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From the New York Times:

Two Lessons in Prejudice
By SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH AUG. 26, 2017

What I know of rural white America mostly begins and ends with the three times I went at the age of 8 to visit a friend’s farm in Butler County, Pa., about an hour north of Pittsburgh, where I grew up. I recall vast farmland, ample sunshine and no black people — or Hispanics or Jews, or for that matter, half-Iranian, half-Jewish people like me. There was, however, my friend’s father, who found it amusing to make fun of my name over dinner, coming up with a wide variety of ways to mispronounce it each time. I did my best to politely correct him each time, until it finally became apparent to me that I was participating in a game in which there was no chance of winning, and I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland.

Okay … “cried among the farmland.” … Possible alternatives:

“cried among the crops.”
“sobbed among the succotash.”
“blubbered all over the beets.”
“sniveled about the terrain.”
“eyeless in Gaza.”

It is, of course, unfair to judge an entire county with a population of almost 200,000 on the behavior of one man 40 years ago, but I hope you can understand my disbelief when on a dark night last November, I watched on television as Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign tried to assure her supporters that little Butler County was going to come through for her in the 11th hour and overtake Donald Trump’s lead in Pennsylvania, and by extension the Electoral College. Now, I thought, is as good a time as any to turn off the television and go bury my head under the pillow.

I’ve read countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?

Update: Interestingly, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh isn’t actually an immigrant. He was born in Brooklyn to a pair of Trotskyites. His Iranian communist father left when he was an infant, and he was raised by his Jewish-American mother. His mother’s brother, the prolific novelist Mark Harris (born Mark Harris Finkelstein), was best known for the 1956 baseball novel Bang the Drum Slowly, which provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role as a dying catcher in the 1973 movie adaptation.

So, Saïd Sayrafiezadeh is basically a Jewish guy from New York who has followed his uncle into the writing biz. But instead of being, say, Sid Finkelstein, he has an unpronounceable name, so that gives him more Pokemon Points in the Diversity Racket and makes him relevant.

 
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  1. It is, of course, unfair to judge an entire county with a population of almost 200,000 on the behavior of one man 40 years ago

    And then goes on to do precisely that.

    • Replies: @Altai
    Can't find the clip online.

    Lisa: Dad, you can't judge a place you've never been to.
    Bart: Yeah, that's what people do in Russia.
     
    , @Nico
    Unsurprisingly, the NYT has turned off comments for this piece. Such a pity. It would be so much fun to MST.
  2. I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?

    Whine listing?

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    Kvetch-up?
    , @al gore rhythms
    La Petite Tort?
    , @bomag
    Diversity Speaks?

    More accurately:

    Diversity Speaks!

    , @Otto
    Resentment. Typical for underachievers.
    , @Jack_Q
    Sour grape-shot
  3. I’m not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    • Agree: L Woods, Sarah Toga
    • LOL: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Kylie
    "I’m not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated."

    I'd prefer Tales of the Departed.
    , @Danindc
    Bravo. Lol
    , @dr kill
    McGregored works for me.
    , @Jack_Q
    The Dearly Deported
    , @Jack_Q
    Defenestration Diary
  4. I have a general practice of deliberately mispronouncing the names of attractive off-white women I want to fornicate with. Uggos get their name pronounced exactly correctly on the first or second attempt.

    I’d like to see one of these female journos explain how this tendency makes me racist.

  5. Oh, so FEZ from “That ’70s Show” has got a gig at the New York Times. And he has lost his sense of humour too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fez_(That_%2770s_Show)

    • Replies: @guest
    There was an episode of That 70s Show featuring Fez (an acronym of "foreign exchange student") briefly playing the racial grievance game. He tries it on Tommy Chong, who points out that he isn't a white oppressor, but rather "Chinese or sumthin'."
  6. The name of the genre?

    Schadenfreude.

    Wallow in it.

  7. Vice signaling.

    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Or "victim signaling".
  8. @Lurker

    It is, of course, unfair to judge an entire county with a population of almost 200,000 on the behavior of one man 40 years ago
     
    And then goes on to do precisely that.

    Can’t find the clip online.

    Lisa: Dad, you can’t judge a place you’ve never been to.
    Bart: Yeah, that’s what people do in Russia.

  9. SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH:

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968)[1] is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party. He was raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His maternal uncle is the novelist Mark Harris.[2] He lives in New York City.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%AFd_Sayrafiezadeh

    Mark Harris, his maternal uncle:

    Harris was born Mark Harris Finkelstein in Mount Vernon, New York, to Carlyle and Ruth (Klausner) Finkelstein. At the age of 11, he began keeping a diary, which he would maintain for every day of his life thereafter.[1]
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because “it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs.”[2] He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler’s Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943. His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944. He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis. He was honorably discharged in April 1944.[3] His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957)
    .

    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years. In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in “You Bet Your Life”, a game played on The Groucho Show

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Harris_(author)

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    In its own way, being that Said is half-Iranian, this makes total sense. Post-1965 Hart-Celler Immigration legislation, Middle Easterners were thus allowed to migrate to the US. With the case of Said's father's family at least we have written evidence that this is the case and Muslim immigration to the US began to occur starting around this time. (unlike the total lack of written evidence for Muslim immigration prior to mid 20th century). He was born post '65, therefore it's safe to assume that his father immigrated to the US post 1965 (which is similar to Nikki Haley's Shihk family).
    , @Nigerian Nationalist
    This is funny.
    , @Hockamaw

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party.
     
    And there it is.
    , @slumber_j
    My wife is partly responsible for the creation and ongoing funding of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. At least this dude didn't actually win it...
  10. and go bury my head under the pillow.

    Will the author be content with a Pulitzer or head straight for the Nobel? Not original but so little is these days.

  11. “Is there a name yet for this genre?”

    fictional autobiography?

    • Replies: @englishmike

    “Is there a name yet for this genre?”
     
    The title that Australian author, Clive James, gave to the first volume of his autobiography:
    Unreliable Memoirs.
  12. “I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland.”

    lol come on, while telling europeans they have to deal with daily terrorism?

    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    "Someone gently teased me about my long, difficult name. WHITE GENTILES MUST DIE FOR THIS!"

    It's so hard being a rich connected Jew.
  13. Officially? The transgenerational trauma case study.

    The compendium of the ascendant.

    Immigrunting.

    • LOL: Frau Katze
    • Replies: @guest
    Immigrunting is good. Immigriping is better.
  14. There was, however, my friend’s father, who found it amusing to make fun of my name over dinner, coming up with a wide variety of ways to mispronounce it each time. I did my best to politely correct him each time, until it finally became apparent to me that I was participating in a game in which there was no chance of winning, and I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland

    .

    That might be the gayest thing that I have ever read…..and I was born in San Francisco…..

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123

    I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland
     
    What the f*** did I just read?
    , @Forbes
    As regards a name for this...I've always referred to it as a pity party.

    Who hasn't had their name made fun of while growing up? Or the shirt they were wearing? Or one's haircut? Or, you name it ___ ? It's called a rite of passage for a child, an adolescent--learning to toughen up and grow some thick skin (some balls) as against the cruel world, which will do more than make fun of your name. There are plenty more games in life like that you'll have no chance of winning.

    An adult so clueless as to write such drivel is embarrassing.

    But definitely a professional victim and member of the grievance class...
  15. I don’t know if there’s a name for it but I’m damn tired of it already.

  16. He ran out of the farmhouse and cried forty years ago. Unless he’s an especially delicate soul, that would make him a Gen Xer. That fits. I’ve noticed legions of such Others, from the same age group, who have done very nicely in the West. They seem to use the guilt-tripping and needling of their white-collar, White colleagues as a kind of social lubricant and career booster. Goofy old White ladies (of either sex) seem to love this kind of banter because they assume it’s not aimed at them but rather those benighted Whites “out there”.

    From the time they got off the plane, nice White ladies have been explaining to them just how much more special and deserving they are than the boring Wonder bread eating kids sitting next to them. Not surprisingly, they’ve developed an inflated sense of themselves and a disdainful attitude to the rest of us. As non-westerners, they invariably come from “kiss up and kick down” and “at your knees or at your throat” societies so, deep down, they’re amazed we take their impudence without caning them or carrying out the sort of week-long pogroms they occasionally carry out in South Asia.

    Jeet Heer is a classic of the type. Cenk Uygur and his Armenian sidekick are two more. Cenk Uygur seems to think red state Americans are just paler versions of the kind of Turks who decapitated captured mutineers on a bridge in Istanbul during the latest coup. These “new Americans” or “new Canadians” don’t get us but they do seem to look down on us. We’re the local peasantry.

    They’re kind of the exotic pets of the Boomers that have now grown big enough to take over the house.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob, Forbes
  17. Retrospective knicker-twisting.

    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Our schools already have a rather unpoetic name for this kind of finger-wagging tall-tale of multicultural microaggressions: Required Reading.
  18. I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?

    Memoirs plus whining: Whine-moirs?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Memoirs plus whining: Whine-moirs?
     
    Whine-moirs vs whine-moir?

    And, for the trans-Atlantic crowd, there's memoirs plus whingeing: Whinge-moirs/ Whinge-moir
  19. I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.

    • Agree: MEH 0910, AndrewR
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.
     
    So did I.
    , @Trelane
    As did I
    , @Frau Katze
    I too thought he was a woman at first.

    It wasn't so much the name as the tone.

    Whine, whine, whine. Someone couldn't pronounce his name decades ago. That's a major tragedy.

    Perhaps his parents might have considered changing the spelling to make it more phonetic. I know, I'm a BadThinker.
  20. I call it annoying dribble that I ignore. What would happen if I and others of my ilk settled in rural Afghanistan? Something tells me I would experience a fate much worse than name calling.

    • Replies: @guest
    It would be exactly the same, except you'd be crying among the poppy fields and your bottom would be sore.

    Or you'd be headless and unable to cry at all.
  21. Where there is demand, there is supply.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    Where there is demand, there is supply.

    http://www.newgeography.com/files/cox-newspapers-1.png

    Of particular note is the LAT figures, evidently the New Californians are going to embrace reading English news Real Soon Now.
  22. @syonredux
    SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH:

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968)[1] is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.
     

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party. He was raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His maternal uncle is the novelist Mark Harris.[2] He lives in New York City.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%AFd_Sayrafiezadeh


    Mark Harris, his maternal uncle:


    Harris was born Mark Harris Finkelstein in Mount Vernon, New York, to Carlyle and Ruth (Klausner) Finkelstein. At the age of 11, he began keeping a diary, which he would maintain for every day of his life thereafter.[1]
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because "it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs."[2] He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler's Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943. His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944. He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis. He was honorably discharged in April 1944.[3] His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957)
    .
     

    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years. In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in "You Bet Your Life", a game played on The Groucho Show
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Harris_(author)

    In its own way, being that Said is half-Iranian, this makes total sense. Post-1965 Hart-Celler Immigration legislation, Middle Easterners were thus allowed to migrate to the US. With the case of Said’s father’s family at least we have written evidence that this is the case and Muslim immigration to the US began to occur starting around this time. (unlike the total lack of written evidence for Muslim immigration prior to mid 20th century). He was born post ’65, therefore it’s safe to assume that his father immigrated to the US post 1965 (which is similar to Nikki Haley’s Shihk family).

  23. Never happened . The guy prolly messed up the pronunciation and then tried to smooth things over by joking . The lil’ brat couldn’t take it and bolted . More importantly, wonder what was for dessert that day .

    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna

    Never happened . The guy prolly messed up the pronunciation and then tried to smooth things over by joking . The lil’ brat couldn’t take it and bolted . More importantly, wonder what was for dessert that day .
     
    Much more likely, the entire story was made up. It's all about what's 'good copy' and what isn't. Like the uncle who claims it was hard for chosenites to get hired in NYC. Though I'll admit dessert probably was served, and the brat probably enjoyed it.
  24. Borderline personality disorder?

  25. Ungrateful kvetching.

  26. @syonredux

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Memoirs plus whining: Whine-moirs?

    Memoirs plus whining: Whine-moirs?

    Whine-moirs vs whine-moir?

    And, for the trans-Atlantic crowd, there’s memoirs plus whingeing: Whinge-moirs/ Whinge-moir

    • Replies: @Ivy
    Saïd is an honorary Whinge-Moor
  27. “What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?”

    I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in. Could we call this Moses Syndrome?

    That’s unfair though because the Egyptians had actually enslaved Moses’ people, rather than give them tenure. Also, to Moses’ credit, he took the slogan “Egypt, love it or leave it” to heart.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in.

     

    Kaepernick could probably give you some ideas.
    , @tlotsi
    >I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in. Could we call this Moses Syndrome?

    Loki Syndrome
  28. @syonredux
    SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH:

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968)[1] is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.
     

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party. He was raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His maternal uncle is the novelist Mark Harris.[2] He lives in New York City.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%AFd_Sayrafiezadeh


    Mark Harris, his maternal uncle:


    Harris was born Mark Harris Finkelstein in Mount Vernon, New York, to Carlyle and Ruth (Klausner) Finkelstein. At the age of 11, he began keeping a diary, which he would maintain for every day of his life thereafter.[1]
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because "it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs."[2] He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler's Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943. His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944. He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis. He was honorably discharged in April 1944.[3] His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957)
    .
     

    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years. In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in "You Bet Your Life", a game played on The Groucho Show
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Harris_(author)

    This is funny.

  29. Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party–his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?

    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.

    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I was reminded of another half-Iranian communist, Gen X love child when I read this. Sahra Wagenknecht is the co-leader of Germany's Left Party and seems to be a far more balanced and productive person. The Marxist-Leninists of the old East Bloc ended up with better commies than us.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    What a professional victim. A profitable one, too.

    Damn.
    , @Feelings
    This guy sounds like a typical narcissistic libtard, the whole world revolves around him and his feeeelings, which change from day to day, hour to hour, but every feeeeling must be heeded.
    , @Opinionator
    It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    Real piece of work this guy. Probably his own projection.
    , @bomag

    I’ve always bristled when...
     
    So just crank up the sensitivity and blast away at every perceived, projected, and imagined slight. And get paid for it.

    I've always thought that capable people had some obligation to do productive things. Or, at least, do no harm. I guess not.
    , @Gunner
    This guy is basically the Persian and more Emo version of Obama.
  30. @Johan Schmidt
    I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.

    I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.

    So did I.

  31. Was gonna add that Pennsylvania farms are known for quality pie but decided not to since that would’ve started all the double entendres . Oh wait …..

  32. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    I was reminded of another half-Iranian communist, Gen X love child when I read this. Sahra Wagenknecht is the co-leader of Germany’s Left Party and seems to be a far more balanced and productive person. The Marxist-Leninists of the old East Bloc ended up with better commies than us.

    • Replies: @theo the kraut
    Highly organised and not without charm, a Leninist psycho anyway.
  33. victim porn?

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Oooh, PERFECT.
    , @res

    victim porn?
     
    That is a good one, but I think "Outrage porn" is even better. The author is expressing victimhood but trying to induce outrage. And I think goodthinkers read material like that to help them feel better about themselves because they are appropriately and righteously outraged. Then there is the tribal bonding aspect of being outraged together.
  34. @inertial
    Where there is demand, there is supply.

    Where there is demand, there is supply.

    Of particular note is the LAT figures, evidently the New Californians are going to embrace reading English news Real Soon Now.

    • Replies: @anonguy
    I'm surprised that they haven't fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.
  35. “among the farmland”

    Let’s just call it bad writing.

    • Agree: Trelane, ben tillman
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    It is pretty awkward. "Among" usually takes a plural: Buford's "Among the Thugs." One might cry in the MIDDLE of the farmland, but a better writer would have been specific: hiding in the cornfield, sobbing on a horse's neck, wailing "among" some innocent lambs (what symbolism! Oh wait, Thomas Harris already used that one).
    , @kihowi
    In the new, vibrant America you can be among a single thing.
    , @rbbarnet
    It has been put better:

    Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home,
    She stood in tears amid the alien corn.

    Keats Ode to a nightingale.
  36. As I mentioned earlier, it seems to be the kids of jet age immigrants who do this griping for fun and profit. Maybe call this whining the “jet baby blues”?

  37. Is there a name yet for this genre?

    Pussy-blogging?

  38. Entitled Victim Culture Primer.

  39. Forty Years a Child?

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    I LIKE!
  40. @Johan Schmidt
    I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.

    As did I

  41. @syonredux

    There was, however, my friend’s father, who found it amusing to make fun of my name over dinner, coming up with a wide variety of ways to mispronounce it each time. I did my best to politely correct him each time, until it finally became apparent to me that I was participating in a game in which there was no chance of winning, and I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland
     
    .

    That might be the gayest thing that I have ever read.....and I was born in San Francisco.....

    I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland

    What the f*** did I just read?

    • Agree: TWS
  42. Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I’m particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I’ve experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven’t heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it’s English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it’s probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I think you're right, Mr. Yan. It's mostly just Orientals though, as the sounds are so different. (.) - Indians have long multi-syllabic names, but each syllable is still a lot like an English sound. Is that it, I dunno?

    Anyway, I know, second-hand, a girl name Wang Fang. It's pretty hard to think of that name without hearing (in your head) "Everybody Wang Fang Tonight!"! Every! Single! Time!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoXu6QmxpJE
    , @Anonymous
    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I’ve experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear.

    Maybe you are personally overly sensitive. Or, maybe it's because Asians tend to be very successful in the U.S. and thriving here, so people don't feel required to feel sorry for you or coddle you.

    Also, is it really that traumatizing to have your native language mocked? That doesn't seem like that big a deal. Many people are mocked for one thing or another. I would guess that only the most popular and well-respected people are free from being made fun of or hurt in one way or another. If everyone were the same race and religion, people would still find things to mock about one another. Creating hierarchies and jockeying for status and power is the nature of human beings.

    , @Neil Templeton
    Yan Shen,

    I was taught in grade school that it was alright to punch down on Asians so long as it was a one-inch punch. Not sure what to do now that it appears to be punching up. BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?
    , @Brutusale
    Gee, nobody back home in Asia would dream of mocking the roundeyes' speech or names, huh?

    Cry me a freaking river. Many European-Americans, myself included, have surnames that weren't the family name back in the old country but something that was Ellis Islanded into an appellation more palatable to American pronunciations.

    If you wish to continue with a name that sounds like a sneeze to some, by all means, carry on.

    , @Malcolm X-Lax
    I used to work with a registered nurse named "Dong". He went by Eric but even I, a 40-something grown adult man, couldn't help but snicker to myself every time I saw his name in print. We're only human, Yan Shen.
    , @ben tillman

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I’ve experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him.
     
    No, it's that your old "cognitive elitism" shtick was disingenuous and quickly grew tiresome. If smart whites want to pursue cognitive elitism, the pool of smart whites is deep enough that we have no need for smart Hans.
  43. “Is there a name yet for this genre?”

    Yes. It’s called whining.

    In the case of the essayist’s supper table sob story, it’s dining and whining.

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Yes. It’s called whining.

    No. "Whining" implies there is some real grievance or hardship, however minor.
  44. “Crying Among the Farmland” should have been the title of Hillary Clinton’s new post-election memoir.

  45. There is, and will ever be, only one answer for this fellow, as follows:

    “America became the greatest economic, scientific and military power in human history without any assistance from anyone named SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH or anything like it, so if you don’t like the way some white Pennsylvanian or any other old stock American pronounced your name, you need to get yourself to that place on this earth where those handles just roll off the tongues of the locals.”

    • Agree: Negrolphin Pool
  46. SAYRAFIEZADEH

    Damn it, man, have you even looked at your name?

    Doesn’t exactly flow off your tongue like “Smith”, does it?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly" that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.
    , @Opinionator
    He could just take "Safire" as a surname.
    , @Hippopotamusdrome
    Just use the mnemonic phrase:

    Say: "Rafie", Zadeh.
  47. Growing up in Hawaii I experienced the same trauma as the author. I had my throat cut by Samoans, held at gunpoint by Hawaiians, and was attacked by Japanese
    for surfing in front of my grandmother’s house.

    But the gravest injury was similar to the author’s. I was out surfing at Kaiser’s and Ricky Cassidy paddled up to me and said “Hey Lang how have you been? I have been trying to call you but there are too many Lees in the phone book.”

    • LOL: Alden
    • Replies: @Alden
    Be glad your parents didn't name you Robert.
  48. @candid_observer

    SAYRAFIEZADEH
     
    Damn it, man, have you even looked at your name?

    Doesn't exactly flow off your tongue like "Smith", does it?

    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel “Bang the Drum Slowly” that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna
    If you like, you can believe that's the reason he changed his name. For my part, I'll assume you were just being sarcastic.
    , @bored identity
    What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?

    bored identity proposes this term : Well-Documented Bastardism.

    Here's the latest case of Well-Documented Bastardism, or :


    "How Do You Recognize Society with a High Level of Jewenile Delinquency ?"



    Jewish group demands New York take down statue and references to Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant

    "...'Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,' said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center *."

    (...)

    'New York, of all American cities, which boasts such important Jewish history and claims such a present day vibrant Jewish community, should take the lead in denouncing Stuyvesant's bigotry.'

    As a prominent New York historical figure, removing traces of Stuyvesant could prove a daunting task.

    Then there's Stuyvesant High School, the most prestigious of the public schools, which arguably accepts only the brightest students in the city.


    " Darshan-Leitner suggests a name swap, replacing the name of Stuyvesant with that of Asher Levy, one of the first Jewish settlers in New Amsterdam."

    http://nypost.com/2017/08/24/jewish-activists-target-removal-of-peter-stuyvesant-monuments/

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shurat_HaDin

     

    p.s. can somebody please remind bored identity what was that chant that crazed, hate-mongering and Beyond the Pale Supremacists with tiki-torches were screaming in Charlottesville ?
    , @kaganovitch
    And his mother coincidentally also changed her name to Harris?

    "Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party–his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh.
    , @Eagle Eye

    his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finkelstein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh.
     

    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, ... changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.
     
    So the sister (Said's mother) changed her name to Harris along with her brother, presumably to seem less ethnic herself, but insists on raising her brat with a super-ethnic and hard-to-remember ethnic name?

    FAR MORE LIKELY: Said was raised with the last name Finkelstein and a plane-Jane American first name until he got to college. There, like Barry Dunham, he started going for exotic charm and called himself Said Sayrafie-Zadeh. (Zadeh is Persian suffix similar to Polish -inski.)
  49. The genre?

    Anti-American Jewish-communist agit-prop.

  50. Standing on the chipped shoulders of giants

  51. Many of the lost children of miscegenation have become so prominent lately, and so hostile to organic white societies, that we can see why our elites keep pushing the haphazard breeding that produces more and more of them.

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.
    , @guest
    I think you mean Kamala with the Good Hair.

    Is there any way we can break up the Coalition of the Fringes using Kamala Harris' hair?
  52. This Asian invader “cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland” could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you’ve any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    • Replies: @Bubba
    The Left is devoid of humor and want it punished. As their hero Ayatollah Khomeini said, "There are no jokes in Islam. There is no humor in Islam. There is no fun in Islam. There can be no fun and joy in whatever is serious."
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Right! Look where it got Gene Simmons. Hot and cold p***y for years (rumor says he took a picture of every one) and then banging Shannon Tweed for 20+ years. Not a bad life for a guy who started out Chaim Witz.
    , @Negrolphin Pool
    Anurag Dikshit, founder of Party Poker, strenuously disagrees.
  53. This Asian invader “cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland” could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons’ commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you’ve any interest in being an American (or at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name) you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    This Asian invader “cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland” could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you’ve any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.
     
    For a Persian example, there's Sarah Shahi:

    Aahoo Jahansouz "Sarah" Shahi[1] (Persian: آهو جهانسوز سارا شاهی ‎‎; born January 10, 1980) is an American television actress and former NFL Cheerleader of Iranian and Spanish ancestry. She played Kate Reed in the USA Network legal drama Fairly Legal in 2011–12, Carmen on The L Word in 2008, and also starred as Sameen Shaw on the CBS crime drama Person of Interest.
     

    Sarah Shahi was born on January 10, 1980, in Euless, Texas, and raised there.[1] She is the daughter of Mah Monir Soroush Azar, an interior designer, and Abbas Jahansouz Shahi, who divorced when she was ten.[4] Her father is from Iran. Her mother was born in Spain, to an Iranian father and a Spanish mother.[5][6] She has an older brother, Cyrus,[7] and a younger sister, Samantha, who is a production assistant.[8][9][10][11][12] Her father's family left Iran two years before the Iranian Revolution.[13][14] Her father, who was working at the American Embassy in Iran, was slated for execution when the last Shah's regime collapsed in 1979 but was able to flee the country.[4] Her birth name, Aahoo (Persian: آهو‎‎), means "gazelle" in Farsi.[6] She is a great-great-granddaughter of Fath-Ali Shah Qajar, who ruled Iran from 1797 to 1834,[4] by one of his wives, Begom Khanom, daughter of Hossein Qoli Khan Afshar, niece of Begom Khanom, daughter Emam Qoli Khan Afshar, through their son Jahansouz Shah.[1]
    Shahi adopted Sarah as her name in second grade after hearing a song called "Sarah" because she was "tormented" by other children about her unusual birth name.[1]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Shahi
  54. @syonredux

    Memoirs plus whining: Whine-moirs?
     
    Whine-moirs vs whine-moir?

    And, for the trans-Atlantic crowd, there's memoirs plus whingeing: Whinge-moirs/ Whinge-moir

    Saïd is an honorary Whinge-Moor

  55. @syonredux
    SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH:

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968)[1] is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.
     

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party. He was raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His maternal uncle is the novelist Mark Harris.[2] He lives in New York City.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%AFd_Sayrafiezadeh


    Mark Harris, his maternal uncle:


    Harris was born Mark Harris Finkelstein in Mount Vernon, New York, to Carlyle and Ruth (Klausner) Finkelstein. At the age of 11, he began keeping a diary, which he would maintain for every day of his life thereafter.[1]
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because "it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs."[2] He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler's Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943. His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944. He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis. He was honorably discharged in April 1944.[3] His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957)
    .
     

    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years. In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in "You Bet Your Life", a game played on The Groucho Show
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Harris_(author)

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party.

    And there it is.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  56. @Autochthon
    This Asian invader "cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland" could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you've any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    The Left is devoid of humor and want it punished. As their hero Ayatollah Khomeini said, “There are no jokes in Islam. There is no humor in Islam. There is no fun in Islam. There can be no fun and joy in whatever is serious.”

  57. @advancedatheist
    Many of the lost children of miscegenation have become so prominent lately, and so hostile to organic white societies, that we can see why our elites keep pushing the haphazard breeding that produces more and more of them.

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.

    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She’s cute, but stupid. Doesn’t seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Under is right. But she wasn't put on the road to the senate and presidency because she's one of his girl friends.

    He's had hundreds of girl friends and she's the only one he's done a thing to help. That whole San Francisco crew sent her to the senate so Nancy Pelosi's nephew Gavin Newsom can be the next governor. So many protégés, so few important elected offices.
    , @Ganderson
    And she has the same name as the Ugandan Giant!
    , @AndrewR
    I'm not saying that no 52 year olds can be described as "cute," nor am I saying Kamala Harris was never cute (although I don't know that she ever was), but 52 year old Kammy Harris is NOT cute. She looks like an equine victim of an acid attack.
    , @Bugg
    "Studied under" is an interesting verb. But as Barack Hussein Obama has shown, an exotic name with an empty head can make a great leftist figurehead.
    , @bored identity



    "...studied under Willie Brown."

     

    bored identity believes how that, for a now still underreported story, will be the straw that broke Kamala's whippy back.


    https://youtu.be/h-fAJRSb2SQ

    https://youtu.be/Bkf7B_rLZp4?t=4m58s
    , @Forbes

    studied under Willie Brown
     
    More like reclining under Willie Brown...as in, lie back and think of England...
  58. Breaking some kid’s balls about having a funny name when he’s stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn’t happen much any more and I’m glad it doesn’t. I agree it’s not worth dwelling on, though.

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Alden
    The entire tale is a lie.
    , @syonredux

    Breaking some kid’s balls about having a funny name when he’s stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn’t happen much any more and I’m glad it doesn’t. I agree it’s not worth dwelling on, though.
     
    I knew kids in grade school who were mocked for thoroughly Anglo-Saxon names. For example, there was a kid named Franklin who got called Frankfurter/Frankfarter on a regular basis.....
    , @Cagey Beast
    Now days the father could kidnap and torture a kid staying over at his house if he suspected the child of being a Trump supporter and CNN wouldn't bat an eye.
    , @guest
    "a mildly assholish thing to do"

    Veeeery mildly.

    "Imagine it was a Polish name"

    This means nothing to me. Near as I can tell, Polack jokes are still allowed, and they've never, ever been added to the Protected List. (Polish Pokemon Points: 0.)
    , @njguy73
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiQiTz3KWCE
    , @Ganderson
    Polish names are easy- just call 'em ' Ski"
    , @AndrewR
    It's not a nice thing to do, but the implied moral of the story is that rural white Americans are Less Tolerant than the average human being, or at least that the Intolerance of the rural white American is worse than the intolerance of, say, Perso-Jew communists who have elite connections and who are allowed to use the most influential newspaper in the US (arguably on earth) to insult and demonize our core population.
    , @scrivener3
    One of my schoolmates was named Lewis Wiener. I once asked him if he ever thought of changing his name to avoid the teasing. He said: "My father was a better man than I am. I am proud to have his name."

    That's a better attitude.
  59. @Autochthon
    This Asian invader "cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland" could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you've any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    Right! Look where it got Gene Simmons. Hot and cold p***y for years (rumor says he took a picture of every one) and then banging Shannon Tweed for 20+ years. Not a bad life for a guy who started out Chaim Witz.

  60. @Anonym
    Where there is demand, there is supply.

    http://www.newgeography.com/files/cox-newspapers-1.png

    Of particular note is the LAT figures, evidently the New Californians are going to embrace reading English news Real Soon Now.

    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    Think of all the businesses and others who have a subscription and can't be bothered to review and end it. After that it's seniors basically, the 1968ers.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/public-editor/the-curious-and-vital-power-of-print.html

    Check out the damnation with faint praise.

    A lot of younger people buy and read the paper in print. Of all subscribers, 23 percent are in their 20s, 30s and 40s — that’s hundreds of thousands each week. They can’t all be journalists.
     
    Median age 60 btw, in 2015.
  61. This did not happen.

    1. How did the son of a Brooklyn commie Jew meet a friend who lives on a farm in Penbsylvania?

    2. Who was the friend? If it was a child his age did the farm kid spend time in Brooklyn?

    3. Presumably the farmer knew the name of the kid who was invited to the farmers home?
    So why the fuss about the name?

    4. Why did the father of the friend carry on about the unpronounceable name? Who would do that? Not a normal person. We had friends in the house. We went to friends houses. My kids went to friends houses. I’ve never heard of anyone berating an 8 year old child guest about his or her name.

    I wonder if the absent father was Jewish. Iran has always had a big Jewish community. Commie Jewish girls of that era made a big deal of marrying exotic foreigners or American blacks.

    Tell this tale to any attorney, insurance investigator, bad debt collector, bank investigator or any law enforcement person
    and they would laugh in the guy’s face.

    An attorney would laugh and tell him I can’t take your case until you tell me the truth. And the bill would be larger than usual because of the time involved in untangling the lies.

    Who would believe this? Stupid liberals who believed that when Tiger Woods was in kindergarten evil KKK White 6th graders jumped over the kindergarten fence, dragged him off, tied him to a tree and beat him.

    What a liar.

    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    They lived in Pittsburgh for a while, and Butler is about an hour from Pittsburgh.
    However, he says he was there three times. Why would the parents let their kid invite him back if they didn't approve of him? More importantly, he was 8. By that time, most kids have heard or personally survived some pretty ruthless nicknames at school. As another reader posted here, even ordinary names can be turned into a nickname. The ones at my elementary school were usually unprintable.
    So there may be a grain of truth somewhere in here mixed Among The Farm Manure, but the majority of it reads like a by-the-numbers victim narrative.
  62. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    The entire tale is a lie.

    • Agree: Kyle McKenna, utu
  63. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    Under is right. But she wasn’t put on the road to the senate and presidency because she’s one of his girl friends.

    He’s had hundreds of girl friends and she’s the only one he’s done a thing to help. That whole San Francisco crew sent her to the senate so Nancy Pelosi’s nephew Gavin Newsom can be the next governor. So many protégés, so few important elected offices.

  64. @Langley
    Growing up in Hawaii I experienced the same trauma as the author. I had my throat cut by Samoans, held at gunpoint by Hawaiians, and was attacked by Japanese
    for surfing in front of my grandmother's house.

    But the gravest injury was similar to the author's. I was out surfing at Kaiser's and Ricky Cassidy paddled up to me and said "Hey Lang how have you been? I have been trying to call you but there are too many Lees in the phone book."

    Be glad your parents didn’t name you Robert.

  65. This could be a Seinfeld spinoff: Four overly sensitive immigrants make a big deal out of small insults from Americans; and the Americans aren’t aware that they’ve offended these hysterical immigrants.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Yes it can be one of those travelling TV series, like Highway To Heaven or the Incredible Hulk. Every week they return to some place in flyover country where one of the team of tinted avengers once got a dirty look or had his name mispronounced. Of course every town beyond Manhattan will be overflowing with Klansmen and Bible-bangers living on Handmaid's Tale themed communes.
  66. “Is there a name yet for this genre?”

    Polish joke?

  67. This whiner’s complaint brings to mind the hilarious Evelyn Waugh bit in Brideshead Revisited in which Charles Ryder and his father have Charles’s friend Jorkins to dinner, throughout which Charles’s father mordantly dumbfounds Jorkins by referring constantly to Jorkins as being an American.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    USA Today's circulation is propped up by all the copies that get stepped on as businessmen walk out of their hotel rooms early in the morning.
    , @guest
    I haven't read the book in a long time, but I saw the tv series a couple years ago. My recollection is the guest doesn't know Charles' father thinks he's American, and the audience is on tenterhooks as to whether it will be revealed. The night is saved by Mr. Ryder Sr. mistaking cricket for baseball in a fortunate direction.
  68. Staying with the farm theme. Call it bullshit.

  69. @JohnnyD
    This could be a Seinfeld spinoff: Four overly sensitive immigrants make a big deal out of small insults from Americans; and the Americans aren't aware that they've offended these hysterical immigrants.

    Yes it can be one of those travelling TV series, like Highway To Heaven or the Incredible Hulk. Every week they return to some place in flyover country where one of the team of tinted avengers once got a dirty look or had his name mispronounced. Of course every town beyond Manhattan will be overflowing with Klansmen and Bible-bangers living on Handmaid’s Tale themed communes.

  70. I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Rhonstadt.

    It’s pronounced pee pee me.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Ronstadt.
     
    No, Linda Ronstadt didn't write that, as President-Eject Øb☭ma could have told her. That was a Warren Zevon song. Miss Ronstadt didn't write most of her big hit songs, maybe all of them. Some were from Buddy Holly, etc.

    However, no matter what her drug of choice, she had a great voice (and the face and body helped bring "folks" to the shows, I can tell you personally).

    From the movie, "FM" watch her sing the Rolling Stones' "Tumbling Dice":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s4_teISos0

    "Always in a hurry, I never stop to worry,
    Don't you see the time flashin' by.
    Honey, got no money,
    I'm all sixes and sevens and nines.
    Say now baby, I'm the rank outsider,
    You can be my partner in crime.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin dice',
    Roll me and call me the tumblin' dice.
    Oh, my, my, my, I'm the lone crap shooter,
    Playin' the field ev'ry night.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin' dice, (Call me the tumblin')"
    , @cthulhu
    As somebody else said, that's a Warren Zevon song, and the difference between Zevon's original version and Ronstadt's cover is striking - in Zevon's hands, the song is extremely ironic and sly, while Ronstadt sings it straight and sappy. But it put money in WZ's pocket, as did Linda's cover of Zevon's "Hasten Down the Wind", so I won't complain too much. WZ was always the dark cynical element of the laid back LA '70s rock scene, and deserved much more success than he had.

    Interesting WZ political tidbit - he had an affair with Walter Mondale's daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive.
  71. Speaking as an immigrant myself, any immigrant (incl. 2nd gen) who whines and complains about America should just go back to where he/she came from, simple as that. No one forced you to come here, no one’s forcing you to stay. Just go. America doesn’t owe you anything, nor does it need you.

    Come to think of it, anyone who complains about America should just leave period, including all the liberals and BLM people. Didn’t they all say they would leave if Trump won? What happened to all that?

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  72. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    What a professional victim. A profitable one, too.

    Damn.

  73. “Is there a name yet for this genre?”

    Potty Training

  74. Is there a name yet for this genre?

    Don’t know about the genre, but in this specific case you could file under: Persian Jew bummers, grown & watered by tears in fine PA farmland. Available in better literary produce markets everywhere.

  75. last try:

    whinefest; you go and cry in the farmland/heartland about the “unfairness” of small stuff in life in a national publication.

  76. @Autochthon
    This Asian invader "cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland" could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons' commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you've any interest in being an American (or at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name) you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    This Asian invader “cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland” could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you’ve any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    For a Persian example, there’s Sarah Shahi:

    Aahoo Jahansouz “Sarah” Shahi[1] (Persian: آهو جهانسوز سارا شاهی ‎‎; born January 10, 1980) is an American television actress and former NFL Cheerleader of Iranian and Spanish ancestry. She played Kate Reed in the USA Network legal drama Fairly Legal in 2011–12, Carmen on The L Word in 2008, and also starred as Sameen Shaw on the CBS crime drama Person of Interest.

    Sarah Shahi was born on January 10, 1980, in Euless, Texas, and raised there.[1] She is the daughter of Mah Monir Soroush Azar, an interior designer, and Abbas Jahansouz Shahi, who divorced when she was ten.[4] Her father is from Iran. Her mother was born in Spain, to an Iranian father and a Spanish mother.[5][6] She has an older brother, Cyrus,[7] and a younger sister, Samantha, who is a production assistant.[8][9][10][11][12] Her father’s family left Iran two years before the Iranian Revolution.[13][14] Her father, who was working at the American Embassy in Iran, was slated for execution when the last Shah’s regime collapsed in 1979 but was able to flee the country.[4] Her birth name, Aahoo (Persian: آهو‎‎), means “gazelle” in Farsi.[6] She is a great-great-granddaughter of Fath-Ali Shah Qajar, who ruled Iran from 1797 to 1834,[4] by one of his wives, Begom Khanom, daughter of Hossein Qoli Khan Afshar, niece of Begom Khanom, daughter Emam Qoli Khan Afshar, through their son Jahansouz Shah.[1]
    Shahi adopted Sarah as her name in second grade after hearing a song called “Sarah” because she was “tormented” by other children about her unusual birth name.[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_Shahi

  77. @Auntie Analogue
    This whiner's complaint brings to mind the hilarious Evelyn Waugh bit in Brideshead Revisited in which Charles Ryder and his father have Charles's friend Jorkins to dinner, throughout which Charles's father mordantly dumbfounds Jorkins by referring constantly to Jorkins as being an American.

    USA Today’s circulation is propped up by all the copies that get stepped on as businessmen walk out of their hotel rooms early in the morning.

  78. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    Breaking some kid’s balls about having a funny name when he’s stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn’t happen much any more and I’m glad it doesn’t. I agree it’s not worth dwelling on, though.

    I knew kids in grade school who were mocked for thoroughly Anglo-Saxon names. For example, there was a kid named Franklin who got called Frankfurter/Frankfarter on a regular basis…..

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Then there are girls named Delores, and cities in Canada named Regina. Non-stop jokes, though I imagine you'd get over it after having lived there a few years ... decades?

    What if a girl named Delores moved to Regina, Saskatchewan? The horror .. the horror ...
  79. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    This guy sounds like a typical narcissistic libtard, the whole world revolves around him and his feeeelings, which change from day to day, hour to hour, but every feeeeling must be heeded.

  80. I know a guy from Iran. Retired electrical engineer, ex-Shah’s Air Force. Came to Baton Rouge in ’75. Told me he was lonely and walking morosely on the side of the road when two Southern belles picked him up and laid him.

  81. @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    I think you’re right, Mr. Yan. It’s mostly just Orientals though, as the sounds are so different. (.) – Indians have long multi-syllabic names, but each syllable is still a lot like an English sound. Is that it, I dunno?

    Anyway, I know, second-hand, a girl name Wang Fang. It’s pretty hard to think of that name without hearing (in your head) “Everybody Wang Fang Tonight!”! Every! Single! Time!

  82. What I know of rural white America mostly begins and ends with the three times I went at the age of 8…

    What you call people like this is ignorant fucks.

  83. @syonredux

    Breaking some kid’s balls about having a funny name when he’s stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn’t happen much any more and I’m glad it doesn’t. I agree it’s not worth dwelling on, though.
     
    I knew kids in grade school who were mocked for thoroughly Anglo-Saxon names. For example, there was a kid named Franklin who got called Frankfurter/Frankfarter on a regular basis.....

    Then there are girls named Delores, and cities in Canada named Regina. Non-stop jokes, though I imagine you’d get over it after having lived there a few years … decades?

    What if a girl named Delores moved to Regina, Saskatchewan? The horror .. the horror …

    • Replies: @njguy73

    What if a girl named Delores moved to Regina, Saskatchewan? The horror .. the horror …
     
    Mulva? Bovary? Loreola? Celeste? Hest? Gipple?
  84. @anonguy
    I'm surprised that they haven't fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    Think of all the businesses and others who have a subscription and can’t be bothered to review and end it. After that it’s seniors basically, the 1968ers.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/public-editor/the-curious-and-vital-power-of-print.html

    Check out the damnation with faint praise.

    A lot of younger people buy and read the paper in print. Of all subscribers, 23 percent are in their 20s, 30s and 40s — that’s hundreds of thousands each week. They can’t all be journalists.

    Median age 60 btw, in 2015.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They're great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.
    , @Kyle McKenna
    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as 'younger' ... speaking of tells....
    , @Jack D
    This was written when they still had a public editor. They fired her, ostensibly as a cost cutting measure (plausible enough given the falling subscriptions) but not having to have your own leftist BS contradicted (as the public editor sometimes did) was a probably a motive too. Leftists don't like no backtalk. They can dish it out but they can't take it.

    She also mentions "the median age of the digital subscriber is a graying (but no doubt Pilates-practicing) 54, not much younger than the median age of the print subscriber, which is 60".

    In other words, hardly any one under 30 reads it in any fashion, whether in print or digital.
  85. The simple fact is the people who hand out the dwindling number of plum jobs and paying gigs in academia and the media love stories such stories of grievance and alienation from the majority culture. It’s been that way for at least two generations.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  86. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    Now days the father could kidnap and torture a kid staying over at his house if he suspected the child of being a Trump supporter and CNN wouldn’t bat an eye.

  87. My Mother’s Psychotherapy — and Mine
    By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh
    October 25, 2014 2:30 pm

    The books I have written have each been dedicated to the same two people: my wife and my psychotherapist. My psychotherapist preceded my wife. He also preceded my writing.

    [MORE]

    My mother, plagued by an occasionally crippling, always present depression throughout most of her life (and all of my childhood), had a few years earlier summoned the wherewithal to seek professional help. And while I was not privy to the specific diagnosis of clinical depression, I was privy to her rage, her paranoia, her fatigue and her sorrow, all of which she experienced in the extreme, and all of which I thought, of course, were entirely normal — in the same way that I thought it was normal to come from a broken family and to reside in a cramped and cluttered one-bedroom apartment where the rule of thumb was pessimism and the smallest tasks were regarded as monumentally burdensome. Making dinner was exhausting and often sad, and so was doing the laundry, and so was — as my mother pointed out to me one afternoon on the way home from nursery school — the blade of grass struggling out of a crack in the sidewalk. While I had some vague awareness in my teenage years that my mother was seeing “someone” about “something,” beyond that I had no real understanding, and no real interest.

    All of that changed one October morning. As I left for school, I noticed that my mother was lying face down on her bed in the living room. She had been in the same position the night before when I’d gotten home from my job bagging groceries at the supermarket, and I’d assumed that she had simply gone to bed early, just as I assumed now that she was not feeling well and was taking the day off. But an hour or so later, at school, I was ushered out of the classroom by a principal’s aide and into an empty office where a phone call from my mother’s work informed me that she had not called in sick that day or the day before. I left for home immediately, overwhelmed and petrified, walking through the city streets with the understanding that I was about to discover that my mother, unbeknown to me, had died two days ago in our apartment.

    And sure enough, when I opened the front door, there she was in the same position, face down in bed. It took me great effort to rouse her lifeless, unyielding body, and when she finally woke up she was groggy, incoherent and irritated. I pleaded with her to tell me what was wrong, but her reply was merely, “You wouldn’t understand.” I suppose there was some truth to that.

    What I wasn’t able to understand, at the age of 16, was that the relationship she had developed with her therapist had become the most emotionally intimate of her life. And subsequently, the news of this woman’s impending departure had devastated my mother to the point where she no longer wanted to go on living. This was all perplexing to me, but mostly it was shameful. I ended up taking my mother to the hospital by cab, and she reiterated to the doctors her desire to die, but somehow promised that she wouldn’t. How they believed her, I don’t know.

    THE first thing I said to my therapist in that initial visit was that I was there because I was having trouble staying in a relationship. I offered up a compendium of traumatic events from my childhood that I thought might have some bearing on the matter, of which my mother’s suicide attempt was only one. I don’t recall exactly what we talked about in the beginning, but I came away with a sense that the therapist was a sympathetic and understanding man, and also quite funny. He had a shrewd ability to break tension by offering a well-placed joke. For instance, when I recounted the confusing night, when I was 4 or 5, that my mother brought a strange man into our apartment, my therapist offered, “Perhaps he came over for tea and a scone.”

    “What are we going to do with all this?” I asked him one evening, just as our session was ending. By which I meant, how will it ever be possible to alleviate these unhappy memories that can never be undone? “Keep coming and talking about it with me,” my therapist said. And that’s exactly what I did.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/jun/27/said-sayrafiezadeh-family-father

    When Saïd was four, his mother took in a fellow party member who was passing through Pittsburgh: it was customary to open your house to travelling comrades. The man offered to babysit. They started to play tickling games, then the man unzipped his fly and proceeded to molest his young charge. When Saïd told his mother what had happened she rang the party headquarters and got the comrade moved. "Under capitalism, everyone has problems," someone told her - an explanation she found "insufficient".
     
  88. @dearieme
    Retrospective knicker-twisting.

    Our schools already have a rather unpoetic name for this kind of finger-wagging tall-tale of multicultural microaggressions: Required Reading.

  89. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    Real piece of work this guy. Probably his own projection.

  90. What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre …

    Drumroll please:

    Class War! *Ba Dum Tsh*

    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Race War, rather.
  91. @Auntie Analogue

    "Is there a name yet for this genre?"
     
    Yes. It's called whining.

    In the case of the essayist's supper table sob story, it's dining and whining.

    Yes. It’s called whining.

    No. “Whining” implies there is some real grievance or hardship, however minor.

  92. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre …
     
    Drumroll please:

    Class War! *Ba Dum Tsh*

    Race War, rather.

  93. @Autochthon
    This Asian invader "cry[ing] among [sic] the farmland" could clearly stand to spend more time learning English and less bitching about imagined slights in the face of some good natured teasing. I refer everyone to my earlier citation of Gene Simmons commonsense advice that if your name is ridiculous to American sensibilities, and you've any interest in being an American (ot at least avoiding constant hassles caused by your ridiculous name, you might try actually assimilating instead of being a melodramatic jackass eight days a week.

    Anurag Dikshit, founder of Party Poker, strenuously disagrees.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "Anurag Dikshit"? Hell no. Some people should be required to change their names on arrival in the USA. Forcing people to change their names at Ellis Island was one of the best things that the US government ever did.
  94. @candid_observer

    SAYRAFIEZADEH
     
    Damn it, man, have you even looked at your name?

    Doesn't exactly flow off your tongue like "Smith", does it?

    He could just take “Safire” as a surname.

  95. Dahlia says:

    It’s called the White-liberals-blow-smoke-up-our-asses-and-encourage-navel-gazing-in-the-furtive-hope-that-we’ll-get-off-our-aaaaaauh-and-vote genre.

    Are any of these pieces meant for us?
    -No.
    Who is the intended audience?
    -Liberals.
    Why would any liberal want to read this?
    -I’ve gotten the distinct impression these essays are like books you’re supposed to read and like, but nobody really does.
    So why do these get churned out endlessly?
    -Do you have a better idea to turn these people out to vote for a neoliberal-ID politics uber alles program? It doesn’t offer a lot, you know?

  96. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I’ve experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear.

    Maybe you are personally overly sensitive. Or, maybe it’s because Asians tend to be very successful in the U.S. and thriving here, so people don’t feel required to feel sorry for you or coddle you.

    Also, is it really that traumatizing to have your native language mocked? That doesn’t seem like that big a deal. Many people are mocked for one thing or another. I would guess that only the most popular and well-respected people are free from being made fun of or hurt in one way or another. If everyone were the same race and religion, people would still find things to mock about one another. Creating hierarchies and jockeying for status and power is the nature of human beings.

  97. @MEH 0910
    My Mother’s Psychotherapy — and Mine
    By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh
    October 25, 2014 2:30 pm

    The books I have written have each been dedicated to the same two people: my wife and my psychotherapist. My psychotherapist preceded my wife. He also preceded my writing.
     

    My mother, plagued by an occasionally crippling, always present depression throughout most of her life (and all of my childhood), had a few years earlier summoned the wherewithal to seek professional help. And while I was not privy to the specific diagnosis of clinical depression, I was privy to her rage, her paranoia, her fatigue and her sorrow, all of which she experienced in the extreme, and all of which I thought, of course, were entirely normal — in the same way that I thought it was normal to come from a broken family and to reside in a cramped and cluttered one-bedroom apartment where the rule of thumb was pessimism and the smallest tasks were regarded as monumentally burdensome. Making dinner was exhausting and often sad, and so was doing the laundry, and so was — as my mother pointed out to me one afternoon on the way home from nursery school — the blade of grass struggling out of a crack in the sidewalk. While I had some vague awareness in my teenage years that my mother was seeing “someone” about “something,” beyond that I had no real understanding, and no real interest.

    All of that changed one October morning. As I left for school, I noticed that my mother was lying face down on her bed in the living room. She had been in the same position the night before when I’d gotten home from my job bagging groceries at the supermarket, and I’d assumed that she had simply gone to bed early, just as I assumed now that she was not feeling well and was taking the day off. But an hour or so later, at school, I was ushered out of the classroom by a principal’s aide and into an empty office where a phone call from my mother’s work informed me that she had not called in sick that day or the day before. I left for home immediately, overwhelmed and petrified, walking through the city streets with the understanding that I was about to discover that my mother, unbeknown to me, had died two days ago in our apartment.

    And sure enough, when I opened the front door, there she was in the same position, face down in bed. It took me great effort to rouse her lifeless, unyielding body, and when she finally woke up she was groggy, incoherent and irritated. I pleaded with her to tell me what was wrong, but her reply was merely, “You wouldn’t understand.” I suppose there was some truth to that.

    What I wasn’t able to understand, at the age of 16, was that the relationship she had developed with her therapist had become the most emotionally intimate of her life. And subsequently, the news of this woman’s impending departure had devastated my mother to the point where she no longer wanted to go on living. This was all perplexing to me, but mostly it was shameful. I ended up taking my mother to the hospital by cab, and she reiterated to the doctors her desire to die, but somehow promised that she wouldn’t. How they believed her, I don’t know.
     

    THE first thing I said to my therapist in that initial visit was that I was there because I was having trouble staying in a relationship. I offered up a compendium of traumatic events from my childhood that I thought might have some bearing on the matter, of which my mother’s suicide attempt was only one. I don’t recall exactly what we talked about in the beginning, but I came away with a sense that the therapist was a sympathetic and understanding man, and also quite funny. He had a shrewd ability to break tension by offering a well-placed joke. For instance, when I recounted the confusing night, when I was 4 or 5, that my mother brought a strange man into our apartment, my therapist offered, “Perhaps he came over for tea and a scone.”
     

    “What are we going to do with all this?” I asked him one evening, just as our session was ending. By which I meant, how will it ever be possible to alleviate these unhappy memories that can never be undone? “Keep coming and talking about it with me,” my therapist said. And that’s exactly what I did.
     

    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/jun/27/said-sayrafiezadeh-family-father

    When Saïd was four, his mother took in a fellow party member who was passing through Pittsburgh: it was customary to open your house to travelling comrades. The man offered to babysit. They started to play tickling games, then the man unzipped his fly and proceeded to molest his young charge. When Saïd told his mother what had happened she rang the party headquarters and got the comrade moved. “Under capitalism, everyone has problems,” someone told her – an explanation she found “insufficient”.

    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Thanks for sharing these.

    Saïd's bio on Wikipedia was unusually sparse, not even a mention of education. For personalities whose entire contribution to society is a professionally compensated expression of their subjective grievance, they deserve serious scrutiny if the wagging accusatory finger of their tone is to be taken seriously. Funny thing about these memoirists is that are published and taken as scripture, even though their anecdotes of microaggressions that burden them their whole lives and become so pivotal in the deformation of their personalities can never be fact-checked. A memoirist would never distort, exaggerate or embellish his suffering or heroism, whether subconsciously or intentionally... No incentive there... wink, wink...

    (Hiya Tennessee "Genius" Coates) - Look at naughty me, just like that mean ol' Pennsyltucky hillbilly who couldn't remember how to pronounce the immigrant boy's name... I can't be bothered to remember how to spell a fella's name whose whole point was a Black revolutionary provocation and middlefingering of the established western society that his family hated. It's so precious, after such a conscious intentional insult of prevailing norms, society at large is supposed to be guilted into respectful kowtowing. Previous generations of newcomers consciously gave their kids typical American names like "Mike." For contrast, observe the effort & respect of Chinese when they give themselves western names upon arrival to make transacting with natives easier and more convenient. Sure the result can at times turn out silly or comical, but their effort to get along and make things easier for their hosts (and themselves) deserves some credit.

    More from the article...

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh grew up hoping for the overthrow of capitalism. But his zeal died when he realised his father put revolution before his wife and kids.
     
    Where have we heard this before?
    Many such cases...
    Half-breed offspring raised by a mother infatuated with hot-blooded third-world Revolutionary swagger, abandoned by a brown father for whom the fate of strangers oppressed & neglected by the capitalist establishment were more important than his own poor & neglected family. Perhaps his only success as a father was transmitting some of his hatred and resentment of the society at large to the next generation? Another clear example of the "Leapfrogging Loyalties" that our host Mr. Sailer has highlighted before. This theme certainly deserves more attention. It seems it is at the root of so much social and internal conflict that we demand of ourselves and fellow citizens completely disable and indeed reverse their natural hierarchy of loyalties. It's not just Saïd who needs therapy from this damage... What is it that compels us favor an exotic race over our own? Foreigners over fellow citizens? Victims of distant calamities over neighbors? Strangers over family? This phenomenon is certainly not unique to the left, but rather the same perversion of an underlying altruism into something unhealthy or decadent can also frequently be observed on the right or among the religious. See the pastors or missionaries who neglect their families because the put the welfare and perhaps adulation of their flock first. Observe the fashion for adopting diverse children from the third world instead of have one's own. If G*d's plan is written also in nature, we disobey and dishonor its command (and the legacy of our ancestors) when we favor strangers and the foreign over our own blood.
  98. @Waylon 347
    Never happened . The guy prolly messed up the pronunciation and then tried to smooth things over by joking . The lil' brat couldn't take it and bolted . More importantly, wonder what was for dessert that day .

    Never happened . The guy prolly messed up the pronunciation and then tried to smooth things over by joking . The lil’ brat couldn’t take it and bolted . More importantly, wonder what was for dessert that day .

    Much more likely, the entire story was made up. It’s all about what’s ‘good copy’ and what isn’t. Like the uncle who claims it was hard for chosenites to get hired in NYC. Though I’ll admit dessert probably was served, and the brat probably enjoyed it.

  99. ‘Das Kapital’ as a Boy’s Bedtime Story

    I wish this book had been called something else. There’s nothing wrong, exactly, with the title “When Skateboards Will Be Free.” It’s been borrowed, in fact, from one of this memoir’s many endearing moments.

    But the title isn’t evocative of the book’s delicacy and discernment, its free-floating humor and overlapping ironies. It’s as if Isaac Bashevis Singer had decided to give “Enemies: A Love Story” a title like “My Bad” instead.

    I also wish Saïd Sayrafiezadeh had a surname that is simpler to pronounce. (Try this: say-RAH-fee-ZAH-day.) Because it’s one that you may want to remember and be able to speak aloud, if this exacting and finely made first book is any indication.

    In “When Skateboards Will Be Free,” Mr. Sayrafiezadeh writes with extraordinary power and restraint. My evocation of Isaac Bashevis Singer above was not an accident. This writer’s prose has some of Singer’s wistful comedy, and a good deal of that writer’s curiosity about the places where desire, self-sacrifice and societal obligation intersect and collide.

    Mr. Sayrafiezadeh is amazingly even-handed and even somewhat nostalgic about his blasted childhood. “There was something attractive, alluring,” he admits, “about being in the presence of men and women who had committed their lives to uncovering the hidden, unspoken secrets of the world.”

    Try it again: say-RAH-fee-ZAH-day.

  100. @Steve Sailer
    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly" that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    If you like, you can believe that’s the reason he changed his name. For my part, I’ll assume you were just being sarcastic.

  101. I have the same sort of reaction to this that I have to girls saying they never feel safe because of the Male Gaze, or whatever. Well, if you really feel that way, I suppose we better go back to the patriarchy. Get a man to look after you.

    If this guy really feels like crying in the farmland, he can just stay away from the farmland. Or go to other farmland in another part of the world. Problem solved.

  102. Reminiscent of Corky St. Clair’s epic monologue in Waiting for Guffman:

    Corky St. Clair: We’re talking about MY life, you know? And it’s forcing me to do somethin’ I don’t wanna do. To leave. To, to go out and just leave and go home and say, make a clean cut here and say “no way, Corky, you’re not puttin’ up with these people!” And I’ll tell you why I can’t put up with you people: because you’re BASTARD people! That’s what you are! You’re just bastard people! And I’m goin’ home and I’m gonna… I’m gonna BITE MY PILLOW, is what I’m gonna do!

    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna
    Ah, Corky St. Clair, a man for the ages.

    Okay, not exactly a man, but something..
  103. @Daniel H
    Oh, so FEZ from "That '70s Show" has got a gig at the New York Times. And he has lost his sense of humour too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fez_(That_%2770s_Show)

    There was an episode of That 70s Show featuring Fez (an acronym of “foreign exchange student”) briefly playing the racial grievance game. He tries it on Tommy Chong, who points out that he isn’t a white oppressor, but rather “Chinese or sumthin’.”

  104. He reminds me of fragile Frankie Merman from Seinfeld, who would go out into the woods, dig a hole, and cry.

  105. @Anonymous
    Officially? The transgenerational trauma case study.

    The compendium of the ascendant.

    Immigrunting.

    Immigrunting is good. Immigriping is better.

    • Agree: European-American
  106. “Crying among the farmland” sounds like the greatest phrase from the worst poem ever.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    Yes, it's so bad they could add it to The New Colossus:

    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
    I lift my lamp beside the golden door!
    Come, and then, crying among the farmland,
    Tell us it's only the people here you deplore.
  107. “a game in which there was no chance of winning”

    Millions of schoolchildren play that game every day. Of course there’s a chance of winning. How about making fun of his name? Did that never occur to you?

    Outcasts can score one against the cool kids in the “comically rearrange people’s names” game. If no one recognizes their victory, or if they get beat up for their effort, well, at least they won.

  108. @cucksworth
    "I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland."

    lol come on, while telling europeans they have to deal with daily terrorism?

    “Someone gently teased me about my long, difficult name. WHITE GENTILES MUST DIE FOR THIS!”

    It’s so hard being a rich connected Jew.

  109. @Perspective
    I call it annoying dribble that I ignore. What would happen if I and others of my ilk settled in rural Afghanistan? Something tells me I would experience a fate much worse than name calling.

    It would be exactly the same, except you’d be crying among the poppy fields and your bottom would be sore.

    Or you’d be headless and unable to cry at all.

  110. @advancedatheist
    Many of the lost children of miscegenation have become so prominent lately, and so hostile to organic white societies, that we can see why our elites keep pushing the haphazard breeding that produces more and more of them.

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.

    I think you mean Kamala with the Good Hair.

    Is there any way we can break up the Coalition of the Fringes using Kamala Harris’ hair?

  111. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    I don’t think this guy understands that through America’s history until recently, a lot of immigrants with funny names changed or simplified them to something more American-sounding/less weird, and they didn’t get bent out of shape about the result. They thought it was a practical thing to do, and some of the immigrants were happy to take the opportunity to ditch a last name that sounded funny in the old world as well as America.

  112. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    “a mildly assholish thing to do”

    Veeeery mildly.

    “Imagine it was a Polish name”

    This means nothing to me. Near as I can tell, Polack jokes are still allowed, and they’ve never, ever been added to the Protected List. (Polish Pokemon Points: 0.)

  113. Second paragraph is classic “Dolchstosslegende”. First paragraph is mise-en-scene for same. e.g.,

    California Proposition 8 would never have passed if not for the Elders of Zion National Park. (Solution: eliminate the secret ballot, convert Utah to nuclear test site)

    Hilary, peace be With Her, would have won if only the treasonous white farmers had done their part. (Solution: eliminate voting, genocide the offenders)

    Asian males would be kings of the dating and employment markets and 60 percent of the Ivy League if not for white discrimination and the Elders of Harvard Square. (Solution: neutralize meritocracy through regulation, spy for China, hold struggle sessions for Jewish academics)

    The general trope is always that some Paradise for a favored group has been Lost due to sneaky treason that whites/males/Jews can’t help but cook up when not Gulag’ed for the greater good.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stab-in-the-back_myth

    • Replies: @academic gossip
    By the way, there is something specially delicious and effective about Literally Nazi memes for equivalent leftist behavior today. Although parallels to Stalin, Mao, 1984 and religious inquisitions are funny, it seems to be a rule of comedy that when a Nazi comparison genuinely applies, that is a higher plane of mockery. Examples I know of are:

    Dolchstosslegende (Hilary 2016 loss etc as described above)

    Honorary Aryan (Steve's term for whitening malfeasors in media crime reports)

    Libensraum (Section 8 and gentrification ethnically cleansing inner cities to make space for white elites)

    Are there more of these to add to the list?

  114. Because is my cause!

  115. @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    Yan Shen,

    I was taught in grade school that it was alright to punch down on Asians so long as it was a one-inch punch. Not sure what to do now that it appears to be punching up. BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?

    • Replies: @res

    BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?
     
    He seems to have become annoyed with the moderation a month ago: http://www.unz.com/isteve/africans-vs-african-americans-in-minneapolis/#comment-1945926

    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.
  116. @Auntie Analogue
    This whiner's complaint brings to mind the hilarious Evelyn Waugh bit in Brideshead Revisited in which Charles Ryder and his father have Charles's friend Jorkins to dinner, throughout which Charles's father mordantly dumbfounds Jorkins by referring constantly to Jorkins as being an American.

    I haven’t read the book in a long time, but I saw the tv series a couple years ago. My recollection is the guest doesn’t know Charles’ father thinks he’s American, and the audience is on tenterhooks as to whether it will be revealed. The night is saved by Mr. Ryder Sr. mistaking cricket for baseball in a fortunate direction.

    • Replies: @Vinteuil
    In the 1981 tv series, the Jorkins scene is in episode 1, starting at 1:23:00 and running for a couple of minutes. John Gielgud as Ryder Sr. is hilarious. He knows perfectly well that the guest isn't American - he's just torturing the poor guy. Pretending to believe that cricket is America's national sport is his concluding masterstroke, dumbfounding Jorkins & Ryder Jr. alike.
  117. I call this guy a pussy. My 7th grade geography teacher later became my daughter’s middle school vice principal before she graduated to this day mispronounces my name every time he sees me just to get under my skin. It’s a game get over it. Get a sense of humor dick head.

  118. So My name is Robert Forman and I had an uncle who called me Rumpled Foreskin. This name stuck with me until I graduated professional school. What’s my point..none, jyust like Faid Said- Hey that rhymes!

  119. @Grumpy
    "among the farmland"

    Let's just call it bad writing.

    It is pretty awkward. “Among” usually takes a plural: Buford’s “Among the Thugs.” One might cry in the MIDDLE of the farmland, but a better writer would have been specific: hiding in the cornfield, sobbing on a horse’s neck, wailing “among” some innocent lambs (what symbolism! Oh wait, Thomas Harris already used that one).

  120. Well, did he at least thank the friend’s father for dinner, or did he just hightail it into the bush? Ingrate.

  121. I’ve read countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?

    Yes…in Blighty we have a succinct name for this genre….’bollocks’.

  122. @lurker

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Whine listing?

    Kvetch-up?

  123. @Anonym
    I'm not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    “I’m not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.”

    I’d prefer Tales of the Departed.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I’d prefer Tales of the Departed.

    I like the plausibly deniable edginess - the female handle helps! I never specified that they couldn't be repatriated by trebuchet or cannon.
  124. @academic gossip
    Second paragraph is classic "Dolchstosslegende". First paragraph is mise-en-scene for same. e.g.,

    California Proposition 8 would never have passed if not for the Elders of Zion National Park. (Solution: eliminate the secret ballot, convert Utah to nuclear test site)

    Hilary, peace be With Her, would have won if only the treasonous white farmers had done their part. (Solution: eliminate voting, genocide the offenders)

    Asian males would be kings of the dating and employment markets and 60 percent of the Ivy League if not for white discrimination and the Elders of Harvard Square. (Solution: neutralize meritocracy through regulation, spy for China, hold struggle sessions for Jewish academics)

    The general trope is always that some Paradise for a favored group has been Lost due to sneaky treason that whites/males/Jews can't help but cook up when not Gulag'ed for the greater good.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stab-in-the-back_myth

    By the way, there is something specially delicious and effective about Literally Nazi memes for equivalent leftist behavior today. Although parallels to Stalin, Mao, 1984 and religious inquisitions are funny, it seems to be a rule of comedy that when a Nazi comparison genuinely applies, that is a higher plane of mockery. Examples I know of are:

    Dolchstosslegende (Hilary 2016 loss etc as described above)

    Honorary Aryan (Steve’s term for whitening malfeasors in media crime reports)

    Libensraum (Section 8 and gentrification ethnically cleansing inner cities to make space for white elites)

    Are there more of these to add to the list?

  125. @lurker

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Whine listing?

    La Petite Tort?

  126. … “cried among the farmland”

    That weird, ungrammatical phrase, right there, is the tell.

    He’s fibbing. It’s plausible that someone teased him, and being only eight years old, tears came to his eyes. The rest is rubbish.

    In any case, why does this matter to him now? Is he man, or mouse?

    Even more than, what right does he have to demand that this long-ago childhood incident should be our concern?

  127. I just talked to my sophomore who said that in freshman writing class, every single essay read aloud by a foreign student or child of non-white immigrants belonged to this genre. The instructors practically demanded that the kids conjure up some ancient, personal, ethnicity related “trauma” at the hands of the privileged majority as the basis for any autobiographical essay.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I wonder how many of their White classmates felt a little bit more Alt-Right by the end of that writing exercise?
  128. @newrouter
    "Is there a name yet for this genre?"

    fictional autobiography?

    “Is there a name yet for this genre?”

    The title that Australian author, Clive James, gave to the first volume of his autobiography:
    Unreliable Memoirs.

  129. I have some Malaysian friends who named their daughter “Zara” after the shop. Maybe you should name your next child “Walmart” I said.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    Zara is a very common name for girls, in Malaysia. I think it's the Arabic form of Sarah.

    There were two persons with that name in my office, when I was working in Southeast Asia.

  130. @Anonym
    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    Think of all the businesses and others who have a subscription and can't be bothered to review and end it. After that it's seniors basically, the 1968ers.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/public-editor/the-curious-and-vital-power-of-print.html

    Check out the damnation with faint praise.

    A lot of younger people buy and read the paper in print. Of all subscribers, 23 percent are in their 20s, 30s and 40s — that’s hundreds of thousands each week. They can’t all be journalists.
     
    Median age 60 btw, in 2015.

    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They’re great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They’re great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.

    Still, and it goes to my original point, where is the demand (from white English speakers basically) to read how much white people suck? Re: Newsweek for example:

    https://youtu.be/qBdjRPUp2hY

    A lot of supply of PC and SJWism but not so much demand.
  131. @Harry Baldwin
    Reminiscent of Corky St. Clair's epic monologue in Waiting for Guffman:

    Corky St. Clair: We're talking about MY life, you know? And it's forcing me to do somethin' I don't wanna do. To leave. To, to go out and just leave and go home and say, make a clean cut here and say "no way, Corky, you're not puttin' up with these people!" And I'll tell you why I can't put up with you people: because you're BASTARD people! That's what you are! You're just bastard people! And I'm goin' home and I'm gonna... I'm gonna BITE MY PILLOW, is what I'm gonna do!
     

    Ah, Corky St. Clair, a man for the ages.

    Okay, not exactly a man, but something..

  132. @Anonym
    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    Think of all the businesses and others who have a subscription and can't be bothered to review and end it. After that it's seniors basically, the 1968ers.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/public-editor/the-curious-and-vital-power-of-print.html

    Check out the damnation with faint praise.

    A lot of younger people buy and read the paper in print. Of all subscribers, 23 percent are in their 20s, 30s and 40s — that’s hundreds of thousands each week. They can’t all be journalists.
     
    Median age 60 btw, in 2015.

    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as ‘younger’ … speaking of tells….

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as ‘younger’ … speaking of tells….

    The whole paragraph is gold IMHO. I didn't even notice that, but yeah, they had to scrape up the "40s is the new 30s" demographic just to break 20%. My favorite, read in your best Dr Evil voice: "hundreds of thousands"! Again, by the math I think it just cracked 200k so it could be plural.

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.
  133. “Immigratitude”. No Slight Left Behind. Works of the genre include:

    Immigrants of the Corn.
    Giant Snowflakes In the Earth.
    Cry The Unloved Country.
    Return of the Not Native.
    The Nero’s Journey.
    No Good Citizen Goes Unpunished.

  134. @Cagey Beast
    I was reminded of another half-Iranian communist, Gen X love child when I read this. Sahra Wagenknecht is the co-leader of Germany's Left Party and seems to be a far more balanced and productive person. The Marxist-Leninists of the old East Bloc ended up with better commies than us.

    Highly organised and not without charm, a Leninist psycho anyway.

  135. @Steve Sailer
    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They're great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.

    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They’re great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.

    Still, and it goes to my original point, where is the demand (from white English speakers basically) to read how much white people suck? Re: Newsweek for example:

    A lot of supply of PC and SJWism but not so much demand.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    There's demand. It's what brown-nosers read when they run out of apples to polish (leave school).
  136. @Kylie
    "I’m not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated."

    I'd prefer Tales of the Departed.

    I’d prefer Tales of the Departed.

    I like the plausibly deniable edginess – the female handle helps! I never specified that they couldn’t be repatriated by trebuchet or cannon.

    • LOL: Kylie
  137. @Kyle McKenna
    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as 'younger' ... speaking of tells....

    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as ‘younger’ … speaking of tells….

    The whole paragraph is gold IMHO. I didn’t even notice that, but yeah, they had to scrape up the “40s is the new 30s” demographic just to break 20%. My favorite, read in your best Dr Evil voice: “hundreds of thousands“! Again, by the math I think it just cracked 200k so it could be plural.

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.

    • Replies: @anonguy

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.
     
    I can't even remember the last time I saw anyone I know reading a newspaper or maybe even anyone at all. I'm going to keep an eye out for this.

    I stopped home delivery subscriptions in the early 2000s, first the daily but kept the Sunday going for a while for the feature articles and comics. But soon the Sunday Wash Post (I lived in DC then) became smaller and more content-free than the daily had been so I threw in the towel. That had to be at least 10 years ago and probably closer 15 now.
  138. @Alden
    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Rhonstadt.

    It's pronounced pee pee me.

    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Ronstadt.

    No, Linda Ronstadt didn’t write that, as President-Eject Øb☭ma could have told her. That was a Warren Zevon song. Miss Ronstadt didn’t write most of her big hit songs, maybe all of them. Some were from Buddy Holly, etc.

    However, no matter what her drug of choice, she had a great voice (and the face and body helped bring “folks” to the shows, I can tell you personally).

    From the movie, “FM” watch her sing the Rolling Stones’ “Tumbling Dice“:

    “Always in a hurry, I never stop to worry,
    Don’t you see the time flashin’ by.
    Honey, got no money,
    I’m all sixes and sevens and nines.
    Say now baby, I’m the rank outsider,
    You can be my partner in crime.
    But baby, I can’t stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin dice’,
    Roll me and call me the tumblin’ dice.
    Oh, my, my, my, I’m the lone crap shooter,
    Playin’ the field ev’ry night.
    But baby, I can’t stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin’ dice, (Call me the tumblin’)”

    • Replies: @Ganderson
    Both Zevon and Ronstadt were A-list talents. Ronstadt had a terrific set of pipes, used to great effect on many of Warren's tunes- Hasten Down the Wind comes to mind as well as Poor Poor Pitiful Me.
    Also, the band Warren used for his '70s recordings was pretty much the same band that Linda used, featuring the great Waddy Wachtel.

    " I was workin' on a steak the other day
    Whe I say Waddy in the Rattlesnake Cafe
    Dressed in black, tossin' back a shot of rye
    Finding things to do in Denver when you die..."

    , @cthulhu
    I watched the Eagles documentary a while back - not a big fan but love Joe Walsh's stuff - and I realized that I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the '70s.

    BTW, if you grew up in the '70s, I highly recommend the Eagles documentary. It's much more warts-and-all than I expected; the late Glen Frey in particular comes off like a major asshole, Don Henley seems to have actually grown a sardonic sense of humor over the years, Bernie Leadon bailed when he wanted to, I felt sorry for Randy Meisner who just seemed to get overwhelmed by it all, I'm happy that everybody helped Joe Walsh get clean, and Don Felder must be the most clueless person to ever be in a hugely successful band. And Glyn Johns' comments about real rock and roll vs the Eagles are priceless.
    , @Alden
    The poor, poor, pitiful me admission essay has replaced grades and SATs as the main criteria for college admissions.
  139. @Anonym
    I'm not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    Bravo. Lol

  140. @jim jones
    I have some Malaysian friends who named their daughter "Zara" after the shop. Maybe you should name your next child "Walmart" I said.

    Zara is a very common name for girls, in Malaysia. I think it’s the Arabic form of Sarah.

    There were two persons with that name in my office, when I was working in Southeast Asia.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    I meant to add, in the U.K. Zara Phillips, the Queen's granddaughter, is well known as an equestrienne and Olympic medalist.
    , @jim jones
    Sarah is a Jewish name:

    http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/112508/jewish/Sarah.htm
  141. @PiltdownMan
    Zara is a very common name for girls, in Malaysia. I think it's the Arabic form of Sarah.

    There were two persons with that name in my office, when I was working in Southeast Asia.

    I meant to add, in the U.K. Zara Phillips, the Queen’s granddaughter, is well known as an equestrienne and Olympic medalist.

  142. @Cagey Beast
    "What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?"

    I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in. Could we call this Moses Syndrome?

    That's unfair though because the Egyptians had actually enslaved Moses' people, rather than give them tenure. Also, to Moses' credit, he took the slogan "Egypt, love it or leave it" to heart.

    I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in.

    Kaepernick could probably give you some ideas.

  143. @Lurker

    It is, of course, unfair to judge an entire county with a population of almost 200,000 on the behavior of one man 40 years ago
     
    And then goes on to do precisely that.

    Unsurprisingly, the NYT has turned off comments for this piece. Such a pity. It would be so much fun to MST.

  144. @Anonym
    The ads are better in a print newspaper. They’re great in a slick paper magazine, which is why newsracks are still jammed with magazines.

    Still, and it goes to my original point, where is the demand (from white English speakers basically) to read how much white people suck? Re: Newsweek for example:

    https://youtu.be/qBdjRPUp2hY

    A lot of supply of PC and SJWism but not so much demand.

    There’s demand. It’s what brown-nosers read when they run out of apples to polish (leave school).

  145. No kid with an ordinary surname of British origin, such as Duncan, Roach, Coward, or Glasscock, ever got teased about it.

    • Replies: @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    I'm sure Captain Bushyhead, who I once saluted as a private, never was taunted for his name either. And, no, I won't tell you his ethnicity.
  146. It is, of course, unfair to judge an entire county with a population of almost 200,000 on the behavior of one man 40 years ago, but I hope you can understand my disbelief when on a dark night last November, I watched on television as Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign tried to assure her supporters that little Butler County was going to come through for her in the 11th hour and overtake Donald Trump’s lead in Pennsylvania, and by extension the Electoral College. Now, I thought, is as good a time as any to turn off the television and go bury my head under the pillow.

    Uh, isn’t THIS guy representative of the politics in Butler County?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_Santorum

  147. @lurker

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Whine listing?

    Diversity Speaks?

    More accurately:

    Diversity Speaks!

  148. Not living in my country of birth, and not speaking my mother tongue on a daily basis, I usually introduce myself with a translation of my first name/names. My explanation is that the locals’ attempts to pronounce my first name in my maternal language result in almost systematic phonetic catastrophe since it is close enough to the equivalent in their language but employs several devices not commonly found in theirs.

    That said, I find *deliberate* outright massacres of the original pronunciation highly amusing. When they go one further and syllables are inverted or lobbed off I occasionally get as a bonus a fun new nickname.

    Was I ever bullied in school? Occasionally, as are most “normal” folks. Did I take it hard? Sometimes. Am I over it now? Sure, not the least because most of my former tormentors are either mellowed down considerably (I’m still good friends with at least one of them) or have turned into loser fat f___s who’d be obliged to lick my boots if we ever saw each other again. However, I think they’ve done enough harm to themselves to avenge any momentary dickheaded moves they might have pulled on me. They inspirepity more than anything else.

    The author needs to grow up.

  149. @Anonym
    I'm not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    McGregored works for me.

  150. @Anonym
    I’m surprised that they haven’t fallen by much more over this time. Reading a paper newspaper seems as anachronistic as shoeing horses these days, despite having been an avid newspaper reader for decades.

    Think of all the businesses and others who have a subscription and can't be bothered to review and end it. After that it's seniors basically, the 1968ers.

    https://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/public-editor/the-curious-and-vital-power-of-print.html

    Check out the damnation with faint praise.

    A lot of younger people buy and read the paper in print. Of all subscribers, 23 percent are in their 20s, 30s and 40s — that’s hundreds of thousands each week. They can’t all be journalists.
     
    Median age 60 btw, in 2015.

    This was written when they still had a public editor. They fired her, ostensibly as a cost cutting measure (plausible enough given the falling subscriptions) but not having to have your own leftist BS contradicted (as the public editor sometimes did) was a probably a motive too. Leftists don’t like no backtalk. They can dish it out but they can’t take it.

    She also mentions “the median age of the digital subscriber is a graying (but no doubt Pilates-practicing) 54, not much younger than the median age of the print subscriber, which is 60″.

    In other words, hardly any one under 30 reads it in any fashion, whether in print or digital.

  151. @Cagey Beast
    "What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?"

    I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in. Could we call this Moses Syndrome?

    That's unfair though because the Egyptians had actually enslaved Moses' people, rather than give them tenure. Also, to Moses' credit, he took the slogan "Egypt, love it or leave it" to heart.

    >I was trying to think of a fairy tale, novel or song that featured an exotic child who grows up to be an ungrateful and destructive adult for those who took him in. Could we call this Moses Syndrome?

    Loki Syndrome

    • Agree: MEH 0910
  152. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    I’ve always bristled when…

    So just crank up the sensitivity and blast away at every perceived, projected, and imagined slight. And get paid for it.

    I’ve always thought that capable people had some obligation to do productive things. Or, at least, do no harm. I guess not.

  153. What’s even more curious than this case is the appearance of DACA babies amongst the ANTIFA rabble at Confederate monument protests/riots in the South.

    https://twitter.com/natalie_allison/status/865973254955184128/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.occidentaldissent.com%2F2017%2F05%2F20%2Factbac-nc-raleigh-durham-iww-square-off-in-graham-nc%2F

    Chuey Huerta (referenced in recent photo of ANTIFA rabble) was a Mexican 17 y/o DACA gangbanger kid who shot himself to death with his own (illegally procured) concealed pistol while ostensibly cuffed in the back seat of a Durham, NC police car after an incompetent Black Durham PD officer (working for some goof ball Puerto Rican police chief) had arrested him on an outstanding warrant in Durham over three years before his name showed up in Alamance County at a recent Confederate memorial defense rally which ANTIFA protested.

    http://www.latinorebels.com/2014/01/10/durham-police-internal-affairs-report-jesus-chuy-huerta-killed-himself-in-back-of-patrol-car/

    Any La Raza shitbirds out there who might explain such intersectionality?

    Yeah, I know the leg bone is connected to the hip bone.

  154. @Achmed E. Newman
    Then there are girls named Delores, and cities in Canada named Regina. Non-stop jokes, though I imagine you'd get over it after having lived there a few years ... decades?

    What if a girl named Delores moved to Regina, Saskatchewan? The horror .. the horror ...

    What if a girl named Delores moved to Regina, Saskatchewan? The horror .. the horror …

    Mulva? Bovary? Loreola? Celeste? Hest? Gipple?

  155. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

  156. It’s been a long time since anyone in the US has lost money by expressing anti-white sentiments. I’m sure even Grandpa Steve can’t remember any cases of it. The so-called Greatest Generation and their parents and grandparents dedicated our entire nation to beating those big meany Germans* only to win and promptly give their country away to hostile, albeit generally less well-armed, ethnic aliens. “Boomers” get a lot of blame from younger generations, and not entirely without good reason, but the rot had set in when “baby boomers” were still babies. The very eldest Boomers were barely out of high school when the Hart-Celler Act passed. And the “Civil Rights Movement,” which after 60 years we can definitively conclude had virtually nothing to do with attaining actual equality, started well before that.

    *For a good laugh and/or cry, imagine if American leftists/cucks/Juden treated “Japanese supremacists”, real or imagined, with 1% of the fear and loathing that they treat the equally imaginary 21st century “Nazis.”

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I was researching for a post, never posted, about a "psychoneurosis" or some such from WW2 that was Jewish related. In any case, the Patton Slapping Incident was a pointer to the softening up that was happening even then, compared to what came before. The troops loved the idea that Patton came down hard on the free-riders, the yellow. They chanted at him that he should not apologize, when he was basically ordered to by Ike.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_S._Patton_slapping_incidents

    We can probably chart the softening of our society with the introduction of labor saving devices such as washing machines, refrigeration, automobiles, etc. It has been one long march of progress from 1900 or so until now. I would love to see the diary of a trigglypuff or Carl the Cuck if they could be somehow dumped back in the early 1900s, for example, even the 1930s depression era would have been good.
    , @Vinteuil
    "The so-called Greatest Generation and their parents and grandparents dedicated our entire nation to beating those big meany Germans only to win and promptly give their country away to hostile, albeit generally less well-armed, ethnic aliens. 'Boomers' get a lot of blame from younger generations, and not entirely without good reason, but the rot had set in when 'baby boomers' were still babies. The very eldest Boomers were barely out of high school when the Hart-Celler Act passed. And the 'Civil Rights Movement,' which after 60 years we can definitively conclude had virtually nothing to do with attaining actual equality, started well before that."

    This bears repeating. Thanks for noticing. The "boomers" were, after all, raised by the "greatest generation."
  157. @PiltdownMan
    Zara is a very common name for girls, in Malaysia. I think it's the Arabic form of Sarah.

    There were two persons with that name in my office, when I was working in Southeast Asia.

  158. @Negrolphin Pool
    Anurag Dikshit, founder of Party Poker, strenuously disagrees.

    “Anurag Dikshit”? Hell no. Some people should be required to change their names on arrival in the USA. Forcing people to change their names at Ellis Island was one of the best things that the US government ever did.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    “Anurag Dikshit”? Hell no. Some people should be required to change their names on arrival in the USA.
     
    We've been here before, recently.

    http://www.unz.com/?s=dikshit&searchsubmit=Search&authors=steve-sailer&ptype=isteve&commentsearch=include
  159. @PiltdownMan
    I just talked to my sophomore who said that in freshman writing class, every single essay read aloud by a foreign student or child of non-white immigrants belonged to this genre. The instructors practically demanded that the kids conjure up some ancient, personal, ethnicity related "trauma" at the hands of the privileged majority as the basis for any autobiographical essay.

    I wonder how many of their White classmates felt a little bit more Alt-Right by the end of that writing exercise?

  160. But instead of being, say, Sid Finkelstein, he has an unpronounceable name, so that makes him Diverse and thus relevant.

    Elsewhere, Said mentions that his father called him “Sidsky”, I kid you not.

    In the NYT piece, Sidsky mentions that later, he himself ganged up with other white kids and tormented an immigrant kid over his name. Leftists like to punch down but don’t like it when someone punches them.

    Sidsky’s father comes to America as an exchange student, marries local (dysfunctional leftist) woman, leaves when he is an infant. Does this remind you of anyone else you know?

    Anyone who has this kind of background is going to have “daddy issues” – cognitive dissonance means that instead of hating the guy, you idealize him, at least while you are growing up. He may be totally absent but he has got to be better than your crazy mother. Sid seems to have gotten over it – he apparently met a strong woman (another Obama parallel) and was able to work through his issues and achieve success.

    When I was at Penn in the mid-70s (before the Shah was deposed), the Iranian Bolsheviks like Sid’s dad used to demonstrate against the Shah almost every day (when the weather was nice). They had a department store dummy set up as a Savak torture victim with a bucket over his head with wires sticking out. Later, the revolution came, the Islamists just had them all shot – no need to bother with all those wires and stuff – just shoot them. Sid’s dad went back to Iran to foment the revolution but somehow escaped with his life and came back to the hated US and became a math teacher.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  161. @guest
    "Crying among the farmland" sounds like the greatest phrase from the worst poem ever.

    Yes, it’s so bad they could add it to The New Colossus:

    Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,
    I lift my lamp beside the golden door!
    Come, and then, crying among the farmland,
    Tell us it’s only the people here you deplore.

  162. @Mark Caplan
    No kid with an ordinary surname of British origin, such as Duncan, Roach, Coward, or Glasscock, ever got teased about it.

    I’m sure Captain Bushyhead, who I once saluted as a private, never was taunted for his name either. And, no, I won’t tell you his ethnicity.

  163. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    And she has the same name as the Ugandan Giant!

  164. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    Polish names are easy- just call ‘em ‘ Ski”

  165. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    I’m not saying that no 52 year olds can be described as “cute,” nor am I saying Kamala Harris was never cute (although I don’t know that she ever was), but 52 year old Kammy Harris is NOT cute. She looks like an equine victim of an acid attack.

  166. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    It’s not a nice thing to do, but the implied moral of the story is that rural white Americans are Less Tolerant than the average human being, or at least that the Intolerance of the rural white American is worse than the intolerance of, say, Perso-Jew communists who have elite connections and who are allowed to use the most influential newspaper in the US (arguably on earth) to insult and demonize our core population.

  167. @Achmed E. Newman

    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Ronstadt.
     
    No, Linda Ronstadt didn't write that, as President-Eject Øb☭ma could have told her. That was a Warren Zevon song. Miss Ronstadt didn't write most of her big hit songs, maybe all of them. Some were from Buddy Holly, etc.

    However, no matter what her drug of choice, she had a great voice (and the face and body helped bring "folks" to the shows, I can tell you personally).

    From the movie, "FM" watch her sing the Rolling Stones' "Tumbling Dice":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s4_teISos0

    "Always in a hurry, I never stop to worry,
    Don't you see the time flashin' by.
    Honey, got no money,
    I'm all sixes and sevens and nines.
    Say now baby, I'm the rank outsider,
    You can be my partner in crime.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin dice',
    Roll me and call me the tumblin' dice.
    Oh, my, my, my, I'm the lone crap shooter,
    Playin' the field ev'ry night.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin' dice, (Call me the tumblin')"

    Both Zevon and Ronstadt were A-list talents. Ronstadt had a terrific set of pipes, used to great effect on many of Warren’s tunes- Hasten Down the Wind comes to mind as well as Poor Poor Pitiful Me.
    Also, the band Warren used for his ’70s recordings was pretty much the same band that Linda used, featuring the great Waddy Wachtel.

    ” I was workin’ on a steak the other day
    Whe I say Waddy in the Rattlesnake Cafe
    Dressed in black, tossin’ back a shot of rye
    Finding things to do in Denver when you die…”

  168. I, too call BS on this story. And, WHAT A FAG!

    I’m a HS teacher and coach, and I feel it is my duty to bestow nicknames- many traditional ‘shortenings’ but, for example, I had an Indian (dot not woo-woo) kid named Aditya, who became ‘Adidas’. Guess I better watch my ass.

    My dad used to get called a ‘squarehead ‘as he walked to school through the mean streets of St. Paul’s east side in the 1920′s. Where’s my compensation?

    • Replies: @Alden
    Wasn't dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?
  169. @Steve Sailer
    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly" that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?

    bored identity proposes this term : Well-Documented Bastardism.

    Here’s the latest case of Well-Documented Bastardism, or :

    “How Do You Recognize Society with a High Level of Jewenile Delinquency ?”

    Jewish group demands New York take down statue and references to Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant

    “…’Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,’ said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center *.”

    (…)

    ‘New York, of all American cities, which boasts such important Jewish history and claims such a present day vibrant Jewish community, should take the lead in denouncing Stuyvesant’s bigotry.’

    As a prominent New York historical figure, removing traces of Stuyvesant could prove a daunting task.

    Then there’s Stuyvesant High School, the most prestigious of the public schools, which arguably accepts only the brightest students in the city.

    ” Darshan-Leitner suggests a name swap, replacing the name of Stuyvesant with that of Asher Levy, one of the first Jewish settlers in New Amsterdam.”

    http://nypost.com/2017/08/24/jewish-activists-target-removal-of-peter-stuyvesant-monuments/

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shurat_HaDin

    p.s. can somebody please remind bored identity what was that chant that crazed, hate-mongering and Beyond the Pale Supremacists with tiki-torches were screaming in Charlottesville ?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    “Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,” said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center.
     
    Whereas jewish activist groups are so famous for championing the interests of catholics.
    , @Alden
    Another Jewish lie.

    Stuyvesant DID let Jews settle in New Amsterdam. All he demanded was that they establish their own cemetery and charity / welfare system which they were happy to do as it was Jewish custom wherever Jews lived.

    Why the separate system? In those days every little parish church had a cemetery attached. The cemetery was for the parishioners who paid the expenses.

    All charity came through the churches.
    All over Europe and MENA religious organizations administered charity to their own, Jews as well as the numerous Christian sects.

    Jews fit very well into this system as it kept "the people that shall live alone" away from non Jewish influence.

    Stuyvestant let the Jews in.

    He didn't keep them out as all the colonies except for Maryland and Pennsylvania kept *Catholics out. It was a crime to be a Catholic in the other colonies until after the revolution.

    The Jews of New Amsterdam would have set up their own religious synagogue, school, charity and cemetery as they did in every town they ever settled in.
    * Except for Catholic Irish and Scots slaves and deported rebels.
  170. @Grumpy
    "among the farmland"

    Let's just call it bad writing.

    In the new, vibrant America you can be among a single thing.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    It stands to reason, since a single thing like a person (not a collective noun, mind you) can now also be "diverse." ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  171. I believe Kevin MacDonald already answered this: “The Culture of Critique”.

  172. There was, however, my friend’s father, who found it amusing to make fun of my name over dinner, coming up with a wide variety of ways to mispronounce it each time.

    Of course there is another way to play that game. Cluster with other oddball groups in areas like Brooklyn where you are the majority and when outsiders come tell them how racist they are because they don’t understand or cannot pronounce your shibboleths.

  173. “………and I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland.”

    “among the farmland”?

    That isn’t even proper english grammar. I thought the Times was a high-brow, literate newspaper. Can’t they bother to get writers who know how to write, or at least copy-editors who know how to edit?

    By the way, any man who admits to crying over anything other than the loss of a family member, a close friend, a comrade-in-arms, a person for whom he is responsible, a dog, or a horse, is no man worthy of the name.

  174. @lurker

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Whine listing?

    Resentment. Typical for underachievers.

  175. @syonredux
    SAÏD SAYRAFIEZADEH:

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh /sɑːˈiːd ˌsɛərəfiˈzɑːdeɪ/ (born 1968)[1] is an American memoirist, playwright and fiction writer living in New York City. He won a 2010 Whiting Award for his memoir, When Skateboards Will Be Free. His short-story collection, Brief Encounters With the Enemy, was short-listed for the 2014 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for debut fiction. He serves on the board of directors for the New York Foundation for the Arts.
     

    Sayrafiezadeh was born in Brooklyn, New York, to an Iranian father and an American Jewish mother, both of whom were members of the Socialist Workers Party. He was raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. His maternal uncle is the novelist Mark Harris.[2] He lives in New York City.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sa%C3%AFd_Sayrafiezadeh


    Mark Harris, his maternal uncle:


    Harris was born Mark Harris Finkelstein in Mount Vernon, New York, to Carlyle and Ruth (Klausner) Finkelstein. At the age of 11, he began keeping a diary, which he would maintain for every day of his life thereafter.[1]
    After graduating in 1940 from Mount Vernon High School, he dropped his surname because "it was a difficult time for kids with Jewish names to get jobs."[2] He subsequently went to work for Paul Winkler's Press Alliance news agency in New York City as a messenger and mimeograph operator.
    He was drafted into the United States Army in January 1943. His growing opposition to war and his anger at the prevalence of racial discrimination in the Army led him to go AWOL from Camp Wheeler, Georgia, in February 1944. He was soon arrested and then hospitalized for psychoneurosis. He was honorably discharged in April 1944.[3] His wartime experience formed the basis for two of his novels, Trumpet to the World (1946) and Something About a Soldier (1957)
    .
     

    His first novel, Trumpet to the World, is the story of a young black soldier married to a white woman who is put on trial for striking back at a white officer, was published in 1946, and he continued to produce novels and contribute to periodicals through the years. In 1960, while in his first college teaching position, at San Francisco State College, Harris promoted his then-most-recent book in a TV appearance as guest contestant in "You Bet Your Life", a game played on The Groucho Show
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Harris_(author)

    My wife is partly responsible for the creation and ongoing funding of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. At least this dude didn’t actually win it…

  176. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    “Studied under” is an interesting verb. But as Barack Hussein Obama has shown, an exotic name with an empty head can make a great leftist figurehead.

  177. @Clem
    Breaking some kid's balls about having a funny name when he's stuck at your house is a mildly assholish thing to do. Nine out of ten small-town Americans would agree. Imagine it was a Polish name, if you find it hard to see the issue. Stuff like that doesn't happen much any more and I'm glad it doesn't. I agree it's not worth dwelling on, though.

    One of my schoolmates was named Lewis Wiener. I once asked him if he ever thought of changing his name to avoid the teasing. He said: “My father was a better man than I am. I am proud to have his name.”

    That’s a better attitude.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    Yeah, but not if your father's first name is Anthony.
  178. The only thing I can tell them is: They have to go back where they belong!

    Iran or Israel can have them, which ever one cares.

  179. @Neil Templeton
    Yan Shen,

    I was taught in grade school that it was alright to punch down on Asians so long as it was a one-inch punch. Not sure what to do now that it appears to be punching up. BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?

    BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?

    He seems to have become annoyed with the moderation a month ago: http://www.unz.com/isteve/africans-vs-african-americans-in-minneapolis/#comment-1945926

    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, it would be great to see Steve do a post consisting solely of comments that he did not let through. They would be anonymized of course and perhaps not tagged with the thread they came from. He lets through a lot of stuff that I wouldn't were this my blog.
    , @Anonym
    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.

    I hope he comes back. I was just thinking about Svigor and missing his commentary. If you are reading Svigor, pro tip: apply the court jester principle - if it's funny enough Steve will let practically anything through.
  180. @syonredux

    Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party--his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh. The following is an edited transcript of our discussion at the Housing Works Bookstore in Soho, which ranged from the recent elections in Iran and anti-Semitism, to why he now considers himself a Jew.
     

    You’re quite critical of the socialist movement in your book. Did you ever really believe in the movement?

    Yes, I did.

    So what made you change?

    I don’t think it’s entirely spelled out in the book, but it was a gradual change over time. The example I use in the book is when Karen [his girlfriend in the book, who is now his wife] asks me what I am, and I say ‘I’m a communist,’ and she asks, ‘What does that mean?’ and I start to explain it to her and I realize that I’m pretty much a [phony]. She asked me very basic questions that I could not answer.
     

    Your father divorced your mother and left the house when you were 9 months old. But you say that he had a profound influence on you as a child, even though you’ve distanced yourself from him as an adult. How has that affected your sense of being Iranian?



    It’s very complicated. I identify with Iran and I don’t want anyone saying anything bad about it. Only Iranians can say bad things about Iran, so as soon as [President] Barack Obama, The New York Times started to criticize the recent elections and the clerics, I began to feel very defensive of them. It always to me feels that beneath the surface there’s this xenophobia. You know, it could just be my own paranoia. But it seems like xenophobia just bubbles beneath the surface, like anti-Semitism.

    So you opposed the Iranians who protested the election results?

    No, no. I didn’t oppose them; it’s just that on a deeper emotional level the criticism of the clerics I took personally. I’m not saying it’s completely rational either.

     


    I assume you accepted this interview because you identify as Jewish in some way. But you say that you don’t have any kind of visceral reaction to Jewish issues nor do you partake in Jewish culture or religion.

    You’re right, I don’t. I don’t have a dream to visit Israel, though I know that is a dream for a lot of Jews. If anything, it’s the other way around. I always identify with the Palestinians. I think I was taught to identify with Palestinians, so if I’m going to have an initial emotional response it’s going to be that.

    Is it possible to consciously identify as Jewish even though you have no immediate connection to the culture or people?

    I think so. It’s all part of my heritage. Here’s a good example: not long ago I was with someone who was saying things about Jews, making anti-Semitic comments. And I said, ‘I’m Jewish.’ I’ve never done that before. I don’t know if I would have been bothered by it before, but I was bothered by it then. She responded and said, ‘Oh, I’m Jewish too.’ Then there was this thing where it’s OK to be anti-Semitic. I think I was proud of myself because I don’t think it’s OK anymore.

    What brought about that change?

    I’ve always bristled when people say you need to stay within your own race, and my wife, who’s Roman Catholic, is very interested in religions. Here, I’ll tell you this: We went to the Chabad Lubavitch headquarters in Crown Heights recently. We went on a group tour; it lasted four or five hours. I highly recommend it. We went into the synagogue and had a kosher meal. The rabbi found out that I was Jewish and put the tefillin on me, then he said some words that I was asked to repeat and asked us to dance. And, you know, it was quite poignant.
     
    http://www.interfaithfamily.com/arts_and_entertainment/popular_culture/Its_All_Part_of_My_Heritage_A_Profile_of_Said_Sayrafiezadeh.shtml

    This guy is basically the Persian and more Emo version of Obama.

  181. @Anonym
    I totally love that they refer to readers in their 40s as ‘younger’ … speaking of tells….

    The whole paragraph is gold IMHO. I didn't even notice that, but yeah, they had to scrape up the "40s is the new 30s" demographic just to break 20%. My favorite, read in your best Dr Evil voice: "hundreds of thousands"! Again, by the math I think it just cracked 200k so it could be plural.

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.

    I can’t even remember the last time I saw anyone I know reading a newspaper or maybe even anyone at all. I’m going to keep an eye out for this.

    I stopped home delivery subscriptions in the early 2000s, first the daily but kept the Sunday going for a while for the feature articles and comics. But soon the Sunday Wash Post (I lived in DC then) became smaller and more content-free than the daily had been so I threw in the towel. That had to be at least 10 years ago and probably closer 15 now.

    • Replies: @Anonym
    I stopped home delivery subscriptions in the early 2000s, first the daily but kept the Sunday going for a while for the feature articles and comics. But soon the Sunday Wash Post (I lived in DC then) became smaller and more content-free than the daily had been so I threw in the towel. That had to be at least 10 years ago and probably closer 15 now.

    The funny thing is I would buy (out of principle) a newspaper that actually stuck up for me and my kind, even if I could get news elsewhere. But if they are just going to pretend that they get to spread Tikkun Olam from on high like it's the 1980s, well, I wouldn't piss on them if they were burning. These idiots want their main demographic gone, I'm only happy to oblige but not in the way they want. I will still exist but never as a NYT reader.

    It would be kind of sad to see the NYT go the way of Newsweek (I am sentimental towards history), but since Duranty the bad outweighs the good. It's kind of a monument to leftism and so in the spirit of the current year, good riddance.
  182. @newrouter
    victim porn?

    victim porn?

    That is a good one, but I think “Outrage porn” is even better. The author is expressing victimhood but trying to induce outrage. And I think goodthinkers read material like that to help them feel better about themselves because they are appropriately and righteously outraged. Then there is the tribal bonding aspect of being outraged together.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    you know, I'm REALLY starting to think one can't improve upon "Among the Farmland" as the name of this genre.
    , @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    res & newrouter

    Outrage Porn, Grievance Porn, Victim Porn....

    All good. Thumbs-up.

    To inspire creativity for more contributions, maybe something with "White Guilt Trip?"
    But "White Guilt Trip Porn" does seem too long...

  183. @res

    BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?
     
    He seems to have become annoyed with the moderation a month ago: http://www.unz.com/isteve/africans-vs-african-americans-in-minneapolis/#comment-1945926

    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.

    Yeah, it would be great to see Steve do a post consisting solely of comments that he did not let through. They would be anonymized of course and perhaps not tagged with the thread they came from. He lets through a lot of stuff that I wouldn’t were this my blog.

  184. @lurker

    I’ve read about countless such essays in recent years. Is there a name yet for this genre?
     
    Whine listing?

    Sour grape-shot

  185. @Anonym
    I'm not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    The Dearly Deported

  186. • Replies: @Anonym
    Thanks for posting. That was artful.
    , @Inquiring Mind
    My Russian isn't that great, but the Soviet YouTube hymn is neither the Soviet Hymn Soyuz Nerushimy nor the new Russian Hymn to the same music Rossiya Svyashchennaya?
  187. @Steve Sailer
    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly" that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    And his mother coincidentally also changed her name to Harris?

    “Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party–his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    In the interview posted above at #34, it's stated that Said's father left when Said was 9 months of age. How can he possibly have been raised by his father...

    I think that's called propaganda.
  188. @Anonym
    I'm not sure what to call them now but hopefully in a decade or two they will be known as Tales of the Repatriated.

    Defenestration Diary

  189. America’s founders whine one about how they were oppressed in Europe. Boo Hoo Hoo.

    European Persecution

    The religious persecution that drove settlers from Europe to the British North American colonies sprang from the conviction, held by Protestants and Catholics alike, that uniformity of religion must exist in any given society.

    https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/religion/rel01.html

    It’s not an immigrant or Jewish thing. I think Virgil’s Aeneid could be thought of as Romans complaining about how oppressed they were. Rotten Greeks burning our Troy down and all that. You don’t hear much from Trojans anymore, genocide, holocaust? But fear not after being so oppressed and disposed of their land our heroes, the oppressed Romans, come back to kick everyone’s butt and take their stuff. Happy ending until Jesus freaks take over, and don’t really care about pagan foundational myths. Zuckerberg’s sister should publicize this.

    I have respect for the Great Kahn of Kahn’s and his descendants who did it for glory, fun, sex, and money and because he had amazing organizational skills without resorting to some silly the Chinese screwed us foundational myth.

  190. @kihowi
    In the new, vibrant America you can be among a single thing.

    It stands to reason, since a single thing like a person (not a collective noun, mind you) can now also be “diverse.” ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    • Replies: @res
    Out of one, many.

    Once seen in all seriousness as a translation for e pluribus unum in a screed advocating diversity.
  191. @Alden
    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Rhonstadt.

    It's pronounced pee pee me.

    As somebody else said, that’s a Warren Zevon song, and the difference between Zevon’s original version and Ronstadt’s cover is striking – in Zevon’s hands, the song is extremely ironic and sly, while Ronstadt sings it straight and sappy. But it put money in WZ’s pocket, as did Linda’s cover of Zevon’s “Hasten Down the Wind”, so I won’t complain too much. WZ was always the dark cynical element of the laid back LA ’70s rock scene, and deserved much more success than he had.

    Interesting WZ political tidbit – he had an affair with Walter Mondale’s daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Warren Zevon wasn't a shrinking violet. He knocked on Igor Stravinsky's door when he was 13 to ask for music lessons.
    , @Flip
    "Interesting WZ political tidbit – he had an affair with Walter Mondale’s daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive."

    So did President Clinton, which drove Monica crazy with jealousy.
  192. @Achmed E. Newman

    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Ronstadt.
     
    No, Linda Ronstadt didn't write that, as President-Eject Øb☭ma could have told her. That was a Warren Zevon song. Miss Ronstadt didn't write most of her big hit songs, maybe all of them. Some were from Buddy Holly, etc.

    However, no matter what her drug of choice, she had a great voice (and the face and body helped bring "folks" to the shows, I can tell you personally).

    From the movie, "FM" watch her sing the Rolling Stones' "Tumbling Dice":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s4_teISos0

    "Always in a hurry, I never stop to worry,
    Don't you see the time flashin' by.
    Honey, got no money,
    I'm all sixes and sevens and nines.
    Say now baby, I'm the rank outsider,
    You can be my partner in crime.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin dice',
    Roll me and call me the tumblin' dice.
    Oh, my, my, my, I'm the lone crap shooter,
    Playin' the field ev'ry night.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin' dice, (Call me the tumblin')"

    I watched the Eagles documentary a while back – not a big fan but love Joe Walsh’s stuff – and I realized that I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the ’70s.

    BTW, if you grew up in the ’70s, I highly recommend the Eagles documentary. It’s much more warts-and-all than I expected; the late Glen Frey in particular comes off like a major asshole, Don Henley seems to have actually grown a sardonic sense of humor over the years, Bernie Leadon bailed when he wanted to, I felt sorry for Randy Meisner who just seemed to get overwhelmed by it all, I’m happy that everybody helped Joe Walsh get clean, and Don Felder must be the most clueless person to ever be in a hugely successful band. And Glyn Johns’ comments about real rock and roll vs the Eagles are priceless.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don't know as she was "hot". Her figure was not great: she had a unimpressive rear, that's for sure. Emmylou Harris actually had a better body, she just never showed it off. Facewise she was not unattractive, but not especially appealing either. And she aged poorly.

    Does anyone else remember Glenn Frey in "Wiseguy"?
    , @Jim Don Bob
    "I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the ’70s."

    Yeah, she had that come fuck me look down pat.

    Got a link to the Eagles' documentary? Google is closed for the weekend.

    And why do you say Don Feder was clueless?

    TIA.

  193. What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?

    Insolence? Ingratitude?

  194. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    “…studied under Willie Brown.”

    bored identity believes how that, for a now still underreported story, will be the straw that broke Kamala’s whippy back.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Kamala Harris came to understand the fundamental essence of the politician's trade while studying under Willie Brown.
  195. @bored identity
    What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?

    bored identity proposes this term : Well-Documented Bastardism.

    Here's the latest case of Well-Documented Bastardism, or :


    "How Do You Recognize Society with a High Level of Jewenile Delinquency ?"



    Jewish group demands New York take down statue and references to Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant

    "...'Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,' said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center *."

    (...)

    'New York, of all American cities, which boasts such important Jewish history and claims such a present day vibrant Jewish community, should take the lead in denouncing Stuyvesant's bigotry.'

    As a prominent New York historical figure, removing traces of Stuyvesant could prove a daunting task.

    Then there's Stuyvesant High School, the most prestigious of the public schools, which arguably accepts only the brightest students in the city.


    " Darshan-Leitner suggests a name swap, replacing the name of Stuyvesant with that of Asher Levy, one of the first Jewish settlers in New Amsterdam."

    http://nypost.com/2017/08/24/jewish-activists-target-removal-of-peter-stuyvesant-monuments/

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shurat_HaDin

     

    p.s. can somebody please remind bored identity what was that chant that crazed, hate-mongering and Beyond the Pale Supremacists with tiki-torches were screaming in Charlottesville ?

    “Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,” said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center.

    Whereas jewish activist groups are so famous for championing the interests of catholics.

  196. Cavilier, n. see ‘Whinist’

  197. @Alden
    This did not happen.

    1. How did the son of a Brooklyn commie Jew meet a friend who lives on a farm in Penbsylvania?

    2. Who was the friend? If it was a child his age did the farm kid spend time in Brooklyn?

    3. Presumably the farmer knew the name of the kid who was invited to the farmers home?
    So why the fuss about the name?

    4. Why did the father of the friend carry on about the unpronounceable name? Who would do that? Not a normal person. We had friends in the house. We went to friends houses. My kids went to friends houses. I've never heard of anyone berating an 8 year old child guest about his or her name.

    I wonder if the absent father was Jewish. Iran has always had a big Jewish community. Commie Jewish girls of that era made a big deal of marrying exotic foreigners or American blacks.

    Tell this tale to any attorney, insurance investigator, bad debt collector, bank investigator or any law enforcement person
    and they would laugh in the guy's face.

    An attorney would laugh and tell him I can't take your case until you tell me the truth. And the bill would be larger than usual because of the time involved in untangling the lies.

    Who would believe this? Stupid liberals who believed that when Tiger Woods was in kindergarten evil KKK White 6th graders jumped over the kindergarten fence, dragged him off, tied him to a tree and beat him.

    What a liar.

    They lived in Pittsburgh for a while, and Butler is about an hour from Pittsburgh.
    However, he says he was there three times. Why would the parents let their kid invite him back if they didn’t approve of him? More importantly, he was 8. By that time, most kids have heard or personally survived some pretty ruthless nicknames at school. As another reader posted here, even ordinary names can be turned into a nickname. The ones at my elementary school were usually unprintable.
    So there may be a grain of truth somewhere in here mixed Among The Farm Manure, but the majority of it reads like a by-the-numbers victim narrative.

  198. @res

    victim porn?
     
    That is a good one, but I think "Outrage porn" is even better. The author is expressing victimhood but trying to induce outrage. And I think goodthinkers read material like that to help them feel better about themselves because they are appropriately and righteously outraged. Then there is the tribal bonding aspect of being outraged together.

    [MORE]
    you know, I’m REALLY starting to think one can’t improve upon “Among the Farmland” as the name of this genre.

  199. @Achmed E. Newman

    I call it The Poor Poor Pitiful Me genre with thanks to the writer of that song, the pretty coke addict, Linda Ronstadt.
     
    No, Linda Ronstadt didn't write that, as President-Eject Øb☭ma could have told her. That was a Warren Zevon song. Miss Ronstadt didn't write most of her big hit songs, maybe all of them. Some were from Buddy Holly, etc.

    However, no matter what her drug of choice, she had a great voice (and the face and body helped bring "folks" to the shows, I can tell you personally).

    From the movie, "FM" watch her sing the Rolling Stones' "Tumbling Dice":

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s4_teISos0

    "Always in a hurry, I never stop to worry,
    Don't you see the time flashin' by.
    Honey, got no money,
    I'm all sixes and sevens and nines.
    Say now baby, I'm the rank outsider,
    You can be my partner in crime.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin dice',
    Roll me and call me the tumblin' dice.
    Oh, my, my, my, I'm the lone crap shooter,
    Playin' the field ev'ry night.
    But baby, I can't stay,
    You got to roll me and call me the tumblin' dice, (Call me the tumblin')"

    The poor, poor, pitiful me admission essay has replaced grades and SATs as the main criteria for college admissions.

  200. @bored identity
    What Do You Call This Now Ubiquitous Genre of Immigrants Complaining About Long-Ago Slights by Americans?

    bored identity proposes this term : Well-Documented Bastardism.

    Here's the latest case of Well-Documented Bastardism, or :


    "How Do You Recognize Society with a High Level of Jewenile Delinquency ?"



    Jewish group demands New York take down statue and references to Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant

    "...'Peter Stuyvesant was an extreme racist who targeted Jews and other minorities including Catholics and energetically tried to prohibit them from settling in then New Amsterdam,' said Nitsana Darshan-Leitner, the head of the Shurat HaDin-Israel Law Center *."

    (...)

    'New York, of all American cities, which boasts such important Jewish history and claims such a present day vibrant Jewish community, should take the lead in denouncing Stuyvesant's bigotry.'

    As a prominent New York historical figure, removing traces of Stuyvesant could prove a daunting task.

    Then there's Stuyvesant High School, the most prestigious of the public schools, which arguably accepts only the brightest students in the city.


    " Darshan-Leitner suggests a name swap, replacing the name of Stuyvesant with that of Asher Levy, one of the first Jewish settlers in New Amsterdam."

    http://nypost.com/2017/08/24/jewish-activists-target-removal-of-peter-stuyvesant-monuments/

    * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shurat_HaDin

     

    p.s. can somebody please remind bored identity what was that chant that crazed, hate-mongering and Beyond the Pale Supremacists with tiki-torches were screaming in Charlottesville ?

    Another Jewish lie.

    Stuyvesant DID let Jews settle in New Amsterdam. All he demanded was that they establish their own cemetery and charity / welfare system which they were happy to do as it was Jewish custom wherever Jews lived.

    Why the separate system? In those days every little parish church had a cemetery attached. The cemetery was for the parishioners who paid the expenses.

    All charity came through the churches.
    All over Europe and MENA religious organizations administered charity to their own, Jews as well as the numerous Christian sects.

    Jews fit very well into this system as it kept “the people that shall live alone” away from non Jewish influence.

    Stuyvestant let the Jews in.

    He didn’t keep them out as all the colonies except for Maryland and Pennsylvania kept *Catholics out. It was a crime to be a Catholic in the other colonies until after the revolution.

    The Jews of New Amsterdam would have set up their own religious synagogue, school, charity and cemetery as they did in every town they ever settled in.
    * Except for Catholic Irish and Scots slaves and deported rebels.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Stuyvesant did not want to let the Jews in. The management of the Dutch West India Company wrote to him and told him that he had to because the Company had important Jewish shareholders whom the did not want to piss off. However, they did not let the Jews open a synagogue. They did not get a permission to build a building until 1730, long after the Dutch were gone. They did establish a cemetery though.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=0Bu5GnLZCw0C&pg=PA452&dq=jews+in+the+modern+world+petition+to+expel&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjWuZX_wvvVAhXC54MKHZGDCXIQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=jews%20in%20the%20modern%20world%20petition%20to%20expel&f=false

    , @Jack D
    The Company's reply is on the next page.

    The reply sounds insincere to me. "We would have liked to help you out... but" The kind of thing that you say to someone to soften the bad news. By the time they get to the end of the letter they end with a no nonsense "you will now govern yourself accordingly" - i.e. don't even think of disobeying our orders.

  201. @Ganderson
    I, too call BS on this story. And, WHAT A FAG!

    I'm a HS teacher and coach, and I feel it is my duty to bestow nicknames- many traditional 'shortenings' but, for example, I had an Indian (dot not woo-woo) kid named Aditya, who became 'Adidas'. Guess I better watch my ass.

    My dad used to get called a 'squarehead 'as he walked to school through the mean streets of St. Paul's east side in the 1920's. Where's my compensation?

    Wasn’t dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My impression is that "Swissman" in America tended to imply "provincial," "stubborn," "hillbillyish," or at least that's how my mother used it to refer to my dad during arguments: e.g., "stubborn Swissman."

    But the Swiss were never all that well known as a group in America since they mostly get lumped in with their larger neighbors of the same language.

    , @syonredux

    Wasn’t dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?
     
    Yeah, the "dumb Swede" stereotype. Note how you don't hear that one anymore. Why? Because stereotypes reflect reality. Once people figured out that Swedes (after mastering English) had plenty on the ball, the stereotype swiftly vanished. Cf how views on Japanese products changed in the '70s. Once the Japanese stopped making crappy stuff, you stopped hearing about "Jap crap."
  202. “Crying among the America.”

  203. @MEH 0910
    https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/jun/27/said-sayrafiezadeh-family-father

    When Saïd was four, his mother took in a fellow party member who was passing through Pittsburgh: it was customary to open your house to travelling comrades. The man offered to babysit. They started to play tickling games, then the man unzipped his fly and proceeded to molest his young charge. When Saïd told his mother what had happened she rang the party headquarters and got the comrade moved. "Under capitalism, everyone has problems," someone told her - an explanation she found "insufficient".
     

    Thanks for sharing these.

    Saïd’s bio on Wikipedia was unusually sparse, not even a mention of education. For personalities whose entire contribution to society is a professionally compensated expression of their subjective grievance, they deserve serious scrutiny if the wagging accusatory finger of their tone is to be taken seriously. Funny thing about these memoirists is that are published and taken as scripture, even though their anecdotes of microaggressions that burden them their whole lives and become so pivotal in the deformation of their personalities can never be fact-checked. A memoirist would never distort, exaggerate or embellish his suffering or heroism, whether subconsciously or intentionally… No incentive there… wink, wink…

    (Hiya Tennessee “Genius” Coates) – Look at naughty me, just like that mean ol’ Pennsyltucky hillbilly who couldn’t remember how to pronounce the immigrant boy’s name… I can’t be bothered to remember how to spell a fella’s name whose whole point was a Black revolutionary provocation and middlefingering of the established western society that his family hated. It’s so precious, after such a conscious intentional insult of prevailing norms, society at large is supposed to be guilted into respectful kowtowing. Previous generations of newcomers consciously gave their kids typical American names like “Mike.” For contrast, observe the effort & respect of Chinese when they give themselves western names upon arrival to make transacting with natives easier and more convenient. Sure the result can at times turn out silly or comical, but their effort to get along and make things easier for their hosts (and themselves) deserves some credit.

    More from the article…

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh grew up hoping for the overthrow of capitalism. But his zeal died when he realised his father put revolution before his wife and kids.

    Where have we heard this before?
    Many such cases…
    Half-breed offspring raised by a mother infatuated with hot-blooded third-world Revolutionary swagger, abandoned by a brown father for whom the fate of strangers oppressed & neglected by the capitalist establishment were more important than his own poor & neglected family. Perhaps his only success as a father was transmitting some of his hatred and resentment of the society at large to the next generation? Another clear example of the “Leapfrogging Loyalties” that our host Mr. Sailer has highlighted before. This theme certainly deserves more attention. It seems it is at the root of so much social and internal conflict that we demand of ourselves and fellow citizens completely disable and indeed reverse their natural hierarchy of loyalties. It’s not just Saïd who needs therapy from this damage… What is it that compels us favor an exotic race over our own? Foreigners over fellow citizens? Victims of distant calamities over neighbors? Strangers over family? This phenomenon is certainly not unique to the left, but rather the same perversion of an underlying altruism into something unhealthy or decadent can also frequently be observed on the right or among the religious. See the pastors or missionaries who neglect their families because the put the welfare and perhaps adulation of their flock first. Observe the fashion for adopting diverse children from the third world instead of have one’s own. If G*d’s plan is written also in nature, we disobey and dishonor its command (and the legacy of our ancestors) when we favor strangers and the foreign over our own blood.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3wQeKgWeV8


    Scarred old slaver knows he's doin' all right...
    hear him whip the women just around midnight
    , @MEH 0910
    Keeping it in the family
    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh 24th March 2009

    He had abandoned me, after all, when I was nine months old, mostly so that he could devote his time, energy and money to the cause of workers’ revolution. I had hoped, however, that thirty-five years later there might be a chance he would put aside political considerations for my wedding. No. In his email he wished me well, said June was a great time to have a wedding as roses will be ‘permeating the air’, and that he would be sure to celebrate in Tehran with his brother. This was no consolation for me. And I called him and told him so. Then I cried. Sobbed really. I had never done that in front of him before. I also swore at him. Finally, he said, okay, okay, he’d see what he could do. Which was also no consolation. And then since my birthday was coming up he wondered if I would like a subscription to National Geographic which a month before had run an immensely popular photograph of the earth at night, clearly displaying the great inequity in access to electricity in the Third World.
     

    And about two hours after this photograph was taken my father would take it upon himself to procure the microphone and make a toast to the newlyweds. After years of giving speeches on Trotsky and capitalism and Iran and the Baku Congress of 1920, he’s a natural. Full of charm and wit. Much to my chagrin he easily won over the crowd. At least those of whom had no idea that he didn’t want to be there in the first place. When he was done commending my wife and me, he inappropriately devoted the rest of his toast to extolling the merits of another guest at the reception: my uncle, Mark Harris (my mother’s brother), the author of the novel Bang the Drum Slowly, who was sitting at a nearby table in an advanced stage of Alzheimer’s. My father hadn’t spoken to my uncle in probably forty years, nor has he ever been much of a reader of fiction, but here he was suddenly declaiming that ‘Mark Harris is a pillar of American literature!’ There was a smattering of confused applause. And then he added, ‘Next time you’re in a bookstore pick up a copy of one of his books’.

    That night my wife and I stayed at The Maritime Hotel on Ninth Avenue in Chelsea. Paid for, incidentally, by my wife’s enormously caring and generous parents who I was delighted to have as in-laws. The hotel had originally been the headquarters for the National Maritime Union, and our little room had a cute porthole window that faced out onto the street. It happened to also be Gay Pride that day and there was lots of celebration going on outside. People were shouting and laughing and screaming, and at some point fireworks were set off by the Hudson River. My wife and I looked out of our window and pretended the festivities were for us.
     
  204. @res

    victim porn?
     
    That is a good one, but I think "Outrage porn" is even better. The author is expressing victimhood but trying to induce outrage. And I think goodthinkers read material like that to help them feel better about themselves because they are appropriately and righteously outraged. Then there is the tribal bonding aspect of being outraged together.

    res & newrouter

    Outrage Porn, Grievance Porn, Victim Porn….

    All good. Thumbs-up.

    To inspire creativity for more contributions, maybe something with “White Guilt Trip?”
    But “White Guilt Trip Porn” does seem too long…

  205. @Alden
    Wasn't dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?

    My impression is that “Swissman” in America tended to imply “provincial,” “stubborn,” “hillbillyish,” or at least that’s how my mother used it to refer to my dad during arguments: e.g., “stubborn Swissman.”

    But the Swiss were never all that well known as a group in America since they mostly get lumped in with their larger neighbors of the same language.

    • Replies: @Flip
    "Stubborn Dutchman" (from Deutschland not Holland) is heard in St. Louis
  206. @bored identity



    "...studied under Willie Brown."

     

    bored identity believes how that, for a now still underreported story, will be the straw that broke Kamala's whippy back.


    https://youtu.be/h-fAJRSb2SQ

    https://youtu.be/Bkf7B_rLZp4?t=4m58s

    Kamala Harris came to understand the fundamental essence of the politician’s trade while studying under Willie Brown.

    • Replies: @bored identity
    Meanwhile:

    Harward Law School Giant of Dark Matter is dejavuing his New Orleans counterpart :


    August 25. 2017;

    https://twitter.com/SylvesterTurner/status/901154698316722176



    August 27. 2017;

    https://twitter.com/SylvesterTurner/status/901779307718160384

    https://twitter.com/SylvesterTurner/status/901826764502118405



    Main Smear Media Headlines on August 30. 2017;

    "Houston, blah,blah,blah....because of Trump!"

    Also, short video from Cool Cat Sylvester's Hurricane Harvey First Responders Headquaters:

    https://youtu.be/OJX5SDcuFXs
    , @Kylie
    Whoa, Steve!

    I see what you did there.
  207. So the other kids at school did not twist his name into something insulting?

    Our grade school and junior high were the last of White-topia. Man, we were cruel to each other in retrospect. But it just toughened us up, began our smack-talking skills and “street smarts”.

    He missed out on a rite of passage . . .

  208. @cthulhu
    As somebody else said, that's a Warren Zevon song, and the difference between Zevon's original version and Ronstadt's cover is striking - in Zevon's hands, the song is extremely ironic and sly, while Ronstadt sings it straight and sappy. But it put money in WZ's pocket, as did Linda's cover of Zevon's "Hasten Down the Wind", so I won't complain too much. WZ was always the dark cynical element of the laid back LA '70s rock scene, and deserved much more success than he had.

    Interesting WZ political tidbit - he had an affair with Walter Mondale's daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive.

    Warren Zevon wasn’t a shrinking violet. He knocked on Igor Stravinsky’s door when he was 13 to ask for music lessons.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    I highly recommend I'll Sleep When I'm Dead: The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon, a combination oral history and biography by his ex-wife Crystal; it's pretty unvarnished, and WZ comes off as a man of great talent and probably even greater assholiness, at least any time he was drinking (which was mostly, until the last several years of his life). He wrote and performed some seriously great stuff though, and was an extremely accomplished musician and composer. But he inflicted serious damage on people too; apparently part of why he asked Crystal to do the biography is that he knew she wouldn't sugarcoat anything.
  209. @anonguy

    I would love to see what the 20s and 30s demo pulled. Maybe not even 10% if the curve is centered on 60.
     
    I can't even remember the last time I saw anyone I know reading a newspaper or maybe even anyone at all. I'm going to keep an eye out for this.

    I stopped home delivery subscriptions in the early 2000s, first the daily but kept the Sunday going for a while for the feature articles and comics. But soon the Sunday Wash Post (I lived in DC then) became smaller and more content-free than the daily had been so I threw in the towel. That had to be at least 10 years ago and probably closer 15 now.

    I stopped home delivery subscriptions in the early 2000s, first the daily but kept the Sunday going for a while for the feature articles and comics. But soon the Sunday Wash Post (I lived in DC then) became smaller and more content-free than the daily had been so I threw in the towel. That had to be at least 10 years ago and probably closer 15 now.

    The funny thing is I would buy (out of principle) a newspaper that actually stuck up for me and my kind, even if I could get news elsewhere. But if they are just going to pretend that they get to spread Tikkun Olam from on high like it’s the 1980s, well, I wouldn’t piss on them if they were burning. These idiots want their main demographic gone, I’m only happy to oblige but not in the way they want. I will still exist but never as a NYT reader.

    It would be kind of sad to see the NYT go the way of Newsweek (I am sentimental towards history), but since Duranty the bad outweighs the good. It’s kind of a monument to leftism and so in the spirit of the current year, good riddance.

  210. @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Thanks for sharing these.

    Saïd's bio on Wikipedia was unusually sparse, not even a mention of education. For personalities whose entire contribution to society is a professionally compensated expression of their subjective grievance, they deserve serious scrutiny if the wagging accusatory finger of their tone is to be taken seriously. Funny thing about these memoirists is that are published and taken as scripture, even though their anecdotes of microaggressions that burden them their whole lives and become so pivotal in the deformation of their personalities can never be fact-checked. A memoirist would never distort, exaggerate or embellish his suffering or heroism, whether subconsciously or intentionally... No incentive there... wink, wink...

    (Hiya Tennessee "Genius" Coates) - Look at naughty me, just like that mean ol' Pennsyltucky hillbilly who couldn't remember how to pronounce the immigrant boy's name... I can't be bothered to remember how to spell a fella's name whose whole point was a Black revolutionary provocation and middlefingering of the established western society that his family hated. It's so precious, after such a conscious intentional insult of prevailing norms, society at large is supposed to be guilted into respectful kowtowing. Previous generations of newcomers consciously gave their kids typical American names like "Mike." For contrast, observe the effort & respect of Chinese when they give themselves western names upon arrival to make transacting with natives easier and more convenient. Sure the result can at times turn out silly or comical, but their effort to get along and make things easier for their hosts (and themselves) deserves some credit.

    More from the article...

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh grew up hoping for the overthrow of capitalism. But his zeal died when he realised his father put revolution before his wife and kids.
     
    Where have we heard this before?
    Many such cases...
    Half-breed offspring raised by a mother infatuated with hot-blooded third-world Revolutionary swagger, abandoned by a brown father for whom the fate of strangers oppressed & neglected by the capitalist establishment were more important than his own poor & neglected family. Perhaps his only success as a father was transmitting some of his hatred and resentment of the society at large to the next generation? Another clear example of the "Leapfrogging Loyalties" that our host Mr. Sailer has highlighted before. This theme certainly deserves more attention. It seems it is at the root of so much social and internal conflict that we demand of ourselves and fellow citizens completely disable and indeed reverse their natural hierarchy of loyalties. It's not just Saïd who needs therapy from this damage... What is it that compels us favor an exotic race over our own? Foreigners over fellow citizens? Victims of distant calamities over neighbors? Strangers over family? This phenomenon is certainly not unique to the left, but rather the same perversion of an underlying altruism into something unhealthy or decadent can also frequently be observed on the right or among the religious. See the pastors or missionaries who neglect their families because the put the welfare and perhaps adulation of their flock first. Observe the fashion for adopting diverse children from the third world instead of have one's own. If G*d's plan is written also in nature, we disobey and dishonor its command (and the legacy of our ancestors) when we favor strangers and the foreign over our own blood.

    Scarred old slaver knows he’s doin’ all right…
    hear him whip the women just around midnight

  211. @Peripatetic commenter
    Another comment on the Goolag:

    https://twitter.com/IWillRedPillYou/status/901684549494636545

    Thanks for posting. That was artful.

  212. @res

    BTW, whatever happened to Svigor?
     
    He seems to have become annoyed with the moderation a month ago: http://www.unz.com/isteve/africans-vs-african-americans-in-minneapolis/#comment-1945926

    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.

    He has popped up a few times since then, but not in his regular frequency and volume. I miss his comments. Though I do confess to curiosity about the comments that are moderated away given what Steve does let through.

    I hope he comes back. I was just thinking about Svigor and missing his commentary. If you are reading Svigor, pro tip: apply the court jester principle – if it’s funny enough Steve will let practically anything through.

  213. Wow, I should write a memoir about my first hand experiences with Kill Haole Day back in the ’70s and become famous like this guy.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kill_Haole_Day

    • Replies: @anonguy

    I should write a memoir about my first hand experiences with Kill Haole Day back in the ’70s
     
    Kill Haole Day is something of an ongoing Hawaiian myth, or at least a mass psychosis gross exaggeration IME. Or an excuse for haole kids to skip the last day of school

    Do tell, Snowflake.

  214. @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Thanks for sharing these.

    Saïd's bio on Wikipedia was unusually sparse, not even a mention of education. For personalities whose entire contribution to society is a professionally compensated expression of their subjective grievance, they deserve serious scrutiny if the wagging accusatory finger of their tone is to be taken seriously. Funny thing about these memoirists is that are published and taken as scripture, even though their anecdotes of microaggressions that burden them their whole lives and become so pivotal in the deformation of their personalities can never be fact-checked. A memoirist would never distort, exaggerate or embellish his suffering or heroism, whether subconsciously or intentionally... No incentive there... wink, wink...

    (Hiya Tennessee "Genius" Coates) - Look at naughty me, just like that mean ol' Pennsyltucky hillbilly who couldn't remember how to pronounce the immigrant boy's name... I can't be bothered to remember how to spell a fella's name whose whole point was a Black revolutionary provocation and middlefingering of the established western society that his family hated. It's so precious, after such a conscious intentional insult of prevailing norms, society at large is supposed to be guilted into respectful kowtowing. Previous generations of newcomers consciously gave their kids typical American names like "Mike." For contrast, observe the effort & respect of Chinese when they give themselves western names upon arrival to make transacting with natives easier and more convenient. Sure the result can at times turn out silly or comical, but their effort to get along and make things easier for their hosts (and themselves) deserves some credit.

    More from the article...

    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh grew up hoping for the overthrow of capitalism. But his zeal died when he realised his father put revolution before his wife and kids.
     
    Where have we heard this before?
    Many such cases...
    Half-breed offspring raised by a mother infatuated with hot-blooded third-world Revolutionary swagger, abandoned by a brown father for whom the fate of strangers oppressed & neglected by the capitalist establishment were more important than his own poor & neglected family. Perhaps his only success as a father was transmitting some of his hatred and resentment of the society at large to the next generation? Another clear example of the "Leapfrogging Loyalties" that our host Mr. Sailer has highlighted before. This theme certainly deserves more attention. It seems it is at the root of so much social and internal conflict that we demand of ourselves and fellow citizens completely disable and indeed reverse their natural hierarchy of loyalties. It's not just Saïd who needs therapy from this damage... What is it that compels us favor an exotic race over our own? Foreigners over fellow citizens? Victims of distant calamities over neighbors? Strangers over family? This phenomenon is certainly not unique to the left, but rather the same perversion of an underlying altruism into something unhealthy or decadent can also frequently be observed on the right or among the religious. See the pastors or missionaries who neglect their families because the put the welfare and perhaps adulation of their flock first. Observe the fashion for adopting diverse children from the third world instead of have one's own. If G*d's plan is written also in nature, we disobey and dishonor its command (and the legacy of our ancestors) when we favor strangers and the foreign over our own blood.

    Keeping it in the family
    Saïd Sayrafiezadeh 24th March 2009

    He had abandoned me, after all, when I was nine months old, mostly so that he could devote his time, energy and money to the cause of workers’ revolution. I had hoped, however, that thirty-five years later there might be a chance he would put aside political considerations for my wedding. No. In his email he wished me well, said June was a great time to have a wedding as roses will be ‘permeating the air’, and that he would be sure to celebrate in Tehran with his brother. This was no consolation for me. And I called him and told him so. Then I cried. Sobbed really. I had never done that in front of him before. I also swore at him. Finally, he said, okay, okay, he’d see what he could do. Which was also no consolation. And then since my birthday was coming up he wondered if I would like a subscription to National Geographic which a month before had run an immensely popular photograph of the earth at night, clearly displaying the great inequity in access to electricity in the Third World.

    [MORE]

    And about two hours after this photograph was taken my father would take it upon himself to procure the microphone and make a toast to the newlyweds. After years of giving speeches on Trotsky and capitalism and Iran and the Baku Congress of 1920, he’s a natural. Full of charm and wit. Much to my chagrin he easily won over the crowd. At least those of whom had no idea that he didn’t want to be there in the first place. When he was done commending my wife and me, he inappropriately devoted the rest of his toast to extolling the merits of another guest at the reception: my uncle, Mark Harris (my mother’s brother), the author of the novel Bang the Drum Slowly, who was sitting at a nearby table in an advanced stage of Alzheimer’s. My father hadn’t spoken to my uncle in probably forty years, nor has he ever been much of a reader of fiction, but here he was suddenly declaiming that ‘Mark Harris is a pillar of American literature!’ There was a smattering of confused applause. And then he added, ‘Next time you’re in a bookstore pick up a copy of one of his books’.

    That night my wife and I stayed at The Maritime Hotel on Ninth Avenue in Chelsea. Paid for, incidentally, by my wife’s enormously caring and generous parents who I was delighted to have as in-laws. The hotel had originally been the headquarters for the National Maritime Union, and our little room had a cute porthole window that faced out onto the street. It happened to also be Gay Pride that day and there was lots of celebration going on outside. People were shouting and laughing and screaming, and at some point fireworks were set off by the Hudson River. My wife and I looked out of our window and pretended the festivities were for us.

  215. @Autochthon
    It stands to reason, since a single thing like a person (not a collective noun, mind you) can now also be "diverse." ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    Out of one, many.

    Once seen in all seriousness as a translation for e pluribus unum in a screed advocating diversity.

  216. @AndrewR
    It's been a long time since anyone in the US has lost money by expressing anti-white sentiments. I'm sure even Grandpa Steve can't remember any cases of it. The so-called Greatest Generation and their parents and grandparents dedicated our entire nation to beating those big meany Germans* only to win and promptly give their country away to hostile, albeit generally less well-armed, ethnic aliens. "Boomers" get a lot of blame from younger generations, and not entirely without good reason, but the rot had set in when "baby boomers" were still babies. The very eldest Boomers were barely out of high school when the Hart-Celler Act passed. And the "Civil Rights Movement," which after 60 years we can definitively conclude had virtually nothing to do with attaining actual equality, started well before that.

    *For a good laugh and/or cry, imagine if American leftists/cucks/Juden treated "Japanese supremacists", real or imagined, with 1% of the fear and loathing that they treat the equally imaginary 21st century "Nazis."

    I was researching for a post, never posted, about a “psychoneurosis” or some such from WW2 that was Jewish related. In any case, the Patton Slapping Incident was a pointer to the softening up that was happening even then, compared to what came before. The troops loved the idea that Patton came down hard on the free-riders, the yellow. They chanted at him that he should not apologize, when he was basically ordered to by Ike.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_S._Patton_slapping_incidents

    We can probably chart the softening of our society with the introduction of labor saving devices such as washing machines, refrigeration, automobiles, etc. It has been one long march of progress from 1900 or so until now. I would love to see the diary of a trigglypuff or Carl the Cuck if they could be somehow dumped back in the early 1900s, for example, even the 1930s depression era would have been good.

  217. @Peripatetic commenter
    Another comment on the Goolag:

    https://twitter.com/IWillRedPillYou/status/901684549494636545

    My Russian isn’t that great, but the Soviet YouTube hymn is neither the Soviet Hymn Soyuz Nerushimy nor the new Russian Hymn to the same music Rossiya Svyashchennaya?

  218. @AndrewR
    It's been a long time since anyone in the US has lost money by expressing anti-white sentiments. I'm sure even Grandpa Steve can't remember any cases of it. The so-called Greatest Generation and their parents and grandparents dedicated our entire nation to beating those big meany Germans* only to win and promptly give their country away to hostile, albeit generally less well-armed, ethnic aliens. "Boomers" get a lot of blame from younger generations, and not entirely without good reason, but the rot had set in when "baby boomers" were still babies. The very eldest Boomers were barely out of high school when the Hart-Celler Act passed. And the "Civil Rights Movement," which after 60 years we can definitively conclude had virtually nothing to do with attaining actual equality, started well before that.

    *For a good laugh and/or cry, imagine if American leftists/cucks/Juden treated "Japanese supremacists", real or imagined, with 1% of the fear and loathing that they treat the equally imaginary 21st century "Nazis."

    “The so-called Greatest Generation and their parents and grandparents dedicated our entire nation to beating those big meany Germans only to win and promptly give their country away to hostile, albeit generally less well-armed, ethnic aliens. ‘Boomers’ get a lot of blame from younger generations, and not entirely without good reason, but the rot had set in when ‘baby boomers’ were still babies. The very eldest Boomers were barely out of high school when the Hart-Celler Act passed. And the ‘Civil Rights Movement,’ which after 60 years we can definitively conclude had virtually nothing to do with attaining actual equality, started well before that.”

    This bears repeating. Thanks for noticing. The “boomers” were, after all, raised by the “greatest generation.”

  219. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @cthulhu
    I watched the Eagles documentary a while back - not a big fan but love Joe Walsh's stuff - and I realized that I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the '70s.

    BTW, if you grew up in the '70s, I highly recommend the Eagles documentary. It's much more warts-and-all than I expected; the late Glen Frey in particular comes off like a major asshole, Don Henley seems to have actually grown a sardonic sense of humor over the years, Bernie Leadon bailed when he wanted to, I felt sorry for Randy Meisner who just seemed to get overwhelmed by it all, I'm happy that everybody helped Joe Walsh get clean, and Don Felder must be the most clueless person to ever be in a hugely successful band. And Glyn Johns' comments about real rock and roll vs the Eagles are priceless.

    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don’t know as she was “hot”. Her figure was not great: she had a unimpressive rear, that’s for sure. Emmylou Harris actually had a better body, she just never showed it off. Facewise she was not unattractive, but not especially appealing either. And she aged poorly.

    Does anyone else remember Glenn Frey in “Wiseguy”?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    About 15 years ago I hiking in Topanga Canyon State Park and was privileged to cross paths with an extraordinarily beautiful woman with waist length grey hair.

    It was Emmy Lou Harris.

    , @Mr. Anon

    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don’t know as she was “hot”.
     
    She wasn't for you. She was for others. It's not like such standards are absolute and universal.
  220. @Steve Sailer
    Kamala Harris came to understand the fundamental essence of the politician's trade while studying under Willie Brown.

    Meanwhile:

    Harward Law School Giant of Dark Matter is dejavuing his New Orleans counterpart :

    August 25. 2017;

    August 27. 2017;

    Main Smear Media Headlines on August 30. 2017;

    “Houston, blah,blah,blah….because of Trump!”

    Also, short video from Cool Cat Sylvester’s Hurricane Harvey First Responders Headquaters:

  221. @guest
    I haven't read the book in a long time, but I saw the tv series a couple years ago. My recollection is the guest doesn't know Charles' father thinks he's American, and the audience is on tenterhooks as to whether it will be revealed. The night is saved by Mr. Ryder Sr. mistaking cricket for baseball in a fortunate direction.

    In the 1981 tv series, the Jorkins scene is in episode 1, starting at 1:23:00 and running for a couple of minutes. John Gielgud as Ryder Sr. is hilarious. He knows perfectly well that the guest isn’t American – he’s just torturing the poor guy. Pretending to believe that cricket is America’s national sport is his concluding masterstroke, dumbfounding Jorkins & Ryder Jr. alike.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Gielgud as the main character's passive-aggressive father in the TV "Brideshead Revisited" is one of the summits of comic character acting.

    Peter O'Toole played a similar role as the main character's fiance's passive-aggressive dad in Stephen Fry's adaptation of Waugh's "Vile Bodies," "Bright Young Things." O'Toole was similarly brilliant at getting every laugh possible from the book's dialogue. He got laughs from two lines in the book that I had never realized were jokes.

  222. This reminds me of an old SNL skit with Nicholas Cage, who suffered through childhood with a name the name “Assessor Johnson.” As he and his wife go through a list of potential baby names, he works out every possible permutation through which their son could be mocked.

    With “Benjamin,” he imagined kids in the schoolyard comparing him to president Benjamin Harrison. “Hey, Benjamin! How’s the tariff coming? Montana a state yet?”

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Assessor Johnson, eh? It could be (much) worse.
  223. @Steve Sailer
    Warren Zevon wasn't a shrinking violet. He knocked on Igor Stravinsky's door when he was 13 to ask for music lessons.

    I highly recommend I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead: The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon, a combination oral history and biography by his ex-wife Crystal; it’s pretty unvarnished, and WZ comes off as a man of great talent and probably even greater assholiness, at least any time he was drinking (which was mostly, until the last several years of his life). He wrote and performed some seriously great stuff though, and was an extremely accomplished musician and composer. But he inflicted serious damage on people too; apparently part of why he asked Crystal to do the biography is that he knew she wouldn’t sugarcoat anything.

  224. @cthulhu
    I watched the Eagles documentary a while back - not a big fan but love Joe Walsh's stuff - and I realized that I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the '70s.

    BTW, if you grew up in the '70s, I highly recommend the Eagles documentary. It's much more warts-and-all than I expected; the late Glen Frey in particular comes off like a major asshole, Don Henley seems to have actually grown a sardonic sense of humor over the years, Bernie Leadon bailed when he wanted to, I felt sorry for Randy Meisner who just seemed to get overwhelmed by it all, I'm happy that everybody helped Joe Walsh get clean, and Don Felder must be the most clueless person to ever be in a hugely successful band. And Glyn Johns' comments about real rock and roll vs the Eagles are priceless.

    “I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the ’70s.”

    Yeah, she had that come fuck me look down pat.

    Got a link to the Eagles’ documentary? Google is closed for the weekend.

    And why do you say Don Feder was clueless?

    TIA.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
    "History of the Eagles" is on Netflix, and I think it's available to rent from iTunes as well. Don't know about Amazon Prime.

    The bit about Don Felder is like this: he continually felt disrespected because he didn't get to sing lead and his songs were often passed over for recording, a famous exception being Hotel California, which started life as a Felder demo called "Mexican Reggae"; Henley and Frey added the lyrics and rearranged it a bit but the basic song structure, chord progression, rhythm, etc is Felder's. Felder's attitude got worse after Henley did the vocal on a second Felder-originated tune from the "Hotel California" album, "Victim of Love", after Felder thought the vocal had been promised to him. This "not getting my due as songwriter or singer" continued to grind Felder's gears even after the "Hell Freezes Over" reunion, and led to Felder being kicked out permanently.

    I call Felder astoundingly clueless because he was making good money as an Eagles member (although Henley and Frey made the lion's share, the rest have done very well for themselves, especially with the tours over the last 20 years), and...he threw it all away because he didn't get to sing lead and didn't get to write as much as he wanted. That's what the time between tours is for, dumb-ass!! Make some solo records! He was playing big arenas as one of the two lead guitarists for one of the biggest bands ever, and he bailed because he wasn't getting to sing lead? Say what you will about the Eagles, but as a vocal act, they - especially the original lineup of Henley, Frey, Leadon, and Meisner - sang as well as any band of the era, and Felder just wasn't that good. Is that really worth throwing away fuck-you money? Like I said, world-class clueless...
  225. @Vinteuil
    In the 1981 tv series, the Jorkins scene is in episode 1, starting at 1:23:00 and running for a couple of minutes. John Gielgud as Ryder Sr. is hilarious. He knows perfectly well that the guest isn't American - he's just torturing the poor guy. Pretending to believe that cricket is America's national sport is his concluding masterstroke, dumbfounding Jorkins & Ryder Jr. alike.

    Gielgud as the main character’s passive-aggressive father in the TV “Brideshead Revisited” is one of the summits of comic character acting.

    Peter O’Toole played a similar role as the main character’s fiance’s passive-aggressive dad in Stephen Fry’s adaptation of Waugh’s “Vile Bodies,” “Bright Young Things.” O’Toole was similarly brilliant at getting every laugh possible from the book’s dialogue. He got laughs from two lines in the book that I had never realized were jokes.

  226. @Steve Sailer
    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, author of the baseball novel "Bang the Drum Slowly" that provided Robert De Niro with his breakout role, changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finkelstein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh.

    His uncle, the prolific leftwing American novelist, … changed his name to Mark Harris to make it easier for readers.

    So the sister (Said’s mother) changed her name to Harris along with her brother, presumably to seem less ethnic herself, but insists on raising her brat with a super-ethnic and hard-to-remember ethnic name?

    FAR MORE LIKELY: Said was raised with the last name Finkelstein and a plane-Jane American first name until he got to college. There, like Barry Dunham, he started going for exotic charm and called himself Said Sayrafie-Zadeh. (Zadeh is Persian suffix similar to Polish -inski.)

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  227. @syonredux

    There was, however, my friend’s father, who found it amusing to make fun of my name over dinner, coming up with a wide variety of ways to mispronounce it each time. I did my best to politely correct him each time, until it finally became apparent to me that I was participating in a game in which there was no chance of winning, and I ran from the table and out of the house and cried among the farmland
     
    .

    That might be the gayest thing that I have ever read.....and I was born in San Francisco.....

    As regards a name for this…I’ve always referred to it as a pity party.

    Who hasn’t had their name made fun of while growing up? Or the shirt they were wearing? Or one’s haircut? Or, you name it ___ ? It’s called a rite of passage for a child, an adolescent–learning to toughen up and grow some thick skin (some balls) as against the cruel world, which will do more than make fun of your name. There are plenty more games in life like that you’ll have no chance of winning.

    An adult so clueless as to write such drivel is embarrassing.

    But definitely a professional victim and member of the grievance class…

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    I have the most common last name in the English language. Smith. How could anyone make fun of that? Well, here's how: Smith became "Smitty". And "Smitty" became "Shitty". Now, most people called me Smitty but I did get the occasional Shitty thrown at me. So my point is, no one is safe!
  228. @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    Gee, nobody back home in Asia would dream of mocking the roundeyes’ speech or names, huh?

    Cry me a freaking river. Many European-Americans, myself included, have surnames that weren’t the family name back in the old country but something that was Ellis Islanded into an appellation more palatable to American pronunciations.

    If you wish to continue with a name that sounds like a sneeze to some, by all means, carry on.

  229. @Jim Don Bob

    Just wait until the propaganda machine revs up to promote the lost girl Kamala Harris on us as the next Democrat Presidential candidate.
     
    Dude!

    Kamala Harris as the next Democrat Presidential candidate has already started. She's cute, but stupid. Doesn't seem to realize that she is where she is today because she is exotic and sortaBlack and more importantly, studied under Willie Brown.

    studied under Willie Brown

    More like reclining under Willie Brown…as in, lie back and think of England…

  230. @Alden
    Wasn't dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?

    Wasn’t dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?

    Yeah, the “dumb Swede” stereotype. Note how you don’t hear that one anymore. Why? Because stereotypes reflect reality. Once people figured out that Swedes (after mastering English) had plenty on the ball, the stereotype swiftly vanished. Cf how views on Japanese products changed in the ’70s. Once the Japanese stopped making crappy stuff, you stopped hearing about “Jap crap.”

    • Replies: @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...
    , @Ganderson
    Swedes (and their cousins, the Danes and the Norskies) have done well, both in the old country and in North America, although a penchant for cultural suicide is now coming to the fore. The sing-song nature of Scandinavian languages, and the accents of Scandinavians speaking English contribute to the "dumb squarehead" meme. Overall, in "Boy Named Sue " fashion, my dad got pretty good with his fists as a result of the taunting! Wearing glasses as a 4th grader didn't help either.

    In the Walter Hill movie "The Long Riders", Randy Quaid's dying words, after the gang is shot up by a bunch of Swedish farmers on the Main Street (or should that be mean street!) of Northfield, were "goddamn square heads!".
    '

  231. @Steve Sailer
    My impression is that "Swissman" in America tended to imply "provincial," "stubborn," "hillbillyish," or at least that's how my mother used it to refer to my dad during arguments: e.g., "stubborn Swissman."

    But the Swiss were never all that well known as a group in America since they mostly get lumped in with their larger neighbors of the same language.

    “Stubborn Dutchman” (from Deutschland not Holland) is heard in St. Louis

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    In St. Louis, they can tell a Dutchman from a German pretty well.


    Germans are not _especially_ stubborn, but the Dutch quite often are. I have noticed this myself.

    The Dutch still harbor a grievance against the Germans and will harass or misdirect German tourists if given a chance to this day on occasion.

    The Dutch, however, are better than the Germans-and everyone else-in their mastery of foreign languages and in some types of craftsmanship, such as marine engineering.
  232. @syonredux

    Wasn’t dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?
     
    Yeah, the "dumb Swede" stereotype. Note how you don't hear that one anymore. Why? Because stereotypes reflect reality. Once people figured out that Swedes (after mastering English) had plenty on the ball, the stereotype swiftly vanished. Cf how views on Japanese products changed in the '70s. Once the Japanese stopped making crappy stuff, you stopped hearing about "Jap crap."

    I haven’t heard any Polish jokes for thirty years…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Didn't you see "Borat?"
    , @Jim Don Bob
    What has 50 feet and 73 teeth?















    The beer line at the Polish Festival.

    Ba-dum!
    , @Jim Don Bob
    A Texan and a Polack are peeing in adjacent urinals at a rest stop.
    The Texan finishes and goes to leave.
    The Polack says, "Where I come from, they teach you to wash your hands after you pee".
    The Texan says, "Where I come from, they teach you not to pee on your hands".

    Ba_dum!

    I'll be here all week. Try the veal. And don't forget to tip your waiter.
    , @anonguy

    I haven’t heard any Polish jokes for thirty years…
     
    They seemed to go rapidly out of style around the time Solidarity arose in Poland. I'm not calling cause and effect, but it might be interesting to research for humor researchers or whoever keeps up on these things.
    , @whoever
    Q: Why did the Polack cross the road?
    A: He couldn't get his dick out of the chicken.
  233. @cthulhu
    As somebody else said, that's a Warren Zevon song, and the difference between Zevon's original version and Ronstadt's cover is striking - in Zevon's hands, the song is extremely ironic and sly, while Ronstadt sings it straight and sappy. But it put money in WZ's pocket, as did Linda's cover of Zevon's "Hasten Down the Wind", so I won't complain too much. WZ was always the dark cynical element of the laid back LA '70s rock scene, and deserved much more success than he had.

    Interesting WZ political tidbit - he had an affair with Walter Mondale's daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive.

    “Interesting WZ political tidbit – he had an affair with Walter Mondale’s daughter Eleanor, who was apparently pretty uninhibited as well as being quite attractive.”

    So did President Clinton, which drove Monica crazy with jealousy.

  234. @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...

    Didn’t you see “Borat?”

  235. @kaganovitch
    And his mother coincidentally also changed her name to Harris?

    "Last week, I spoke with the author Said Sayrafiezadeh, 40, whose debut memoir When Skateboards Will Be Free has been receiving widespread praise. The book describes how he was raised by committed members of the Socialist Workers Party–his mother, Martha Harris (nee Finklestein), and his estranged father, Mahmoud Sayrafiezadeh.

    In the interview posted above at #34, it’s stated that Said’s father left when Said was 9 months of age. How can he possibly have been raised by his father…

    I think that’s called propaganda.

    • Replies: @kaganovitch
    Yes, it is. I was primarily interested in how both his mother and uncle changed their names to Harris.
  236. @Jim Don Bob
    "I had forgotten just how amazingly hot Linda Ronstadt was in the ’70s."

    Yeah, she had that come fuck me look down pat.

    Got a link to the Eagles' documentary? Google is closed for the weekend.

    And why do you say Don Feder was clueless?

    TIA.

    “History of the Eagles” is on Netflix, and I think it’s available to rent from iTunes as well. Don’t know about Amazon Prime.

    The bit about Don Felder is like this: he continually felt disrespected because he didn’t get to sing lead and his songs were often passed over for recording, a famous exception being Hotel California, which started life as a Felder demo called “Mexican Reggae”; Henley and Frey added the lyrics and rearranged it a bit but the basic song structure, chord progression, rhythm, etc is Felder’s. Felder’s attitude got worse after Henley did the vocal on a second Felder-originated tune from the “Hotel California” album, “Victim of Love”, after Felder thought the vocal had been promised to him. This “not getting my due as songwriter or singer” continued to grind Felder’s gears even after the “Hell Freezes Over” reunion, and led to Felder being kicked out permanently.

    I call Felder astoundingly clueless because he was making good money as an Eagles member (although Henley and Frey made the lion’s share, the rest have done very well for themselves, especially with the tours over the last 20 years), and…he threw it all away because he didn’t get to sing lead and didn’t get to write as much as he wanted. That’s what the time between tours is for, dumb-ass!! Make some solo records! He was playing big arenas as one of the two lead guitarists for one of the biggest bands ever, and he bailed because he wasn’t getting to sing lead? Say what you will about the Eagles, but as a vocal act, they – especially the original lineup of Henley, Frey, Leadon, and Meisner – sang as well as any band of the era, and Felder just wasn’t that good. Is that really worth throwing away fuck-you money? Like I said, world-class clueless…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Okay, but Felder did write the group their most famous song, so maybe he did have a complaint of sorts.
  237. @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...

    What has 50 feet and 73 teeth?

    The beer line at the Polish Festival.

    Ba-dum!

  238. I don’t want to sugar coat this, but how about “Ungrateful asshole who should promptly return to the Nirvana that is his home country, take all his homies with him, and see how they like his bitching about made up shit there?”.

    Hmmmm?

  239. @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...

    A Texan and a Polack are peeing in adjacent urinals at a rest stop.
    The Texan finishes and goes to leave.
    The Polack says, “Where I come from, they teach you to wash your hands after you pee”.
    The Texan says, “Where I come from, they teach you not to pee on your hands”.

    Ba_dum!

    I’ll be here all week. Try the veal. And don’t forget to tip your waiter.

  240. Meanwhile, Iranian-American Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi will take over as Uber’s new CEO.

    I bet he didn’t cry among the farmland to get to where he is.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Looks like the expression for this already IS "Crying Among the Farmland." It wrote itself.
  241. @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...

    I haven’t heard any Polish jokes for thirty years…

    They seemed to go rapidly out of style around the time Solidarity arose in Poland. I’m not calling cause and effect, but it might be interesting to research for humor researchers or whoever keeps up on these things.

  242. @Curle
    Wow, I should write a memoir about my first hand experiences with Kill Haole Day back in the '70s and become famous like this guy.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kill_Haole_Day

    I should write a memoir about my first hand experiences with Kill Haole Day back in the ’70s

    Kill Haole Day is something of an ongoing Hawaiian myth, or at least a mass psychosis gross exaggeration IME. Or an excuse for haole kids to skip the last day of school

    Do tell, Snowflake.

  243. @Anonymous
    "Anurag Dikshit"? Hell no. Some people should be required to change their names on arrival in the USA. Forcing people to change their names at Ellis Island was one of the best things that the US government ever did.

    “Anurag Dikshit”? Hell no. Some people should be required to change their names on arrival in the USA.

    We’ve been here before, recently.

    http://www.unz.com/?s=dikshit&searchsubmit=Search&authors=steve-sailer&ptype=isteve&commentsearch=include

  244. @PiltdownMan
    Meanwhile, Iranian-American Expedia CEO Dara Khosrowshahi will take over as Uber's new CEO.

    I bet he didn't cry among the farmland to get to where he is.

    Looks like the expression for this already IS “Crying Among the Farmland.” It wrote itself.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  245. @guest
    This reminds me of an old SNL skit with Nicholas Cage, who suffered through childhood with a name the name "Assessor Johnson." As he and his wife go through a list of potential baby names, he works out every possible permutation through which their son could be mocked.

    With "Benjamin," he imagined kids in the schoolyard comparing him to president Benjamin Harrison. "Hey, Benjamin! How's the tariff coming? Montana a state yet?"

    Assessor Johnson, eh? It could be (much) worse.

    • Replies: @guest
    I just noticed I got autocorrected on that one. Actually, it was Asswhipe Johnson.
  246. Here’s an article by a Muslim invader complaining about the racism of … Portland, Oregon! He quotes a diverse array of Portland POC about the unbearable whiteness of the city:

    “Because of the racism and the deeply held commitment to inequity, people ask how I can stand to live here,” Martinez-Bateman said. “My answer is I traded one form of oppression for another. In Los Angeles, the sexism and classism is overwhelming. There’s more opportunity here for me as a queer woman who grew up in poverty than there ever was in majority Latino LA.”

    [...]

    “The thing that trips me out about Portland is not that it’s so white. That’s just a numbers game that will change as the demographics shift,” said Robin Ye, a Chinese American recent graduate of the University of Chicago who is now once again in his native Portland. “The issue is that for many white people, they walk into an office meeting or classroom, see no people of color around, and feel like there’s nothing wrong about that.”

    [...]

    Taz Loomans, an Indian American, also moved to the Bay Area from Portland.
    “I’m not saying the Bay Area doesn’t have race problems, because it does,” Loomans said. “But Portland was the Twilight Zone of race. You knew something was off and it felt really weird there as a POC, even though on the face of it everyone ‘means well and doesn’t have a racist bone in their body.’ Living in Portland made me hate white people! I came from Phoenix, which is a very diverse city, and I hardly ever thought about race there. In [San Francisco] I feel normal again cause I see people like me around everywhere. In Portland the most painful experience was that my white friends and colleagues very much resisted and refuted the idea that it was a difficult place for people of color.”

    [...]

    One woman, who is Black and declined to be named, said she disliked being in Portland, but her fix for enduring the city was to “avoid white people at all costs.” She’s survived, she said, because she made adjustments.
    “I don’t ride my bike at night,” she said. “No way. I’m Black. Even Black people are shocked to see Black people ride their bikes here.”

    And then comes the punch line:
    ‘Two words that kept coming up repeatedly in my interviews were “erasure” and “privilege.” ‘

    White people are erasing the POC immigrants who are displacing them.

    http://www.portlandmercury.com/feature/2017/08/23/19263182/how-portland-is-driving-away-new-residents-of-color

  247. @candid_observer

    SAYRAFIEZADEH
     
    Damn it, man, have you even looked at your name?

    Doesn't exactly flow off your tongue like "Smith", does it?

    Just use the mnemonic phrase:

    Say: “Rafie”, Zadeh.

  248. @scrivener3
    One of my schoolmates was named Lewis Wiener. I once asked him if he ever thought of changing his name to avoid the teasing. He said: "My father was a better man than I am. I am proud to have his name."

    That's a better attitude.

    Yeah, but not if your father’s first name is Anthony.

  249. @Forbes
    As regards a name for this...I've always referred to it as a pity party.

    Who hasn't had their name made fun of while growing up? Or the shirt they were wearing? Or one's haircut? Or, you name it ___ ? It's called a rite of passage for a child, an adolescent--learning to toughen up and grow some thick skin (some balls) as against the cruel world, which will do more than make fun of your name. There are plenty more games in life like that you'll have no chance of winning.

    An adult so clueless as to write such drivel is embarrassing.

    But definitely a professional victim and member of the grievance class...

    I have the most common last name in the English language. Smith. How could anyone make fun of that? Well, here’s how: Smith became “Smitty”. And “Smitty” became “Shitty”. Now, most people called me Smitty but I did get the occasional Shitty thrown at me. So my point is, no one is safe!

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    From Henry A Shute's Real Diary of a Real Boy, @: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5111/5111-h/5111-h.htm

    May 5, 186- Saw a bully fite today. Cris Staples and Charlie Clark. Charlie is visiting his uncle J. Albert Clark, the feller that we sassed. that is he said we did but we dident. Charlie is a city feller, he lives in Chelsy and think he knows a pile about things and gets mad if we call him names. now every feller who amounts to anything has a nickname, and some of them have 2 or 3. my nicknames are Plupy and Skinny and Polelegs, and Beany is called Bullethead and sometimes Fatty. i told Charlie that if i called him Charlie the fellers would call him sissy or Mary and he better agree to let me call him bulldog or tomcat or diddly or gobbler or some nickname whitch wood mean something. but he said he would lam the head off of enny feller which called him names. well you jest see what trouble he got into for not having a nickname. he would have knowed better than that if he hadent lived in Chelsy.
    Well today me and Charlie was setting on his steps. Beany was mad because i was going with Charlie and he had gone riding with his father and he felt pretty big because his father let him drive. well while we were setting there along came Cris Staples who carries papers for Lane and Rollins store, and Cris hollered over, hullo Polelegs. Charlie hadent heard enyone call me Polelegs. and i said, i woodent stand that if i was you Charlie, now less see you lam the head off of him, and Charlie he started across the road and walked up to Cris and said who in time are you calling Polelegs and Cris wasent going to back down and said, you, and Charlie said jest drop them papers and i will nock your face rite off, and Cris dropped his papers and they went at it. it was the best fite i have seen this year. they fit from Mr. Head's down to Gim Ellisons corner, and Cris licked time out of Charlie, and Charlie began to yell and give up and then Cris let go of his hair and told him he was to smart, and that it was me he was calling Polelegs and not him, and he better not be so smart another time, and Cris he picked up his papers and went off with a great slit in his jacket and his necktie way round on one side, and Charlie came home howling and Aunt Clark, Charlie's grandmother came out and said, that is what you get Charlie for quareling. see how much better Harry feels, and i said, yes mam. Charlie is never going to speak to me again.
    May 7. Beany was pretty mad when I told him about the fite because he dident see it. i gess he will find it don't pay to get mad with me. i saw Charlie today but he dident speak. he has got a black eye. Cris has got a funny looking nose on one side.
     
  250. @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    I used to work with a registered nurse named “Dong”. He went by Eric but even I, a 40-something grown adult man, couldn’t help but snicker to myself every time I saw his name in print. We’re only human, Yan Shen.

  251. @cthulhu
    "History of the Eagles" is on Netflix, and I think it's available to rent from iTunes as well. Don't know about Amazon Prime.

    The bit about Don Felder is like this: he continually felt disrespected because he didn't get to sing lead and his songs were often passed over for recording, a famous exception being Hotel California, which started life as a Felder demo called "Mexican Reggae"; Henley and Frey added the lyrics and rearranged it a bit but the basic song structure, chord progression, rhythm, etc is Felder's. Felder's attitude got worse after Henley did the vocal on a second Felder-originated tune from the "Hotel California" album, "Victim of Love", after Felder thought the vocal had been promised to him. This "not getting my due as songwriter or singer" continued to grind Felder's gears even after the "Hell Freezes Over" reunion, and led to Felder being kicked out permanently.

    I call Felder astoundingly clueless because he was making good money as an Eagles member (although Henley and Frey made the lion's share, the rest have done very well for themselves, especially with the tours over the last 20 years), and...he threw it all away because he didn't get to sing lead and didn't get to write as much as he wanted. That's what the time between tours is for, dumb-ass!! Make some solo records! He was playing big arenas as one of the two lead guitarists for one of the biggest bands ever, and he bailed because he wasn't getting to sing lead? Say what you will about the Eagles, but as a vocal act, they - especially the original lineup of Henley, Frey, Leadon, and Meisner - sang as well as any band of the era, and Felder just wasn't that good. Is that really worth throwing away fuck-you money? Like I said, world-class clueless...

    Okay, but Felder did write the group their most famous song, so maybe he did have a complaint of sorts.

  252. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Flip
    "Stubborn Dutchman" (from Deutschland not Holland) is heard in St. Louis

    In St. Louis, they can tell a Dutchman from a German pretty well.

    Germans are not _especially_ stubborn, but the Dutch quite often are. I have noticed this myself.

    The Dutch still harbor a grievance against the Germans and will harass or misdirect German tourists if given a chance to this day on occasion.

    The Dutch, however, are better than the Germans-and everyone else-in their mastery of foreign languages and in some types of craftsmanship, such as marine engineering.

    • Replies: @Flip
    "Dutch" used to be used for "German" in expressions like the "damned Dutch" referring to German immigrant soldiers in the Union Army during the Civil War, and the "scrubby Dutch" referring to German housewives who scrubbed their sidewalks.
  253. @syonredux

    Wasn’t dumb always attached to the word Swede in Minn 100 years ago?
     
    Yeah, the "dumb Swede" stereotype. Note how you don't hear that one anymore. Why? Because stereotypes reflect reality. Once people figured out that Swedes (after mastering English) had plenty on the ball, the stereotype swiftly vanished. Cf how views on Japanese products changed in the '70s. Once the Japanese stopped making crappy stuff, you stopped hearing about "Jap crap."

    Swedes (and their cousins, the Danes and the Norskies) have done well, both in the old country and in North America, although a penchant for cultural suicide is now coming to the fore. The sing-song nature of Scandinavian languages, and the accents of Scandinavians speaking English contribute to the “dumb squarehead” meme. Overall, in “Boy Named Sue ” fashion, my dad got pretty good with his fists as a result of the taunting! Wearing glasses as a 4th grader didn’t help either.

    In the Walter Hill movie “The Long Riders”, Randy Quaid’s dying words, after the gang is shot up by a bunch of Swedish farmers on the Main Street (or should that be mean street!) of Northfield, were “goddamn square heads!”.

  254. @Anonymous
    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don't know as she was "hot". Her figure was not great: she had a unimpressive rear, that's for sure. Emmylou Harris actually had a better body, she just never showed it off. Facewise she was not unattractive, but not especially appealing either. And she aged poorly.

    Does anyone else remember Glenn Frey in "Wiseguy"?

    About 15 years ago I hiking in Topanga Canyon State Park and was privileged to cross paths with an extraordinarily beautiful woman with waist length grey hair.

    It was Emmy Lou Harris.

    • Replies: @Corn
    When my mother and other women I know state that older women should not have long hair, I reply by dropping the name of Emmylou Harris.
    , @Mr. Anon
    She got better looking with age. That happens with some women - Hillary Clinton being a notable example.
    , @dr kill
    Ronstadt, Nice. Harris, way over rated. Can no one remember Joni Mitchell?
  255. @Anonymous
    In St. Louis, they can tell a Dutchman from a German pretty well.


    Germans are not _especially_ stubborn, but the Dutch quite often are. I have noticed this myself.

    The Dutch still harbor a grievance against the Germans and will harass or misdirect German tourists if given a chance to this day on occasion.

    The Dutch, however, are better than the Germans-and everyone else-in their mastery of foreign languages and in some types of craftsmanship, such as marine engineering.

    “Dutch” used to be used for “German” in expressions like the “damned Dutch” referring to German immigrant soldiers in the Union Army during the Civil War, and the “scrubby Dutch” referring to German housewives who scrubbed their sidewalks.

  256. Emmy Lou Harris. Daniel Lanois. 1995 Wrecking Ball album. Cajun Navy sets sail by pickup to help out Texas after flood. Steve Sailer connects it all; if you got the mind to follow the moving parts.

  257. @Steve Sailer
    About 15 years ago I hiking in Topanga Canyon State Park and was privileged to cross paths with an extraordinarily beautiful woman with waist length grey hair.

    It was Emmy Lou Harris.

    When my mother and other women I know state that older women should not have long hair, I reply by dropping the name of Emmylou Harris.

  258. @Anonymous
    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don't know as she was "hot". Her figure was not great: she had a unimpressive rear, that's for sure. Emmylou Harris actually had a better body, she just never showed it off. Facewise she was not unattractive, but not especially appealing either. And she aged poorly.

    Does anyone else remember Glenn Frey in "Wiseguy"?

    Ronstadt was a great singer, perhaps the best female pop singer of her generation, but I don’t know as she was “hot”.

    She wasn’t for you. She was for others. It’s not like such standards are absolute and universal.

  259. @Steve Sailer
    About 15 years ago I hiking in Topanga Canyon State Park and was privileged to cross paths with an extraordinarily beautiful woman with waist length grey hair.

    It was Emmy Lou Harris.

    She got better looking with age. That happens with some women – Hillary Clinton being a notable example.

  260. @Forbes
    In the interview posted above at #34, it's stated that Said's father left when Said was 9 months of age. How can he possibly have been raised by his father...

    I think that's called propaganda.

    Yes, it is. I was primarily interested in how both his mother and uncle changed their names to Harris.

  261. @Desiderius
    Vice signaling.

    Or “victim signaling”.

  262. @Johan Schmidt
    I skimmed over the given name and thought the author was female from that excerpt.

    I too thought he was a woman at first.

    It wasn’t so much the name as the tone.

    Whine, whine, whine. Someone couldn’t pronounce his name decades ago. That’s a major tragedy.

    Perhaps his parents might have considered changing the spelling to make it more phonetic. I know, I’m a BadThinker.

    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    A REAL girl would have corrected the grown-up each time, with increasing eyerolls and disdain.
    As for a REAL boy, heres an excerpt from Henry Shute's Real Diary of a Real Boy:

    May 5, 186- Saw a bully fite today. Cris
    Staples and Charlie Clark. Charlie is vis
    iting his uncle J. Albert Clark, the feller
    that we sassed. that is he said we did but
    we dident. Charlie is a city feller, he lives
    in Chelsy and thinks he knows a pile about
    things and gets mad if we call him names,
    now every feller who amounts to anything
    has a nickname, and some of them have 2
    or 3. my nicknames are Plupy and Skinny
    and Polelegs, and Beany is called Bullet-
    head and sometimes Fatty, i told Charlie
    that if i called him Charlie the fellers would
    call him sissy or Mary and he better agree
    74

    Of si Real Boy

    to let me call him bulldog or tomcat or
    diddly or gobbler or some nickname whitch
    wood mean something, but he said he would
    lam the head off of enny feller which called
    him names.

    well you jest see what trouble he got into
    for not having a nickname, he would have
    knowed better than that if he hadent lived
    in Chelsy. ,

    Well today me and Charlie was setting on
    his steps. Beany was mad because i was
    going with Charlie and he had gone riding
    with his father, and he felt pretty big be
    cause his father let him drive, well while
    we were setting there along came Cris
    Staples who carries papers for Lane and
    Rollins store, and Cris hollered over, hullo
    Polelegs. Charlie hadent heard enyone call
    me Polelegs. and i said, i woodent stand that

    75

    The Real Diary

    if i was you Charlie, now less see you lam
    the head off of him, and Charlie he started
    across the road and walked up to Cris and
    said who in time are you calling Polelegs
    and Cris wasent going to back down and
    said, you, and Charlie said jest drop them
    papers and i will nock your face rite off,
    and Cris dropped his papers and they went
    at it. it was the best fite i have seen this
    year, they fit from Mr. Head's down to Gim
    Ellisons corner, and Cris licked time out of
    Charlie, and Charlie began to yell and give
    up and then Cris let go of his hair and told
    him he was too smart, and that it was me
    he was calling Polelegs and not him, and he
    better not be as smart another time, and Cris
    he picked up his papers and went off with a
    great slit in his jacket and his necktie way
    round on one side, and Charlie came home
    76

    Of a Real Boy

    howling and Aunt Clark, Charlie's grand
    mother came out and said, that is what you
    get Charlie for quareling. see how much
    better Harry feels, and i said, yes mam.
    Charlie is never going to speak to me
    again.

    May 7. Beany was pretty mad when I
    told him about the fite becaus he dident see
    it. i gess he will find it don't pay to get
    mad with me. i saw Charlie today but he
    dident speak, he has got a black eye. Cris
    has got a funny looking nose on one side.
     

  263. @Frau Katze
    I too thought he was a woman at first.

    It wasn't so much the name as the tone.

    Whine, whine, whine. Someone couldn't pronounce his name decades ago. That's a major tragedy.

    Perhaps his parents might have considered changing the spelling to make it more phonetic. I know, I'm a BadThinker.

    A REAL girl would have corrected the grown-up each time, with increasing eyerolls and disdain.
    As for a REAL boy, heres an excerpt from Henry Shute’s Real Diary of a Real Boy:

    May 5, 186- Saw a bully fite today. Cris
    Staples and Charlie Clark. Charlie is vis
    iting his uncle J. Albert Clark, the feller
    that we sassed. that is he said we did but
    we dident. Charlie is a city feller, he lives
    in Chelsy and thinks he knows a pile about
    things and gets mad if we call him names,
    now every feller who amounts to anything
    has a nickname, and some of them have 2
    or 3. my nicknames are Plupy and Skinny
    and Polelegs, and Beany is called Bullet-
    head and sometimes Fatty, i told Charlie
    that if i called him Charlie the fellers would
    call him sissy or Mary and he better agree
    74

    Of si Real Boy

    to let me call him bulldog or tomcat or
    diddly or gobbler or some nickname whitch
    wood mean something, but he said he would
    lam the head off of enny feller which called
    him names.

    well you jest see what trouble he got into
    for not having a nickname, he would have
    knowed better than that if he hadent lived
    in Chelsy. ,

    Well today me and Charlie was setting on
    his steps. Beany was mad because i was
    going with Charlie and he had gone riding
    with his father, and he felt pretty big be
    cause his father let him drive, well while
    we were setting there along came Cris
    Staples who carries papers for Lane and
    Rollins store, and Cris hollered over, hullo
    Polelegs. Charlie hadent heard enyone call
    me Polelegs. and i said, i woodent stand that

    75

    The Real Diary

    if i was you Charlie, now less see you lam
    the head off of him, and Charlie he started
    across the road and walked up to Cris and
    said who in time are you calling Polelegs
    and Cris wasent going to back down and
    said, you, and Charlie said jest drop them
    papers and i will nock your face rite off,
    and Cris dropped his papers and they went
    at it. it was the best fite i have seen this
    year, they fit from Mr. Head’s down to Gim
    Ellisons corner, and Cris licked time out of
    Charlie, and Charlie began to yell and give
    up and then Cris let go of his hair and told
    him he was too smart, and that it was me
    he was calling Polelegs and not him, and he
    better not be as smart another time, and Cris
    he picked up his papers and went off with a
    great slit in his jacket and his necktie way
    round on one side, and Charlie came home
    76

    Of a Real Boy

    howling and Aunt Clark, Charlie’s grand
    mother came out and said, that is what you
    get Charlie for quareling. see how much
    better Harry feels, and i said, yes mam.
    Charlie is never going to speak to me
    again.

    May 7. Beany was pretty mad when I
    told him about the fite becaus he dident see
    it. i gess he will find it don’t pay to get
    mad with me. i saw Charlie today but he
    dident speak, he has got a black eye. Cris
    has got a funny looking nose on one side.

  264. @Malcolm X-Lax
    I have the most common last name in the English language. Smith. How could anyone make fun of that? Well, here's how: Smith became "Smitty". And "Smitty" became "Shitty". Now, most people called me Smitty but I did get the occasional Shitty thrown at me. So my point is, no one is safe!

    From Henry A Shute’s Real Diary of a Real Boy, @: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5111/5111-h/5111-h.htm

    May 5, 186- Saw a bully fite today. Cris Staples and Charlie Clark. Charlie is visiting his uncle J. Albert Clark, the feller that we sassed. that is he said we did but we dident. Charlie is a city feller, he lives in Chelsy and think he knows a pile about things and gets mad if we call him names. now every feller who amounts to anything has a nickname, and some of them have 2 or 3. my nicknames are Plupy and Skinny and Polelegs, and Beany is called Bullethead and sometimes Fatty. i told Charlie that if i called him Charlie the fellers would call him sissy or Mary and he better agree to let me call him bulldog or tomcat or diddly or gobbler or some nickname whitch wood mean something. but he said he would lam the head off of enny feller which called him names. well you jest see what trouble he got into for not having a nickname. he would have knowed better than that if he hadent lived in Chelsy.
    Well today me and Charlie was setting on his steps. Beany was mad because i was going with Charlie and he had gone riding with his father and he felt pretty big because his father let him drive. well while we were setting there along came Cris Staples who carries papers for Lane and Rollins store, and Cris hollered over, hullo Polelegs. Charlie hadent heard enyone call me Polelegs. and i said, i woodent stand that if i was you Charlie, now less see you lam the head off of him, and Charlie he started across the road and walked up to Cris and said who in time are you calling Polelegs and Cris wasent going to back down and said, you, and Charlie said jest drop them papers and i will nock your face rite off, and Cris dropped his papers and they went at it. it was the best fite i have seen this year. they fit from Mr. Head’s down to Gim Ellisons corner, and Cris licked time out of Charlie, and Charlie began to yell and give up and then Cris let go of his hair and told him he was to smart, and that it was me he was calling Polelegs and not him, and he better not be so smart another time, and Cris he picked up his papers and went off with a great slit in his jacket and his necktie way round on one side, and Charlie came home howling and Aunt Clark, Charlie’s grandmother came out and said, that is what you get Charlie for quareling. see how much better Harry feels, and i said, yes mam. Charlie is never going to speak to me again.
    May 7. Beany was pretty mad when I told him about the fite because he dident see it. i gess he will find it don’t pay to get mad with me. i saw Charlie today but he dident speak. he has got a black eye. Cris has got a funny looking nose on one side.

  265. @Autochthon
    Assessor Johnson, eh? It could be (much) worse.

    I just noticed I got autocorrected on that one. Actually, it was Asswhipe Johnson.

  266. @Steve Sailer
    Kamala Harris came to understand the fundamental essence of the politician's trade while studying under Willie Brown.

    Whoa, Steve!

    I see what you did there.

  267. @Flip
    I haven't heard any Polish jokes for thirty years...

    Q: Why did the Polack cross the road?
    A: He couldn’t get his dick out of the chicken.

    • LOL: Jim Don Bob, MEH 0910
  268. @Steve Sailer
    About 15 years ago I hiking in Topanga Canyon State Park and was privileged to cross paths with an extraordinarily beautiful woman with waist length grey hair.

    It was Emmy Lou Harris.

    Ronstadt, Nice. Harris, way over rated. Can no one remember Joni Mitchell?

  269. Am I the only one to get this or is the allusion to Keats’ Ode (the Biblical Ruth, standing “in tears amid the alien corn”) just too obvious for anyone to remark upon?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks. I couldn't pull that one up from my memory, but that's what reminded me of Milton's Samson being "eyeless in Gaza."
    , @Desiderius
    The contrast with Ruth's behavior couldn't be more stark.

    "And Ruth said, Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me."

    Ruth, immigrant from Moab, ended up great-grandmother of King David.
    , @rbbarnet
    I have just quoted Keat's lines on Ruth but this the source and it is beautiful too.
  270. @Michael Soeren
    Am I the only one to get this or is the allusion to Keats' Ode (the Biblical Ruth, standing "in tears amid the alien corn") just too obvious for anyone to remark upon?

    Thanks. I couldn’t pull that one up from my memory, but that’s what reminded me of Milton’s Samson being “eyeless in Gaza.”

  271. @Yan Shen
    Honestly this guy misses the reality of things. Not that I'm particularly big on whining about past grievances, but it seems to me that Asian Americans are generally the biggest victims of this sort of thing and the culprits are just as likely to be white, black, or Hispanic.

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I've experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him. Probably not that many Yan Shens in his home country of Russia.

    I haven't heard Asians in this country or elsewhere really mock another language though, whether it's English or Spanish or whatever. So it seems to me that rather than describe this phenomenon as being a white American thing, it's probably more appropriate to describe it as a non-Asian thing. As Chris Rock aptly proved at the Oscars, blacks are just as willing to mock Asians as whites or anyone else non-Asian in this country are!

    Studies generally tend to show that Asian Americans are more likely to be bullied than members of other ethnic groups in this country. Growing up, I’ve experienced black, white, and Hispanics all mocking the Chinese language or more specifically my name, i.e. think of the corny ching chong jokes that you always hear. I mean even uh longtime commenter Svigor here for some strange reason referred to me as Yan Shit or Kato for the better part of a year. I guess the name Yan Shen was just that incredibly hilarious to him.

    No, it’s that your old “cognitive elitism” shtick was disingenuous and quickly grew tiresome. If smart whites want to pursue cognitive elitism, the pool of smart whites is deep enough that we have no need for smart Hans.

  272. @Alden
    Another Jewish lie.

    Stuyvesant DID let Jews settle in New Amsterdam. All he demanded was that they establish their own cemetery and charity / welfare system which they were happy to do as it was Jewish custom wherever Jews lived.

    Why the separate system? In those days every little parish church had a cemetery attached. The cemetery was for the parishioners who paid the expenses.

    All charity came through the churches.
    All over Europe and MENA religious organizations administered charity to their own, Jews as well as the numerous Christian sects.

    Jews fit very well into this system as it kept "the people that shall live alone" away from non Jewish influence.

    Stuyvestant let the Jews in.

    He didn't keep them out as all the colonies except for Maryland and Pennsylvania kept *Catholics out. It was a crime to be a Catholic in the other colonies until after the revolution.

    The Jews of New Amsterdam would have set up their own religious synagogue, school, charity and cemetery as they did in every town they ever settled in.
    * Except for Catholic Irish and Scots slaves and deported rebels.

    Stuyvesant did not want to let the Jews in. The management of the Dutch West India Company wrote to him and told him that he had to because the Company had important Jewish shareholders whom the did not want to piss off. However, they did not let the Jews open a synagogue. They did not get a permission to build a building until 1730, long after the Dutch were gone. They did establish a cemetery though.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=0Bu5GnLZCw0C&pg=PA452&dq=jews+in+the+modern+world+petition+to+expel&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjWuZX_wvvVAhXC54MKHZGDCXIQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&q=jews%20in%20the%20modern%20world%20petition%20to%20expel&f=false

  273. @Alden
    Another Jewish lie.

    Stuyvesant DID let Jews settle in New Amsterdam. All he demanded was that they establish their own cemetery and charity / welfare system which they were happy to do as it was Jewish custom wherever Jews lived.

    Why the separate system? In those days every little parish church had a cemetery attached. The cemetery was for the parishioners who paid the expenses.

    All charity came through the churches.
    All over Europe and MENA religious organizations administered charity to their own, Jews as well as the numerous Christian sects.

    Jews fit very well into this system as it kept "the people that shall live alone" away from non Jewish influence.

    Stuyvestant let the Jews in.

    He didn't keep them out as all the colonies except for Maryland and Pennsylvania kept *Catholics out. It was a crime to be a Catholic in the other colonies until after the revolution.

    The Jews of New Amsterdam would have set up their own religious synagogue, school, charity and cemetery as they did in every town they ever settled in.
    * Except for Catholic Irish and Scots slaves and deported rebels.

    The Company’s reply is on the next page.

    The reply sounds insincere to me. “We would have liked to help you out… but” The kind of thing that you say to someone to soften the bad news. By the time they get to the end of the letter they end with a no nonsense “you will now govern yourself accordingly” – i.e. don’t even think of disobeying our orders.

  274. @Michael Soeren
    Am I the only one to get this or is the allusion to Keats' Ode (the Biblical Ruth, standing "in tears amid the alien corn") just too obvious for anyone to remark upon?

    The contrast with Ruth’s behavior couldn’t be more stark.

    “And Ruth said, Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more also, if ought but death part thee and me.”

    Ruth, immigrant from Moab, ended up great-grandmother of King David.

  275. Harris, way over rated.

    Can’t stand her tinny voice. Sounds like amateur country music to me.

    Can no one remember Joni Mitchell?

    I disliked her music when it first came out, but it has grown on me. Same thing with early Elton John. Both very talented.

  276. Remembering My Mother’s Obsession
    By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh January 29, 2014 9:30 pm

    Of all the troubling events from my childhood, one of the most enduring remains the afternoon I visited a prisoner serving a life sentence for murder. It was 1978 and I was 9 years old, escorted to Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh by my mother, who, compelled by a lifelong objective of raising her son’s awareness of injustice in the world, no doubt considered this to be a well-suited occasion.

    The injustice, in this particular instance, was the framing of a 21-year-old black man named Stanton Story for the killing of a white Pittsburgh police officer. At the time of our visit, three years had passed since Mr. Story’s trial, in which, despite having apparently been in North Carolina on the day of the shooting, he was found guilty by an all-white jury and sentenced to die in the electric chair. Almost three years later, however, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court granted Mr. Story a new trial (on the grounds that prejudicial evidence had been introduced at the first one) and, having recently declared the death penalty unconstitutional, set aside his death sentence. It was during the run-up to this second trial that the Socialist Workers Party, of which my mother was a dedicated member, began advocating on Mr. Story’s behalf.

    [MORE]

    At the new trial, Mr. Story was again found guilty by an all-white jury, and since the death penalty had been reinstated, sentenced a second time to the electric chair — a sentence that on appeal would once more be reduced to life in prison. My mother, mercifully, spared me the details, informing me only that he had “lost.” What are we going to do now, I remember asking, because surely, given Mr. Story’s innocence, and given my mother’s unflagging determination, there was always something more to be done. But no, my mother said, this was it, there was nothing else we could do. So after that, we never mentioned his name again.

    But I never forgot him. Over the years, that final image of Mr. Story, looking back at us, would pop into my head at the most inopportune moments. Here I am playing basketball, I would think, and Stanton Story is still in prison. Here I am sitting on my new couch from Crate and Barrel, and Stanton Story is still in prison. Thus my mother’s goal to raise my awareness of injustice in the world had been achieved. Achieved so effectively, in fact, that 30 years after that visit it occurred to me that I could contact Mr. Story, perhaps hear his account of the injustice done to him and, as with other wrongful convictions, help free him. If this sounds like a childish thought, that’s because it is.

    In the meantime, I began to research his case. One of the first websites that I came across, though, was a memorial for slain police officers, which had dedicated a page to Patrick Wallace, the officer who had allegedly been killed by Mr. Story. Up to this point, I had never given much thought to Mr. Wallace. In fact, I had never given any thought to him. It occurred to me as I read that not only did I know very little about Mr. Wallace, but I also knew very little about any of the details of the case.

    I soon discovered some troubling things. I learned, for instance, that at his second trial, Mr. Story admitted he had lied about his alibi of being in North Carolina. He had been in Pittsburgh, at the scene of the shooting, but he insisted that it was his companion, a man named Richard Davis, who had fired the fatal shot. Moreover, I found that he had a long history with crime, beginning as a teenager. When he was 21, he was convicted on multiple counts of armed robbery and sent to Western Penitentiary. In prison, his behavior was so exemplary that he was granted a three-day furlough, but during those three days he robbed two banks and fled to North Carolina. A month later he returned to Pittsburgh, where he may or may not have shot and killed Patrick Wallace.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Lots of people adopted pet prisoners for exoneration in the 1960s/1970s: WF Buckley, Norman Mailer, and William Styron each had their own, and each prisoner committed a similar crime soon after getting released.

    It's a less common hobby now.

    A young lawyer I know recently got an apparently innocent man out of prison on a dubious murder conviction. Hopefully he won't now kill somebody! But, anyway, the unjustly convicted man in this case was extremely colorless, while the Buckley/Mailer/Stryon type prisoners tended to be brilliant sociopaths. So maybe that's a lesson: there are still unjustly convicted prisoners out there for crusaders to help, but they tend to be kind of boring individuals.

  277. @MEH 0910
    Remembering My Mother’s Obsession
    By Saïd Sayrafiezadeh January 29, 2014 9:30 pm

    Of all the troubling events from my childhood, one of the most enduring remains the afternoon I visited a prisoner serving a life sentence for murder. It was 1978 and I was 9 years old, escorted to Western Penitentiary in Pittsburgh by my mother, who, compelled by a lifelong objective of raising her son’s awareness of injustice in the world, no doubt considered this to be a well-suited occasion.

    The injustice, in this particular instance, was the framing of a 21-year-old black man named Stanton Story for the killing of a white Pittsburgh police officer. At the time of our visit, three years had passed since Mr. Story’s trial, in which, despite having apparently been in North Carolina on the day of the shooting, he was found guilty by an all-white jury and sentenced to die in the electric chair. Almost three years later, however, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court granted Mr. Story a new trial (on the grounds that prejudicial evidence had been introduced at the first one) and, having recently declared the death penalty unconstitutional, set aside his death sentence. It was during the run-up to this second trial that the Socialist Workers Party, of which my mother was a dedicated member, began advocating on Mr. Story’s behalf.
     

    At the new trial, Mr. Story was again found guilty by an all-white jury, and since the death penalty had been reinstated, sentenced a second time to the electric chair — a sentence that on appeal would once more be reduced to life in prison. My mother, mercifully, spared me the details, informing me only that he had “lost.” What are we going to do now, I remember asking, because surely, given Mr. Story’s innocence, and given my mother’s unflagging determination, there was always something more to be done. But no, my mother said, this was it, there was nothing else we could do. So after that, we never mentioned his name again.

    But I never forgot him. Over the years, that final image of Mr. Story, looking back at us, would pop into my head at the most inopportune moments. Here I am playing basketball, I would think, and Stanton Story is still in prison. Here I am sitting on my new couch from Crate and Barrel, and Stanton Story is still in prison. Thus my mother’s goal to raise my awareness of injustice in the world had been achieved. Achieved so effectively, in fact, that 30 years after that visit it occurred to me that I could contact Mr. Story, perhaps hear his account of the injustice done to him and, as with other wrongful convictions, help free him. If this sounds like a childish thought, that’s because it is.
     

    In the meantime, I began to research his case. One of the first websites that I came across, though, was a memorial for slain police officers, which had dedicated a page to Patrick Wallace, the officer who had allegedly been killed by Mr. Story. Up to this point, I had never given much thought to Mr. Wallace. In fact, I had never given any thought to him. It occurred to me as I read that not only did I know very little about Mr. Wallace, but I also knew very little about any of the details of the case.

    I soon discovered some troubling things. I learned, for instance, that at his second trial, Mr. Story admitted he had lied about his alibi of being in North Carolina. He had been in Pittsburgh, at the scene of the shooting, but he insisted that it was his companion, a man named Richard Davis, who had fired the fatal shot. Moreover, I found that he had a long history with crime, beginning as a teenager. When he was 21, he was convicted on multiple counts of armed robbery and sent to Western Penitentiary. In prison, his behavior was so exemplary that he was granted a three-day furlough, but during those three days he robbed two banks and fled to North Carolina. A month later he returned to Pittsburgh, where he may or may not have shot and killed Patrick Wallace.
     

    Lots of people adopted pet prisoners for exoneration in the 1960s/1970s: WF Buckley, Norman Mailer, and William Styron each had their own, and each prisoner committed a similar crime soon after getting released.

    It’s a less common hobby now.

    A young lawyer I know recently got an apparently innocent man out of prison on a dubious murder conviction. Hopefully he won’t now kill somebody! But, anyway, the unjustly convicted man in this case was extremely colorless, while the Buckley/Mailer/Stryon type prisoners tended to be brilliant sociopaths. So maybe that’s a lesson: there are still unjustly convicted prisoners out there for crusaders to help, but they tend to be kind of boring individuals.

  278. @Grumpy
    "among the farmland"

    Let's just call it bad writing.

    It has been put better:

    Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home,
    She stood in tears amid the alien corn.

    Keats Ode to a nightingale.

  279. @Michael Soeren
    Am I the only one to get this or is the allusion to Keats' Ode (the Biblical Ruth, standing "in tears amid the alien corn") just too obvious for anyone to remark upon?

    I have just quoted Keat’s lines on Ruth but this the source and it is beautiful too.

  280. Icch freue mch vvon Ihnen zu hören!

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