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One of Paul Johnson’s observations is that aesthetic trends unite enemies. For example, King Louis XVI, Robespierre, and Napoleon didn’t really get along politically, but they all felt the neoclassical style was the only fitting style for a public building.

When I looked back on golf course architecture from the late 20th Century, it suddenly seemed obvious that the Robert Trent Jones era of roughly 1948-1968, which ended more or less with the mobbed-up failure of Dean Martin’s Beverly Hills Country Club, reflected the tastes of the Modernist era in building architecture, such as Mies van der Rohe glass-and-steel skycrapers like the Seagram’s Building. In contrast, the Pete Dye era that followed RTJ had something in common with the postmodernist era in building, such as those of Robert Venturi.

Above is a photo by Jon Cavalier of the par 3 16th at Sleepy Hollow on the Hudson River just north of the new Tappan Zee bridge. The course was built in 1911-1913 by Charles Blair Macdonald and Seth Raynor on a Vanderbilt estate for a club organized by a Vanderbilt, Astor, and Rockefeller: i.e., extreme old money WASP. It was updated in the 1920s by A.W. Tillinghast and recently by Gil Hanse.

The publication of Cavalier’s photo of this hole a year or two ago caused a sensation among followers of golf course design fashion: Macdonald, who was wildly out of fashion in the 1970s, is now the most prestigious golf course architect, just as he was over 100 years ago when he designed the National Golf Links of America in the Hamptons. This hole is Hanse’s slightly hallucinatory tribute to Macdonald’s squared-up designs.

In some ways, this design looks ridiculous: the usual rule of thumb is that a golf course should look “natural.” But a square green indented by a thumbprint-like crater and surrounded by a trench-like bunker with right angle curve looks more like a grassed-over battlefield.

I’m guessing that 2019 golfers like this hole for the same reason they like an Apple Store. It’s what’s in style.

 
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  1. kihowi says:

    Capability Brown died a while ago. Since then, people have sort of understood that making a garden look natural is only compounding the phoniness; not only are you shaping nature by hand , you’re now also pretending that you didn’t. I think there’s probably a great fashion apportunity for a course to go the exact opposite direction: make everything self-consciously artificial. You know, the stage art was at about a hundred years ago. Angular bunkers with pebbles or marbles in them. Hills built from triangular surfaces like an old video game. Oddly colored grass. Might attract the iphone crowd and take away some of the naffishness that has clung to golf for a while.

    • Disagree: donut
  2. Must be a slow news day. We’re back to golf.

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    , @Clyde
  3. “As golf course architecture goes, so goes the nation”.

  4. B36 says:

    Needs a little Dutch windmill.

  5. NickG says:

    I avoid Apple stores — there’s something intensely irritating about them. Also, if I need that sort of treatment I could get it in a bordello.

  6. Robert Trent Jones Sr.: the Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of golf course design.

  7. Barnard says:

    What happens when the members get tired of the gimmick design and it is no longer in style? Do they shut down the course for a year and pay for another expensive redesign?

  8. What an abortion of a golf hole– utterly at odds with the surrounding landscape and flow. A jarring, artificial insult to nature, and to the “good walk” ideal of the game (even cart golfers must sense how this hole alters their pace). Gil Hanse must be related to Piet Mondrian. And aesthetics aside, the vast majority of golfers need to run up, trickle up, kick up, or do whatever to get their ball on the green– not fly the ball in high to overcome what amounts to a forced carry. Long bunker shots onto that big apron, plus an undulating green surface, equals lots of 7s and 8s on scorecards.

    • Agree: Simply Simon
  9. peterike says:

    MAWA.

    Make America WASP Again

  10. It looks like a hole on a putt-putt course at gigantic scale.

  11. Lugash says:

    In some ways, this design looks ridiculous: the usual rule of thumb is that a golf course should look “natural.” But a square green indented by a thumbprint-like crater and surrounded by a trench-like bunker with right angle curve looks more like a grassed-over battlefield.

    Could this be due to nearly 20 years of war in the US? I’m no golfer, but there’s a bit of a parallel to a special ops raid. You’re part of a small group(foursome) trying to get to a target as quickly as possible(drive), get through the enemies defenses(sand traps, water features) and eliminate the target as efficiently as possible(putting).

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  12. “It was updated in the 1920s by A.W. Tillinghast and recently by Gil Hanse.”

    By a strange coincidence, there was another famous Tillinghast around the same generation. Captain Tillinghast L’Hommedieu Huston, known as “Cap. Houston”, served in both the Spanish-American War and WW1, but is today remembered as co-owner of the NY Yankees along with Jacob Ruppert. So Tillinghast must’ve been a name of some repute, as you certainly don’t come across them anymore with regularity.

    Again, Steve, you really should cull these golf articles into a book project.

  13. Hodag says:

    Sand Hills was the Ramones in London in golf course architecture.

    Also do not overlook George Bhato in rediscovering CBM and Seth Raynor.

  14. Lugash says:

    In some ways, this design looks ridiculous: the usual rule of thumb is that a golf course should look “natural.” But a square green indented by a thumbprint-like crater and surrounded by a trench-like bunker with right angle curve looks more like a grassed-over battlefield.

    A result of nearly 20 years of special ops war? There are some parallels between golf and a special ops raid. You’re part of a small group(foursome) trying to get through enemy territory without getting bogged down(drive) who then try to take out a guarded target(bunkers, sand traps, water features) with precision(putting).

    • Replies: @Hodag
  15. Off topic…but very relevant and personal:

    BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW!!!!…..Or we can draft all the War Hawk-Chickenhawk White Males who want their freedom defended by somebody else’s teenage son…..no exceptions….gang press them all outside the NFL Stadiums…direct route to Paris Island…No exceptions…The fat ones will be put on an eight week jello diet….A one way ticket to Afghanistan….

  16. Crank says:

    I’m sorry, but that green complex is an abomination. If that makes me an old crank, so be it

  17. Hodag says:
    @Lugash

    The most famous golf hole design, The Redan, is named after a fortification in the Crimean War.

  18. It’s like a Brasilian: It might look neat, but it just ain’t natural.

  19. Altai says:

    Synthwave as an overall aesthetic is quite popular with both the far right and far left. (The real far left, not the SJWs) SJWs and establishment types correctly perceive it as a kind of punk aesthetic opposed to them and they don’t tend to use it, even if they may enjoy synth music as many of the cohorts born in the 80s/90s do.

    It has a faintly dystopian side to it too, a kind of cry of despair with the world as it has become. This video has 2.4m views. The kids and young adults aren’t alright.

    For all their pseudo-revolutionary braying, the SJW realised they are embraced by the marketised neoliberal establishment. They are a critical part of the liquefaction of society so it can be better harvested, better marketised. They are scared by actual revolutionaries and don’t empathise with the symbology of the disenfranchised.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  20. I’m guessing that 2019 golfers like this hole for the same reason they like an Apple Store.

    Or even because it resembles the iPhone they’re staring at.

  21. Yes, it’s in style, but it’s also loads of fun to play. If Pete Dye had designed the 16th at Sleepy Hollow, he would have put water around at least three sides of the green and probably would have thrown in some unsightly railroad ties for good measure. The overwhelming majority of Dye’s courses seem to be set up that way—as a challenge to the golfer, not as an invitation. Hit one loose shot and you’re out of the hole. Didn’t pick the right line off the tee? Too bad, so sad. Dye’s intention more often than not is to make you uncomfortable as you stand over each shot. It can inspire you to play better, but it can also get exhausting in a hurry.

    With architects like Macdonald back in vogue and people like Hanse leading the charge, the average golfer can rediscover the joys of width on a golf course. Go to Sleepy Hollow, the National, Pinehurst No. 4, L.A. Country Club or—one of your and my favorites—Rustic Canyon, and you’ll find sweeping fairways that reward you for putting the ball in the right spot but don’t kick your ass if you get out of position. Plus, golf holes that are meant to be fun, regardless of skill level. I cannot tell you how much of a thrill it is to watch your ball sail down toward that 16th green at Sleepy, waiting to see whether it’ll nestle inside the thumbprint or leave you with a roller coaster putt. I’ll take it over target golf any day of the week, and I’d wager most other golfers feel the same.

  22. J.Ross says:

    Predictably, after months of mass media defamation of ICE as modern day Nazis, there has been another leftist terrorist attack on an ICE facility.
    https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2019/08/13/exclusive-watch-leftists-threaten-before-shooting-at-ice-facility-we-know-where-all-your-children-live/

    “We know where all your children live throughout the country … John Bulfin you have kids in [bleeped out], you have kids in [bleeped out],” the protester shouted. “We know everything about you and you won’t just be seeing us here.”
    “We know where you sleep at night,” another protester shouted. “We know what kind of dog food you buy your dogs.”

    The protesters are described as members of various familiar Soros astroturf projects such as BLM, which, if we had functioning law enforcement, would mean that they were already on the radar as revolutionists. I guess we just like surprises.

  23. Mike1 says:

    This is like a windmill obstacle at your neighborhood miniature course. One unspoken golf rule is that your score is not destroyed when you are essentially correct in your approach. This hole needs both incredible precision and low speed. You are going to roll off with almost every shot outside the central crater. Even inside the crater you would need to be inside the top third with a soft shot to guarantee staying in.
    This hole rewards blind luck which is not the point of golf.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @ex-banker
  24. syonredux says:

    The course was built in 1911-1913 by Charles Blair Macdonald and Seth Raynor on a Vanderbilt estate for a club organized by a Vanderbilt, Astor, and Rockefeller: i.e., extreme old money WASP.

    I rather doubt that the Rockefellers would have counted as “extreme old money” in 1911.

  25. bailey says:

    To a non-golfer like me, that looks like a hole in a mini golf course.

  26. the mobbed-up failure of Dean Martin’s Beverly Hills Country Club

    Dino hailed from Steubenville. His getting mixed up with mobsters appears to be the old country mouse-city rat story.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  27. @syonredux

    extreme old money WASP.

    I rather doubt that the Rockefellers would have counted as “extreme old money” in 1911

    They’d have been “extreme old WASP”, i.e., of colonial stock, but the money was fairly new.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Alden
  28. syonredux says:

    One of Paul Johnson’s observations is that aesthetic trends unite enemies. For example, King Louis XVI, Robespierre, and Napoleon didn’t really get along politically, but they all felt the neoclassical style was the only fitting style for a public building.

    For a more recent parallel, compare Nazi and New Deal architecture:

  29. Kronos says:

    Who’s likely the worst golf course architect? I don’t golf, but I’m sure there are courses that make people recoil in disgust. Has anyone ever made a golf course based on brutalist architectural principles?

  30. Kronos says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    They weren’t, the neighbors believed them to be uppity Baptists’. It was big news when John D Rockefeller’s father was a polygamist.

  31. I’m guessing that 2019 golfers like this hole for the same reason they like an Apple Store. It’s what’s in style.

    That metaphor is probably a little out of date for 2019. Apple is quickly becoming passé in the world of coolness.

    To the point, I have no idea what golfers like let alone why, but I think the game of golf in general could greatly benefit from the inclusion of more such pinball, trick shot billiards, and miniature golf-like design elements. Golfers in 2019 have ordinary golf pretty much figured out.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  32. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Old John D was a member of a big extended family of very prosperous Great Lakes Erie Canal Ohio River brokers and business men that began on the Ohio “frontier” cerca 1820-30. So old upper middle class rich.

  33. Marty says:

    There’s no way to tell if anyone actually likes the design of that hole, unless considered separate from the beautiful water backdrop and the exquisite grooming. Incidentally, the green on the new 15th (Doak) at SFGC has a similar thumbprint, though less pronounced.

  34. So let’s interrupt the excitement of watching grass grow with this piece on the unreliability of facial recognition software
    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-08-12/facial-recognition-software-mistook-1-in-5-california-lawmakers-for-criminals-says-aclu

    80% of the bastards get off Scot free.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Saxon
  35. Forbes says:

    at Sleepy Hollow on the Hudson River just north of the new Tappan Zee bridge.

    Democrats are busily re-naming everything in sight. The new Tappan Zee Bridge is the Mario Cuomo Bridge, while the Queensborough Bridge (AKA 59th St. bridge) was re-named as the Ed Koch, and the Tri-borough Bridge was re-named the Robert F. Kennedy (“RFK”) Bridge.

    The George Washington Bridge hasn’t been re-named, yet.

  36. ex-banker says:

    While it’s hard to argue that CBM and Raynor are in style, so are the more natural-looking courses like Sand Hills, Pacific Dunes and the restored Pinehurst #2. What’s not in style? Basically anything from the RTJ-era, which realistically extended with the opening of Sand Hills in 1994.

    What both Golden Age and modern architects both emphasize is width and strategy. The Jones family and Fazio embraced the USGA’s philosophy of setting up US Open courses on tree-lined courses with narrow fairways with high rough extending up to and around the greens. Top clubs competed with each from the 50s to make their courses the most difficult. Members enjoyed the bragging rights, but had less fun playing their home courses. Much of their work at top clubs (Oakland Hills, Oak Hill, Inverness, Merion and Southern Hills among others) has been, or is being, undone right now. Same arms race, just different ends.

    While current trends are more about playability and strategy than looks, it’s probably also true that clubs and architects are using the Golden Age and natural looks to distinguish their designs from those of the Fazio/RTJ era.

  37. Ibound1 says:
    @syonredux

    Fascist Italy used the same style – clean lines. The Soviet Union however, while going for massiveness, never really achieved the same. Stalinist architecture was filled with gimcracks.

  38. I always thought Louis XVI was a Rococco guy…

  39. @syonredux

    Yes Neo-Greek was popular for state buildings throughout the whole industrial / industrializing world, Japan excepted.
    Literally from San Francisco to Vladivostok. Either way.

    SADLY NEOGREEK WAS NEVER BIG IN JAPAN.

    • LOL: SimpleSong
  40. Lot says:
    @syonredux

    Speer seemed to want build completely Roman looking buildings but bigger. We already had a lot of them built between 1850-1900.

    The New Deal buildings were plurality Art Deco, and more transitions between neoclassical and modern, as seen in your examples.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @Old Palo Altan
  41. @syonredux

    What is that second building? The writing across the front is not only tacky, it’s filled with Yiddish insults.

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  42. Apple store. excellent observation.

    Newport Beach built a new City Hall @ 10 years ago. Everything about it is clean lines. (The “wavy” roof is evocative of sailboats, you see). Personally I think it looks like an airplane terminal.

    The preferred look is unsullied by homo sapiens. The back is an open lawn – which is fine for concerts – but no color whatsoever.

    The front is all mostly monochrome gray succulents and cactus.

    Look around……just about all new landscaping is done this way. And it’s not just a water issue. You can xeriscape with lantana and bougainvilla.

    Quite a contrast from all those old color newsreels of the 1940s, often promotional films by folks like Santa Fe Railroad, that just gushed about all the flowering trees and bougainvilla and wintertime roses and oranges that set millions of Midwesterners to pack their bags.

    (The building and landscaping were done by more-or-less starchitects in their fields btw, and won armloads of awards, of course.)

  43. syonredux says:
    @Lot

    Sill a lot of overlap. And FDR was a confirmed fan of the Neo- Neoclassical style, with John Russell Pope being a particular favorite:

  44. I wonder whether the hole at Sleepy Hollow looks as artificial from course level as it does from the slight aerial views shown in the several pictures.

  45. Steve has taken note of his audience’s preferences, and only writes about gold course architecture after he’s done his fund raising drive.

  46. @Lugash

    Oh, you know it. But then, so did these guys . . .

  47. I would have thought the parallel between golf and invading enemy territory was obvious to golfers. You’re bombing while trying to avoid existing fortifications and bad terrain.

  48. @Reg Cæsar

    Youngstown has always been big-time mob country. If you were as Italian as Dino you’d have some mob connections somewhere in your family, wherever you grew up.

  49. Is Claiming Native American ancestry is still in style ?

    In 1990 the census counted 2 million Native Americans , their population doubled to 4 million in 2000 and has doubled again to the current 8 million….but if all the Americans who are 1% Native American claim to be Indians we have about 45 million Native Americans living in America today.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  50. @Ozymandias

    It is the Haus der Deutschen Kunst in Munich, designed by Paul Ludwig Troost, Hitler’s first architect. He died in 1934, so had little time to design anything more than this and the much more architecturally successful Fuehrerbau, also in Munich. That both have not long been torn down is something of a miracle, one which I do not expect to continue for much longer.

    This one, now called simply Haus der Kunst, is filled with every sort of modernist horror but mercifully the exhibitions are not permanent. Thus the rather elegantly lettered if vulgar Yiddish insults, there in 2014, are, one can at least hope, now long gone.

  51. @Lot

    Speer was no genius, but at his best he was very good. His Neu Reichskanzlei was magnificent; its loss tragic.

    But neither it, nor any of his buildings, were “completely Roman looking buildings”. That description would be more appropriately used for the Roosevelt favoured style which syonredux usefully illustrates for us.

    • Replies: @Lot
  52. @Jim Don Bob

    It’s not such a slow news day if you’re watching the markets. The DOW just crashed over 800 points and closed on the lows of the day, in what is probably the beginning of the end of the Everything Bubble. As I mentioned in a previous comment, I think the Epstein absurdity has finally broken the will of a critical mass of people to buy into the system. I feel some big changes are afoot.

    • Replies: @Ozymandias
  53. @Kronos

    For most over-rated I nominate Donald Ross. He did quite a few where there is no evidence he even visited the site. He’d take aerial photos and scribble some greens and a few bunkers, then send out a bill.

  54. Barnard says:
    @Mike1

    That is an unspoken rule of golf, but one the USGA did not accept for the U.S. Open until the players forced it on them this year. The members must not be having that much trouble on the 16th, if they were consistently hitting shots on the green and watching them roll into the bunkers I think the course would give up on the gimmick hole.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  55. eah says:

    VW GOLF AND PHILADELPHIA ADVERTS BANNED FOR PROMOTING ‘HARMFUL’ GENDER STEREOTYPES — Recent Advertising Standards Authority ruling bans adverts that promote ‘attributes or behaviours usually associated with a specific gender’

    According to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), three people complained about stereotyping to watchdogs after viewing an advert for the Volkswagen eGolf electric car and one for the famous soft cheese brand on 14 June – the day the new rules came into force. … The complaints were upheld by the watchdog which found both adverts breached new rules regarding “harm and offence”. … The new rules state that “advertisements must not include gender stereotypes that are likely to cause harm, or serious or widespread offence”. … Complainants said that the Volkswagen advert “perpetuated harmful gender stereotypes” by showing men engaged in adventurous activities in contrast to a woman in a “care-giving” role.

  56. ChrisZ says:
    @The Z Blog

    Zman, it’s by Chris Caldwell, whose relationship to Con-Inc. seems to be of the “in, not of” variety. He’s shown a strong familiarity with iSteve themes before (without crediting them, alas), but somehow has not been subjected to the Sailer-Derb-Steyn treatment. I’m sure his article on African migration will be “news” to the NRO readership, but I shudder to think of their reactions to this “discovery.” Something about “yearning to breath free,” perhaps?

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @slumber_j
  57. @Forbes

    Democrats are busily re-naming everything in sight. The new Tappan Zee Bridge is the Mario Cuomo Bridge, while the Queensborough Bridge (AKA 59th St. bridge) was re-named as the Ed Koch, and the Tri-borough Bridge was re-named the Robert F. Kennedy (“RFK”) Bridge.

    Yeah, and someone decided a few decades ago to rename 6th Avenue as Avenue of the Americas, but I don’t recall ever calling it that when telling people where to go. As for the GWB, I think people are so used to calling it “The GWB” that they don’t associate it with that dead, white, owner of slaves.

  58. @syonredux

    The Astors were real old money, the Vanderbilts slightly Johnnie-come-lately, and the Rockefellers indeed quite nouveau in 1911.

    But more to the point, none were WASP; that is, none were Anglo-Saxon. One could argue that this did not matter with the Vanderbilts, given the long and extremely honourable position of the old Dutch families in New York and New Jersey, but the Astors were Germans who came over, via England, as late as 1783, while the Rockefellers, also German, arrived in Pennsylvania around 1723.

    The Boston Brahmins and the Philadelphia Mainliners were happy enough to marry into the money, but they were at least as happy to sniff at the bloodlines.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  59. syonredux says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    The Astors were real old money, the Vanderbilts slightly Johnnie-come-lately, and the Rockefellers indeed quite nouveau in 1911.

    But more to the point, none were WASP; that is, none were Anglo-Saxon.

    Weren’t they all pretty thoroughly intermixed with Anglo-Saxons by 1911?Glancing through the WIKIPEDIA bios, I see a lot of wives and mothers with WASPy names…..

    For example, here’s John D Rockefeller’s wife:

    Laura Celestia Spelman was born in Wadsworth, Ohio to Puritan descendant Harvey Buell Spelman (1811–1881) and Lucy Henry (1818–1897), Yankees who had moved to Ohio from Massachusetts. Harvey was an abolitionist who was active in the Congregationalist Church, the Underground Railroad, and in politics. The Spelmans eventually moved to Cleveland, Ohio. Spelman had an elder adopted sister, Lucy Maria “Lute” Spelman (c. 1837–1920).[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Spelman_Rockefeller

    And then there’s John D’s father:

    William Avery Rockefeller was born in Ancram, New York.[3] He was the eldest son of businessman/farmer Godfrey Lewis Rockefeller (September 24, 1783, Albany, New York – September 28, 1857, Richford, New York) and Lucy Avery (February 11, 1786, Great Barrington, Massachusetts – April 6, 1867). Godfrey and Lucy had married on September 20, 1806, in Amwell, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Bill had two elder sisters—Melinda and Olympia—as well as seven younger siblings; Norman, Sally, Jacob, Mary, Miles, Mary Miranda, and Egbert.

    The Rockefellers trace their patrilineal line to Goddard Rockefeller (born Gotthard Rockenfeller) (1590) of Fahr, today part of Neuwied, Germany. The first Rockefeller to emigrate to America (1723) was Johann Peter Rockenfeller (1710, Segendorf, Neuwied; 1787, Amwell Township, New Jersey), who changed his name to Rockefeller. Godfrey Lewis Rockefeller was a son of distant cousins William Rockefeller (1750–1793) and Christina Rockefeller (1754–1800).

    Lucy Avery was born to Miles Avery and Melinda Pixley, New England Yankees of mostly English descent. She was descended by her father from Edmund of Langley’s first marriage (through 5th Baron Audley’s second marriage)[4] and from Mary Boleyn’s first marriage (through the 2nd Barons de la Warr).[5]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Rockefeller_Sr.

  60. Sleepy Hollow wasn’t officially Sleepy Hollow until 1996. It was North Tarrytown before that. Was it renamed for the movie or for the golf course? They’d had over a century to name it for the story.

    The first (white) owner of the land there was Adriaen van der Donck. The Bronx was named for Jonas Bronck (a Swede, of all things). Sleepy Hollow was lucky not to have been called The Donx.

    By the way, I sent for the book below at the library, and it’s all Steve’s fault. Is there a counterpart for putt-putt course architecture?

    • Replies: @Prosa123
  61. Alfa158 says:
    @kihowi

    That works for miniature golf so maybe for the real thing as well.
    I’ve never played anything but miniature golf but I think it has to be harder than real golf. After all, on a real golf course you may be playing on multi-hundred yard holes, but you also don’t have to swing your club with one hand while trying to not spill the margarita in your other hand.

  62. Clyde says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Must be a slow news day. We’re back to golf.

    Epstein is still in the news. They found Ghislaine living in Massachusetts. And the name of the useless jail warden who was not fired but reassigned, is Lamine N’Diaye. A Senegalese name.

    Jeffrey Epstein rape accuser Jennifer Araoz sues ‘enablers’ Ghislaine Maxwell, 3 others
    Jennifer Araoz files a new lawsuit against financier Jeffrey Epstein’s alleged procurer of young girls and three other women he employed.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  63. @syonredux

    and from Mary Boleyn’s first marriage

    Did three breasts run in Lucy’s line, the way six toes do in Hemingway’s cats?

    • Replies: @syonredux
  64. @kihowi

    Capability Brown died a while ago. Since then, people have sort of understood that making a garden look natural is only compounding the phoniness; not only are you shaping nature by hand , you’re now also pretending that you didn’t.

    A Nordic Hawaiian haole who spent time teaching English in Japan told me that in his view, the Japanese “abhor nature”. Their gardens were intended to be and to look fake.

    When you consider Japan’s nature– earthquakes, tsunamis, the vast majority of the land uninhabitable– who can blame them?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Alden
    , @Liza
  65. Lot says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    A lot of mid-sized U.S. courthouses plus a few churches from mid to late 19th century verge on perfect replicas of greek and roman buildings.

    But by 1910 or so, that had become rare and gave way to more elaborate and grander Beaux Art type neoclassicism. Syon’s D.C. examples included. I think this was a positive trend, while liking both of them.

    San Francisco City Hall (1915)

    • Agree: Old Palo Altan
    • Replies: @SimpleSong
  66. eah says:

    OT

    That Study Claiming Religious Kids Are Less Altruistic That I Said Stinks Was Retracted

    Seems like (?) the authors were perhaps (a bit too) anxious to ding religious people as skinflints/relatively uncharitable (also in their view of others).

    In our paper, we reported cross-cultural differences in how the religious environment of a child negatively impacted their sharing, their judgments of the actions of others, and how their parents evaluated them. An error in this article, our incorrect inclusion of country of origin as a covariate in many analyses, was pointed out in a correspondence … When we reanalyzed these data to correct this error, we found that country of origin, rather than religious affiliation, is the primary predictor of several of the outcomes. While our title finding that increased household religiousness predicts less sharing in children remains significant, we feel it necessary to explicitly correct the scientific record, and we are therefore retracting the article.

  67. J.Ross says:
    @Bill Jones

    It’ll be like in Robocop: they’re hardwire in an exemption for clubmembers.

  68. @Kronos

    Or the opposite, what’s the most ‘natural’ course? I mean, one that could be mistaken for groves and woods etc that are found in nature.

  69. Lot says:
    @ChrisZ

    “but somehow has not been subjected to the Sailer-Derb-Steyn treatment”

    Steve and Derb are completely evicted from polite conservative company, at least publicly. Steyn isn’t. Caldwell is fine too.

    You can ignore, push, or toe the line, and all four are smart enough to know the implications of each choice and make an informed decision.

    The really big thing dividing them into two groups is Steve and Derb have never pretended to be IQ egalitarians, nor do they ever try to dance around or fudge the issue.

    • Replies: @ChrisZ
  70. @Barnard

    I doubt if Sleepy Hollow maintains its greens year-round at US Open speeds. These old money WASP clubs mostly like their golf fun. So an occasional disaster like your ball rolling off the green is fine because bad luck is part of the game, but the members don’t like unremitting pressure for 18 holes. E.g., last year I played the National Golf Links of America on the day that next door (literally) at Shinnecock Hills, Dustin Johnson shot a 77 because the greens were so insanely fast. But I had a delightful round at NGLA because NGLA members like to play with greens that are cut quick enough to make the breaks come into play, but not at all punishing.

    • Replies: @Interested Bystander
  71. @syonredux

    What you point out is true enough, but it is not what people saw, heard or felt at the time: the names were what they were, and they were not WASP, so a suspicion of foreigness remained.

    Take an example of the opposite phenomenon – a nouveau family which was English, and thus became WASP within a generation. That family (there are certainly others) was Grew, of Birmingham in England, and then of Boston from 1795. They both married well and did well in business, so they were fully accepted within a generation, so much so that most people, fifty years later, would have been surprised to learn how relatively recently the family had come to America.

    Read contemporary newspaper accounts of all four families, for weddings in particular, and you will see what I mean: the foreign origins of the first three are almost always at least alluded to, while for the Grews there is never anything of the kind.

    A striking example of what this meant in society is this: the first edition of the New York Social Register (1887) contains no Astors, and only three Vanderbilts; at the same time there are eight Auchinclosses and no less than forty-three Livingstons.

    Make of it what you will; it’s just the way it was.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  72. Prosa123 says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    North Tarrytown was the site of a General Motors assembly plant for many years until it closed in the early 1990’s. Renaming the community to the historic Sleepy Hollow was a way of moving on from the economic blow.

  73. syonredux says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Didn’t Anne Boleyn have an extra finger?

    • Replies: @Alden
  74. Prosa123 says:
    @Forbes

    The city’s renaming of the Triboro Bridge in favor of Robert Kennedy was doubly bad. Its former name had been uniquely descriptive given the way it connected three boroughs. In addition, Kennedy was an odd choice to be honored because he never had significant ties to the city beyond a couple years spent in Riverdale as a child. His election to the Senate from New York in 1964 was strictly a carpetbagger deal. New York happened to have a winnable election that year, if that hadn’t been the case he would have run from some other state. During his term Kennedy lived at his family estate in Virginia and spent just the minimum necessary amount of time in New York.

    At least with the renaming of the Queensboro Bridge for Ed Koch there were no such considerations. In addition, the bridge also had been called the 59th Street Bridge, so its former name was not universally used. Nor was there much controversy over renaming the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel in honor of former governor Hugh Carey or for changing the Interboro Parkway to the Jackie Robinson Parkway. Years earlier the city had made a smart move with respect to the Marine Parkway Bridge, changing to the Gil Hodges-Marine Parkway Bridge rather than changing its name completely.

    • Replies: @Marquandian Hero
  75. @Forbes

    To hell with all that.

    I still say Idlewild.

  76. ChrisZ says:
    @Lot

    Lot: Steve, Derb, and Steyn were all evicted from NR/NRO—which was my point.

    I agree that all four writers (including Caldwell) are smart guys. But I think at least one or two were initially surprised by their defenestration by NR. I agree that, with that experience/example in the rear view mirror, they all know the score and make informed decisions.

    • Replies: @Lot
  77. J.Ross says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Japanese have uninterrupted the old Greek idea that nature is there to be tamed (it is not love of nature to let it run its course), so there’s no contradiction in wanting natural beauty that won’t tear off your face.

  78. Alden says:

    Oh, off topic

    The communist mural at George Washington high school in San Francisco won’t be painted over after all. More people signed the petition to keep it than to paint it over. So the school board caved.

    • Replies: @danand
    , @Anonymous
  79. @Intelligent Dasein

    “The DOW just crashed over 800 points and closed on the lows of the day,”

    Hey pal, were trying to talk golf architecture here!

  80. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Japan’s naturally very green lush and humid. Why do they make sand, gravel and rock gardens suitable for the Sahara? There’s still a lot of Japanese gardens in Ca. In Los Angeles there’s some totally paved small front yards with a narrow little stream running through it. And a couple contorted plants. I appreciate the thought but it’s very artificial.

  81. syonredux says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    What you point out is true enough, but it is not what people saw, heard or felt at the time: the names were what they were, and they were not WASP, so a suspicion of foreigness remained.

    Sure. People were always aware that there was a teuton somewhere in the family line…..But I’m not sure what that would have meant, in operational terms, in 1911….And the right marriage could work wonders in terms of social standing….See, for example, William Backhouse Astor Jr.’s wife, Caroline Schermerhorn Astor (AKA “the Mrs. Astor”) :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Schermerhorn_Astor

    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
  82. Lot says:
    @ChrisZ

    I wasn’t aware Steyn was dumped from NR. Still, I think he is more like Coulter, who was also dropped from NR, but remains not beyond the pale.

    Derb as I recall was not surprised by his firing, and said he knew it was inevitable and he wasn’t going to worry about avoiding it.

    He got away with more than other writers because he’s British and had the back page column that gave especially good writers more freedom, same as Florence King.

    I don’t remember Steve ever saying what happened with him and NR, but I think he just stopped doing freelance submissions, perhaps after one was inexplicably rejected. UPI might also have just paid more or offered more readership. I think Steve was more mainstream and NR was more paleo-friendly and nationalist back when Steve wrote for them.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  83. Kronos says:
    @Altai

    As a Millennial, your correct on all counts. However, please let me provide you some REAL Synthwave.

    Also, this is the most Portland-ish band I’ve ever heard. Most of the music does sound like your on opium or a daze.

  84. slumber_j says:
    @kihowi

    I take your point, completely. However, my favorite place I’ve ever walked around hitting the ball–as a dedicated non-serious golfer, it must be said–is northern-Michigan’s Crystal Downs, which is an often fake-downs course. So there’s that.

    I continue to extend to Mr. Sailer an invitation to play the Tillinghast course at the Norfolk Country Club in Litchfield County, CT. It’s as pretty good as I’m pretty bad.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  85. slumber_j says:
    @ChrisZ

    That’s exactly right. Chris Caldwell is an old friend of mine–partly in the sense that I haven’t had contact with him in a long time. But he’s smarter and more genuine than most of these people, as you indicate. Great guy.

  86. @Steve Sailer

    Steve, I couldn’t find evidence, e.g., photos, but I’m sure I read article in the last couple of years about a major renovation at the club, and this hole in particular. Over the years (decades) entropy had “rounded the corners” of this hole (and others) and made it look more “natural.” The renovation aimed, and succeeded in putting t back to its original design, love or lath it…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  87. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    This Sleepy Hollow hole has the virtue of being fairly easy to replicate in cake form.

  88. Saxon says:
    @Bill Jones

    Is it really unreliable or do some certain faces just look alike? Is it possible that Mexican mestizo and similar racial group lawmakers get confused for the “white males” you see up on the US sheriffs websites due to really having similar faces?

    The entire article is basically “bodycams bad because blacks and browns disparate impact nonsense and also it hurts my feels that the bodycams vindicated the evil po-leece like the man who shot Michael Brown who dindu nuffin except rob a tiny Pakistani man’s store and then try to assault an officer and take his weapon.”

    The only concrete example of this stuff not working well within the paramaters of matching faces I’ve seen is the one weird trick that fans of Insane Clown Posse found to hide the contours of their face with clown facepaint.

  89. danand says:
    @Alden

    Alden, local news yesterday evening indicated that Danny Glover’s personal plea to not paint over the art saved the wall. (Glover is a alumni of the school.)

    https://abc7news.com/education/sf-school-board-reverses-decision-to-paint-over-controversial-mural-/5466365/

    • Replies: @Marty
  90. Dissident says:
    @Lot

    What a strange world we live in where reasonable, measured, thoughtful, honest, incisive, independent and courageous voices such as Steve Sailer and John Derbyshire are considered beyond-the-pale, relegated to UR. A strange, foolish, sad world.

    Derb as I recall was not surprised by his firing, and said he knew it was inevitable and he wasn’t going to worry about avoiding it.

    That’s what I may love most about Derb; his relaxed, natural, matter-of-fact, persistent, sustained independence and defiance. Even in the face of hysterical screeching mobs calling for his head, Derb, like our esteemed host Mr. Sailer, seems to remain unfazed.

    • Agree: Lot
  91. @Forbes

    The new Tappan Zee Bridge is the Mario Cuomo Bridge

    Cuomo of course would be Vito to Chris’ Fredo.

    Sleepy Hollow on the Hudson River just north of the new Tappan Zee bridge

    The new bridge is just north of the old bridge. For those wondering why the bridge were placed at such a wide point of the Hudson River, it’s because it is just over 25 miles from the Statue of Liberty. If it was within that radius, then a different governmental body would have had jurisdiction.

    Also, Sleepy Hollow’s nearest landmark is Sing Sing, a prison so famous that the expression “up the river” comes from New Yorkers being sent there.

  92. Old Prude says:
    @Intelligent Dasein

    Apple may very well be starting down hill: Yesterday I bought a laptop. I avoided the Apple store as it was crowded and disorganized. No prices anywhere. I went to Best Buy and the sale clerk pointed out the new MacBook had no USB ports. WTF. So I bought the 2o15 model to get USB Ports. The Iphone sucks because it has no access for a patch cord, and now the laptops have no USB ports. The asses can’t figure out how to fit stuff in the package, so they try to be cute and tell us that USB and patch cords are so yesterday.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Lot
  93. Old Prude says:
    @Prodigal son

    ALWAYS select Native American when asked for race. Your land is being invaded and you are being lied to by the Big White Father in Washington. If it brings AA gibs: Bonus.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
  94. @Interested Bystander

    Here’s a review of Sleepy Hollow that discusses its history.

    http://golfclubatlas.com/courses-by-country/usa/sleepy-hollow-country-club-ny-usa/

    I’m a little unclear however whether this hole is a restoration to what Macdonald built or whether it’s Hanse’s tribute to Macdonald. The review says Macdonald and a Rockefeller clashed over tree cutting. and the old course turned out not as good as its sensational views and huge wealth implied. So maybe Hanse was authorized to cut loose as if Macdonald had fully delivered 106 years ago?

    Most golf course architects these days are stuck mostly doing restorations because America doesn’t need more golf courses, so there is a big ideology extolling purity of restorations of old architects’ work. But I would imagine the current generation, of which Hanse is one of the top guys, really wants to do originals. So you end up with these C.B. Macdonald-on-acid designs.

    • Replies: @ex-banker
  95. ex-banker says:
    @Mike1

    One unspoken golf rule is that your score is not destroyed when you are essentially correct in your approach.

    This comment is misguided on so many levels. Luck is, and has been, an essential element of golf since the beginning. Well-struck shots fly off downslopes and stick into upslopes all the time. There is no fair in golf.

    With respect to the 16th at Sleepy Hollow, the hole is not that difficult. It plays only 155 yards from the back tees and the green is enormous. Like most short templates, it also plays downhill, making it easier to hold the green. Hitting that green is in no way blind luck (not that there’d be anything wrong with it).

  96. ex-banker says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Hanse’s new work looks nothing like the works of CB Macdonald, though I think he’d persuasively argue that his courses would play similarly in terms of shot values and strategy. His recent new work at Streamsong, Pinehurst #4, the Olympic Course in Rio and Ohoopee are all natural, “minimalist” designs and very unlike his restoration work at Sleepy Hollow, Merion and Southern Hills. While he and his top peers (Doak/Coore & Crenshaw/Mclay-Kidd) all do great work, they have effectively monopolized the top work that’s available. Nobody gets fired for hiring IBM, and there’s risk that we end up in the RTJ/Fazio rut of sameness once again.

  97. @Clyde

    Reports say that Lamine N’Diaye makes $127k a year. You’d think you could find someone who gave a damn for that kind of money.

  98. @The Z Blog

    The comments are interesting. NR readers still can’t bring themselves to simply say, “We don’t want Africans coming our country because we live here and that’s not what we want.” or the even more pure and honest, “We don’t want Africans coming here because they’re not not my people.”

    However, they are willing to at least say we don’t want them here. Granted they use economic arguments, but it’s a good first step. It lets their brain (and heart) move in our direction. They’ll admit more to themselves later.

  99. Liza says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    You might be interested in seeing Naked Island (1960, Kaneto Shindo). It’s one of those impossible, shit-or-go-blind, singular films, depicting the life of the director’s parents in 1930s rural Japan. Solzhenitsyn was quoted as saying that Naked Island is the most moving film he’s ever seen. It made my stomach churn whereas other, more artsy-movie, people were filled with wonder. That, too, I suppose.

    I can see why some Japanese of longstanding rural background would leave, never look back and, indeed, despise the great outdoors and enthusiastically cheer their phony, desert-like, “gardens”. Raking gravel and charging it with some great cosmic meaning. Of course, we in the west do that, too. From backbreaking small farms to life in the “easier” big city and then working your knuckles to the bone making that lawn perfectissimo – as artificial as anything the Japanese could do. I knew a man who spent hours using regular little scissiors doing the grass in his front yard. SMH.

  100. Most golf course architects these days are stuck mostly doing restorations because America doesn’t need more golf courses, so there is a big ideology extolling purity of restorations of old architects’ work. But I would imagine the current generation, of which Hanse is one of the top guys, really wants to do originals. So you end up with these C.B. Macdonald-on-acid designs.

    Did I miss the blog post about how crooked money-grubbing real estate scam artists were building all these damn golf courses to sell their crappy houses?

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/golf-home-owners-chip-in-to-save-struggling-courses-11559757895

    Golf is a giant scam just like globalization is a scam.

    The golf courses were built everywhere and then went belly up. Now the people on the edge of the abandoned golf courses are getting pissed off about the future use of the land.

    Raise the damn federal funds rate to six or ten percent and implode the real asset bubbles now!

    Ornery Thursday!

  101. Anonymous[382] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    It’s going to be vandalized anyway. Or the school will hang posters over it to cover it up, at least the objectionable parts.

  102. J.Ross says:
    @Old Prude

    I have noticed that USBs are universally either ridiculously underprovided or are jammed so close together as to be wasted. A nudge to the monitorable, bottleneckable cloud? They must be thinking cloud or Google Drive if they’re doing without USBs.

  103. @syonredux

    Operational terms? Well, just what I pointed out earlier: winks and nods about the German origins, talk about new money (even in the 1950s where the Rockefellers were concerned), and the fact that the Astors aren’t even in the 1887 Social Register. I imagine they put that right pretty quickly, but it shows what the real gratin were thinking.
    But, as I have also already said, the money was welcome, and the doubts were swallowed in order to get as much as possible of it.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  104. syonredux says:
    @Old Palo Altan

    As Edith Wharton once observed, standards are always falling…

    If in those days any authentic member of the Faubourg Saint–Germain had been asked what really constituted Paris society, the answer would undoubtedly have been; “There is no Paris society any longer — there is just a welter of people from heaven knows where.” In a once famous play by Alexandre Dumas fils, “L’Etrangere,” written, I suppose, in the ‘sixties, the Duke (a Duke of the proudest and most ancient nobility) forces his equally proud and perfectly irreproachable wife to invite his foreign mistress (Mrs. Clarkson) to an evening party. The duchess is seen receiving her guests in the high-ceilinged salon of their old hotel, with tall French windows opening to the floor. Mrs. Clarkson arrives, elegant, arrogant and nervous; the duchess receives her simply and courteously; then she rings for the major-domo, and gives the order: “Ouvrez les fenetres! que tout le monde entre maintenant!”

    In the Paris I knew, the Paris of twenty-five years ago, everybody would have told me that those windows had remained wide open ever since, that tout le monde had long since come in, that all the old social conventions were tottering or already demolished, and that the Faubourg had become as promiscuous as the Fair of Neuilly. The same thing was no doubt said a hundred years earlier, and two hundred years even, and probably something not unlike it was heard in the more exclusive salons of Babylon and Ur.

    A Backward Glance, Chapter 11

  105. Marty says:
    @danand

    Is it possible that Danny Glover kicked off our current era in which people are not required to make sense and subjective feelings go untested? In ‘94 or ‘95, he complained that if African cabbies in NYC passed him by, the reason had to be “racism.” Who knows, if he’d been challenged on that idiocy we might never have had Blasey-Ford.

  106. @Lot

    I personally sorta prefer Beaux Arts to the straight neoclassicism. However I’ve always thought the pollarded trees they have all over San Francisco just look sad and abused.

  107. Lot says:
    @Old Prude

    The rectangular USB ports are from 1996. They’ve had a good run, but are outdated, too big, and easy to break

    Good for Apple to nudge people away from them like they did with floppy drives.

    The new MacBooks have thunderbolt 3 ports which are directly compatible with USB type C, used on the majority of cell phones now.

    Once you go Type C you never will want to go back!

  108. @Prosa123

    The Jackie Robinson is the only one of the renames that has sort of stuck, although I still hear it called the Interboro. The only one that has fully realize is JFK instead of Idlewild, probably because it’s marginally easier to say than “Idlewild”…although it didn’t stick for Cape Canaveral.

  109. e says:

    That’s a downright ugly green, as ugly as an Apple store, both sterile and as far from organic as one can imagine..

  110. @slumber_j

    Thanks.

    Alister MacKenzie’s and Perry Maxwell’s Crystal Downs in the forested duneland near the west coast of Michigan is insanely great. You are just driving along a winding road about a half mile inland and suddenly some of the best golf holes imaginable are rising up toward the lake.

    I see that MacKenzie (who went on to design Augusta National where the Master’s is held) spent 10 days there in 1929 on his way back to Britain from laying out Cypress Point on the Monterey Peninsula. Then the Depression kicked in, so his right hand man from Oklahoma, Perry Maxwell, not having much else to do, kept coming back for several years to perfect the golf course.

    Golf course architecture seems to be an interactive combination of genius and time spent working on the site. Crystal Downs benefited from 10 days of the greatest architect of the 1920s, MacKenzie, plus a lot of time from the guy, Maxwell, who might have been the greatest of the 1930s and 1940s if there’d been many golf courses built in his prime.

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