions they asked patients, the treatments they used, the diagnostic categories available to them at the time, and the way these patients fit within those categories. He points out, for example, that the multiple-personality-disorder epidemic rode on the shoulders of a perceived epidemic of child abuse, which began to emerge in the 1960s and which was thought to be part of the cause of multiple-personality disorder. Multiple personalities were a result of childhood trauma; child abuse is a form of trauma; it seemed to make sense that if there were an epidemic of child abuse, we would see more and more multiples.
     

    Unlike objects, people are conscious of the way they are classified, and they alter their behavior and self-conceptions in response to their classification...In the 1970s, he argues, therapists started asking patients they thought might be multiples if they had been abused as children, and patients in therapy began remembering episodes of abuse (some of which may not have actually occurred). These memories reinforced the diagnosis of multiple-personality disorder, and once they were categorized as multiples, some patients began behaving as multiples are expected to behave. Not intentionally, of course, but the category "multiple-personality disorder" gave them a new way to be mad.

     


    By regarding a phenomenon as a psychiatric diagnosis—treating it, reifying it in psychiatric diagnostic manuals, developing instruments to measure it, inventing scales to rate its severity, establishing ways to reimburse the costs of its treatment, encouraging pharmaceutical companies to search for effective drugs, directing patients to support groups, writing about possible causes in journals—psychiatrists may be unwittingly colluding with broader cultural forces to contribute to the spread of a mental disorder.
     

    Fifty years ago the suggestion that tens of thousands of people would someday want their genitals surgically altered so that they could change their sex would have been ludicrous. But it has happened. The question is why. One answer would have it that this is an ancient condition, that there have always been people who fall outside the traditional sex classifications, but that only during the past forty years or so have we developed the surgical and endocrinological tools to fix the problem.

    But it is possible to imagine another story: that our cultural and historical conditions have not just revealed transsexuals but created them. That is, once "transsexual" and "gender-identity disorder" and "sex-reassignment surgery" became common linguistic currency, more people began conceptualizing and interpreting their experience in these terms. They began to make sense of their lives in a way that hadn't been available to them before, and to some degree they actually became the kinds of people described by these terms.
     

    Ian Hacking uses the term "semantic contagion" to describe the way in which publicly identifying and describing a condition creates the means by which that condition spreads. He says it is always possible for people to reinterpret their past in light of a new conceptual category. And it is also possible for them to contemplate actions that they may not have contemplated before.
     
    ...
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, not germs but seeds, as in "He planted a seed in his head," you know, as in a thought.
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  6. I clicked, ready to get all worked up over muslims in 18-wheelers.

    Oh well, another day.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    I got you, friend-o.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-43105171
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  7. “It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.”

    The “media” surely do. Which toilet do I use?

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  8. “It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.”

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.
     
    I've often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.
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  9. This one is too easy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    As a member of the amphibian LGBT community, I am outraged that Alex Jones thinks there us anything wrong with us frogs "turning gay." There is nothing wrong with being gay, whether you're a frog, a toad, a salamander or even a non-amphibian. We gay frogs have had it up to here with this vile homofrogaphobia, and we will not stand... wait... is that a fly?

    [catches fly with tongue]
    , @SunBakedSuburb
    Alex Jones: proof that the CIA's MK Ultra program is still operational.
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  10. @Luke Lea
    "It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs."

    I've known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.

    I’ve often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.

    Read More
    • Replies: @advancedatheist
    Psychotherapists seem to have scaled back their ambitions in recent years because of the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy in teaching people to manage their emotional issues better, and in recognition of the fact that this form of therapy seems to have validated insights from Stoicism and Buddhism.

    In fact it seems a bit of a letdown to read that one form of CBT effective in treating depression, called activation therapy, tells you to get off your ass and do stuff. (Perhaps you can start by cleaning your room.) This sounds like something the traditional grandmother could have told you to combat the blues.
    , @Corn
    “I’ve often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.”

    My mom-a retired nurse- used to say the only difference between patients and staff at a mental ward were who had keys on their belts.
    , @Anonymous
    I have seen a similar thing, in a family with a recurring history of insanity: all of the sane ones became mental health professionals.
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  11. I wonder how much illness in humans is caused by fungus. Doctors will throw antibiotics at you, and now even antivirals, but antifungals? Bah, they can’t be bothered. The possibility of fungi as disease pathogen seems to never even occur to them. Perhaps that would explain persistent sinus and chest infections that seem immune to antibiotics. Especially in hot humid climates that are teeming with molds and fungi.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccidioidomycosis

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/valley-fever/symptoms-causes/syc-20378761

    Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by coccidioides (kok-sid-e-OY-deze) organisms. It can cause fever, chest pain and coughing, among other signs and symptoms.
    ......
    The fungi that cause valley fever — Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii — thrive in the arid desert soils of southern Arizona, Nevada, northern Mexico and California's San Joaquin Valley. They're also endemic to New Mexico, Texas, and parts of Central and South America — areas with mild winters and arid summers.
    ......
    Race. For reasons that aren't well-understood, Filipinos, Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans are more susceptible to developing serious infection with coccidioidomycosis than are whites.
     
    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/08/the-mysterious-fungus-infecting-the-american-southwest/375191/

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/01/20/death-dust
    , @anonymous
    Excellent post. And I wonder how many molds and fungi exist "out there" about which we are totally ignorant.

    As we dig up the rain forests and the Siberian tundra, God knows what we are letting loose on the populace!

    , @Simple Song
    They tend to be less aggressive about looking for fungus for a few reasons:

    1.) Fungi reproduce much more slowly than bacteria, so
    2.) In non-immune compromised people (no HIV, not on chemo) usually your own immune system can take care of the fungus; although there are exceptions, such as coccidiomycoses in the San Joaquin valley; unfortunately
    3.) unlike antibiotics, which are fairly benign, many antifungals are somewhat toxic to mammals as well. Remember mammals and fungi are much closer to each other than mammals and bacteria on the tree of life.

    So when you're not sure what's causing an infection (very often the case--cultures frequently yield ambiguous results), better to treat for bacteria first. Less downside, more upside...
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  12. @Mr. Anon

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.
     
    I've often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.

    Psychotherapists seem to have scaled back their ambitions in recent years because of the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy in teaching people to manage their emotional issues better, and in recognition of the fact that this form of therapy seems to have validated insights from Stoicism and Buddhism.

    In fact it seems a bit of a letdown to read that one form of CBT effective in treating depression, called activation therapy, tells you to get off your ass and do stuff. (Perhaps you can start by cleaning your room.) This sounds like something the traditional grandmother could have told you to combat the blues.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Unfortunately, "traditional grandmothers" are rare. Even many who had children in the 40's were already F'ed in the head. Their parents seem to have had more sense, in my recollection. The sensible ones are dead now.
    , @Bill
    Agree. Except. Stoicism and Buddhism? As you say, CBT, in a nutshell, is "shut up, quit complaining, get the fuck out of bed, do something productive, pretend you're happy. If you are afraid of X, do X 50,000 times until you're not afraid any more." That's not Stoicism and Buddhism, particularly. It's common sense. It's only the freaking head shrinkers in the modern developed world who came up with the idea that CBT didn't work (before they called it CBT). And they stopped thinking CBT didn't work at precisely the moment they had convinced the entire society it didn't work---because, at that point, they could give it a head shrinker name and charge people for it. Babushka didn't charge for CBT. She dispensed it for free.

    Head shrinkers are the only thing Scientologists are right about.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Heh. Well, there's a little bit more neuroscience to CBT at least. Essentially, so as long as the person engaging in it focuses on the behavior to change and then mentally executes the change, the focus to do so gradually builds the myelin pathways against it. The "habit against habit," as it might be.
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  13. The scientist wrote in her log:
    “Counted seven sick frogs in the bog.
    Lord Kek: Build a wall
    Barring humans and all
    The diseases they bring through the fog.”

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    • LOL: Buffalo Joe
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  14. @Mr. Anon

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.
     
    I've often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.

    “I’ve often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.”

    My mom-a retired nurse- used to say the only difference between patients and staff at a mental ward were who had keys on their belts.

    Read More
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  15. @mobi
    I clicked, ready to get all worked up over muslims in 18-wheelers.

    Oh well, another day.

    Read More
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  16. Feels bad, man.

    Read More
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  17. @anony-mouse
    Moi, j'ai une autre idee.

    Agreed. I too thought he was talking about the French.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Agreed. I too thought he was talking about the French.
     
    https://www.amazon.com/French-Revolution-San-Domingo/dp/1447664965
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  18. @Anonymous
    It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??

    Here (?):

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/12/a-new-way-to-be-mad/304671/

    Why do certain psychopathologies arise, seemingly out of nowhere, in certain societies and during certain historical periods, and then disappear just as suddenly? Why did young men in late-nineteenth-century France begin lapsing into a fugue state, wandering the continent with no memory of their past, coming to themselves months later in Moscow or Algiers with no idea how they got there? What was it about America in the 1970s and 1980s that made it possible for thousands of Americans and their therapists to come to believe that two, ten, even dozens of personalities could be living in the same head?

    A transient mental illness is a mental illness that is limited to a certain time and place. It finds an ecological niche, as Hacking puts it—an idea that helps to explain how it thrives…Hacking’s ecological niches help to explain the conditions that made it possible for multiple-personality disorder to flourish in late-twentieth-century America and the fugue state to flourish in nineteenth-century Bordeaux. If the niche disappears, the mental illness disappears along with it.

    He has argued…that psychiatrists and other clinicians helped to create the epidemics of fugue in nineteenth-century Europe and multiple-personality disorder in late-twentieth-century America simply by the way they viewed the disorders—by the kinds of questions they asked patients, the treatments they used, the diagnostic categories available to them at the time, and the way these patients fit within those categories. He points out, for example, that the multiple-personality-disorder epidemic rode on the shoulders of a perceived epidemic of child abuse, which began to emerge in the 1960s and which was thought to be part of the cause of multiple-personality disorder. Multiple personalities were a result of childhood trauma; child abuse is a form of trauma; it seemed to make sense that if there were an epidemic of child abuse, we would see more and more multiples.

    Unlike objects, people are conscious of the way they are classified, and they alter their behavior and self-conceptions in response to their classification…In the 1970s, he argues, therapists started asking patients they thought might be multiples if they had been abused as children, and patients in therapy began remembering episodes of abuse (some of which may not have actually occurred). These memories reinforced the diagnosis of multiple-personality disorder, and once they were categorized as multiples, some patients began behaving as multiples are expected to behave. Not intentionally, of course, but the category “multiple-personality disorder” gave them a new way to be mad.

    By regarding a phenomenon as a psychiatric diagnosis—treating it, reifying it in psychiatric diagnostic manuals, developing instruments to measure it, inventing scales to rate its severity, establishing ways to reimburse the costs of its treatment, encouraging pharmaceutical companies to search for effective drugs, directing patients to support groups, writing about possible causes in journals—psychiatrists may be unwittingly colluding with broader cultural forces to contribute to the spread of a mental disorder.

    Fifty years ago the suggestion that tens of thousands of people would someday want their genitals surgically altered so that they could change their sex would have been ludicrous. But it has happened. The question is why. One answer would have it that this is an ancient condition, that there have always been people who fall outside the traditional sex classifications, but that only during the past forty years or so have we developed the surgical and endocrinological tools to fix the problem.

    But it is possible to imagine another story: that our cultural and historical conditions have not just revealed transsexuals but created them. That is, once “transsexual” and “gender-identity disorder” and “sex-reassignment surgery” became common linguistic currency, more people began conceptualizing and interpreting their experience in these terms. They began to make sense of their lives in a way that hadn’t been available to them before, and to some degree they actually became the kinds of people described by these terms.

    Ian Hacking uses the term “semantic contagion” to describe the way in which publicly identifying and describing a condition creates the means by which that condition spreads. He says it is always possible for people to reinterpret their past in light of a new conceptual category. And it is also possible for them to contemplate actions that they may not have contemplated before.

    Read More
    • Replies: @StAugustine
    This reinforces the point that Mr Sailer often makes, that having the words to discuss and classify phenomenon makes it easier to notice when this phenomenon is occurring. How can you diagnose something that you can't describe? Public manias probably always demand new descriptions.
    , @The Anti-Gnostic
    'Transgenderism' seems explainable by this model; the thesis, given great and serious credence, that the patient truly has a female/male Mind trapped in a male/female Body. If that's your premise, then the obvious solution is hack healthy human tissue, administer synthetic hormones to override every cell in the body, and apply makeup, clothing, etc. to reinforce what the patient is telling you.

    Speaking of scientists blundering around doing harmful things, I've read the Antarctic has a lot of filthy dumps now because we pay scientists to be there.
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  19. Regarding antifungals, it’s worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won’t kill anyone (who isn’t allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you’re really darn sure it’s a fungal infection.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem, and it's due in large part to physicians "freely" prescribing them to patients in whom they're uncertain that a bacterial infection exists. Anecdotally, one even hears of physicians, for purposes of shutting neurotic patients or child patients' parents up, prescribing antibiotics to patients who the physicians know do not need antibiotics. I had assumed this was common knowledge, but the way you worded your comment makes me think you're unaware of it.

    So yes, antibiotics don't typically have any direct major harmful effect on patients who don't need them (although they do kill off important gut flora), but they should not be prescribed more freely than antifungals.

    , @Jack Highlands
    Good point: Amphoterrible. Fungi and humans are both eukaryotes. Prokaryote biochemistry is a billion or two years older, so it's easier to find bacterial targets we don't have.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Regarding antifungals, it’s worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won’t kill anyone (who isn’t allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you’re really darn sure it’s a fungal infection.
     
    That is a good point, and I am aware that anti-fungals can be pretty hard on the body. But doctors seldom even test for fungal pathogens. They'll run up blood work, find nothing bacterial, and yet still prescribe antibiotics, figuring - eh', couldn't hurt.

    I'm not bashing doctors per se. They have a hard job, and most doctors are conscientious and try to do the best job they can for their patients. But they aren't scientists, and it often shows. Again, it's an object lesson in why IQ is generally a good trait to have in any profession. The smarter your doctor is, the more likely he is to actually think about your diagnosis.
    , @Twodees Partain
    The antifungals made by pharmaceutical manufacturers are indeed dangerous. The ones used by doctors before the advent of big pharma such as colloidal silver are much safer and still effective.

    Newer antifungals such as GSE, which are botanically based are also effective, but have been subjects of attacks, mainly on wikipedia, as a means of scaring people who want to try them.
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  20. It’s those genocidal ANGLO monsters that were responsible for the murder of 200 BILLION Quebecois starting in 1789. Who else could it be?

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  21. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    On a related issue, what is the consensus on the controversy involving Napoleon Chagnon and the Yanomami? As I understand things, he gained fame for claiming they were violent and warlike, but was subsequently accused of introducing disease and warlike tendencies to them. I haven’t read the detailed analyses on either side, and am trying to keep an open mind, since I have inclinations pushing in opposite directions. Maybe nobody knows the facts here? I don’t.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Studying a human group in the manner of anthropologists necessarily changes both the group and the anthropologist in ways in which no one is necessarily conscious. And personal biases and prejudices in all directions will necessarily taint any analysis of Chagnon's relationship with the Yanomami.

    So basically: I wouldn't try too hard to form any conclusions about this case.
    , @Samuel Skinner

    As I understand things, he gained fame for claiming they were violent and warlike, but was subsequently accused of introducing disease and warlike tendencies to them.
     
    Darkness in El Dorado. The claims of wrong doing have been rejected. The anthropological claims are treated like Steve Sailor and the claims of sexual impropriety (2 other anthropologists) are true.

    Napoleon Chagnon's anthropological claims are essentially basic redpill stuff- women desire violent men and men are violent to get more women and have more children. In other words, human behavior is shaped by evolution. This is controversial because if human behavior is so simple that dramatically reduces the scope of cultural anthropology. There are also complaints about his interactions and how he got access- it turns out violent people want weapons- but those are inevitable in anthropology (both the practice of and the practice of complaining about other anthropologists).
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  22. @Anonymous
    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We've been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it's been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    :

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    :

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm -- those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.
     
    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I'm not sure I'd feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I've visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don't think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    CBP agents really do tend to be terrible human beings, or at least they generally choose to act as such.

    It’s true that, for reasons everyone on this site is well aware of, the median American is an idiot compared to the median inhabitant of other first world countries, but I would chalk CBP awfulness up to pure lack of accountability. There really seems to be no accountability whatsoever for that agency. And of course, even the most cursory analysis of human nature reveals that there is an almost perfect correlation between lack of accountability and abuse of power.

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  23. @Wally
    Agreed. I too thought he was talking about the French.

    Agreed. I too thought he was talking about the French.

    https://www.amazon.com/French-Revolution-San-Domingo/dp/1447664965

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  24. @Polynices
    Regarding antifungals, it's worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won't kill anyone (who isn't allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you're really darn sure it's a fungal infection.

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem, and it’s due in large part to physicians “freely” prescribing them to patients in whom they’re uncertain that a bacterial infection exists. Anecdotally, one even hears of physicians, for purposes of shutting neurotic patients or child patients’ parents up, prescribing antibiotics to patients who the physicians know do not need antibiotics. I had assumed this was common knowledge, but the way you worded your comment makes me think you’re unaware of it.

    So yes, antibiotics don’t typically have any direct major harmful effect on patients who don’t need them (although they do kill off important gut flora), but they should not be prescribed more freely than antifungals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill
    This problem is caused by medical ethics. It is unethical to prescribe placebos because muh autonomy. There is no end to the damage caused by moderns' freakishly faulty mental models of humans.
    , @Simple Song
    I would respectfully disagree that the majority of antibiotic resistance is being caused by over prescription by physicians in a primary care setting. I think this is a relatively minor factor and most likely the biggest downside of antibiotic overprescription in humans is likely unexpected allergic reaction (sometimes fatal) or c. dificile superinfection (which is separate from resistance) or just poor allocation of resources.

    The majority of antibiotic resistance to common antibiotics is caused by widespread agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals to increase weight gain and allow confinement operations. There is a lot of bacteria in cow shit, and if the cow has constantly been getting oral antibiotics for the majority of its life, all that bacteria has been highly selected for antibiotic resistance; and once they're out of the cow's ass, they're into the environment.

    Multidrug resistant TB and gonorrhea that have emerged recently likely are due to the healthcare system aggressively treating infections, but this is a different scenario from the primary care physician giving somebody augmentin for an ear infection to keep the day moving along.
    , @Alden
    As usual, you don’t know what you’re writing about. You’re not a liberal, but you have the standard empty brain that will believe anything mind of a liberal.
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  25. @PSR
    Psychiatrist joke falls ... very ... flat
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  26. @Mr. Anon
    I wonder how much illness in humans is caused by fungus. Doctors will throw antibiotics at you, and now even antivirals, but antifungals? Bah, they can't be bothered. The possibility of fungi as disease pathogen seems to never even occur to them. Perhaps that would explain persistent sinus and chest infections that seem immune to antibiotics. Especially in hot humid climates that are teeming with molds and fungi.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccidioidomycosis

    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/valley-fever/symptoms-causes/syc-20378761

    Valley fever is a fungal infection caused by coccidioides (kok-sid-e-OY-deze) organisms. It can cause fever, chest pain and coughing, among other signs and symptoms.
    ……
    The fungi that cause valley fever — Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii — thrive in the arid desert soils of southern Arizona, Nevada, northern Mexico and California’s San Joaquin Valley. They’re also endemic to New Mexico, Texas, and parts of Central and South America — areas with mild winters and arid summers.
    ……
    Race. For reasons that aren’t well-understood, Filipinos, Hispanics, blacks and Native Americans are more susceptible to developing serious infection with coccidioidomycosis than are whites.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/08/the-mysterious-fungus-infecting-the-american-southwest/375191/

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/01/20/death-dust

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  27. @Anonymous
    On a related issue, what is the consensus on the controversy involving Napoleon Chagnon and the Yanomami? As I understand things, he gained fame for claiming they were violent and warlike, but was subsequently accused of introducing disease and warlike tendencies to them. I haven't read the detailed analyses on either side, and am trying to keep an open mind, since I have inclinations pushing in opposite directions. Maybe nobody knows the facts here? I don't.

    Studying a human group in the manner of anthropologists necessarily changes both the group and the anthropologist in ways in which no one is necessarily conscious. And personal biases and prejudices in all directions will necessarily taint any analysis of Chagnon’s relationship with the Yanomami.

    So basically: I wouldn’t try too hard to form any conclusions about this case.

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  28. @Polynices
    Regarding antifungals, it's worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won't kill anyone (who isn't allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you're really darn sure it's a fungal infection.

    Good point: Amphoterrible. Fungi and humans are both eukaryotes. Prokaryote biochemistry is a billion or two years older, so it’s easier to find bacterial targets we don’t have.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    I don't know about anti-fungal medicine, but killing fungi on foods is no big deal: Sulfur. It's the insecticides that are more harmful to us. Talk about eukaryotes!
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  29. @advancedatheist
    Psychotherapists seem to have scaled back their ambitions in recent years because of the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy in teaching people to manage their emotional issues better, and in recognition of the fact that this form of therapy seems to have validated insights from Stoicism and Buddhism.

    In fact it seems a bit of a letdown to read that one form of CBT effective in treating depression, called activation therapy, tells you to get off your ass and do stuff. (Perhaps you can start by cleaning your room.) This sounds like something the traditional grandmother could have told you to combat the blues.

    Unfortunately, “traditional grandmothers” are rare. Even many who had children in the 40′s were already F’ed in the head. Their parents seem to have had more sense, in my recollection. The sensible ones are dead now.

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  30. @Clifford Brown
    This one is too easy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ar-Pl0Ep00A

    As a member of the amphibian LGBT community, I am outraged that Alex Jones thinks there us anything wrong with us frogs “turning gay.” There is nothing wrong with being gay, whether you’re a frog, a toad, a salamander or even a non-amphibian. We gay frogs have had it up to here with this vile homofrogaphobia, and we will not stand… wait… is that a fly?

    [catches fly with tongue]

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  31. @mobi

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??
     
    Here (?):

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/12/a-new-way-to-be-mad/304671/

    Why do certain psychopathologies arise, seemingly out of nowhere, in certain societies and during certain historical periods, and then disappear just as suddenly? Why did young men in late-nineteenth-century France begin lapsing into a fugue state, wandering the continent with no memory of their past, coming to themselves months later in Moscow or Algiers with no idea how they got there? What was it about America in the 1970s and 1980s that made it possible for thousands of Americans and their therapists to come to believe that two, ten, even dozens of personalities could be living in the same head?
     

    A transient mental illness is a mental illness that is limited to a certain time and place. It finds an ecological niche, as Hacking puts it—an idea that helps to explain how it thrives...Hacking's ecological niches help to explain the conditions that made it possible for multiple-personality disorder to flourish in late-twentieth-century America and the fugue state to flourish in nineteenth-century Bordeaux. If the niche disappears, the mental illness disappears along with it.

     


    He has argued...that psychiatrists and other clinicians helped to create the epidemics of fugue in nineteenth-century Europe and multiple-personality disorder in late-twentieth-century America simply by the way they viewed the disorders—by the kinds of questions they asked patients, the treatments they used, the diagnostic categories available to them at the time, and the way these patients fit within those categories. He points out, for example, that the multiple-personality-disorder epidemic rode on the shoulders of a perceived epidemic of child abuse, which began to emerge in the 1960s and which was thought to be part of the cause of multiple-personality disorder. Multiple personalities were a result of childhood trauma; child abuse is a form of trauma; it seemed to make sense that if there were an epidemic of child abuse, we would see more and more multiples.
     

    Unlike objects, people are conscious of the way they are classified, and they alter their behavior and self-conceptions in response to their classification...In the 1970s, he argues, therapists started asking patients they thought might be multiples if they had been abused as children, and patients in therapy began remembering episodes of abuse (some of which may not have actually occurred). These memories reinforced the diagnosis of multiple-personality disorder, and once they were categorized as multiples, some patients began behaving as multiples are expected to behave. Not intentionally, of course, but the category "multiple-personality disorder" gave them a new way to be mad.

     


    By regarding a phenomenon as a psychiatric diagnosis—treating it, reifying it in psychiatric diagnostic manuals, developing instruments to measure it, inventing scales to rate its severity, establishing ways to reimburse the costs of its treatment, encouraging pharmaceutical companies to search for effective drugs, directing patients to support groups, writing about possible causes in journals—psychiatrists may be unwittingly colluding with broader cultural forces to contribute to the spread of a mental disorder.
     

    Fifty years ago the suggestion that tens of thousands of people would someday want their genitals surgically altered so that they could change their sex would have been ludicrous. But it has happened. The question is why. One answer would have it that this is an ancient condition, that there have always been people who fall outside the traditional sex classifications, but that only during the past forty years or so have we developed the surgical and endocrinological tools to fix the problem.

    But it is possible to imagine another story: that our cultural and historical conditions have not just revealed transsexuals but created them. That is, once "transsexual" and "gender-identity disorder" and "sex-reassignment surgery" became common linguistic currency, more people began conceptualizing and interpreting their experience in these terms. They began to make sense of their lives in a way that hadn't been available to them before, and to some degree they actually became the kinds of people described by these terms.
     

    Ian Hacking uses the term "semantic contagion" to describe the way in which publicly identifying and describing a condition creates the means by which that condition spreads. He says it is always possible for people to reinterpret their past in light of a new conceptual category. And it is also possible for them to contemplate actions that they may not have contemplated before.
     
    ...

    This reinforces the point that Mr Sailer often makes, that having the words to discuss and classify phenomenon makes it easier to notice when this phenomenon is occurring. How can you diagnose something that you can’t describe? Public manias probably always demand new descriptions.

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  32. It’s also possible that The Economist magazine is spreading the virus which will kill off white people around the world.

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  33. War on Pepe

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cortes
    Amphibious warfare.

    To prevent the return of the dinosaur (Jurassic Park).

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  34. @Polynices
    Regarding antifungals, it's worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won't kill anyone (who isn't allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you're really darn sure it's a fungal infection.

    Regarding antifungals, it’s worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won’t kill anyone (who isn’t allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you’re really darn sure it’s a fungal infection.

    That is a good point, and I am aware that anti-fungals can be pretty hard on the body. But doctors seldom even test for fungal pathogens. They’ll run up blood work, find nothing bacterial, and yet still prescribe antibiotics, figuring – eh’, couldn’t hurt.

    I’m not bashing doctors per se. They have a hard job, and most doctors are conscientious and try to do the best job they can for their patients. But they aren’t scientists, and it often shows. Again, it’s an object lesson in why IQ is generally a good trait to have in any profession. The smarter your doctor is, the more likely he is to actually think about your diagnosis.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.
    , @Eustace Tilley (not)
    LeBron has got plenty to say
    On political issues today;
    Calls time out for a quibble
    Over "Shut up and dribble."
    Athlete's-Foot-in-the-Mouth's here to stay.
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  35. @Mr. Anon

    Regarding antifungals, it’s worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won’t kill anyone (who isn’t allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you’re really darn sure it’s a fungal infection.
     
    That is a good point, and I am aware that anti-fungals can be pretty hard on the body. But doctors seldom even test for fungal pathogens. They'll run up blood work, find nothing bacterial, and yet still prescribe antibiotics, figuring - eh', couldn't hurt.

    I'm not bashing doctors per se. They have a hard job, and most doctors are conscientious and try to do the best job they can for their patients. But they aren't scientists, and it often shows. Again, it's an object lesson in why IQ is generally a good trait to have in any profession. The smarter your doctor is, the more likely he is to actually think about your diagnosis.

    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    How would that work? For example, in this situation?
    , @Anonymous
    I'm pretty sure some elaborate algorithm medical diagnosis computer packages have existed for years now.
    , @MEH 0910
    Google’s new AI algorithm predicts heart disease by looking at your eyes

    Scientists from Google and its health-tech subsidiary Verily have discovered a new way to assess a person’s risk of heart disease using machine learning. By analyzing scans of the back of a patient’s eye, the company’s software is able to accurately deduce data, including an individual’s age, blood pressure, and whether or not they smoke. This can then be used to predict their risk of suffering a major cardiac event — such as a heart attack — with roughly the same accuracy as current leading methods.
     
    , @Romanian
    The diagnosis AI is only as good as what it is taught to recognize. Think about how the AMA has removed transgenderism from the worst body dysphoria category specifically to allow for elective self-mutilation. We are politicizing diseases nowadays. It is easier to do with mental health, but who is to say it will not jump to physical health as well? It is not like they are not related. After all mental disease may just be a chemical imbalance in the brain. Like racism and preference for one's own people or reticence towards wonderful refugees.
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  36. @Steve Sailer
    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.

    How would that work? For example, in this situation?

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  37. @Steve Sailer
    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.

    I’m pretty sure some elaborate algorithm medical diagnosis computer packages have existed for years now.

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  38. @Anonymous
    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We've been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it's been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    :

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    :

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm -- those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.
     
    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I'm not sure I'd feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I've visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don't think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    Livestock farmers are particularly sensitive to this method of pathogen transmission. Even backyard chicken farmers are warned about their boots.

    I read about a guy who used breeding strategy to develop the perfect rooster tail feathers for use in fly fishing. Millionaire many times over. He has at least two separate facilities isolated by many miles and the staff is strictly sequestered.

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910

    I read about a guy who used breeding strategy to develop the perfect rooster tail feathers for use in fly fishing.
     
    http://www.5280.com/2017/06/the-feather-baron/

    https://www.fieldandstream.com/perfect-feathers-for-fly-tiers

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  39. @Anon
    War on Pepe

    Amphibious warfare.

    To prevent the return of the dinosaur (Jurassic Park).

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  40. I’m not bashing doctors per se. They have a hard job, and most doctors are conscientious and try to do the best job they can for their patients. But they aren’t scientists, and it often shows. Again, it’s an object lesson in why IQ is generally a good trait to have in any profession. The smarter your doctor is, the more likely he is to actually think about your diagnosis.

    What doctors learn in medical school burns a life-long imprint on their brains; due to stress and the cram-school atmosphere of memorization. Doctors are supposed to keep up with the latest research, but that is easier said than done. Most of them stick with the tried and true. I’m not saying that doctors are incapable of learning new tricks, just that the odds are against it.

    Scientists, OTOH, constantly learn new tricks; and their education is not so “flashbulb”.

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  41. @Mr. Anon

    Regarding antifungals, it’s worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won’t kill anyone (who isn’t allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you’re really darn sure it’s a fungal infection.
     
    That is a good point, and I am aware that anti-fungals can be pretty hard on the body. But doctors seldom even test for fungal pathogens. They'll run up blood work, find nothing bacterial, and yet still prescribe antibiotics, figuring - eh', couldn't hurt.

    I'm not bashing doctors per se. They have a hard job, and most doctors are conscientious and try to do the best job they can for their patients. But they aren't scientists, and it often shows. Again, it's an object lesson in why IQ is generally a good trait to have in any profession. The smarter your doctor is, the more likely he is to actually think about your diagnosis.

    LeBron has got plenty to say
    On political issues today;
    Calls time out for a quibble
    Over “Shut up and dribble.”
    Athlete’s-Foot-in-the-Mouth’s here to stay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Eustace, excellent as always. The Cleveland.com website, Plains Dealer on line, seriously asks if Le Bron is presidential material. So Steve, are there any athletes that could run for president in 2020? WNY had Jack Kemp who was half of a presidential ticket, but I don't see any contenders today.
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  42. @mobi

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??
     
    Here (?):

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2000/12/a-new-way-to-be-mad/304671/

    Why do certain psychopathologies arise, seemingly out of nowhere, in certain societies and during certain historical periods, and then disappear just as suddenly? Why did young men in late-nineteenth-century France begin lapsing into a fugue state, wandering the continent with no memory of their past, coming to themselves months later in Moscow or Algiers with no idea how they got there? What was it about America in the 1970s and 1980s that made it possible for thousands of Americans and their therapists to come to believe that two, ten, even dozens of personalities could be living in the same head?
     

    A transient mental illness is a mental illness that is limited to a certain time and place. It finds an ecological niche, as Hacking puts it—an idea that helps to explain how it thrives...Hacking's ecological niches help to explain the conditions that made it possible for multiple-personality disorder to flourish in late-twentieth-century America and the fugue state to flourish in nineteenth-century Bordeaux. If the niche disappears, the mental illness disappears along with it.

     


    He has argued...that psychiatrists and other clinicians helped to create the epidemics of fugue in nineteenth-century Europe and multiple-personality disorder in late-twentieth-century America simply by the way they viewed the disorders—by the kinds of questions they asked patients, the treatments they used, the diagnostic categories available to them at the time, and the way these patients fit within those categories. He points out, for example, that the multiple-personality-disorder epidemic rode on the shoulders of a perceived epidemic of child abuse, which began to emerge in the 1960s and which was thought to be part of the cause of multiple-personality disorder. Multiple personalities were a result of childhood trauma; child abuse is a form of trauma; it seemed to make sense that if there were an epidemic of child abuse, we would see more and more multiples.
     

    Unlike objects, people are conscious of the way they are classified, and they alter their behavior and self-conceptions in response to their classification...In the 1970s, he argues, therapists started asking patients they thought might be multiples if they had been abused as children, and patients in therapy began remembering episodes of abuse (some of which may not have actually occurred). These memories reinforced the diagnosis of multiple-personality disorder, and once they were categorized as multiples, some patients began behaving as multiples are expected to behave. Not intentionally, of course, but the category "multiple-personality disorder" gave them a new way to be mad.

     


    By regarding a phenomenon as a psychiatric diagnosis—treating it, reifying it in psychiatric diagnostic manuals, developing instruments to measure it, inventing scales to rate its severity, establishing ways to reimburse the costs of its treatment, encouraging pharmaceutical companies to search for effective drugs, directing patients to support groups, writing about possible causes in journals—psychiatrists may be unwittingly colluding with broader cultural forces to contribute to the spread of a mental disorder.
     

    Fifty years ago the suggestion that tens of thousands of people would someday want their genitals surgically altered so that they could change their sex would have been ludicrous. But it has happened. The question is why. One answer would have it that this is an ancient condition, that there have always been people who fall outside the traditional sex classifications, but that only during the past forty years or so have we developed the surgical and endocrinological tools to fix the problem.

    But it is possible to imagine another story: that our cultural and historical conditions have not just revealed transsexuals but created them. That is, once "transsexual" and "gender-identity disorder" and "sex-reassignment surgery" became common linguistic currency, more people began conceptualizing and interpreting their experience in these terms. They began to make sense of their lives in a way that hadn't been available to them before, and to some degree they actually became the kinds of people described by these terms.
     

    Ian Hacking uses the term "semantic contagion" to describe the way in which publicly identifying and describing a condition creates the means by which that condition spreads. He says it is always possible for people to reinterpret their past in light of a new conceptual category. And it is also possible for them to contemplate actions that they may not have contemplated before.
     
    ...

    ‘Transgenderism’ seems explainable by this model; the thesis, given great and serious credence, that the patient truly has a female/male Mind trapped in a male/female Body. If that’s your premise, then the obvious solution is hack healthy human tissue, administer synthetic hormones to override every cell in the body, and apply makeup, clothing, etc. to reinforce what the patient is telling you.

    Speaking of scientists blundering around doing harmful things, I’ve read the Antarctic has a lot of filthy dumps now because we pay scientists to be there.

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  43. It’s not just frogs!

    The return of measles in Europe is “a tragedy we simply cannot accept”

    https://qz.com/1210622/measles-outbreaks-in-europe-saw-cases-rise-400-in-2017/

    The number of measles cases has rebounded in Europe in 2017, after setting a record low in 2016. The continent recorded some 21,000 cases last year, according to the World Health Organization, which is nearly four times as many cases as in the year before that.

    Neither the words immigrant nor migrant appear in the article. But they do mention the latest euphemism, “unevenly spread-out populations.”

    Unlike the NHS, however, Salathe argues that in practice vaccination rates need to be much higher. That’s because the non-immunized population is not evenly spread out. So even though the average vaccination rate may be 95%, there may be some pockets where the rate may be lower than 80% and that’s low enough for the disease to spread.

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  44. “I’m French! Why do you think I have this outrageous accent, you silly king?”

    “Uh, parasites?”

    “Mind your own business!”

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  45. I just read the Audacious Epigone posting that this refers to. Didn’t find a stitch of evidence for this theory nor the slightest link to any.

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  46. @Anonymous
    On a related issue, what is the consensus on the controversy involving Napoleon Chagnon and the Yanomami? As I understand things, he gained fame for claiming they were violent and warlike, but was subsequently accused of introducing disease and warlike tendencies to them. I haven't read the detailed analyses on either side, and am trying to keep an open mind, since I have inclinations pushing in opposite directions. Maybe nobody knows the facts here? I don't.

    As I understand things, he gained fame for claiming they were violent and warlike, but was subsequently accused of introducing disease and warlike tendencies to them.

    Darkness in El Dorado. The claims of wrong doing have been rejected. The anthropological claims are treated like Steve Sailor and the claims of sexual impropriety (2 other anthropologists) are true.

    Napoleon Chagnon’s anthropological claims are essentially basic redpill stuff- women desire violent men and men are violent to get more women and have more children. In other words, human behavior is shaped by evolution. This is controversial because if human behavior is so simple that dramatically reduces the scope of cultural anthropology. There are also complaints about his interactions and how he got access- it turns out violent people want weapons- but those are inevitable in anthropology (both the practice of and the practice of complaining about other anthropologists).

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  47. @Jack Highlands
    Good point: Amphoterrible. Fungi and humans are both eukaryotes. Prokaryote biochemistry is a billion or two years older, so it's easier to find bacterial targets we don't have.

    I don’t know about anti-fungal medicine, but killing fungi on foods is no big deal: Sulfur. It’s the insecticides that are more harmful to us. Talk about eukaryotes!

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  48. @PSR
    Psychiatrist joke falls ... very ... flat

    Nah, the joke about shrinks is pretty good. IMO, a shrink is a fraud by definition. Some, at least the ones who have medical degrees, do the most harm by prescribing very harmful drugs. The others who limit their practice to talking, mainly harm their patients through fraud, draining them of money while delivering nothing more than a chance to vent.

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    • Replies: @Allison
    Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology. In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments. The drugs aren't perfect but most patients treated with the correct drugs can live fulfilling lives. I'm grateful to be alive now when I can have the chance of a life and career with proper medical treatment. I made it to medical school!
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  49. It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.

    Viktor E. Frankl claimed in 1966, that there’d be doctor-caused neuroses – and he even gave them a name: Iatrogenic Neuroses.

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  50. @Polynices
    Regarding antifungals, it's worth noting that they tend to be fairly toxic drugs. Antibiotics can be prescribed pretty freely because they generally won't kill anyone (who isn't allergic) but systemic antifungals are nasty with lots of concerns about liver or kidney function. So you wait to prescribe them until you're really darn sure it's a fungal infection.

    The antifungals made by pharmaceutical manufacturers are indeed dangerous. The ones used by doctors before the advent of big pharma such as colloidal silver are much safer and still effective.

    Newer antifungals such as GSE, which are botanically based are also effective, but have been subjects of attacks, mainly on wikipedia, as a means of scaring people who want to try them.

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  51. @william munny
    Livestock farmers are particularly sensitive to this method of pathogen transmission. Even backyard chicken farmers are warned about their boots.

    I read about a guy who used breeding strategy to develop the perfect rooster tail feathers for use in fly fishing. Millionaire many times over. He has at least two separate facilities isolated by many miles and the staff is strictly sequestered.

    I read about a guy who used breeding strategy to develop the perfect rooster tail feathers for use in fly fishing.

    http://www.5280.com/2017/06/the-feather-baron/

    https://www.fieldandstream.com/perfect-feathers-for-fly-tiers

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  52. @Anonymous
    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We've been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it's been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    :

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    :

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm -- those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.
     
    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I'm not sure I'd feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I've visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don't think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    Anonymous, my grand daughter is an equestrian, and often when we visit the stables, they spray our shoes to prevent the spread of equine diseases.

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  53. @Anonymous
    It’s also possible that psychiatrists spread mental disease germs.

    Say what? Where did this idea come from??

    Anonymous, not germs but seeds, as in “He planted a seed in his head,” you know, as in a thought.

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    The germ of an idea.
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  54. @advancedatheist
    Psychotherapists seem to have scaled back their ambitions in recent years because of the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy in teaching people to manage their emotional issues better, and in recognition of the fact that this form of therapy seems to have validated insights from Stoicism and Buddhism.

    In fact it seems a bit of a letdown to read that one form of CBT effective in treating depression, called activation therapy, tells you to get off your ass and do stuff. (Perhaps you can start by cleaning your room.) This sounds like something the traditional grandmother could have told you to combat the blues.

    Agree. Except. Stoicism and Buddhism? As you say, CBT, in a nutshell, is “shut up, quit complaining, get the fuck out of bed, do something productive, pretend you’re happy. If you are afraid of X, do X 50,000 times until you’re not afraid any more.” That’s not Stoicism and Buddhism, particularly. It’s common sense. It’s only the freaking head shrinkers in the modern developed world who came up with the idea that CBT didn’t work (before they called it CBT). And they stopped thinking CBT didn’t work at precisely the moment they had convinced the entire society it didn’t work—because, at that point, they could give it a head shrinker name and charge people for it. Babushka didn’t charge for CBT. She dispensed it for free.

    Head shrinkers are the only thing Scientologists are right about.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    To this point the best one-stop treatment of psychiatry is a three hour video by the Hubbardites, free on YouTube, The Marketing of Madness. It contains no proselytization.
    , @Melendwyr
    I'm afraid you're quite right. The medicine of the mind is in roughly the same state that the medicine of the body was three hundred years ago - and it isn't actually all that impressive right now.
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  55. @AndrewR
    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem, and it's due in large part to physicians "freely" prescribing them to patients in whom they're uncertain that a bacterial infection exists. Anecdotally, one even hears of physicians, for purposes of shutting neurotic patients or child patients' parents up, prescribing antibiotics to patients who the physicians know do not need antibiotics. I had assumed this was common knowledge, but the way you worded your comment makes me think you're unaware of it.

    So yes, antibiotics don't typically have any direct major harmful effect on patients who don't need them (although they do kill off important gut flora), but they should not be prescribed more freely than antifungals.

    This problem is caused by medical ethics. It is unethical to prescribe placebos because muh autonomy. There is no end to the damage caused by moderns’ freakishly faulty mental models of humans.

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  56. @Mr. Anon
    I wonder how much illness in humans is caused by fungus. Doctors will throw antibiotics at you, and now even antivirals, but antifungals? Bah, they can't be bothered. The possibility of fungi as disease pathogen seems to never even occur to them. Perhaps that would explain persistent sinus and chest infections that seem immune to antibiotics. Especially in hot humid climates that are teeming with molds and fungi.

    Excellent post. And I wonder how many molds and fungi exist “out there” about which we are totally ignorant.

    As we dig up the rain forests and the Siberian tundra, God knows what we are letting loose on the populace!

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  57. “We are bringing them the plague.”—Sigmund Freud, on his way to America in 1909

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Cite?
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  58. @Buffalo Joe
    Anonymous, not germs but seeds, as in "He planted a seed in his head," you know, as in a thought.

    The germ of an idea.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    MEH, nicely done, better than mine.
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  59. @Mr. Anon
    I wonder how much illness in humans is caused by fungus. Doctors will throw antibiotics at you, and now even antivirals, but antifungals? Bah, they can't be bothered. The possibility of fungi as disease pathogen seems to never even occur to them. Perhaps that would explain persistent sinus and chest infections that seem immune to antibiotics. Especially in hot humid climates that are teeming with molds and fungi.

    They tend to be less aggressive about looking for fungus for a few reasons:

    1.) Fungi reproduce much more slowly than bacteria, so
    2.) In non-immune compromised people (no HIV, not on chemo) usually your own immune system can take care of the fungus; although there are exceptions, such as coccidiomycoses in the San Joaquin valley; unfortunately
    3.) unlike antibiotics, which are fairly benign, many antifungals are somewhat toxic to mammals as well. Remember mammals and fungi are much closer to each other than mammals and bacteria on the tree of life.

    So when you’re not sure what’s causing an infection (very often the case–cultures frequently yield ambiguous results), better to treat for bacteria first. Less downside, more upside…

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I understand what you're saying and do not dispute it. However, a lot of doctors seem resistant even to the idea of considering fungi as a pathogen - it's as if it never occured to them. As anti-biotics have gotten better, and the threat of bacterial infection has receded (although perhaps now making a comeback due to hardier/more resistant bacteria), so it seems that medical/pharmacological science would spend a little more time considering fungal and parasitical infections, the latter of which now seems to becoming more prevalent due to immigration from the third world.
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  60. @AndrewR
    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem, and it's due in large part to physicians "freely" prescribing them to patients in whom they're uncertain that a bacterial infection exists. Anecdotally, one even hears of physicians, for purposes of shutting neurotic patients or child patients' parents up, prescribing antibiotics to patients who the physicians know do not need antibiotics. I had assumed this was common knowledge, but the way you worded your comment makes me think you're unaware of it.

    So yes, antibiotics don't typically have any direct major harmful effect on patients who don't need them (although they do kill off important gut flora), but they should not be prescribed more freely than antifungals.

    I would respectfully disagree that the majority of antibiotic resistance is being caused by over prescription by physicians in a primary care setting. I think this is a relatively minor factor and most likely the biggest downside of antibiotic overprescription in humans is likely unexpected allergic reaction (sometimes fatal) or c. dificile superinfection (which is separate from resistance) or just poor allocation of resources.

    The majority of antibiotic resistance to common antibiotics is caused by widespread agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals to increase weight gain and allow confinement operations. There is a lot of bacteria in cow shit, and if the cow has constantly been getting oral antibiotics for the majority of its life, all that bacteria has been highly selected for antibiotic resistance; and once they’re out of the cow’s ass, they’re into the environment.

    Multidrug resistant TB and gonorrhea that have emerged recently likely are due to the healthcare system aggressively treating infections, but this is a different scenario from the primary care physician giving somebody augmentin for an ear infection to keep the day moving along.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I agree that the profligate use of antibiotics in agriculture is a big problem and likely a big source of anti-biotic resistance. I would guess that the worst effect of over-prescription of antibiotics in health-care settings is not the drugs given to Sally Soccer-mom and her kids (she knows to complete the course), but rather to the hard-cases - drug addicts, drunks, and the sexually promiscous. What are the chances that it is only 1-5% of the prescribed-to population that accounts for most of the drug-resistance? I would guess pretty high.

    A friend of mine speculated about sewers being breeding grounds too. A lot of the anti-biotics that people take, just get pissed out. All that crap in the sewers is probably marinating in the stuff. Think of what might be evolving down there.
    , @Alden
    Antibiotics actually cure ear and other infections and what is wrong with that?

    It’s good the be cynical about all the medical scares on the internet.
    , @Alden
    So drs should not prescribe antibiotics to cure ear and other infections? What are we supposed to do, suffer agonizing pain and perhaps even die while waiting for our bodies “natural defenses” to end the infections?

    Ever looked at the stats on soldiers not dying from wounds but weeks later from infected wounds that are now easily cured or never occur because of antibiotics?

    People often died from infections before antibiotics. Even tooth infections spread bacteria all over the body through the blood system and killed people.
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  61. @PSR
    Psychiatrist joke falls ... very ... flat

    Given that the vast majority of non-mooslim mass murderers in the past decade or so were taking or recently coming off prescribed psychiatric medications, I’d disagree with you and say Steve Sailer’s humor is spot on.

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  62. @PSR
    Psychiatrist joke falls ... very ... flat

    No joke. Self-fulfilling prophecy, in this case, Gaslighting.

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  63. @BrokenSymmetry
    "We are bringing them the plague.”—Sigmund Freud, on his way to America in 1909

    Cite?

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  64. @Clifford Brown
    This one is too easy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ar-Pl0Ep00A

    Alex Jones: proof that the CIA’s MK Ultra program is still operational.

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  65. @PSR
    Psychiatrist joke falls ... very ... flat

    Certainly anybody who has any contact with psychiatrists knows that as a general matter they are crazier than a bag of rabid weasels. And if there are “mental disease germs”, that would explain a lot. They are both sources and recipients of these germs.

    From the West Hunter post: “…For a few years the herpetologists were concerned yet happy. Concerned, because many frog populations were crashing and some were going extinct. Happy, because confused puppies in Washington were giving them money, something that hardly ever happens to frogmen. The theory was that amphibians were ‘canaries in a coal mine’, uniquely sensitive to environmental degradation….”

    The theories were (in order) UV radiation due to CFCs (not true), herbicides (not true) and then climate change (not true). Turns out the problem was, like most of our problems, caused by government, which financed activities which directly caused the problem, sending herpetologists out to infect the frogs.

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  66. @Simple Song
    They tend to be less aggressive about looking for fungus for a few reasons:

    1.) Fungi reproduce much more slowly than bacteria, so
    2.) In non-immune compromised people (no HIV, not on chemo) usually your own immune system can take care of the fungus; although there are exceptions, such as coccidiomycoses in the San Joaquin valley; unfortunately
    3.) unlike antibiotics, which are fairly benign, many antifungals are somewhat toxic to mammals as well. Remember mammals and fungi are much closer to each other than mammals and bacteria on the tree of life.

    So when you're not sure what's causing an infection (very often the case--cultures frequently yield ambiguous results), better to treat for bacteria first. Less downside, more upside...

    I understand what you’re saying and do not dispute it. However, a lot of doctors seem resistant even to the idea of considering fungi as a pathogen – it’s as if it never occured to them. As anti-biotics have gotten better, and the threat of bacterial infection has receded (although perhaps now making a comeback due to hardier/more resistant bacteria), so it seems that medical/pharmacological science would spend a little more time considering fungal and parasitical infections, the latter of which now seems to becoming more prevalent due to immigration from the third world.

    Read More
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  67. @Simple Song
    I would respectfully disagree that the majority of antibiotic resistance is being caused by over prescription by physicians in a primary care setting. I think this is a relatively minor factor and most likely the biggest downside of antibiotic overprescription in humans is likely unexpected allergic reaction (sometimes fatal) or c. dificile superinfection (which is separate from resistance) or just poor allocation of resources.

    The majority of antibiotic resistance to common antibiotics is caused by widespread agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals to increase weight gain and allow confinement operations. There is a lot of bacteria in cow shit, and if the cow has constantly been getting oral antibiotics for the majority of its life, all that bacteria has been highly selected for antibiotic resistance; and once they're out of the cow's ass, they're into the environment.

    Multidrug resistant TB and gonorrhea that have emerged recently likely are due to the healthcare system aggressively treating infections, but this is a different scenario from the primary care physician giving somebody augmentin for an ear infection to keep the day moving along.

    I agree that the profligate use of antibiotics in agriculture is a big problem and likely a big source of anti-biotic resistance. I would guess that the worst effect of over-prescription of antibiotics in health-care settings is not the drugs given to Sally Soccer-mom and her kids (she knows to complete the course), but rather to the hard-cases – drug addicts, drunks, and the sexually promiscous. What are the chances that it is only 1-5% of the prescribed-to population that accounts for most of the drug-resistance? I would guess pretty high.

    A friend of mine speculated about sewers being breeding grounds too. A lot of the anti-biotics that people take, just get pissed out. All that crap in the sewers is probably marinating in the stuff. Think of what might be evolving down there.

    Read More
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  68. I remember when I was growing up that occasionally we need a vet to visit the farm because the chickens were sick. The vet alway put rubber overshoes on his boots and then dipped his feet in a pan of iodine solution which he carried with him as soon as he got out of his car. This was so that he would not go from farm to farm spreading disease.

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  69. “Mental disease germs” no, hypochondria and over-diagnosis yes.

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  70. @Bill
    Agree. Except. Stoicism and Buddhism? As you say, CBT, in a nutshell, is "shut up, quit complaining, get the fuck out of bed, do something productive, pretend you're happy. If you are afraid of X, do X 50,000 times until you're not afraid any more." That's not Stoicism and Buddhism, particularly. It's common sense. It's only the freaking head shrinkers in the modern developed world who came up with the idea that CBT didn't work (before they called it CBT). And they stopped thinking CBT didn't work at precisely the moment they had convinced the entire society it didn't work---because, at that point, they could give it a head shrinker name and charge people for it. Babushka didn't charge for CBT. She dispensed it for free.

    Head shrinkers are the only thing Scientologists are right about.

    To this point the best one-stop treatment of psychiatry is a three hour video by the Hubbardites, free on YouTube, The Marketing of Madness. It contains no proselytization.

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  71. Am I first to say it? Put up signs:
    Do not bring your evil here.

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  72. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    LeBron has got plenty to say
    On political issues today;
    Calls time out for a quibble
    Over "Shut up and dribble."
    Athlete's-Foot-in-the-Mouth's here to stay.

    Eustace, excellent as always. The Cleveland.com website, Plains Dealer on line, seriously asks if Le Bron is presidential material. So Steve, are there any athletes that could run for president in 2020? WNY had Jack Kemp who was half of a presidential ticket, but I don’t see any contenders today.

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    • Replies: @MB
    Bruce Gender Jenner?
    Come on. Why not?
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  73. @Anonymous
    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We've been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it's been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    :

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    :

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm -- those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.
     
    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I'm not sure I'd feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I've visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don't think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    I don’t know if you can really stop something. Too many smugglers, and I’m just talking about normal people who don’t declare that they are carrying stuff. Too few even understand the risks.

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  74. @MEH 0910
    The germ of an idea.

    MEH, nicely done, better than mine.

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  75. @Steve Sailer
    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.

    Google’s new AI algorithm predicts heart disease by looking at your eyes

    Scientists from Google and its health-tech subsidiary Verily have discovered a new way to assess a person’s risk of heart disease using machine learning. By analyzing scans of the back of a patient’s eye, the company’s software is able to accurately deduce data, including an individual’s age, blood pressure, and whether or not they smoke. This can then be used to predict their risk of suffering a major cardiac event — such as a heart attack — with roughly the same accuracy as current leading methods.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    So, could we use this AI to weed out DACA "children" and Muslim "youths" attempting to break into Europe?
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  76. Wilhelm Reich’s emotional plague?

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  77. @Twodees Partain
    Nah, the joke about shrinks is pretty good. IMO, a shrink is a fraud by definition. Some, at least the ones who have medical degrees, do the most harm by prescribing very harmful drugs. The others who limit their practice to talking, mainly harm their patients through fraud, draining them of money while delivering nothing more than a chance to vent.

    Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology. In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments. The drugs aren’t perfect but most patients treated with the correct drugs can live fulfilling lives. I’m grateful to be alive now when I can have the chance of a life and career with proper medical treatment. I made it to medical school!

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Psychiatrists receive some medical training but it is not accurate to call them "medical doctors." No psychiatric patient "languished" ever -- psychiatric medication has always been a matter of compelling obedience and knocking you the Friday out, in Salieri's time and today. Psychiatry is nakedly political and Soviet in its power grabs: look up Brandon Raub.
    , @Twodees Partain
    " I made it to medical school!"

    More's the pity. If you're out wandering around under the influence of psychotropic drugs, you're far more likely to snap and kill a lot of your fellow students than anyone else in your classes.
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  78. @Bill
    Agree. Except. Stoicism and Buddhism? As you say, CBT, in a nutshell, is "shut up, quit complaining, get the fuck out of bed, do something productive, pretend you're happy. If you are afraid of X, do X 50,000 times until you're not afraid any more." That's not Stoicism and Buddhism, particularly. It's common sense. It's only the freaking head shrinkers in the modern developed world who came up with the idea that CBT didn't work (before they called it CBT). And they stopped thinking CBT didn't work at precisely the moment they had convinced the entire society it didn't work---because, at that point, they could give it a head shrinker name and charge people for it. Babushka didn't charge for CBT. She dispensed it for free.

    Head shrinkers are the only thing Scientologists are right about.

    I’m afraid you’re quite right. The medicine of the mind is in roughly the same state that the medicine of the body was three hundred years ago – and it isn’t actually all that impressive right now.

    Read More
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  79. @Anonymous
    Those of us who live abroad are asked, when we travel to the United States, if we have visited a farm during our stay abroad. Googling now,

    We've been to a few countries where the airports have posters talking about hoof and mouth disease/foot and mouth disease. I think the box on the form is an attempt to indicate people who may have come into contact with this on a farm in another country. Apparently it's been eliminated in the US so they keep a watchful eye out to make sure it stays that way.

    :

    A friend checked this box. He went thru a different line. They sprayed the bottom of his shoes and he actually got thru customs faster since it was a much shorter line.

    :

    My friend was asked to open her suitcase and get out the shoes she had worn on the farm -- those are the ones they sprayed, not the ones she wore on the flight.
     
    And returning to Japan I have stopped by the agricultural desk many times with seeds and bulbs. They almost always let me through after examining the stuff, but not always. They confiscated some chile seeds last time, explaining that there were pathogens in the U.S. for chile that could not be visually detected from the seeds.

    I have to admit that I look forward to these friendly little chats. I'm not sure I'd feel the same way coming the other direction, since the customs staff in the U.S. are such assholes. The quality of customer-facing United States government employees is remarkably low compared to every Asian and European country that I've visited. Either the 50 percentile of U.S. citizens are mostly morons, or government affirmative action has degraded the whole system. I don't think that it helps that government service is not considered prestigious in the U.S.

    Government service in the United States is affirmative action for the dumbest and nastiest of our population, the same demographics who populate our prisons and drop out of high school.

    What does one expect of the affirmative action demographic?

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  80. @AndrewR
    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious problem, and it's due in large part to physicians "freely" prescribing them to patients in whom they're uncertain that a bacterial infection exists. Anecdotally, one even hears of physicians, for purposes of shutting neurotic patients or child patients' parents up, prescribing antibiotics to patients who the physicians know do not need antibiotics. I had assumed this was common knowledge, but the way you worded your comment makes me think you're unaware of it.

    So yes, antibiotics don't typically have any direct major harmful effect on patients who don't need them (although they do kill off important gut flora), but they should not be prescribed more freely than antifungals.

    As usual, you don’t know what you’re writing about. You’re not a liberal, but you have the standard empty brain that will believe anything mind of a liberal.

    Read More
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    You're the one who resorts to insults instead of arguments. That's a pretty common liberal habit.
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  81. @Simple Song
    I would respectfully disagree that the majority of antibiotic resistance is being caused by over prescription by physicians in a primary care setting. I think this is a relatively minor factor and most likely the biggest downside of antibiotic overprescription in humans is likely unexpected allergic reaction (sometimes fatal) or c. dificile superinfection (which is separate from resistance) or just poor allocation of resources.

    The majority of antibiotic resistance to common antibiotics is caused by widespread agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals to increase weight gain and allow confinement operations. There is a lot of bacteria in cow shit, and if the cow has constantly been getting oral antibiotics for the majority of its life, all that bacteria has been highly selected for antibiotic resistance; and once they're out of the cow's ass, they're into the environment.

    Multidrug resistant TB and gonorrhea that have emerged recently likely are due to the healthcare system aggressively treating infections, but this is a different scenario from the primary care physician giving somebody augmentin for an ear infection to keep the day moving along.

    Antibiotics actually cure ear and other infections and what is wrong with that?

    It’s good the be cynical about all the medical scares on the internet.

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  82. @Simple Song
    I would respectfully disagree that the majority of antibiotic resistance is being caused by over prescription by physicians in a primary care setting. I think this is a relatively minor factor and most likely the biggest downside of antibiotic overprescription in humans is likely unexpected allergic reaction (sometimes fatal) or c. dificile superinfection (which is separate from resistance) or just poor allocation of resources.

    The majority of antibiotic resistance to common antibiotics is caused by widespread agricultural use of antibiotics in healthy animals to increase weight gain and allow confinement operations. There is a lot of bacteria in cow shit, and if the cow has constantly been getting oral antibiotics for the majority of its life, all that bacteria has been highly selected for antibiotic resistance; and once they're out of the cow's ass, they're into the environment.

    Multidrug resistant TB and gonorrhea that have emerged recently likely are due to the healthcare system aggressively treating infections, but this is a different scenario from the primary care physician giving somebody augmentin for an ear infection to keep the day moving along.

    So drs should not prescribe antibiotics to cure ear and other infections? What are we supposed to do, suffer agonizing pain and perhaps even die while waiting for our bodies “natural defenses” to end the infections?

    Ever looked at the stats on soldiers not dying from wounds but weeks later from infected wounds that are now easily cured or never occur because of antibiotics?

    People often died from infections before antibiotics. Even tooth infections spread bacteria all over the body through the blood system and killed people.

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  83. Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology.

    If history began ten years ago, this would be very true.

    However, psychiatry has a dark past based not on treatment but genocide. Psychiatry from 1840 to 1990 has destroyed literally millions of lives, and ruined tens of millions more. Torture, mutilation (lobotomies), forced labor, drugging / poisoning, institutionalization. Criminals were treated better than the inmates of Amerika’s psychiatric gulags.

    In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments.

    “Languished.” That has got to be the euphemism of all times.

    Let’s just call a spade a spade, and say that early psychiatry was a cornfield for human beings who’s only crime was being unpopular.

    FACT: Psychiatry is the number one profession that attracts sadists. Even dentistry is only number 100, and education/educracy only 50 or so.

    FACT: Virtually every American psychiatrist scored over 4 on Adorno’s ironic F-scale.

    FACT: Since 1920, the psychiatric profession was a communist hotbed.

    FACT: If Jesus were to return to the Western Wold, he would be diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic, forced to “languish” in a padded cell, and injected with toxic drugs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D

    FACT: If Jesus were to return to the Western Wo[r]ld, he would be diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic, forced to “languish” in a padded cell, and injected with toxic drugs.
     
    If your own son or brother proclaimed himself to be the Son of God, would you accept him as such or would you try to get him help with his delusions? In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were?
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  84. @Allison
    Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology. In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments. The drugs aren't perfect but most patients treated with the correct drugs can live fulfilling lives. I'm grateful to be alive now when I can have the chance of a life and career with proper medical treatment. I made it to medical school!

    Psychiatrists receive some medical training but it is not accurate to call them “medical doctors.” No psychiatric patient “languished” ever — psychiatric medication has always been a matter of compelling obedience and knocking you the Friday out, in Salieri’s time and today. Psychiatry is nakedly political and Soviet in its power grabs: look up Brandon Raub.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Allison
    I am in training to be a psychiatrist someday soon and I am taking all the same classes and passing the same tests as the other medical students. So yes, I will be a doctor. I also have a severe mental illness and take several medications every day to maintain my equilibrium. These medications are a life saver to me and I am very grateful to the psychiatrists who helped me claw my way up from psychosis. Without medication, I could not be functional the way I am now. The difference is night and day. I am able to pass hard classes and prepare for board exams on these medications. Before the meds, I was completely disabled. As I said before I am grateful to be alive today when I can get treated. Of course psychiatry is not perfect but it's a lot better than nothing and I hope to help mentally ill people just like me become productive members of society. I can think of nothing more rewarding.
    , @Jack D
    You are wrong on all counts. Psychiatrists are trained as medical doctors in the same way as any other M.D. Modern psychiatric medications, while not perfect, do no knock you out and are part of the reason why many people who formerly would need to be locked up can now live relatively normal lives. Modern psychiatry has nothing to do with power grabs - you have people who are desperately ill and in need of help. Sometimes it is an element of their illness that they don't think of themselves as ill, but believe me their family and friends know that they are. The tools we have to help them, even now are relatively crude and imperfect (though much better than in the past) and psychiatrists do the best that they can with the tools available. If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.
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  85. @J.Ross
    Psychiatrists receive some medical training but it is not accurate to call them "medical doctors." No psychiatric patient "languished" ever -- psychiatric medication has always been a matter of compelling obedience and knocking you the Friday out, in Salieri's time and today. Psychiatry is nakedly political and Soviet in its power grabs: look up Brandon Raub.

    I am in training to be a psychiatrist someday soon and I am taking all the same classes and passing the same tests as the other medical students. So yes, I will be a doctor. I also have a severe mental illness and take several medications every day to maintain my equilibrium. These medications are a life saver to me and I am very grateful to the psychiatrists who helped me claw my way up from psychosis. Without medication, I could not be functional the way I am now. The difference is night and day. I am able to pass hard classes and prepare for board exams on these medications. Before the meds, I was completely disabled. As I said before I am grateful to be alive today when I can get treated. Of course psychiatry is not perfect but it’s a lot better than nothing and I hope to help mentally ill people just like me become productive members of society. I can think of nothing more rewarding.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I hope you get where you want to be but I also hope you remember this: a lot of the biggest critics of psychiatry are experienced psychiatrists who came to see the central fraud, but are able to help people in a counselling capacity.
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  86. @MEH 0910
    Google’s new AI algorithm predicts heart disease by looking at your eyes

    Scientists from Google and its health-tech subsidiary Verily have discovered a new way to assess a person’s risk of heart disease using machine learning. By analyzing scans of the back of a patient’s eye, the company’s software is able to accurately deduce data, including an individual’s age, blood pressure, and whether or not they smoke. This can then be used to predict their risk of suffering a major cardiac event — such as a heart attack — with roughly the same accuracy as current leading methods.
     

    So, could we use this AI to weed out DACA “children” and Muslim “youths” attempting to break into Europe?

    Read More
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  87. Read More
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  88. @Allison
    I am in training to be a psychiatrist someday soon and I am taking all the same classes and passing the same tests as the other medical students. So yes, I will be a doctor. I also have a severe mental illness and take several medications every day to maintain my equilibrium. These medications are a life saver to me and I am very grateful to the psychiatrists who helped me claw my way up from psychosis. Without medication, I could not be functional the way I am now. The difference is night and day. I am able to pass hard classes and prepare for board exams on these medications. Before the meds, I was completely disabled. As I said before I am grateful to be alive today when I can get treated. Of course psychiatry is not perfect but it's a lot better than nothing and I hope to help mentally ill people just like me become productive members of society. I can think of nothing more rewarding.

    I hope you get where you want to be but I also hope you remember this: a lot of the biggest critics of psychiatry are experienced psychiatrists who came to see the central fraud, but are able to help people in a counselling capacity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Allison
    Thank you for your good wishes. I'm curious what the central fraud you posit is? If it's medications they certainly work for many many people, myself included.
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  89. @Buffalo Joe
    Eustace, excellent as always. The Cleveland.com website, Plains Dealer on line, seriously asks if Le Bron is presidential material. So Steve, are there any athletes that could run for president in 2020? WNY had Jack Kemp who was half of a presidential ticket, but I don't see any contenders today.

    Bruce Gender Jenner?
    Come on. Why not?

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  90. @J.Ross
    I hope you get where you want to be but I also hope you remember this: a lot of the biggest critics of psychiatry are experienced psychiatrists who came to see the central fraud, but are able to help people in a counselling capacity.

    Thank you for your good wishes. I’m curious what the central fraud you posit is? If it’s medications they certainly work for many many people, myself included.

    Read More
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  91. @advancedatheist
    Psychotherapists seem to have scaled back their ambitions in recent years because of the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy in teaching people to manage their emotional issues better, and in recognition of the fact that this form of therapy seems to have validated insights from Stoicism and Buddhism.

    In fact it seems a bit of a letdown to read that one form of CBT effective in treating depression, called activation therapy, tells you to get off your ass and do stuff. (Perhaps you can start by cleaning your room.) This sounds like something the traditional grandmother could have told you to combat the blues.

    Heh. Well, there’s a little bit more neuroscience to CBT at least. Essentially, so as long as the person engaging in it focuses on the behavior to change and then mentally executes the change, the focus to do so gradually builds the myelin pathways against it. The “habit against habit,” as it might be.

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  92. @Mr. Anon

    I’ve known a few psychiatrists whom that would seem to make sense for.
     
    I've often wondered how many psychiatrists and psychologists get into the therapy biz in the hope that they will be able to cure themselves.

    I have seen a similar thing, in a family with a recurring history of insanity: all of the sane ones became mental health professionals.

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  93. Road salt in the East, and use of fertilizer all over the world.b Fertilizers, duh. shit, duh.

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  94. Psychology/Psychiatry: Szasz and Laing
    Education: Gatto and Holt

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    These are very good (Gatto's Underground History should be everyone's First Text on education; for unintentionally hilarious contrast check out the Battle For Room 314). I would suggest also Peter Breggin's books on handling medication since you can't just go cold turkey.
    , @Anonymous
    Gatto and Holt are great, but I'd add Ivan Illich. He seems to have been "captured" by the SJW left, insofar as he is known at all, but I find almost everything I've read to be quite astute.
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  95. When I found Steve’s site, 4 years ago, I also, found many people who challenged all kinds of viewpoints. And, the one point that no one, on here, cared about was animals; No one really cares,,,,whether right or left. At that point, when I realized that no one cares about animals, it was easy to vote for Trump ( I was for Trump) because he was most importantly, the last of the observers of the greatest time of history…when we give up giving a shit about regional, prehistoric, migrant history. When people and states and regions are revered and not ridiculed. I moved here in 1968…don’t make me regret it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Before 4chan hacked elections it righteously doxed animal abusers.
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  96. @Lagertha
    When I found Steve's site, 4 years ago, I also, found many people who challenged all kinds of viewpoints. And, the one point that no one, on here, cared about was animals; No one really cares,,,,whether right or left. At that point, when I realized that no one cares about animals, it was easy to vote for Trump ( I was for Trump) because he was most importantly, the last of the observers of the greatest time of history...when we give up giving a shit about regional, prehistoric, migrant history. When people and states and regions are revered and not ridiculed. I moved here in 1968...don't make me regret it.

    Before 4chan hacked elections it righteously doxed animal abusers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    horrible. I think doxxing of bad people if it is with animals or children will increase, because so many people are exposed.
    , @Lagertha
    and, keep doing the great work against animal abusers, that you are all doing. I am proud of you fighting for animals.
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  97. @Proton Gakhe
    Psychology/Psychiatry: Szasz and Laing
    Education: Gatto and Holt

    These are very good (Gatto’s Underground History should be everyone’s First Text on education; for unintentionally hilarious contrast check out the Battle For Room 314). I would suggest also Peter Breggin’s books on handling medication since you can’t just go cold turkey.

    Read More
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  98. @Proton Gakhe
    Psychology/Psychiatry: Szasz and Laing
    Education: Gatto and Holt

    Gatto and Holt are great, but I’d add Ivan Illich. He seems to have been “captured” by the SJW left, insofar as he is known at all, but I find almost everything I’ve read to be quite astute.

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  99. @Steve Sailer
    We really need artificial intelligence for diagnosing.

    The diagnosis AI is only as good as what it is taught to recognize. Think about how the AMA has removed transgenderism from the worst body dysphoria category specifically to allow for elective self-mutilation. We are politicizing diseases nowadays. It is easier to do with mental health, but who is to say it will not jump to physical health as well? It is not like they are not related. After all mental disease may just be a chemical imbalance in the brain. Like racism and preference for one’s own people or reticence towards wonderful refugees.

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  100. @Allison
    Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology. In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments. The drugs aren't perfect but most patients treated with the correct drugs can live fulfilling lives. I'm grateful to be alive now when I can have the chance of a life and career with proper medical treatment. I made it to medical school!

    ” I made it to medical school!”

    More’s the pity. If you’re out wandering around under the influence of psychotropic drugs, you’re far more likely to snap and kill a lot of your fellow students than anyone else in your classes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    I really doubt this. The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.
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  101. @Alden
    As usual, you don’t know what you’re writing about. You’re not a liberal, but you have the standard empty brain that will believe anything mind of a liberal.

    You’re the one who resorts to insults instead of arguments. That’s a pretty common liberal habit.

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  102. @J.Ross
    Psychiatrists receive some medical training but it is not accurate to call them "medical doctors." No psychiatric patient "languished" ever -- psychiatric medication has always been a matter of compelling obedience and knocking you the Friday out, in Salieri's time and today. Psychiatry is nakedly political and Soviet in its power grabs: look up Brandon Raub.

    You are wrong on all counts. Psychiatrists are trained as medical doctors in the same way as any other M.D. Modern psychiatric medications, while not perfect, do no knock you out and are part of the reason why many people who formerly would need to be locked up can now live relatively normal lives. Modern psychiatry has nothing to do with power grabs – you have people who are desperately ill and in need of help. Sometimes it is an element of their illness that they don’t think of themselves as ill, but believe me their family and friends know that they are. The tools we have to help them, even now are relatively crude and imperfect (though much better than in the past) and psychiatrists do the best that they can with the tools available. If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Proton Gakhe

    If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.
     
    How do you identify someone who is dangerous?

    Here is a quote from Marc "Animal" MacYoung on avoiding rape, from his great website:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/avoid_rape.htm

    Let's start out with the fact that there is a BIG difference between 'weird' and 'dangerous.' The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn't dangerous. On the other hand the classmate who is obsessing on you and always trying to talk and touch you is. So too is a date who reveals himself to be a 'mean drunk' or begins to exhibit more and more of the characteristics common to rapists.
     
    From the same website, thirteen traits of dangerous people:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/profile.html

    1) Insensitivity for others/emphasis on self
    2) Belittling behavior or attitudes towards others
    3) Negating behavior or comments
    4) Hostile and/or threatening language
    5) Bullying
    6) Excessive anger
    7) Brooding/ revenge
    8) Obsession *
    9) Extreme mood swings
    10) Physical tantrums
    11) Jock or gorilla mentality
    12) A mean drunk
    13) Alcohol or drug abuse

     

    * Obsession here means "the person who won't leave you alone", not hobbies and interests.

    And no, wearing black clothes, or composing poetry on the job, or going to the wrong church, is not on that list.
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  103. @Twodees Partain
    " I made it to medical school!"

    More's the pity. If you're out wandering around under the influence of psychotropic drugs, you're far more likely to snap and kill a lot of your fellow students than anyone else in your classes.

    I really doubt this. The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dfordoom

    The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.
     
    That is certainly true of schizophrenia, which seems to be a real illness. Unfortunately most mental illnesses are not so clear-cut. Some may not be illnesses at all, but merely part of the normal range of human behaviour. It is very unlikely that conditions such as ADHD actually exist outside the imaginations of psychiatrists. There are literally hundreds of mental disorders listed in that illustrious work of science fiction known as the DSM. Maybe half a dozen are real.

    Some mental illnesses are simply bad life choices. Drug "addiction" for example is simply self-indulgent self-destructive behaviour. You might as well label laziness as a mental illness. Or say that burglars suffer from burglary addiction. As for depression, it's basically self-pity.

    Schizophrenia has given psychiatry a credibility it doesn't deserve. It's one of the very few mental illnesses that actually does respond to drug treatment. The drugs do seem to help, or at least they make the patient less dangerous to himself and others.
    , @Twodees Partain
    Several mass killers have been found to be on SSRI drugs. Doubt away, you bold centurion, but check out a few articles on the subject:

    https://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/28307-from-prozac-to-parkland-are-psychiatric-drugs-causing-mass-shootings

    http://www.cchrflorida.org/antidepressants-are-a-prescription-for-mass-shootings/

    http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Another-Mass-Shooting-Potentially-Linked-to-Psychiatric-Drugs-1002085657

    http://commonground.ca/mass-murderers-ssris/
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  104. @Proton Gakhe

    Psychiatrists are medical doctors who often save lives with pharmacology.
     
    If history began ten years ago, this would be very true.

    However, psychiatry has a dark past based not on treatment but genocide. Psychiatry from 1840 to 1990 has destroyed literally millions of lives, and ruined tens of millions more. Torture, mutilation (lobotomies), forced labor, drugging / poisoning, institutionalization. Criminals were treated better than the inmates of Amerika's psychiatric gulags.

    In the past the mentally ill languished because there were few good treatments.
     
    "Languished." That has got to be the euphemism of all times.

    Let's just call a spade a spade, and say that early psychiatry was a cornfield for human beings who's only crime was being unpopular.

    FACT: Psychiatry is the number one profession that attracts sadists. Even dentistry is only number 100, and education/educracy only 50 or so.

    FACT: Virtually every American psychiatrist scored over 4 on Adorno's ironic F-scale.

    FACT: Since 1920, the psychiatric profession was a communist hotbed.

    FACT: If Jesus were to return to the Western Wold, he would be diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic, forced to "languish" in a padded cell, and injected with toxic drugs.

    FACT: If Jesus were to return to the Western Wo[r]ld, he would be diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic, forced to “languish” in a padded cell, and injected with toxic drugs.

    If your own son or brother proclaimed himself to be the Son of God, would you accept him as such or would you try to get him help with his delusions? In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were?

    Read More
    • Agree: Corn
    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were? Answer at your earliest convenience, please.
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  105. @Jack D
    I really doubt this. The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.

    The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.

    That is certainly true of schizophrenia, which seems to be a real illness. Unfortunately most mental illnesses are not so clear-cut. Some may not be illnesses at all, but merely part of the normal range of human behaviour. It is very unlikely that conditions such as ADHD actually exist outside the imaginations of psychiatrists. There are literally hundreds of mental disorders listed in that illustrious work of science fiction known as the DSM. Maybe half a dozen are real.

    Some mental illnesses are simply bad life choices. Drug “addiction” for example is simply self-indulgent self-destructive behaviour. You might as well label laziness as a mental illness. Or say that burglars suffer from burglary addiction. As for depression, it’s basically self-pity.

    Schizophrenia has given psychiatry a credibility it doesn’t deserve. It’s one of the very few mental illnesses that actually does respond to drug treatment. The drugs do seem to help, or at least they make the patient less dangerous to himself and others.

    Read More
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  106. @Jack D
    You are wrong on all counts. Psychiatrists are trained as medical doctors in the same way as any other M.D. Modern psychiatric medications, while not perfect, do no knock you out and are part of the reason why many people who formerly would need to be locked up can now live relatively normal lives. Modern psychiatry has nothing to do with power grabs - you have people who are desperately ill and in need of help. Sometimes it is an element of their illness that they don't think of themselves as ill, but believe me their family and friends know that they are. The tools we have to help them, even now are relatively crude and imperfect (though much better than in the past) and psychiatrists do the best that they can with the tools available. If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.

    If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.

    How do you identify someone who is dangerous?

    Here is a quote from Marc “Animal” MacYoung on avoiding rape, from his great website:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/avoid_rape.htm

    Let’s start out with the fact that there is a BIG difference between ‘weird’ and ‘dangerous.’ The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous. On the other hand the classmate who is obsessing on you and always trying to talk and touch you is. So too is a date who reveals himself to be a ‘mean drunk’ or begins to exhibit more and more of the characteristics common to rapists.

    From the same website, thirteen traits of dangerous people:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/profile.html

    1) Insensitivity for others/emphasis on self
    2) Belittling behavior or attitudes towards others
    3) Negating behavior or comments
    4) Hostile and/or threatening language
    5) Bullying
    6) Excessive anger
    7) Brooding/ revenge
    8) Obsession *
    9) Extreme mood swings
    10) Physical tantrums
    11) Jock or gorilla mentality
    12) A mean drunk
    13) Alcohol or drug abuse

    * Obsession here means “the person who won’t leave you alone”, not hobbies and interests.

    And no, wearing black clothes, or composing poetry on the job, or going to the wrong church, is not on that list.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Marc Animal MacYoung is an amazingly good writer and if I had a daughter I would make her memorize his self-defense posting.
    , @Jack D

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.
     
    This is not true. Many times the "mind control beam" will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.
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  107. @Jack D
    I really doubt this. The truly dangerous ones are people with UNTREATED mental illness or who are off their meds.
    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    This is like saying "severely obese people have been found to be on diet pills, therefore diet pills are the cause of obesity." People who become mass killers are placed on SSRI drugs because they are already mentally ill (depressed) and sometimes the SSRI's don't work.
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  108. @Proton Gakhe

    If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.
     
    How do you identify someone who is dangerous?

    Here is a quote from Marc "Animal" MacYoung on avoiding rape, from his great website:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/avoid_rape.htm

    Let's start out with the fact that there is a BIG difference between 'weird' and 'dangerous.' The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn't dangerous. On the other hand the classmate who is obsessing on you and always trying to talk and touch you is. So too is a date who reveals himself to be a 'mean drunk' or begins to exhibit more and more of the characteristics common to rapists.
     
    From the same website, thirteen traits of dangerous people:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/profile.html

    1) Insensitivity for others/emphasis on self
    2) Belittling behavior or attitudes towards others
    3) Negating behavior or comments
    4) Hostile and/or threatening language
    5) Bullying
    6) Excessive anger
    7) Brooding/ revenge
    8) Obsession *
    9) Extreme mood swings
    10) Physical tantrums
    11) Jock or gorilla mentality
    12) A mean drunk
    13) Alcohol or drug abuse

     

    * Obsession here means "the person who won't leave you alone", not hobbies and interests.

    And no, wearing black clothes, or composing poetry on the job, or going to the wrong church, is not on that list.

    Marc Animal MacYoung is an amazingly good writer and if I had a daughter I would make her memorize his self-defense posting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Proton Gakhe

    Marc Animal MacYoung is an amazingly good writer and if I had a daughter I would make her memorize his self-defense posting.
     
    Marc is both an amazingly good writer (who tells it like it bloody is), and someone who really knows the self-defense scene. He also (usually) checks his politics at the door. And these politics, when he does bring them up, like those many unz.com posters, are hard to nail as jelly to a wall.
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  109. @Jack D

    FACT: If Jesus were to return to the Western Wo[r]ld, he would be diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic, forced to “languish” in a padded cell, and injected with toxic drugs.
     
    If your own son or brother proclaimed himself to be the Son of God, would you accept him as such or would you try to get him help with his delusions? In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were?

    In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were? Answer at your earliest convenience, please.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Proton Gakhe

    In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were? Answer at your earliest convenience, please.
     
    Is it even possible to have an objective answer to this question?

    I'll give you a few data points, though. Both the Jews and Muslims rejected all the would-be messiahs in recorded history; including the Christian-recognized one who died in ~35 AD.
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  110. @Proton Gakhe

    If people have to be locked up, it is because they are dangers to themselves or others and frankly more people should be locked up than are actually being locked up nowadays. Someone like Nikolas Cruz should not have been out on the street.
     
    How do you identify someone who is dangerous?

    Here is a quote from Marc "Animal" MacYoung on avoiding rape, from his great website:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/avoid_rape.htm

    Let's start out with the fact that there is a BIG difference between 'weird' and 'dangerous.' The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn't dangerous. On the other hand the classmate who is obsessing on you and always trying to talk and touch you is. So too is a date who reveals himself to be a 'mean drunk' or begins to exhibit more and more of the characteristics common to rapists.
     
    From the same website, thirteen traits of dangerous people:

    https://www.nononsenseselfdefense.com/profile.html

    1) Insensitivity for others/emphasis on self
    2) Belittling behavior or attitudes towards others
    3) Negating behavior or comments
    4) Hostile and/or threatening language
    5) Bullying
    6) Excessive anger
    7) Brooding/ revenge
    8) Obsession *
    9) Extreme mood swings
    10) Physical tantrums
    11) Jock or gorilla mentality
    12) A mean drunk
    13) Alcohol or drug abuse

     

    * Obsession here means "the person who won't leave you alone", not hobbies and interests.

    And no, wearing black clothes, or composing poetry on the job, or going to the wrong church, is not on that list.

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.

    This is not true. Many times the “mind control beam” will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.

    Read More
    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Proton Gakhe

    @Proton Gakhe

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.
     
    This is not true. Many times the “mind control beam” will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.
     
    It's true 99.9+% of the time.

    Just like it's true that 99.9+% of the young men with swarthy complexions, bushy black eyebrows and beards, and Semitic noses aren't Islamic terrorists. (Many of them aren't even Muslims.) Or 99.9+% of people that habitually wear black clothes are not Nazi-Satanic terrorists.

    Anyone, whether neo-bicameral or not, can claim to be directed by mind-control beams, or God, or Satan, or Satan in the body of a talking dog. Why do you think criminals say these stories so often?
    , @Steve Sailer
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Rather#"Kenneth,_what_is_the_frequency?"

    The psycho who beat up Dan Rather while shouting at him, "Kenneth, what is the frequency?" later murdered an NBC stage hand in another attempt to find out the frequency.

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  111. @Twodees Partain
    Several mass killers have been found to be on SSRI drugs. Doubt away, you bold centurion, but check out a few articles on the subject:

    https://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/crime/item/28307-from-prozac-to-parkland-are-psychiatric-drugs-causing-mass-shootings

    http://www.cchrflorida.org/antidepressants-are-a-prescription-for-mass-shootings/

    http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Another-Mass-Shooting-Potentially-Linked-to-Psychiatric-Drugs-1002085657

    http://commonground.ca/mass-murderers-ssris/

    This is like saying “severely obese people have been found to be on diet pills, therefore diet pills are the cause of obesity.” People who become mass killers are placed on SSRI drugs because they are already mentally ill (depressed) and sometimes the SSRI’s don’t work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    The evidence shows that people go from being depressed to becoming homicidal and/or suicidal under the influence of SSRI drugs. Is it your position that just because some people snap and kill others under the influence of these drugs, that these drugs are still valid treatments for depression?

    I would come to the opposite conclusion, that these drugs, and the clueless shrinks who overprescribe them have been the cause of some mass killings as well as suicides, and therefore they are not valid treatment for depression.
    , @Steve Sailer
    It's not impossible that pills that help the mental health of a lot of people also hurt the mental health of some people.
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  112. @J.Ross
    Marc Animal MacYoung is an amazingly good writer and if I had a daughter I would make her memorize his self-defense posting.

    Marc Animal MacYoung is an amazingly good writer and if I had a daughter I would make her memorize his self-defense posting.

    Marc is both an amazingly good writer (who tells it like it bloody is), and someone who really knows the self-defense scene. He also (usually) checks his politics at the door. And these politics, when he does bring them up, like those many unz.com posters, are hard to nail as jelly to a wall.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. @Twodees Partain
    In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were? Answer at your earliest convenience, please.

    In the 2,000 years since Jesus, how many people thought that they were the Messiah and how many of them actually were? Answer at your earliest convenience, please.

    Is it even possible to have an objective answer to this question?

    I’ll give you a few data points, though. Both the Jews and Muslims rejected all the would-be messiahs in recorded history; including the Christian-recognized one who died in ~35 AD.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. @Jack D

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.
     
    This is not true. Many times the "mind control beam" will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.

    This is not true. Many times the “mind control beam” will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.

    It’s true 99.9+% of the time.

    Just like it’s true that 99.9+% of the young men with swarthy complexions, bushy black eyebrows and beards, and Semitic noses aren’t Islamic terrorists. (Many of them aren’t even Muslims.) Or 99.9+% of people that habitually wear black clothes are not Nazi-Satanic terrorists.

    Anyone, whether neo-bicameral or not, can claim to be directed by mind-control beams, or God, or Satan, or Satan in the body of a talking dog. Why do you think criminals say these stories so often?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. @Jack D
    This is like saying "severely obese people have been found to be on diet pills, therefore diet pills are the cause of obesity." People who become mass killers are placed on SSRI drugs because they are already mentally ill (depressed) and sometimes the SSRI's don't work.

    The evidence shows that people go from being depressed to becoming homicidal and/or suicidal under the influence of SSRI drugs. Is it your position that just because some people snap and kill others under the influence of these drugs, that these drugs are still valid treatments for depression?

    I would come to the opposite conclusion, that these drugs, and the clueless shrinks who overprescribe them have been the cause of some mass killings as well as suicides, and therefore they are not valid treatment for depression.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    People who are depressed are often suicidal even if (especially if) they are not taking any drugs. And a small % become homicidal (typically as an adjunct to their suicide).

    Even if becoming more suicidal/ homicidal is an actual (but apparently very rare) side effect of the drugs then you have to weigh the side effect against the benefit of the drug - say that it causes 1 guy to become suicidal, it prevents 100 people from committing suicide because their depression lifts and it allows 1 million people to get up out of bed and resume their normal lives. Is it worth it?

    Please feel free to petition the FDA to revoke the approval of these drugs.
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  116. @Twodees Partain
    The evidence shows that people go from being depressed to becoming homicidal and/or suicidal under the influence of SSRI drugs. Is it your position that just because some people snap and kill others under the influence of these drugs, that these drugs are still valid treatments for depression?

    I would come to the opposite conclusion, that these drugs, and the clueless shrinks who overprescribe them have been the cause of some mass killings as well as suicides, and therefore they are not valid treatment for depression.

    People who are depressed are often suicidal even if (especially if) they are not taking any drugs. And a small % become homicidal (typically as an adjunct to their suicide).

    Even if becoming more suicidal/ homicidal is an actual (but apparently very rare) side effect of the drugs then you have to weigh the side effect against the benefit of the drug – say that it causes 1 guy to become suicidal, it prevents 100 people from committing suicide because their depression lifts and it allows 1 million people to get up out of bed and resume their normal lives. Is it worth it?

    Please feel free to petition the FDA to revoke the approval of these drugs.

    Read More
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  117. @Jack D
    This is like saying "severely obese people have been found to be on diet pills, therefore diet pills are the cause of obesity." People who become mass killers are placed on SSRI drugs because they are already mentally ill (depressed) and sometimes the SSRI's don't work.

    It’s not impossible that pills that help the mental health of a lot of people also hurt the mental health of some people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    That's the sad part: all drugs affect individuals in a specific personal way. Just like cancer; it is all specific to the individual with a very specific cancer. That's why there are no cures; because each cure has to specify the exact genes and cells of the individual, and the 'make-up' of their body, to attack/cure the cancer. My head exploded when I realized that.
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  118. @Jack D

    The barking moonbat who wants to talk to you about how the CIA is broadcasting microwave mind control beams directly into his head, really isn’t dangerous.
     
    This is not true. Many times the "mind control beam" will tell the schizo to kill the President or John Lennon or shoot up a school or whatever and the schizo will obey the voice in his head.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Rather#”Kenneth,_what_is_the_frequency?”

    The psycho who beat up Dan Rather while shouting at him, “Kenneth, what is the frequency?” later murdered an NBC stage hand in another attempt to find out the frequency.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    ????????????????????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Steve... I can not last too many copy's and pastes. I am only making me look like the Dummy, your intention; because we are friends. Haha, I am done. I am so tired and over your shite, Steve :).
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  119. @J.Ross
    Before 4chan hacked elections it righteously doxed animal abusers.

    horrible. I think doxxing of bad people if it is with animals or children will increase, because so many people are exposed.

    Read More
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  120. @Steve Sailer
    It's not impossible that pills that help the mental health of a lot of people also hurt the mental health of some people.

    That’s the sad part: all drugs affect individuals in a specific personal way. Just like cancer; it is all specific to the individual with a very specific cancer. That’s why there are no cures; because each cure has to specify the exact genes and cells of the individual, and the ‘make-up’ of their body, to attack/cure the cancer. My head exploded when I realized that.

    Read More
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  121. @J.Ross
    Before 4chan hacked elections it righteously doxed animal abusers.

    and, keep doing the great work against animal abusers, that you are all doing. I am proud of you fighting for animals.

    Read More
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  122. @Steve Sailer
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Rather#"Kenneth,_what_is_the_frequency?"

    The psycho who beat up Dan Rather while shouting at him, "Kenneth, what is the frequency?" later murdered an NBC stage hand in another attempt to find out the frequency.

    ????????????????????????????????!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Steve… I can not last too many copy’s and pastes. I am only making me look like the Dummy, your intention; because we are friends. Haha, I am done. I am so tired and over your shite, Steve :).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

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