The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
What Apple Has Been Up to Since Steve Jobs Died

Apple hasn’t had too many knockout new products in this decade, but, then, they’ve been busy, building a $5 billion headquarters for themselves in Cupertino, CA in fulfillment of Jobs’ last vision. Steven Levy takes the tour of the nearly completed circular main building in Wired.

It’s kind of a Hank Scorpio campus as in a 1970s sci-fi movie filmed at Malibu Creek:

Though he always professed to loathe nostalgia, Jobs based many of his ideas on his favorite features of the Bay Area of his youth. “His briefing was all about California—his idealized California,” says Stefan Behling, a Foster partner who became one of the project leads. The site Apple had bought was an industrial park, largely covered by asphalt, but Jobs envisioned hilly terrain, with sluices of walking paths. He again turned to Stanford for inspiration by evoking the Dish, a popular hiking area near the campus where rolling hills shelter a radio telescope.

My impression is that a fair number of billionaires, such as Jobs, are homeboys who really like where they grew up. Jobs insisted on planting orchards on the campus like Silicon Valley had when he was a lad.

One interesting thing is that it sounds like they’re taking a next step that I’ve long expected: designer parking garages. It’s striking that when you visit zillion dollar projects like the Getty Center Museum in Sepulveda Pass, which even has its own monorail, you still wind up parking in a claustrophobic, ominous garage like everywhere else. But not at Apple HQ:

During my tour, when we pass through an aboveground parking garage, [Sir Jonny] Ive quivers with enthusiasm as he describes what we’re seeing. He points out how smooth the edges are on the concrete beams and how carefully molded the curves are at the rectangular building’s corners, like perfectly formed round-rects on a dialog box. Further­more, infrastructure like water pipes and electrical conduits is hidden in the beams, so the whole thing doesn’t look like a basement. “It’s not that we’re using expensive concrete,” Ive says, defining what he calls the transformative nature of this parking garage.

Why not use expensive concrete in the parking garages of a $5 billion project? Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

“It’s the care and development of a design idea and then being resolute—no, we’re not going to just do the easy, least-path-of-resistance sort of standardized form work.”

One of Parkinson’s Laws is that:

“During a period of exciting discovery or progress there is no time to plan the perfect headquarters. The time for that comes later, when all the important work has been done. Perfection, we know, is finality; and finality is death.”

But Apple has surprised me before, so …

 
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
[]
  1. It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    The least you can say of California is that Bill Gates isn't from it.
    , @Anonymous
    He died of a wasting disease in the Bay Area. You do the math.
    , @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.
    , @syonredux

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.
     
    Well, we are talking about a specific era:

    Though he always professed to loathe nostalgia, Jobs based many of his ideas on his favorite features of the Bay Area of his youth.
     
    Steve Jobs was born in 1955, so his "youth" would have been from the very late '50s (say, for coherent memories, 1959) to the mid-'70s......

    Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was "hideously White".....
    , @biz
    Have you ever been to California? There are mountains right up against the ocean, enormous canyons backed by painted deserts, and forests of giant trees surrounding crystal blue alpine lakes, all right above vineyards and beaches with a perfect Mediterranean climate. Then, right in the middle of all of that, are two enormous, fascinating, chaotic cities, both built on impossible dreams, fame in one case and boundless innovation in the other, and in each the entire world of cuisine and culture is available at your fingertips.

    As long as you never have to worry about money and never have to commute during rush hour, California is a paradise on Earth, and both of those conditions applied to Steve Jobs.
    , @WJ
    As a former Texan, the appeal to me was the summer weather. Camp Pendleton, between the mountain ranges and the Pacific, has a fantastic cool climate moderated by the sea breeze that would kick up every day around noon, sometimes later, sometimes earlier. Go east of the mountains and you loose the wind and it gets extremely hot. I didnt care for the wet mild winters however. That was probably the big draw for people from the north.

    Of course , the natural geography is stunning also.

    Too many people now

    , @Mr. Anon

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.
     
    It's California. It's a nice place with a fantastic climate.
    , @Steve in Greensboro
    I was born in the same year as Jobs and grew up in the Almaden Valley (due South of San Jose and Southeast of Cupertino). We had the perfect California climate and a view of the lovely, redwood-covered Santa Cruz Mountains. Driving North toward San Jose, we would pass groves of plums, apricots and walnuts and strawberry truck farms.

    Santa Clara County from 1955 to 1972 was a veritable heaven.
    , @Mr Mack Bolan
    I lived there back in the early seventies, in the Monterey bay area.
    One thing that always stuck with me was, after going through Utah and up through the mountains, the sight looking down into the Salinas Valley wa.s amazing. The dusty brown from the other side of mountains turns to many different shades of lush green. It was like another planet with all of the strange plants and insects. Once we got close to the coast, the bumper to bumper traffic, the litter so thick along the roadsides it looks like snow from a distance. The people weren't too kind to their fellow man, if you happen to be looking at someone you get the middle finger instead of hi more often than not. The people take away from the paradise it could be.
    It's been thirty years and I would like to go back, just to see how far it has deteriorated.
    , @Muse
    Have you ever smelled the sweet eucalyptus mingling with the cool breeze as it blows off the Pacific as you head into Santa Cruz, or Capitola? Have you watched the sun set at the Marin Headlands, Stinson Beach or Half Moon Bay? Can you remember biting into the most lucious peach ever while standing in the farmers market in San Fran, picked yesterday from an orchard on the other side of the bay? Have you stood at the base of El Capitan, gazing up as the brilliant light bounces off the granite and forms rainbows in the mist of the waterfalls flowing into the Merced River? Have you ridden a bike down the PCH from Monterrey to Slo-town? If you have done any of these things, I don't know how you can ask this question.

    I know of no place with a more fortuitous confluence of climate, terrain and sheer natural beauty than California. Jobs had a superb aesthetic sense. None of the virtues of california were lost on him. He could see there could beauty in simple typeface, and that each person could have a tiny moment of transcendence if the materials, design and workmanship of an everyday thing like your cell phone gave you a shiver when you touched it. Having the object respond perfectly to your desire, requiring no effort or though on your part as you used it was part of his vision. How could a person like Jobs not appreciate California in the 50s and 60s? Who doesn't yearn for it now?

    Life is short. Beauty is rare and fleeting.
    Carpe Diem.
    , @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    You're asking as if the author of this post would know... A billionaire boy he ain't and therefore he'd be far removed from 'their' thinking all the while dreaming of that exclusive world while wallowing in the mud pits of Unz!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/what-apple-has-been-up-to-since-steve-jobs-died/#comment-1876136
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Yeah, replication crisis and all that, but it does seem to be one of the confirmed truths of experimental psychology that the last stages of an experience weigh much more heavily on our memories than the earlier. (Or is this really just another utterly dubious result?)

    This parking garage idea is actually pretty ingenious, I’d say. I suppose everyone will say it’s obvious in retrospect.

    Read More
  3. There was another WSJ article over the weekend that hinted at that Parkinson’s Law:

    I quoted it here and got a lot of pushback.

    Surprised about the above ground parking. I recall Steve Jobs speaking at the planning or zoning commission, shortly before his death, about how he wanted the parking underground, so there’d be more trees, and how he had hired some silviculture professor from Stanford to select the sort of trees for the site that were there before it got paved over.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    Jobs was no doubt reaching back to the fact that Infinite Loop (the company's road, not the new building) was sited on former orchards. As was Silicon Valley in general. And the population at that time was way majority white.

    When he was growing up and in the Cupertino schools, he would have grown up surrounded by fruit farms and the kind of California Heartland men and women who ran them and worked at them. By then, some of them already for a century. Though someone at Santa Clara U told me that "silicon valley" had been orchards back to the Spanish occupation.

    The last fruit farmer in Sunnyvale was a guy named Charlie Olson. He ran a centennial farm where he grew cherries and apricots and prunes as did his parents and grandparents before him.

    He'd remember and relate how his neighbors got six-figure sums per acre for their land in the era of Arrillaga and Peery. Though I also heard that some of them got way way less than that.

    I imagine Olson must have sold up by now, though he was still holding out in the early '90s. Possibly today is making money as a lessor with guest stints in the LA Times food section/Martha Stewart. Or like the Christopher Ranch people gone into international brokering of their commodity. Actually he's probably old enough to have retired.

    An engineer friend told me stories about the clearing of the orchards from his days at NEC long before the dust-up with Intel regarding the V20/8086 and V30/8088 microprocessors. By Reagan's performance in the White House most of it was gone, but those with suburban or urban woodstoves bought hardwood firewood from the orchard clearcutters/developers or pruners. In the early '90s, when I first had occasion for travel to Cupertino/Apple, you'd still see signs here and there for firewood or fruit.

    The biggest developer of CA orchards into Silicon was John Arrillaga, the furtive real estate billionaire, later FIL of the exceedingly cucky Marc Andreessen.

    Arrillaga started in on this in the 1960s with his Mormon partner, Richard Peery. I was told they had a reputation for gathering intelligence on farmers who were in leveraged or distressed financial situations...then offering them a way out. Many an unrecorded story there. IIRC Arrillaga himself brokered the land deal for Apple's site (and Intel's, and Google's, and Cisco's...).

    Arrillaga pumped hundreds of millions (you read that right) into Stanford; he spent nine figures alone on rebuilding the stadium.

    He and his family and partners are key voices in pushing open borders as part of their FIRE and silicon fiefdom.

  4. I miss these kind of articles at iSteve.

    Any idea why Apple is no longer innovativing? It seems Amazon of all companies has taken the lead in making interesting hardware. I love the Firestick and have bought two of them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Diminishing marginal returns.
    , @anonymous coward
    Real estate is the endgame of all capital. The high-tech gadget venture capital is no exception.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Microsoft seems to become ever more arrogant and insufferable. They now force mandatory updates, necessitated by the many vulnerabilities lodged in their operating system. I could see a lot of computer business shifting to Apple as people get fed up with the Evil Empire headquartered in Redmond. I've decided that my next computer will be a Mac. I know that personal computers are not as big a market as they once were, but still.
  5. You could ask the “why not make it a little nicer” question of all modernist architecture and design, and there’s no answer. They build stuff no one wants to live in or look at, and among other things blame cost. Then the tenants spend ungodly amounts of money drowning it in decoration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    You could ask the “why not make it a little nicer” question of all modernist architecture and design, and there’s no answer.

     

    You said it. Even if a contemporary architect hasn't been fully indoctrinated into the cult of modernism/postmodernism, and thinks he might want to design something beautiful, he's terrified his building will turn out to be merely pretty. And we all know that will not do.
    , @Alfa158
    I haven't been able to verify the apocryphal quote about Le Corbusier who was the supreme master of stark, un-livable, modern architecture: "He liberated architecture from the shackles of habitability" .
    On an old PBS show about architecture the host/critic took the camera crew to one of Le Corbusier's French houses, which consisted of raw concrete rectangular castings with plate glass walls, and the whole thing propped eight feet off the ground on steel posts. There was no narration for the segment, the camera simply moved through and around the house with no spoken commentary.
  6. It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Well in his absence his widow has certainly been working overtime to turn it into Mexico.

    Read More
  7. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    The least you can say of California is that Bill Gates isn’t from it.

    Read More
  8. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    He died of a wasting disease in the Bay Area. You do the math.

    Read More
  9. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Can’t believe you didn’t do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their “civilization” ….. it’s all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It’s a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an “Arab NATO.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    This seems to me to be a North American version of the riots in Germany between competing Turkish factions over the last election. I agree with you--involvement in that area of the world is simply disastrous for the people of Europe and North America.
    , @TelfoedJohn
    Dragging the thread back on topic:
    Jobs (Armenian adoptive mother) once criticised Turkey on their record:

    "What happened to all those Christians, suddenly gone like that? You, Muslims, what did you do to so many Christians? You subjected 1.5 million Armenians to genocide. Tell us, how did it happen?"

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/23/apple-s-armenian-genocide-problem

    , @Diversity Heretic
    Had another thought: maybe Trump could start messing with the Turks' heads by references to Constantinople or even Byzantium, from time to time. Or calling the European portion of Turkey "the land of the Romans," (Rumelia).
    , @Some Economist
    To clarify what is happening there:

    Some Kurdish and/or Armenian protestors are gathered in Sheridan Circle, which is across from the Turkish ambassador's residence (the Embassy is a few blocks down on Mass. Ave.).

    The guys in nice suits crossing the street to kick them in their faces are Erdogan's goons, who forget, momentarily, that they are not in Turkey where they are above the law and civilized conduct. They must have some sort of diplomatic immunity here, but I don't think that even crossed their minds. It was just natural for them.

    The DC police seemed obviously confused about what was happening. I'm assuming most visiting heads of state to not have security detail that go and start attacking people who are protesting from a reasonable distance.
    , @Alfa158
    Could have been worse. Remember the 1984 protest at the Libyan embassy in London? Libyan security guards opened fire on the protesters from inside the embassy. An English policewoman, Yvonne Fletcher, was killed.
  10. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Here’s an idea for an alternate history novel (steal it, by all means):
    Steve Jobs is still alive (saved by some biotech startup, no doubt), wants to be more public-spirited, and so as part of some grand peace deal, he “returns” to his ancestral homeland to replace Assad as President of Syria, which he remakes into a giant Apple campus.
    Come to think of it, isn’t that pretty much the SJW dream?

    Read More
  11. Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn’t worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It’s why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane’s domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn’t have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn’t been born and raised the way he was he would’ve ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Woz has said that Jobs asked him shortly before he died if he'd like to come back to the company in some capacity and Woz said no. He seems pretty happy going out to eat, giving speeches around the world, playing blackjack, etc.
    , @Pericles
    I'm somewhat disappointed Jobs' remains aren't to be found in a sarcophagus, perhaps cryonic, somewhere in the middle of this monument.

    Regarding Woz: Apple did a lot of rather successful stuff after Wozniak left (1985). I don't think he was that indispensable.
    , @Art Deco
    It’s why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, j

    Didn't he leave the company about 35 years ago and retire completely about 30 years ago? While we're at it, hasn't Mr. Wozniak been married about 4 times? Ya think maybe he's not such an easy chap himself?
    , @Rod1963
    Excellent summation of Jobs.


    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does
     
    Spot on. The whole thing of making Jobs a demi-god is rather sickening. The man was indeed talented at aesthetics and marketing, branding etc. But in terms of a human being he was a total a**hole and sociopath. His temper tantrums and acid tongue tirades were legendary in Silicon Valley by the 90's. Jobs went through all the top psychologists in the area to no avail - you can't fix a sociopath with zero social skills intelligence.
    , @Laugh Track

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.
     
    To give Jobs his due — or at least to give his legend its due — it does seem like innovation at Apple came and went with his presence or absence. I was never a great fan of some of those innovations, e.g. doing away with most disk drives, many I/O ports, virtualizing the music industry, increasingly sealing off the Mac from self-upgrading or modifying, and making the Apple universe a self-reinforcing gated community.

    OTOH, the Mac itself, the iPhone, and iPad were all visionary in their ways, and one used to be able to expect a new mind-blowing Apple product every couple of years. Since Job's departure, there's been precious little of that and an almost complete abandonment of support for new Macs (and an accompanying abandonment of the Mac's professional users).

    Jobs may well have been a sociopath, but he was also a genius, and I miss the genius part still being in play.
    , @Wency
    I'm not really an Apple fan, but to give the man his due (or at least explain the popularity):

    1. His is a great story. Help found a great company. Make some mistakes. Get betrayed by your hand-picked man. Get kicked out. Spend some time in the wilderness while fools run it to the ground. Return. Expel the fools. Turn that company into the most valuable one in the world. Then die before your time.

    Though he was a jerk, that just makes him more of a flawed, tragic hero. And he appears to have grown enough not to let those flaws sink him the second time around as they did the first.

    2. The fact that he left, came back, and succeeded is something rare among the founders of the largest companies. He might have gotten lucky the first time, but it's hard to say he got lucky the second. I doubt that Bill Gates, for example, could have ever done anything close to what Jobs did, had Microsoft followed a similar trajectory. He got lucky with MS-DOS, saw the potential to make it the standard for computing, and then simply rode that one success to becoming the richest man in the world.

    Jobs was tested and passed.

    3. Jobs built the world's most valuable company by designing consumer products that many people just plain liked a lot more than the competition. This will take you far in popularity contests compared to companies that become valuable by building B2B products, or by using market power to crush the competition, or by taking advantage of government contracts or some loophole in a system.

  12. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don’t even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70′s and it was paradise once you left LA.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    If only Mulholland hadn't stolen the water from the Owens valley.
    , @Escher
    Steve Jobs grew up in a mass produced house in Mountain View.
    , @Art Deco
    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts.

    Housing developments take up only a single-digit share of available land. The trouble has been that developers and planners created places for automobiles with human cargo, not places for people. (Mark Hinshaw discusses some aspects of this in True Urbanism). This has gone on all over the country.
    , @James Richard
    California is not completely ruined yet. It is after all a very big place. In the Bay Area megalopolis the Berkeley Hills from Castro Valley to El Cerrito are still lovely as they were developed early and are protected on their east side by East Bay Park and Utility District reservoir land. Much of the North Coast and the Sierras are still relatively undeveloped as is the Central Coast from Point Conception to San Francisco where, unlike in Southern California, the Coastal Commission has actually been able to enforce the rules set out in 1972's Proposition 20.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Hills

    , @pepperinmono
    As I posted once before, watch Rockford Files reruns to see how California used to be.
    And how much it has changed .
    It was not that long ago .
    Read VDH's Mexifornia.
    The rapidity of change is literally mind boggling.
  13. anonymous says: • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Frank Lloyd Wright hated garages and loved, loved, loved — and maybe invented — the carport. Which is OK in Los Angeles but sucks in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Okay in Los Angeles?! Ha! You're forgetting that garages keep out criminals
    as well as cold and precipitation. Hell, I'd argue it's more important to have a garage than a carport in L.A. than in most parts of the states you mention.

    In the brief few months since I sold my house my vehicles have been vandalised twice, most recently to the tune of about $8,000.00.

    Carports are okay in Los Angeles! What a card! Buy this guy a drink, somebody, will ya?
    , @Alden
    Cracker box apartment buildings are bad enough but the carports turn them from ugly to hideous. They're ultra hideous when the car ports are in the front right on the street.

    Another horrible Wright innovation was the main entrance of single family homes placed around the side which forced every visitor to come in through the kitchen.

    Another bad thing about those cracker box apartments with car ports is that they get soooo shabby so quickly. Even in ghetto sections the apartments built 120 years ago still look presentable from the street.

    20th century architecture was horrible and 21st century architecture will be worse.
  14. There is correlation between corporations making expensive headquarter buildings and corporations going down. For Apple 5B is pocket change, but still, …

    Read More
  15. It was here at iSteve where I was first made aware of Gangnam Style, so I don’t feel too guilty posting this.

    The music video features the most pristine parking garage I had ever seen. Are the Koreans ahead of Apple on this?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    I prefer the underground car park in Downfall: purring , dazzlingly clean Mercedes' with perfectly tailored drivers wait for Himmler and other Nazi Bonzen to make their leisurely escape from Berlin and the Fuehrer whose birthday they have just celebrated for the last time.
  16. I suspect it has something to with asians taking over the middle ranks of the company.

    Read More
  17. Off-topic,

    The PGT Beauregard statue in New Orleans has been taken down:

    He was Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, the Confederate States of America’s first mega hero, and early Wednesday morning a statue of him astride his horse was removed from its pedestal in New Orleans under the watchful eye of mounted police and police snipers.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/05/17/gen-p-g-t-beauregard-was-a-rebel-hero-now-his-statue-in-new-orleans-is-gone/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Their city was rebuilt under a massive amount of federal largesse after the hurricanes. The next time, they should be left to rot.
    , @Altai
    Beauregard must fall...
  18. @Jean Ralphio
    I miss these kind of articles at iSteve.

    Any idea why Apple is no longer innovativing? It seems Amazon of all companies has taken the lead in making interesting hardware. I love the Firestick and have bought two of them.

    Diminishing marginal returns.

    Read More
  19. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Well, we are talking about a specific era:

    Though he always professed to loathe nostalgia, Jobs based many of his ideas on his favorite features of the Bay Area of his youth.

    Steve Jobs was born in 1955, so his “youth” would have been from the very late ’50s (say, for coherent memories, 1959) to the mid-’70s……

    Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was “hideously White”…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was “hideously White”….."

    Being born in 1955 means Steve Jobs is from The Nice Guys and Boogie Nights era of California. That California was a glorious California.
    , @Autochthon
    He sure helped to fix that problem.
  20. @Anonymous
    Can't believe you didn't do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their "civilization" ..... it's all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It's a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an "Arab NATO."

    This seems to me to be a North American version of the riots in Germany between competing Turkish factions over the last election. I agree with you–involvement in that area of the world is simply disastrous for the people of Europe and North America.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    21 diversity Heretic > This seems to me to be a North American version of the riots in Germany between competing Turkish faction

    the account I saw, said that the beater-up-ees were Armenians; behaving in antifa fashion - throwing bottles.

    The DC cops, of course, didn't even think to shut THAT down.
  21. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    Woz has said that Jobs asked him shortly before he died if he’d like to come back to the company in some capacity and Woz said no. He seems pretty happy going out to eat, giving speeches around the world, playing blackjack, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Eh, if you buy that.

    It could be true that Woz made his money and now wants to goof around instead of running things (he's stated in interviews that when his role at Apple shifted from engineering to management he became unhappy), and certainly his lack of concrete action since supports that.

    But it's more telling that when Jobs and Woz went from creators to managers that Jobs became the arrogant-god-deity-wanna-be and Woz was given a corporate freeze out. Jobs ensconced himself in authority and ruthlessly cut out both bad designs AND anyone who could challenge him, especially after he was brought back to the company when it was on its knees.

    Jobs kept Woz on the payroll at Apple (and still is, apparently, to this day), and probably Woz has developed a few things for them along the way when he's bored. Jobs probably worked really hard to keep Woz from getting in with other companies and paying him off to remain in retirement, while Woz probably looked at Silicon Valley becoming a cutthroat West Coast Wall Street and not a gee-whiz playground and decided being a goofball millionaire inventor was better than corporate slavery and boring fights for absolute power.

  22. @guest
    You could ask the "why not make it a little nicer" question of all modernist architecture and design, and there's no answer. They build stuff no one wants to live in or look at, and among other things blame cost. Then the tenants spend ungodly amounts of money drowning it in decoration.

    You could ask the “why not make it a little nicer” question of all modernist architecture and design, and there’s no answer.

    You said it. Even if a contemporary architect hasn’t been fully indoctrinated into the cult of modernism/postmodernism, and thinks he might want to design something beautiful, he’s terrified his building will turn out to be merely pretty. And we all know that will not do.

    Read More
  23. >>Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

    Gee. I sure hope that smelly immigrant cab drivers don’t urinate in this beautiful parking garage like they do at the parking lots of Kennedy, La Guardia and (presumably) LAX.

    Read More
  24. @Anonymous
    Can't believe you didn't do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their "civilization" ..... it's all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It's a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an "Arab NATO."

    Dragging the thread back on topic:
    Jobs (Armenian adoptive mother) once criticised Turkey on their record:

    “What happened to all those Christians, suddenly gone like that? You, Muslims, what did you do to so many Christians? You subjected 1.5 million Armenians to genocide. Tell us, how did it happen?”

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/04/23/apple-s-armenian-genocide-problem

    Read More
  25. @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.

    If only Mulholland hadn’t stolen the water from the Owens valley.

    Read More
  26. @Dave Pinsen
    Woz has said that Jobs asked him shortly before he died if he'd like to come back to the company in some capacity and Woz said no. He seems pretty happy going out to eat, giving speeches around the world, playing blackjack, etc.

    Eh, if you buy that.

    It could be true that Woz made his money and now wants to goof around instead of running things (he’s stated in interviews that when his role at Apple shifted from engineering to management he became unhappy), and certainly his lack of concrete action since supports that.

    But it’s more telling that when Jobs and Woz went from creators to managers that Jobs became the arrogant-god-deity-wanna-be and Woz was given a corporate freeze out. Jobs ensconced himself in authority and ruthlessly cut out both bad designs AND anyone who could challenge him, especially after he was brought back to the company when it was on its knees.

    Jobs kept Woz on the payroll at Apple (and still is, apparently, to this day), and probably Woz has developed a few things for them along the way when he’s bored. Jobs probably worked really hard to keep Woz from getting in with other companies and paying him off to remain in retirement, while Woz probably looked at Silicon Valley becoming a cutthroat West Coast Wall Street and not a gee-whiz playground and decided being a goofball millionaire inventor was better than corporate slavery and boring fights for absolute power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Man From K Street
    Woz has admitted on a few TWiT podcasts that Apple still cuts him a check every month. I don't think it is so much to keep him in retirement or away from other companies, but more to keep the notion of him representing some kind of corporate history and continuity.

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company's legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.
  27. My 20 year old son has just upgraded his phone – from an Apple Iphone to an Android LG G6.

    He is a complete fashion slave with verging on religions devotion to Apple products. So something’s changed in the Zeitgeist.

    Read More
  28. @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    The PGT Beauregard statue in New Orleans has been taken down:

    He was Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, the Confederate States of America’s first mega hero, and early Wednesday morning a statue of him astride his horse was removed from its pedestal in New Orleans under the watchful eye of mounted police and police snipers.
     
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/05/17/gen-p-g-t-beauregard-was-a-rebel-hero-now-his-statue-in-new-orleans-is-gone/

    Their city was rebuilt under a massive amount of federal largesse after the hurricanes. The next time, they should be left to rot.

    Read More
  29. Lite OT, but still cries for Dr. Sailer’s expertise:

    Jobs’ paternal sperm donor made it here thanks to Celler’s Act of Treason.

    That ended pretty well ; probably because 51% Nurture part somehow tamed 49 % Nature factoring …

    Now, what is really puzzling is how Adam Cohen’s ancestors had ever manage to make it through Ellis Island, if obtaining dreaded Idiocracy IQ and Aptitude Test was so mercilessly holocausting fragile shtelter-skelter population:

    http://www.npr.org/2017/05/17/528813842/this-simple-puzzle-test-sealed-the-fate-of-immigrants-at-ellis-island?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20170517

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fJIjoE27F-Q

    Read More
  30. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    It’s a less impressive version of the GCHQ building.

    Also, apple hasn’t been up to much “innovation” lately. They’ve ruined their Macbook line, still promote that worthless watch, and have severely damaged the Iphone brand by unnecessarily removing the headphone jack. Meanwhile, Samsung has a phone out that is better than the best quality Iphone 7.

    Apple’s business strategy is in trouble, and they know it. There are rumors that they are going to branch out into other markets, perhaps buying EA or Disney. Sooner or later, their stock is coming down. Tim Cook is a competent manager but no innovator.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    Oh, what have they done to the MacBook that you don't like?
  31. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    FWIW, Apple earned $47 billion over the last 12 months.

    Jobs invented a new industry — smart phones.

    Peak Apple may turn out to be like peak oil. Although I suppose they have no where to go but down. At some point.

    It used to be that the computer maker’s earnings shed a good deal of light on profit growth of the overall market. But that’s changing. Apple’s operating earnings, as measured by Standard & Poor’s, in the last three months of the year, will make up just 6.6% of the overall earnings of the S&P 500. That’s the lowest that figure has been in three years. Last year, Apple brought in 9.0% of the overall earnings of the S&P 500. The year before the figure was 7.6%.

    Which is one reason that people who passively index to the S&P have been unbeatable.

    I have owned a number of Apple laptops. The Air was introduced in Jan 2008. Apple can’t figure out how to replace it. I have a 2012 Air, and it simply wore out. It didn’t break. I still have it. I replaced it with a new MacBook Pro. On paper, it is better in every way, but doesn’t feel like an upgrade.

    The latest is that Apple will finally cave in and upgrade the Air. Regardless — 10 years is a ridiculous product lifespan in the PC/Laptop era. Apple knew it and it took years for them to release their Pro upgrade.

    I don’t really have an opinion on their future. It isn’t the same without Jobs. On the other hand, they are still absurdly successful.

    Per Capita Apple earnings are $150.

    Read More
  32. @syonredux

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.
     
    Well, we are talking about a specific era:

    Though he always professed to loathe nostalgia, Jobs based many of his ideas on his favorite features of the Bay Area of his youth.
     
    Steve Jobs was born in 1955, so his "youth" would have been from the very late '50s (say, for coherent memories, 1959) to the mid-'70s......

    Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was "hideously White".....

    “Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was “hideously White”…..”

    Being born in 1955 means Steve Jobs is from The Nice Guys and Boogie Nights era of California. That California was a glorious California.

    Read More
  33. @Dave Pinsen
    There was another WSJ article over the weekend that hinted at that Parkinson's Law:
    https://twitter.com/ByronYork/status/863738343376527360

    I quoted it here and got a lot of pushback.

    Surprised about the above ground parking. I recall Steve Jobs speaking at the planning or zoning commission, shortly before his death, about how he wanted the parking underground, so there'd be more trees, and how he had hired some silviculture professor from Stanford to select the sort of trees for the site that were there before it got paved over.

    Jobs was no doubt reaching back to the fact that Infinite Loop (the company’s road, not the new building) was sited on former orchards. As was Silicon Valley in general. And the population at that time was way majority white.

    When he was growing up and in the Cupertino schools, he would have grown up surrounded by fruit farms and the kind of California Heartland men and women who ran them and worked at them. By then, some of them already for a century. Though someone at Santa Clara U told me that “silicon valley” had been orchards back to the Spanish occupation.

    The last fruit farmer in Sunnyvale was a guy named Charlie Olson. He ran a centennial farm where he grew cherries and apricots and prunes as did his parents and grandparents before him.

    He’d remember and relate how his neighbors got six-figure sums per acre for their land in the era of Arrillaga and Peery. Though I also heard that some of them got way way less than that.

    I imagine Olson must have sold up by now, though he was still holding out in the early ’90s. Possibly today is making money as a lessor with guest stints in the LA Times food section/Martha Stewart. Or like the Christopher Ranch people gone into international brokering of their commodity. Actually he’s probably old enough to have retired.

    An engineer friend told me stories about the clearing of the orchards from his days at NEC long before the dust-up with Intel regarding the V20/8086 and V30/8088 microprocessors. By Reagan’s performance in the White House most of it was gone, but those with suburban or urban woodstoves bought hardwood firewood from the orchard clearcutters/developers or pruners. In the early ’90s, when I first had occasion for travel to Cupertino/Apple, you’d still see signs here and there for firewood or fruit.

    The biggest developer of CA orchards into Silicon was John Arrillaga, the furtive real estate billionaire, later FIL of the exceedingly cucky Marc Andreessen.

    Arrillaga started in on this in the 1960s with his Mormon partner, Richard Peery. I was told they had a reputation for gathering intelligence on farmers who were in leveraged or distressed financial situations…then offering them a way out. Many an unrecorded story there. IIRC Arrillaga himself brokered the land deal for Apple’s site (and Intel’s, and Google’s, and Cisco’s…).

    Arrillaga pumped hundreds of millions (you read that right) into Stanford; he spent nine figures alone on rebuilding the stadium.

    He and his family and partners are key voices in pushing open borders as part of their FIRE and silicon fiefdom.

    Read More
  34. I remember laughing at the 6502 processor used in the original Apple 1, I decided to go with the Zilog Z80 and have never looked back.

    Read More
  35. Looks like a round Pentagon to me. A giant fortress for the technocracy to operate from in isolation from the pauperized population that surrounds them.

    Read More
  36. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    I’m somewhat disappointed Jobs’ remains aren’t to be found in a sarcophagus, perhaps cryonic, somewhere in the middle of this monument.

    Regarding Woz: Apple did a lot of rather successful stuff after Wozniak left (1985). I don’t think he was that indispensable.

    Read More
  37. That Apple building looks remarkably like the GCHQ building in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire (except GCHQ is surrounded by a vast car park).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Doughnut

    It appears that we can ignore any economic analysis from MI5/MI6, if this is their level of estimating competence.

    “In 2004 the chairman of the Commons Public Accounts Committee, Edward Leigh, criticised the increasing cost of GCHQ’s move to the Doughnut.[11] Leigh said that “It was astonishing GCHQ did not realise the extent of what would be involved much sooner”.[11] Leigh had said in 2003 that GCHQ’s original estimate for the cost of the move was “staggeringly inaccurate”.[12]

    For security reasons, GCHQ moved its own computers and technical infrastructure to the Doughnut, which caused the cost of its move to increase from £41m to £450m over two years.[11] The moves of MI5 and the SIS to new buildings had also cost more than three times their original estimates due to issues with transferring computers.[13] HM Treasury paid £216m toward a newly agreed budget of £308m, having initially refused to finance the original high figure.[11] The final cost of GCHQ’s move to their new headquarters was more than seven times the original estimate.[12]

    The complexity of the computer network at GCHQ was responsible for the increase in costs. Issues with the network were found while preparing computers for the “Millennium bug”. Simply shutting down each computer individually before restarting them in the Doughnut would have left GCHQ unable to complete key intelligence work for two years, while moving their electronics according to the original schedule without “unacceptable damage” to intelligence gathering would cost £450m.[12] In a review of GCHQ’s move in 2003, the National Audit Office said government ministers might never have approved the consolidation of facilities had the final cost been known.”

    Read More
    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Lurker
    I was going to post something similar!

    A pic of it:

    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/media/images/82026000/jpg/_82026553_benhall1_large.jpg

    I've never been close enough to see it in the flesh but it was faintly surreal to see local buses in Cheltenham with 'GCHQ' on the destination display.
  38. @Jean Ralphio
    I miss these kind of articles at iSteve.

    Any idea why Apple is no longer innovativing? It seems Amazon of all companies has taken the lead in making interesting hardware. I love the Firestick and have bought two of them.

    Real estate is the endgame of all capital. The high-tech gadget venture capital is no exception.

    Read More
  39. @Anonymous
    Can't believe you didn't do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their "civilization" ..... it's all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It's a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an "Arab NATO."

    Had another thought: maybe Trump could start messing with the Turks’ heads by references to Constantinople or even Byzantium, from time to time. Or calling the European portion of Turkey “the land of the Romans,” (Rumelia).

    Read More
  40. @Diversity Heretic
    This seems to me to be a North American version of the riots in Germany between competing Turkish factions over the last election. I agree with you--involvement in that area of the world is simply disastrous for the people of Europe and North America.

    21 diversity Heretic > This seems to me to be a North American version of the riots in Germany between competing Turkish faction

    the account I saw, said that the beater-up-ees were Armenians; behaving in antifa fashion – throwing bottles.

    The DC cops, of course, didn’t even think to shut THAT down.

    Read More
  41. @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    The PGT Beauregard statue in New Orleans has been taken down:

    He was Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, the Confederate States of America’s first mega hero, and early Wednesday morning a statue of him astride his horse was removed from its pedestal in New Orleans under the watchful eye of mounted police and police snipers.
     
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2017/05/17/gen-p-g-t-beauregard-was-a-rebel-hero-now-his-statue-in-new-orleans-is-gone/

    Beauregard must fall…

    Read More
  42. Years ago someone wrote that you could tell when a company, especially a tech one, had peaked; they created a monolith for themselves in the form of a high-end corporate headquarters. I wonder if this is the case with Apple.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    This used to be the conventional wisdom. Any idea why it seems to have changed?
  43. It is interesting that tech titans have a nostalgic vision of CA yet they are trying to morp not only Silicon Valley but the entire country into a world that is dramatically different and inferior to the one they so fondly remember.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DWB
    Really, what's interesting about it?

    Check out where the "Tech Titans" live.

    Jobs - before he died - bought a house in Woodside, Calif (one built by Julia Morgan, the famed architect who designed Hearst Castle). Woodside, for those not familiar with the Bay Area, is a rural town north and west of the real "valley." It retains a highly rustic flavour, with many tracts large enough to have horses. They have zoning laws that forbid parcels less than an acre, so cheap, tract housing or apartments with 10 adults to a room are effectively banned.

    It looks very much the same now as it did in 1960.

    Many of the others are not different. Larry Ellison also lives in Woodside.

    Sheryl Sandberg lives just across 280 in Atherton, which also has almost zero retail or commercial, and restricts lots to 1 acre or more.

    These guys do not care about the impact of their policies on America, because they simply build a wall between the effects and their own lives.
  44. Am I out of my gourd for thinking this thing looks not a little like a rounded off, aluminum Pentagon?

    There probably are some advantages to a circular building with no corners – there are no corner offices for little Napoleons to fight over.

    Read More
  45. Further­more, infrastructure like water pipes and electrical conduits is hidden in the beams, so the whole thing doesn’t look like a basement.

    Aesthetic considerations aside, I sure am glad I don’t have to maintain that.

    It’s striking that when you visit zillion dollar projects like the Getty Center Museum in Sepulveda Pass, which even has its own monorail, you still wind up parking in a claustrophobic, ominous garage like everywhere else.

    Having been present for lots and lots of meetings about the Getty Center parking structure and much else when I worked for Richard Meier + Partners at the Westwood office in the early 90s, I know more about that garage than most people.

    Believe it or not, budgetary issues had something to do with a lot of choices on that project. At the top of the hill, finishes in the non-trophy spaces are similarly stingy. A very good friend of my wife’s is curator of manuscripts at the Museum. While her office down in the bowels is fine, a lot of what surrounds it is finished pretty much like a parking garage.

    Read More
  46. The picture reminds me of what a feudal lord would build, with his keep on a medium size hill right in the center.

    Read More
  47. Interesting that Apple chose an alpha London architect to design this HQ … in London, Apple will move into the rescued 1930s Battersea Power Station …

    Read More
  48. Every pipe concealed? Doesn’t sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe’s derided exposed, protruding I-beams? Richard Rogers’ Lloyds building is now an eighties embarrassment?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old fogey
    Isn't it asking for plumbing problems to conceal all the pipes in such a fashion?
    , @The Last Real Calvinist

    Every pipe concealed? Doesn’t sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe’s derided exposed, protruding I-beams?

     

    Hiding the working parts under a glossy, mostly-impenetrable exterior is right in line with Apple's core aesthetic.
    , @guest
    Ah, "expressed structure." Because covering up pipes makes you a liar! Probably with a small penis.

    Did ancient Greek temples conceal their plumbing? Didn't think so.
  49. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Is anyone noticing that Apple’s voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand “Americans” with thick foreign accents?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is anyone noticing that Apple’s voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand “Americans” with thick foreign accents?

     

    This is a very interesting question.

    Mrs Calvinist is not a native English speaker. Although she's very fluent, voice recognition software sometimes lets her down. She then has to hand me her phone and so I can repeat, in my utterly mainstream Iowa-American accent, what she wants recognized. It never fails to register perfectly.

    But there are hundreds of millions of people -- not just in the USA -- trying to use voice recognition in English who don't have textbook midwestern pronunciation. Overcoming these often-significant variations in pronunciation can't be a trivial problem.
    , @jim jones
    Siri versus Japanese:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiU8GPlsZqE&feature=b-vrec
  50. Elizabeth what’s-her-face had a really nice headquarters for her fake blood test results.

    Read More
  51. Why not use expensive concrete in the parking garages of a $5 billion project? Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

    It would have been agreeable over the years had municipal governments made more use of community parking – say, land use regulations that created public spaces which commercial developers would build around so that the rear of their establishments would be adjacent to a common municipal parking lot and the front would be smack on the sidewalk – in order that streets of a given width be able to handle more traffic and the aesthetics of the streetscape would be much improved. In higher density areas, you might have had community parking garages maintained by the municipality, something you see only in central business districts. With regard to the interiors, engineering, security, and organization of space (so that motorists could find their vehicle and find the entrance readily) would be the priority. The facade would properly be decorative, so the garage does not mar the streetscape. Over the postwar period, planning agencies and real estate developers could have done a much better job at integrating automobiles into urban life.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    It would be agreeable to most everyone here if you left and never came back.
    , @Jack D
    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I'm sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don't have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It's hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don't know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.
    , @Alden
    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape. When the lots are between the street and the stores, there is a lot less crime in the parking lots.

    The obsolete farm equipment brought from Africa in the colonial period made parking lots behind the stores playgrounds for criminals. They ruin everything.
  52. @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.

    Steve Jobs grew up in a mass produced house in Mountain View.

    Read More
  53. Yes, we’ve seen this movie before. Big company makes lots of cash, blows some on a fancy HQ, then sags into mediocrity.

    American homeowners do it too. They buy their first home when they can. They keep working and the lucky ones go up the ladder and make good money. Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.

    My father climbed in a big corporation that did this same thing. I remember touring the new headquarters on the big ranch they’d bought at the foot of the Rocky Mountains. They’d moved all of us to another state for this. They had cash. The place was a 1970s designer’s wet dream. I even remember custom woven, 3-D artwork lining hallways. Dad’s new office looked out over an amazing landscape. Parking garage? Ha! Spiral ramps took you and your vehicle up to the roof overlooking the scenery.

    A Dow Jones industrial, my father’s company crapped itself in a few years. Now William Buffett owns it.

    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Correction: "William" Buffett is of course Warren Buffett. He still owns the company and still lives in the same house.
    , @Bill

    Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.
     
    Stop rubbing it in!! :(
    , @27 year old
    American homeowners stretch to buy "McMansions" because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn't need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here's a pic of his "modest" house...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG
  54. Steve, what’s the source on that claim you periodically cite about how people imprint on the landscapes they find themselves in around age 13?

    Read More
  55. “During a period of exciting discovery or progress there is no time to plan the perfect headquarters. The time for that comes later, when all the important work has been done. Perfection, we know, is finality; and finality is death.”

    Sears finally built the headquarters of its dreams and it all went downhill from there.

    Read More
  56. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Have you ever been to California? There are mountains right up against the ocean, enormous canyons backed by painted deserts, and forests of giant trees surrounding crystal blue alpine lakes, all right above vineyards and beaches with a perfect Mediterranean climate. Then, right in the middle of all of that, are two enormous, fascinating, chaotic cities, both built on impossible dreams, fame in one case and boundless innovation in the other, and in each the entire world of cuisine and culture is available at your fingertips.

    As long as you never have to worry about money and never have to commute during rush hour, California is a paradise on Earth, and both of those conditions applied to Steve Jobs.

    Read More
    • Agree: Whoever
    • Replies: @Clark Westwood
    I've known her valleys, I've known her mountains,
    Her missions and her courtyards and her fountains,
    The giant redwoods towering in the skies of her
    That grow as though as they know they show the size of her!
    I've often wandered her farthest reaches,
    Her deserts and her snow and, yes, her beaches.
    A land that paradise could well be jealous of,
    That's California, California, blessed by heaven from above,
    That's California, land I love!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cp-8pS4C5fs
    , @Whoever
    California is as beautiful and amazing as any place on this earth can be. And it is still full of wonderful people doing wonderful things.

    “The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew California was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
    ~ Eve Babitz

    “It seemed like a matter of minutes when we began rolling in the foothills before Oakland and suddenly reached a height and saw stretched out ahead of us the fabulous white city of San Francisco on her eleven mystic hills with the blue Pacific and its advancing wall of potato-patch fog beyond, and smoke and goldenness in the late afternoon of time.”
    ~ Jack Kerouac

    “This morning I saw a coyote walking through the sagebrush right at the very edge of the ocean ― next stop China. The coyote was acting like he was in New Mexico or Wyoming, except that there were whales passing below. That’s what California does for you. Come down to Big Sur and let your soul have some room to get outside its marrow.”
    ~ Richar Brautigan

    “I grew up in a utopia, I did. California when I was a child was a child's paradise, I was healthy, well fed, well clothed, well housed. I went to school and there were libraries with all the world in them and after school I played in orange groves and in Little League and in the band and down at the beach and every day was an adventure. . . . I grew up in utopia.”
    ~ Kim Stanley

    “If you've had good gin on a hot day in Southern California with the people you love, you forget Nebraska. The two things cannot coexist. The stronger, better of the two wins.”
    ~ Ann Patchett

    “It was a splendid population - for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home - you never find that sort of people among pioneers - you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day - and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, 'Well, that is California all over.'”
    ~ Mark Twain

    “California, still a magical vanity fair.”
    ~ Eileen Granfors

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it's being invaded and destroyed, why don't you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    , @Melendwyr
    And don't need to drink water. Southern California is a semi-desert, and survives only by draining the water from major rivers until they no longer reach the sea. What happens if anything - disastrous bad weather, climate change, a big earthquake - disrupts those systems?

    California isn't a paradise, unless it's one for fools.
  57. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    As a former Texan, the appeal to me was the summer weather. Camp Pendleton, between the mountain ranges and the Pacific, has a fantastic cool climate moderated by the sea breeze that would kick up every day around noon, sometimes later, sometimes earlier. Go east of the mountains and you loose the wind and it gets extremely hot. I didnt care for the wet mild winters however. That was probably the big draw for people from the north.

    Of course , the natural geography is stunning also.

    Too many people now

    Read More
  58. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    It’s California. It’s a nice place with a fantastic climate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @new handle
    California in the 1960s and 1970s of Jobs' youth was a pretty cool place with more opportunities for personal expression than elsewhere in the country. There were also pretty girls, sunshine and employment which all make for a wonderful place to live.
  59. @Art Deco
    Why not use expensive concrete in the parking garages of a $5 billion project? Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

    It would have been agreeable over the years had municipal governments made more use of community parking - say, land use regulations that created public spaces which commercial developers would build around so that the rear of their establishments would be adjacent to a common municipal parking lot and the front would be smack on the sidewalk - in order that streets of a given width be able to handle more traffic and the aesthetics of the streetscape would be much improved. In higher density areas, you might have had community parking garages maintained by the municipality, something you see only in central business districts. With regard to the interiors, engineering, security, and organization of space (so that motorists could find their vehicle and find the entrance readily) would be the priority. The facade would properly be decorative, so the garage does not mar the streetscape. Over the postwar period, planning agencies and real estate developers could have done a much better job at integrating automobiles into urban life.

    It would be agreeable to most everyone here if you left and never came back.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Getting to be like Tourette's with you. Why not just write 'bear scat' each time? More concise.
  60. @Jean Ralphio
    I miss these kind of articles at iSteve.

    Any idea why Apple is no longer innovativing? It seems Amazon of all companies has taken the lead in making interesting hardware. I love the Firestick and have bought two of them.

    Microsoft seems to become ever more arrogant and insufferable. They now force mandatory updates, necessitated by the many vulnerabilities lodged in their operating system. I could see a lot of computer business shifting to Apple as people get fed up with the Evil Empire headquartered in Redmond. I’ve decided that my next computer will be a Mac. I know that personal computers are not as big a market as they once were, but still.

    Read More
  61. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Jobs insisted on planting orchards on the campus like Silicon Valley had when he was a lad.

    On Instagram the other day, some upscale women were lamenting the loss of beautiful orchards in Northern California and expressing how they thought Silicon Valley was kind of gross.

    Read More
  62. In 15 years parking lots will be obsolete in California…self driving cars will be driving people to work..

    Read More
  63. …least-path-of-resistance…

    Is the least path of resistance anything like the path of least resistance? Maybe there was a typographical error: the speaker was on about a leased path of resistance (a rented obstacle course…?).

    We can all at least agree the garage is la pièce de résistance.

    Read More
  64. @syonredux

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.
     
    Well, we are talking about a specific era:

    Though he always professed to loathe nostalgia, Jobs based many of his ideas on his favorite features of the Bay Area of his youth.
     
    Steve Jobs was born in 1955, so his "youth" would have been from the very late '50s (say, for coherent memories, 1959) to the mid-'70s......

    Which means that the CA that he fondly remembers was "hideously White".....

    He sure helped to fix that problem.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    He sure helped to fix that problem.
     
    Big agriculture and construction played a vastly bigger role.
  65. @Anonymous
    Can't believe you didn't do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their "civilization" ..... it's all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It's a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an "Arab NATO."

    To clarify what is happening there:

    Some Kurdish and/or Armenian protestors are gathered in Sheridan Circle, which is across from the Turkish ambassador’s residence (the Embassy is a few blocks down on Mass. Ave.).

    The guys in nice suits crossing the street to kick them in their faces are Erdogan’s goons, who forget, momentarily, that they are not in Turkey where they are above the law and civilized conduct. They must have some sort of diplomatic immunity here, but I don’t think that even crossed their minds. It was just natural for them.

    The DC police seemed obviously confused about what was happening. I’m assuming most visiting heads of state to not have security detail that go and start attacking people who are protesting from a reasonable distance.

    Read More
  66. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, we've seen this movie before. Big company makes lots of cash, blows some on a fancy HQ, then sags into mediocrity.

    American homeowners do it too. They buy their first home when they can. They keep working and the lucky ones go up the ladder and make good money. Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.

    My father climbed in a big corporation that did this same thing. I remember touring the new headquarters on the big ranch they'd bought at the foot of the Rocky Mountains. They'd moved all of us to another state for this. They had cash. The place was a 1970s designer's wet dream. I even remember custom woven, 3-D artwork lining hallways. Dad's new office looked out over an amazing landscape. Parking garage? Ha! Spiral ramps took you and your vehicle up to the roof overlooking the scenery.

    A Dow Jones industrial, my father's company crapped itself in a few years. Now William Buffett owns it.

    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    Correction: “William” Buffett is of course Warren Buffett. He still owns the company and still lives in the same house.

    Read More
  67. @anonymous
    Frank Lloyd Wright hated garages and loved, loved, loved -- and maybe invented -- the carport. Which is OK in Los Angeles but sucks in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota.

    Okay in Los Angeles?! Ha! You’re forgetting that garages keep out criminals
    as well as cold and precipitation. Hell, I’d argue it’s more important to have a garage than a carport in L.A. than in most parts of the states you mention.

    In the brief few months since I sold my house my vehicles have been vandalised twice, most recently to the tune of about $8,000.00.

    Carports are okay in Los Angeles! What a card! Buy this guy a drink, somebody, will ya?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Car ports are safe north of Venice Blvd and west of Overland on the west side. I don't know about Santa Monica.
  68. It’s a supercollider. But in this one good ideas can smash themselves against other good ideas.

    Read More
  69. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    I was born in the same year as Jobs and grew up in the Almaden Valley (due South of San Jose and Southeast of Cupertino). We had the perfect California climate and a view of the lovely, redwood-covered Santa Cruz Mountains. Driving North toward San Jose, we would pass groves of plums, apricots and walnuts and strawberry truck farms.

    Santa Clara County from 1955 to 1972 was a veritable heaven.

    Read More
  70. Speaking of fancy parking garages, there is one in Miami that includes a restaurant and some shopping:
    https://tinyurl.com/lgb9vta

    Or in true Detroit fashion….
    https://tinyurl.com/mqknayp

    Read More
  71. The Godfather of conservative media Roger Ailes has passed away at the age of 77. Steve are you going to do a blog about it?

    Read More
  72. @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts.

    Housing developments take up only a single-digit share of available land. The trouble has been that developers and planners created places for automobiles with human cargo, not places for people. (Mark Hinshaw discusses some aspects of this in True Urbanism). This has gone on all over the country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963
    A lot of land in CA isn't meant for housing, it's either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    Traffic isn't a issue unless you're commuting to Los Angeles - then it is.

    The problem is over development of rural areas and the destruction it brings to the quality of life in a town or region.

    End result, a rural town goes from nice place to live to overly developed and expensive suburban shit hole and where everyone is miserable. This went on all through Southern California from the late 90's to the mid 2000's and still is.

    The housing built were often nothing but cookie cutter tracts, closely packed and totally bland. Most had little in the way of a back yard or front yard. Which had the habit of forcing children to either stay inside or wander the streets. Some have the distinction of not even having sidewalks.

    A lot of the fault can be laid at the developers feet. They often put forth housing tracts that violated a multitude of zoning laws and the general plan and used bribes and lawsuits to get their way. They even sued locals who publicly opposed them (SLAPP lawsuits).
    , @David Davenport
    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    From what I read, Mr. Buffet spends most of his time in Manhattan or Palm Beach.

    The humble Wizard of Omaha stuff is a contrived public image.

    By the way, His Buffetness recently sold a big load of IBM stock.

    IBM used to be big, big. Apple looks to be the next IBM.
  73. Hey guys, Bruce was the most virile WHYTEMAN in the world in the late 1970′s. It all went downhill for your boy when he left his first….wife….

    http://i2.cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/150426115322-01-jenner-with-linda-thompson-restricted-0426-large-169.jpg

    Read More
  74. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    It’s why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, j

    Didn’t he leave the company about 35 years ago and retire completely about 30 years ago? While we’re at it, hasn’t Mr. Wozniak been married about 4 times? Ya think maybe he’s not such an easy chap himself?

    Read More
  75. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, we've seen this movie before. Big company makes lots of cash, blows some on a fancy HQ, then sags into mediocrity.

    American homeowners do it too. They buy their first home when they can. They keep working and the lucky ones go up the ladder and make good money. Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.

    My father climbed in a big corporation that did this same thing. I remember touring the new headquarters on the big ranch they'd bought at the foot of the Rocky Mountains. They'd moved all of us to another state for this. They had cash. The place was a 1970s designer's wet dream. I even remember custom woven, 3-D artwork lining hallways. Dad's new office looked out over an amazing landscape. Parking garage? Ha! Spiral ramps took you and your vehicle up to the roof overlooking the scenery.

    A Dow Jones industrial, my father's company crapped itself in a few years. Now William Buffett owns it.

    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.

    Stop rubbing it in!! :(

    Read More
  76. Steve won because he worked. His email address was known to those who cared and he would actually reply to nobodies himself – often at two or three in the morning. I would bet good money he was the only top exec in the country who read his own primary email.

    He NEEDED to win. The stories about his perfection are actually stories about simply getting a product right. All engineers, no matter how high the IQ, slap things out and hate to real life test. If the product works in their head it is done. Steve just used the product and pointed out the obvious.

    Read More
  77. @biz
    Have you ever been to California? There are mountains right up against the ocean, enormous canyons backed by painted deserts, and forests of giant trees surrounding crystal blue alpine lakes, all right above vineyards and beaches with a perfect Mediterranean climate. Then, right in the middle of all of that, are two enormous, fascinating, chaotic cities, both built on impossible dreams, fame in one case and boundless innovation in the other, and in each the entire world of cuisine and culture is available at your fingertips.

    As long as you never have to worry about money and never have to commute during rush hour, California is a paradise on Earth, and both of those conditions applied to Steve Jobs.

    I’ve known her valleys, I’ve known her mountains,
    Her missions and her courtyards and her fountains,
    The giant redwoods towering in the skies of her
    That grow as though as they know they show the size of her!
    I’ve often wandered her farthest reaches,
    Her deserts and her snow and, yes, her beaches.
    A land that paradise could well be jealous of,
    That’s California, California, blessed by heaven from above,
    That’s California, land I love!

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    It's Always Black Hole Sunny in California :

    https://youtu.be/3mbBbFH9fAg


    When asked about the line, "Times are gone for honest men", late Cornell said:



    It's really difficult for a person to create their own life and their own freedom.

    "...It's going to become more and more difficult, and it's going to create more and more disillusioned people who become dishonest and angry and are willing to fu@k the next guy to get what they want.

    There's so much stepping on the backs of other people in our profession.

    We've been so lucky that we've never had to do that.

    Part of it was because of our own tenacity, and part of it was because we were lucky..."

     

    And this would be,I guess, Sinatra's Way:

    https://youtu.be/tnfJ6eB0duM?list=PLAvRw_pbS9nmjqcrgWWWGB-JLDu214ygR


    RIP
  78. @TheBoom
    Years ago someone wrote that you could tell when a company, especially a tech one, had peaked; they created a monolith for themselves in the form of a high-end corporate headquarters. I wonder if this is the case with Apple.

    This used to be the conventional wisdom. Any idea why it seems to have changed?

    Read More
  79. @Buzz Mohawk
    Yes, we've seen this movie before. Big company makes lots of cash, blows some on a fancy HQ, then sags into mediocrity.

    American homeowners do it too. They buy their first home when they can. They keep working and the lucky ones go up the ladder and make good money. Then they blow that income by borrowing up the wazoo for a McMansion. Then all their monthly income from their now well-paying job goes to mortgage, interest, property tax and maintenance. They make themselves house poor.

    My father climbed in a big corporation that did this same thing. I remember touring the new headquarters on the big ranch they'd bought at the foot of the Rocky Mountains. They'd moved all of us to another state for this. They had cash. The place was a 1970s designer's wet dream. I even remember custom woven, 3-D artwork lining hallways. Dad's new office looked out over an amazing landscape. Parking garage? Ha! Spiral ramps took you and your vehicle up to the roof overlooking the scenery.

    A Dow Jones industrial, my father's company crapped itself in a few years. Now William Buffett owns it.

    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    American homeowners stretch to buy “McMansions” because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn’t need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here’s a pic of his “modest” house…

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    That IS a modest house for a billionaire. Any mid-level corporate executive could live in a house like that.


    Someone with that much money could live in a palace if he wanted to. Look at the "cottages" that the Robber Barons built.
    , @Jefferson
    "Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s."

    Omaha is still a majority White city. It hasn't reached Houston, Texas levels of Vibrant Diversity yet.
    , @Barnard
    Buffett's phony "Midwest frugal" persona is so insufferable. Yes, buying and holding their homes was a great deal in certain parts of the country for people in Buffett's generation. That doesn't have much to do with home ownership today.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/billionaire-buffett-says-he-caps-spending-at-mcdonalds-on-stock-markets-down-days-2017-01-05

    Here is the Zillow listing of the house across the street from Buffett, currently on the market for $1.25 million.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/225-S-55th-St-Omaha-NE-68132/75811514_zpid/
    , @Jack D
    BTW, the places with the "good" schools are now often heavily Asian (both East and South). Those schools are so "good" that white people sometime avoid them because the atmosphere is too competitive. White people are like Goldilocks - they want their schools not too hard and not too soft.

    People here make fun of Asians as being mindless drones without creativity but the next generation of soft, lazy white people are going to get their lunch eaten by Asians, both here and abroad. People have NO idea what China is planning, nor do the Chinese want you to know. It will make what Japan did in the '30s look like a joke. And this time the Asians have their own nukes. The Chinese would much rather that America destroy itself with political infighting and worrying about whether Trump is Putin's gay lover and whether Black Lives Matter. For now they are biding their time because they still need trade with the West. By the time people realize what hit them, it will be too late.
  80. @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.

    California is not completely ruined yet. It is after all a very big place. In the Bay Area megalopolis the Berkeley Hills from Castro Valley to El Cerrito are still lovely as they were developed early and are protected on their east side by East Bay Park and Utility District reservoir land. Much of the North Coast and the Sierras are still relatively undeveloped as is the Central Coast from Point Conception to San Francisco where, unlike in Southern California, the Coastal Commission has actually been able to enforce the rules set out in 1972′s Proposition 20.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berkeley_Hills

    Read More
  81. @Art Deco
    Why not use expensive concrete in the parking garages of a $5 billion project? Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

    It would have been agreeable over the years had municipal governments made more use of community parking - say, land use regulations that created public spaces which commercial developers would build around so that the rear of their establishments would be adjacent to a common municipal parking lot and the front would be smack on the sidewalk - in order that streets of a given width be able to handle more traffic and the aesthetics of the streetscape would be much improved. In higher density areas, you might have had community parking garages maintained by the municipality, something you see only in central business districts. With regard to the interiors, engineering, security, and organization of space (so that motorists could find their vehicle and find the entrance readily) would be the priority. The facade would properly be decorative, so the garage does not mar the streetscape. Over the postwar period, planning agencies and real estate developers could have done a much better job at integrating automobiles into urban life.

    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I’m sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don’t have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It’s hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don’t know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.

    Read More
    • Agree: (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone."

    Here in Northern California that describes downtown Sacramento. 8pm there looks like it's 4am in the morning. That's how dead it is there as soon as it gets dark. It looks like the Will Smith film I Am Legend.

    A city with a population of almost 500,000 thousand people like Sactown should not be so dead. I can't imagine a European city with a similar population size as Sacramento being so lifeless in it's downtown area.

    , @utu

    But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don’t know what caused it
     
    America culture demands to be very nice and friendly to each other. Thus it saps lots of energy. Staying away from people saves energy. European do not pretend to be friendly and nice to strangers, so they can handle each other better. Neighbors live w/o ver acknowledging each other. Also by not being friendly in Europe you do not feel you are risking your life.

    New York city is much more normal. Not friendly but to the point. People can be very helpful and useful in NYC. For example they tell you "F.. if know", instead of wasting your time giving you wrong directions when you are in Midwest, because they just feel compelled to be helpful even if the can't. BTW, Brits are also awful in giving directions.
    , @res

    I’m sure that must cost more than an above ground structure
     
    It sure does. I worked for a company once that was building a brand new headquarters (and whose stock subsequently tanked) on a greenfield suburban/rural site and they really wanted something other than buildings in a sea of parking spaces but just could not make the economics work for either above ground or underground parking garages.

    This PDF discusses the cost of parking garages: http://shoup.bol.ucla.edu/HighCost.pdf
    Underground averaged 40% more expensive, but there was a surprising amount of variation by city. Here are some example costs:

    Across the 12 cities, the average cost per space ranges from a low of $26,000 in Phoenix to a high of $48,000 in Honolulu, with an overall average of $34,000 per space. For an aboveground garage, the cost per space ranges from $17,000 in Phoenix to $29,000 in Chicago and San Francisco, with an average of $24,000.
     
    P.S. The paper's focus was on the cost of meeting minimum parking requirements. Their headline conclusion: "Minimum parking requirements increase the cost of constructing a shopping center by up to 67 percent if the parking is in an aboveground structure and by up to 93 percent if the parking is underground."
    I found those numbers surprising.

    P.P.S. Here is a look at some cost factors for parking spaces: https://watrydesign.com/insights/top-10-issues-affecting-cost-of-building-a-parking-space
    I think all of this makes it easy to understand the scrimping.
    , @Art Deco
    I've seen vibrant downtowns and deserted ones. I think the crucial feature is security. There just isn't enough of it. The contrast between Rochester's downtown (low security) and Syracuse's (adequate security) is instructive.

    Some decentralization of commerce is to be expected with changing modes of locomotion and settlement patterns. I think the main problem has been poor planning re suburban and neighborhood commercial nodes, both in their placement and in their configuration. You have the courts, city hall, the banks, the law firms, convention centers, arenas, and hotels downtown. You have pubs and restaurants derived from this traffic. You might still have some department stores. What you'd really benefit from would not be much more downtown, but places like this:

    http://villageofpittsford.org/

    You've got common parking lots, sidewalks, and commerce within walking distance of residences.
  82. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    I lived there back in the early seventies, in the Monterey bay area.
    One thing that always stuck with me was, after going through Utah and up through the mountains, the sight looking down into the Salinas Valley wa.s amazing. The dusty brown from the other side of mountains turns to many different shades of lush green. It was like another planet with all of the strange plants and insects. Once we got close to the coast, the bumper to bumper traffic, the litter so thick along the roadsides it looks like snow from a distance. The people weren’t too kind to their fellow man, if you happen to be looking at someone you get the middle finger instead of hi more often than not. The people take away from the paradise it could be.
    It’s been thirty years and I would like to go back, just to see how far it has deteriorated.

    Read More
    • Replies: @psmith
    There's not much litter nowadays.
    , @Alden
    I've never seen litter on highways or anywhere but Mexican sections of Los Angeles.
  83. @27 year old
    American homeowners stretch to buy "McMansions" because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn't need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here's a pic of his "modest" house...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG

    That IS a modest house for a billionaire. Any mid-level corporate executive could live in a house like that.

    Someone with that much money could live in a palace if he wanted to. Look at the “cottages” that the Robber Barons built.

    Read More
  84. @27 year old
    American homeowners stretch to buy "McMansions" because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn't need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here's a pic of his "modest" house...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG

    “Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s.”

    Omaha is still a majority White city. It hasn’t reached Houston, Texas levels of Vibrant Diversity yet.

    Read More
  85. @guest
    You could ask the "why not make it a little nicer" question of all modernist architecture and design, and there's no answer. They build stuff no one wants to live in or look at, and among other things blame cost. Then the tenants spend ungodly amounts of money drowning it in decoration.

    I haven’t been able to verify the apocryphal quote about Le Corbusier who was the supreme master of stark, un-livable, modern architecture: “He liberated architecture from the shackles of habitability” .
    On an old PBS show about architecture the host/critic took the camera crew to one of Le Corbusier’s French houses, which consisted of raw concrete rectangular castings with plate glass walls, and the whole thing propped eight feet off the ground on steel posts. There was no narration for the segment, the camera simply moved through and around the house with no spoken commentary.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Le Corbusier managed to con the city of Marseille into letting him design a moderate rent apartment complex. No one moved into it despite affordable rent because it was just so ugly and stark and the jailhouse corridors.

    The city was finally forced to move city employees in. Salaries were reduced and the amount was made up in free rent.

    The weirdest apartment building I ever saw was in Germany. It was in a rural area of small farms, rolling hills and little wooded areas. And there it was in the middle of fastness fields. The building was dark gray and about 20 stories high. It was surrounded by acres and acres of stark, bare parking lots. It looked like Darth Vader's headquarters.

    Every apartment had a balcony. And Germany being Germany, every balcony was covered with bursts and bursts of geraniums. And they were all the same shade of light pink. I don't know what was weirder, the Darth Vader building in a rural area or the geraniums.

    They could have built 3 story townhouse triplexes in all that space, but they had to build that Stalinesque monstrosity.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    I spent a week in a Corbusier building (quite a large one, housing some 100 people living in community) in 1975. It was not particularly pleasing to the eye, but it was superbly comfortable, and I liked being inside it, looking out.
    , @guest
    Ah, Corbu. I bought an art book of his stuff. Gives me the same sense of thrill I get watching a horror movie.
  86. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    Excellent summation of Jobs.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does

    Spot on. The whole thing of making Jobs a demi-god is rather sickening. The man was indeed talented at aesthetics and marketing, branding etc. But in terms of a human being he was a total a**hole and sociopath. His temper tantrums and acid tongue tirades were legendary in Silicon Valley by the 90′s. Jobs went through all the top psychologists in the area to no avail – you can’t fix a sociopath with zero social skills intelligence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @galileounderground
    The most overrated "genius" of all time...

    http://s1096.photobucket.com/user/gubrushadow/media/502354_460s.jpg.html
    , @Pericles
    The term "reality distortion field" was coined to describe Jobs. That's the reverse of zero social skills.

    As to his personality, he apparently also regularly parked in handicap spaces.

    Apple veteran Andy Hertzfled reports on his history of the Mac website, Folklore.org, that Jobs was constantly parking in the restricted spaces. “He seemed to think the blue wheelchair symbol meant the spot was reserved for the chairman,” Hertzfeld writes.

    In a comment to Hertzfeld’s post, Dan Cochran, who worked at Apple, noted that one day someone converted the handicapped “wheelchair” graphic into the Mercedes logo.

    “I thought it was hilarious but as I recall Steve didn’t find it particularly funny at all,” he notes.

    Quipped former Apple executive, Jean-Louis Gassee, when he saw Jobs park in a restricted spot: “I never realized those spaces were for the emotionally handicapped…” (According to Wikiquote, Jean-Louis now says morally handicapped when retelling the story.)
     
    http://www.cultofmac.com/2613/steve-jobs-still-parking-in-handicapped-spaces-the-pictures/
  87. @Jack D
    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I'm sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don't have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It's hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don't know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.

    “After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone.”

    Here in Northern California that describes downtown Sacramento. 8pm there looks like it’s 4am in the morning. That’s how dead it is there as soon as it gets dark. It looks like the Will Smith film I Am Legend.

    A city with a population of almost 500,000 thousand people like Sactown should not be so dead. I can’t imagine a European city with a similar population size as Sacramento being so lifeless in it’s downtown area.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    We could call this "the Putnam Effect," after Harvard's Robert Putnam, who wrote Bowling Alone.

    Putnam found that racial diversity is adverse to social capital.

    In response, here is a Berman and her assistants cheering for the decline of social capital -- because functioning societies are "dangerous" for the Founders of Morality:

    http://slate.me/1DMAbJn

    Is that one reason why we can't have nice things?
  88. @Anonymous
    Can't believe you didn't do a thread on the Turkish embassy riot video! It is one the most important internet memes ever!

    If you want to understand the middle east Asiatic mindset, the nature of their "civilization" ..... it's all right there. These are the animals with whom our deep state continually gets us, The American Taxpayers, into bed:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/VOANews/status/864655547215171584

    Once upon a time our leaders understood these alien peoples were not like us and fundamentally incompatible with us.

    The people running the governments all across the Middle East are total scum. Their local political opposition is also total scum.

    THERE IS NO BENEFIT TO US BEING INVOLVED IN THE MIDDLE EAST.

    There never has been. It's a giant scam and a giant drain on our treasury. And watching/studying this video should make people think twice about what the hell we are doing over there, let alone the new genius plan for an "Arab NATO."

    Could have been worse. Remember the 1984 protest at the Libyan embassy in London? Libyan security guards opened fire on the protesters from inside the embassy. An English policewoman, Yvonne Fletcher, was killed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Tam Dalyell MP disputed that in Parliament.

    "With the agreement of Queenie Fletcher, her mother, I raised with the Home Office the three remarkable programmes that were made by Fulcrum, and their producer, Richard Bellfield, called Murder In St. James's.[10][11] Television speculation is one thing, but this was rather more than that, because on film was George Styles, the senior ballistics officer in the British Army, who said that, as a ballistics expert, he believed that the WPC could not have been killed from the second floor of the Libyan embassy, as was suggested.

    "Also on film was my friend, Hugh Thomas, who talked about the angles at which bullets could enter bodies, and the position of those bodies. Hugh Thomas was, for years, the consultant surgeon of the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast, and I suspect he knows more about bullets entering bodies than anybody else in Britain. Above that was Professor Bernard Knight, who, on and off, has been the Home Office pathologist for 25 years. When Bernard Knight gives evidence on film that the official explanation could not be, it is time for an investigation."
     
    Who knows though, a bizarre thing for the Libyan's to have done.
  89. @27 year old
    American homeowners stretch to buy "McMansions" because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn't need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here's a pic of his "modest" house...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG

    Buffett’s phony “Midwest frugal” persona is so insufferable. Yes, buying and holding their homes was a great deal in certain parts of the country for people in Buffett’s generation. That doesn’t have much to do with home ownership today.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/billionaire-buffett-says-he-caps-spending-at-mcdonalds-on-stock-markets-down-days-2017-01-05

    Here is the Zillow listing of the house across the street from Buffett, currently on the market for $1.25 million.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/225-S-55th-St-Omaha-NE-68132/75811514_zpid/

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    S>Buffett’s phony “Midwest frugal” persona is so insufferable

    Agree 100%. And it really annoys me when I see people who buy the act and then denigrate non-wealthy Americans for failing to be more like the (fake) persona of Warren Buffet.

  90. Apple has successfully transformed itself from a computer company into an entertainment company because the nature of computers has changed.

    They are now entertainment platforms with word processors attached. People use email, watch video, screw around on social media and play video games. At least, many if not most people use them this way.

    Where the Apple boom is going awry is that these are trends and are not lasting. Over time, computers have not radically improved to the point where people need a new one all the time. Many have switched to mobile devices.

    As these technologies become more distributed, people are switching to other options. Android is proof of this. Once the inertia of iTunes, the iPhone and the Mac Book fade, Apple will be in trouble, just as it was in the late 1980s, late 1990s and early 2010s.

    We may just have to be patient. As a former member of the Apple cult, I see a great advantage in returning computing to the professionals and farming out the entertainment crowd to the group sure to inherit it, the same people who brought you daytime TV in the 1980s. The same is mostly true of the internet, thanks to the monopoly of Google and the filters it has in place to weed out any content but the corporate-level material it desires.

    Read More
  91. @Anonymous Nephew
    That Apple building looks remarkably like the GCHQ building in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire (except GCHQ is surrounded by a vast car park).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Doughnut

    It appears that we can ignore any economic analysis from MI5/MI6, if this is their level of estimating competence.


    "In 2004 the chairman of the Commons Public Accounts Committee, Edward Leigh, criticised the increasing cost of GCHQ's move to the Doughnut.[11] Leigh said that "It was astonishing GCHQ did not realise the extent of what would be involved much sooner".[11] Leigh had said in 2003 that GCHQ's original estimate for the cost of the move was "staggeringly inaccurate".[12]

    For security reasons, GCHQ moved its own computers and technical infrastructure to the Doughnut, which caused the cost of its move to increase from £41m to £450m over two years.[11] The moves of MI5 and the SIS to new buildings had also cost more than three times their original estimates due to issues with transferring computers.[13] HM Treasury paid £216m toward a newly agreed budget of £308m, having initially refused to finance the original high figure.[11] The final cost of GCHQ's move to their new headquarters was more than seven times the original estimate.[12]

    The complexity of the computer network at GCHQ was responsible for the increase in costs. Issues with the network were found while preparing computers for the "Millennium bug". Simply shutting down each computer individually before restarting them in the Doughnut would have left GCHQ unable to complete key intelligence work for two years, while moving their electronics according to the original schedule without "unacceptable damage" to intelligence gathering would cost £450m.[12] In a review of GCHQ's move in 2003, the National Audit Office said government ministers might never have approved the consolidation of facilities had the final cost been known."
     

    I was going to post something similar!

    A pic of it:

    https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/media/images/82026000/jpg/_82026553_benhall1_large.jpg

    I’ve never been close enough to see it in the flesh but it was faintly surreal to see local buses in Cheltenham with ‘GCHQ’ on the destination display.

    Read More
  92. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I think we should call

    Washington Post ‘Bezos Bozos’

    and

    New York Times ‘Slim Slime’

    Read More
  93. @Autochthon
    He sure helped to fix that problem.

    He sure helped to fix that problem.

    Big agriculture and construction played a vastly bigger role.

    Read More
  94. @Jack D
    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I'm sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don't have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It's hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don't know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.

    But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don’t know what caused it

    America culture demands to be very nice and friendly to each other. Thus it saps lots of energy. Staying away from people saves energy. European do not pretend to be friendly and nice to strangers, so they can handle each other better. Neighbors live w/o ver acknowledging each other. Also by not being friendly in Europe you do not feel you are risking your life.

    New York city is much more normal. Not friendly but to the point. People can be very helpful and useful in NYC. For example they tell you “F.. if know”, instead of wasting your time giving you wrong directions when you are in Midwest, because they just feel compelled to be helpful even if the can’t. BTW, Brits are also awful in giving directions.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    America culture demands to be very nice and friendly to each other. Thus it saps lots of energy. Staying away from people saves energy. European do not pretend to be friendly and nice to strangers, so they can handle each other better. Neighbors live w/o ver acknowledging each other. Also by not being friendly in Europe you do not feel you are risking your life.

    Rubbish
  95. “During a period of exciting discovery or progress there is no time to plan the perfect headquarters. The time for that comes later, when all the important work has been done. Perfection, we know, is finality; and finality is death.”

    If this is true, then it provides an interesting parallel with another innovator that Steve Jobs frequently gets compared to: Walt Disney. He originally headquartered his animation studio in a converted organ factory on Hyperion Avenue, in large part because he couldn’t afford anything better. Employees from that era almost universally remember the site as dilapidated, overheated, and disorganized, with entire departments that were sometimes located blocks away from the central location — but in the ten years spent on that site Disney’s company introduced, sound, color, and numerous other innovations to animated cartoons and produced Snow White, Pinnocchio, and Fantasia. When Snow White brought the studio record-breaking ticket sales and made Walt a rich man, he decided to re-invest some of his profits into a new, state-of-the-art studio for his animation team located on better property in Burbank. By 1940, the new campus had been completed and the company moved in. The result? Less than two years after arriving, the animators attempted to unionize, then went on strike, and many of the company’s best talents ultimately left to go to work for other studios. Disney himself largely turned his back on the art form he had done so much to develop and spent the rest of his career mostly focusing on live action, then television, and theme park design. Through 1942, every winner of the Oscar for best animated short except for one was a Disney production; They would win that same award only once more during the nearly three decades that passed before Walt died. The animation studio that had once been regarded as the top of its class was reduced to a being another cog in a Hollywood machine, more valuable for the merchandising opportunities it could provide than for the ticket sales it could generate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Thank you. That was an interesting post about Walt Disney.
  96. @27 year old
    American homeowners stretch to buy "McMansions" because they come with Good Schools. Buffet didn't need to worry about fleeing from black dysfunction because Omaha was heavily White right up till the 2000s. I imagine his particular neighborhood is still 99% White to this day.

    And, by the way here's a pic of his "modest" house...

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dundee_HD_Omaha_NE.JPG

    BTW, the places with the “good” schools are now often heavily Asian (both East and South). Those schools are so “good” that white people sometime avoid them because the atmosphere is too competitive. White people are like Goldilocks – they want their schools not too hard and not too soft.

    People here make fun of Asians as being mindless drones without creativity but the next generation of soft, lazy white people are going to get their lunch eaten by Asians, both here and abroad. People have NO idea what China is planning, nor do the Chinese want you to know. It will make what Japan did in the ’30s look like a joke. And this time the Asians have their own nukes. The Chinese would much rather that America destroy itself with political infighting and worrying about whether Trump is Putin’s gay lover and whether Black Lives Matter. For now they are biding their time because they still need trade with the West. By the time people realize what hit them, it will be too late.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    It's not a cop out to remind people that the Asian almost always chooses well-established stability over chaos because that's really their only salient target.
    [Now visualize all white people represented by an image of Charlie Day shouting the word "WILDCARD!"]
    , @anonymous coward
    The Chinese are the least aggressive nation on Earth, and Russian schools are as competitive as any Chinese school despite being "white".

    Your mental model of the world is very off.
    , @JohnnyWalker123
    This reminds me of Ron Unz's article.

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/chinas-rise-americas-fall/

    However, although American micro-corruption is rare, we seem to suffer from appalling levels of macro-corruption, situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.
     

    Perhaps Americans really do prefer that their broadcasters provide Happy News and that their political campaigns constitute amusing reality shows. Certainly the cheering coliseum crowds of the Roman Empire favored their bread and circuses over the difficult and dangerous tasks that their ancestors had undertaken during Rome’s rise to world greatness. And so long as we can continue to trade bits of printed paper carrying presidential portraits for flat-screen TVs from Chinese factories, perhaps all is well and no one need be too concerned about the apparent course of our national trajectory, least of all our political leadership class.
     
  97. @TheBoom
    It is interesting that tech titans have a nostalgic vision of CA yet they are trying to morp not only Silicon Valley but the entire country into a world that is dramatically different and inferior to the one they so fondly remember.

    Really, what’s interesting about it?

    Check out where the “Tech Titans” live.

    Jobs – before he died – bought a house in Woodside, Calif (one built by Julia Morgan, the famed architect who designed Hearst Castle). Woodside, for those not familiar with the Bay Area, is a rural town north and west of the real “valley.” It retains a highly rustic flavour, with many tracts large enough to have horses. They have zoning laws that forbid parcels less than an acre, so cheap, tract housing or apartments with 10 adults to a room are effectively banned.

    It looks very much the same now as it did in 1960.

    Many of the others are not different. Larry Ellison also lives in Woodside.

    Sheryl Sandberg lives just across 280 in Atherton, which also has almost zero retail or commercial, and restricts lots to 1 acre or more.

    These guys do not care about the impact of their policies on America, because they simply build a wall between the effects and their own lives.

    Read More
  98. @Jack D
    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I'm sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don't have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It's hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don't know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.

    I’m sure that must cost more than an above ground structure

    It sure does. I worked for a company once that was building a brand new headquarters (and whose stock subsequently tanked) on a greenfield suburban/rural site and they really wanted something other than buildings in a sea of parking spaces but just could not make the economics work for either above ground or underground parking garages.

    This PDF discusses the cost of parking garages: http://shoup.bol.ucla.edu/HighCost.pdf
    Underground averaged 40% more expensive, but there was a surprising amount of variation by city. Here are some example costs:

    Across the 12 cities, the average cost per space ranges from a low of $26,000 in Phoenix to a high of $48,000 in Honolulu, with an overall average of $34,000 per space. For an aboveground garage, the cost per space ranges from $17,000 in Phoenix to $29,000 in Chicago and San Francisco, with an average of $24,000.

    P.S. The paper’s focus was on the cost of meeting minimum parking requirements. Their headline conclusion: “Minimum parking requirements increase the cost of constructing a shopping center by up to 67 percent if the parking is in an aboveground structure and by up to 93 percent if the parking is underground.”
    I found those numbers surprising.

    P.P.S. Here is a look at some cost factors for parking spaces: https://watrydesign.com/insights/top-10-issues-affecting-cost-of-building-a-parking-space
    I think all of this makes it easy to understand the scrimping.

    Read More
  99. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    Have you ever smelled the sweet eucalyptus mingling with the cool breeze as it blows off the Pacific as you head into Santa Cruz, or Capitola? Have you watched the sun set at the Marin Headlands, Stinson Beach or Half Moon Bay? Can you remember biting into the most lucious peach ever while standing in the farmers market in San Fran, picked yesterday from an orchard on the other side of the bay? Have you stood at the base of El Capitan, gazing up as the brilliant light bounces off the granite and forms rainbows in the mist of the waterfalls flowing into the Merced River? Have you ridden a bike down the PCH from Monterrey to Slo-town? If you have done any of these things, I don’t know how you can ask this question.

    I know of no place with a more fortuitous confluence of climate, terrain and sheer natural beauty than California. Jobs had a superb aesthetic sense. None of the virtues of california were lost on him. He could see there could beauty in simple typeface, and that each person could have a tiny moment of transcendence if the materials, design and workmanship of an everyday thing like your cell phone gave you a shiver when you touched it. Having the object respond perfectly to your desire, requiring no effort or though on your part as you used it was part of his vision. How could a person like Jobs not appreciate California in the 50s and 60s? Who doesn’t yearn for it now?

    Life is short. Beauty is rare and fleeting.
    Carpe Diem.

    Read More
    • Agree: Alden
    • Replies: @Romanian
    This reminds me of:

    Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.
     
    Sad that I'll never see your California. Maybe there'll be others.
    , @Whoever
    Beautiful post!
    And the perfect cover of the perfect California song:
    https://youtu.be/Oe3VBoE3g4k
  100. Apple and the rest of the tech stocks are at the outer limits of a massive asset bubble in stocks. Apple is going to sour soon.

    The Federal Reserve Bank is responsible for the huge asset bubble in tech stocks, including Apple. This is just like the tech bubble at the end of the 1990s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    Of course, the Fed is responsible! They have been creating a financial bubble after bubble since it allowed the captains of the manufacturing industries to abscond with American jobs to China. And the loss of jobs among gun loving, owning and toting has scared the devil out of those louts and to pacify that last generation of those who remember the real American prosperity, they have inflated the US economy with bullshit, fiat dollars without true value. But when the last of those buggers is dead and their effeminate progeny no longer threaten the powers that be with guns their parents bought to be really independent from tyranny, that would be the day this sham economy will come to a sudden and abrupt end, leaving the hoi polloi to fight it out for sustenance, while the 'elites' are safely ensconced in their gated communities, awaiting the mayhem to end so that they can replay the whole thing over!
  101. @Mr. Anon
    It would be agreeable to most everyone here if you left and never came back.

    Getting to be like Tourette’s with you. Why not just write ‘bear scat’ each time? More concise.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    Getting to be like Tourette’s with you. Why not just write ‘bear scat’ each time? More concise.
     
    Strange you should mention Tourette's, given that your every post is a spewing forth of contempt.

    But, if you think that s**t is an apt summary description of your posts, I'll defer to your judgement on this matter.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Well, if you think that 'excrement' is an apt summary description of your posts, I’ll defer to your judgement on this matter.
    , @Truth
    LMFAO!

    Three things are constant in this world:

    1.Death.
    2. Taxes.
    3. People hating Nymph Anon's guts.
  102. Completely OT, and not from a major news source or website, but it’s still a whopper.

    Not to alarm you, but I probably want you to quit your job, or at least take a demotion. Statistically speaking, you are probably taking up room that should go to someone else. If you are a white cis man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power. That’s right, please quit.

    http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/2017/05/11/get-out-the-way/#sthash.67d17aBi.dpuf

    Author:
    Piper Harron tried really hard to play by the rules of society and academia, but she failed. Not only did she fail, but she was miserable and found that playing by the rules wouldn’t even keep her safe. After giving up completely, and after giving birth to her second child, she finally finished the first draft of her number theory PhD thesis in 2014, a mere 6 years late.

    See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/about-the-editor/#sthash.L9KA0jFa.dpuf

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    When they look back at this time, they will have said that we have turned complaining into a fine art.

    But yeah, her desperate effort to reduce everyone into an atomized unit of "equality" is tragic.

    , @Some Economist
    I saw this story and couldn't look away.

    Continuing her bio there:
    She officially got her degree from Princeton University in January 2016, and is currently a Temporary Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

    According to the weirdest CV ever, she didn't even have a child until after six years in her program when most people would have already finished so I'm not sure what her point is. http://www.theliberatedmathematician.com/cv/

    She has a very colorful dissertation, which includes comics about her birth stories. Maybe John Derbyshire could chime in here on whether there's any advance in our understanding of mathematics to be found, but to me it looks like she just did a copy-paste potpourri thing. Basically the "Lost Puppy" as a metaphor for the industrial revolution scene from Billy Madison.
    http://www.theliberatedmathematician.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/PiperThesisPostPrint.pdf

    I can't not acknowledge, however, that (1) she's not bad with LaTeX and (2) it's actually difficult to write so much nonsense if you have a basic grasp of math, which I think she does. Which makes her *totally* worthy of a PhD from a tippy-top-tier math department with a Fields Medal-winning advisor.

    Imagine being on her committee, having to pretend this is not insane, putting your own signature on this...
    , @Faraday's Bobcat
    The left always confuses institutions with people. They think if Harvard University was turned over to a band of Irish Travellers, it would still be Harvard University, and all those ex-professors would suddenly have to go on welfare.
    , @Pericles
    Wonderful blog, and at the AMS of all places. There furthermore seems to be numerous other examples beyond the one above, like "Supremum/Supremacy" or editor Adriana Salerno complaining about how she was so busy in the racist patriarchal horror she inhabits that she didn't think about getting her car maintained ("A Different Kind of Problem").

    Now that even math has slipped its moorings of seriousness and departed for exciting new political goals, such as the tearing down of outdated monuments and provision of good safe jobs for women and minorities at the expense of stale pale males -- can we say the infection is complete?
  103. @Jack D
    In crowded European cities it is common to have underground parking garages. On top you see a lovely plaza or a park and the only thing visible above ground is a ramp entrance.

    However, I'm sure that must cost more than an above ground structure and there are limits to how deep you can go. In NY, the city is built on bedrock which is great for skyscraper foundations but the only way to dig a hole is with explosives. In other cities there is plenty of land available for parking garages and even surface lots since the white people fled to the suburbs (thus necessitating the car in the 1st place) and the businesses to suburban shopping malls.

    I have been in dozens of US cities where everyone drives downtown from the suburbs, parks in the parking garage, works in the office tower and then at 5PM they get back in their car and flee back to the suburbs. Often they never literally set foot on the streets. Some cities even have tunnel or skyway systems so even if you are walking you still don't have to be on the street. After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone. These places strike me as sad and depressing and the postwar replacement public spaces (e.g. shopping malls) are sterile and corporate and dedicated to commerce above all. There are no real civic spaces and no real civic life.

    Part of the problem is that much of the US does not have a Mediterranean climate. It's hot as hell in the summer and cold in the winter so no one wants to be out on the street. But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don't know what caused it (black criminality causing whites to flee was one element but not the only element) or how to fix it but it really sucks.

    I’ve seen vibrant downtowns and deserted ones. I think the crucial feature is security. There just isn’t enough of it. The contrast between Rochester’s downtown (low security) and Syracuse’s (adequate security) is instructive.

    Some decentralization of commerce is to be expected with changing modes of locomotion and settlement patterns. I think the main problem has been poor planning re suburban and neighborhood commercial nodes, both in their placement and in their configuration. You have the courts, city hall, the banks, the law firms, convention centers, arenas, and hotels downtown. You have pubs and restaurants derived from this traffic. You might still have some department stores. What you’d really benefit from would not be much more downtown, but places like this:

    http://villageofpittsford.org/

    You’ve got common parking lots, sidewalks, and commerce within walking distance of residences.

    Read More
    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    I’ve seen vibrant downtowns and deserted ones. I think the crucial feature is security. There just isn’t enough of it.

    Often, it's a case of hand in glove rather than cause and effect. There's two places with low security: high trust places where it isn't needed and low trust places that high trust people gave up on and no longer consider worth putting security resources into. You tend to see security where high trust people are that are "flipping" downward, or upward- either way the sense of vulnerability is there. Once things have gone down enough, those people and their resources disappear.
  104. @anonymous
    Frank Lloyd Wright hated garages and loved, loved, loved -- and maybe invented -- the carport. Which is OK in Los Angeles but sucks in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota.

    Cracker box apartment buildings are bad enough but the carports turn them from ugly to hideous. They’re ultra hideous when the car ports are in the front right on the street.

    Another horrible Wright innovation was the main entrance of single family homes placed around the side which forced every visitor to come in through the kitchen.

    Another bad thing about those cracker box apartments with car ports is that they get soooo shabby so quickly. Even in ghetto sections the apartments built 120 years ago still look presentable from the street.

    20th century architecture was horrible and 21st century architecture will be worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Growing up in Kalamazoo (Michiana), I knew two families living in the Parkwyn FLW houses. All the Kzoo houses had carports. Besides the car outside thing there was no place to put the garbage cans. Your garbage was always on display at the main entrance of your house.
  105. @utu

    But even in places where the climate is great, people are still in their cars. I don’t know what caused it
     
    America culture demands to be very nice and friendly to each other. Thus it saps lots of energy. Staying away from people saves energy. European do not pretend to be friendly and nice to strangers, so they can handle each other better. Neighbors live w/o ver acknowledging each other. Also by not being friendly in Europe you do not feel you are risking your life.

    New York city is much more normal. Not friendly but to the point. People can be very helpful and useful in NYC. For example they tell you "F.. if know", instead of wasting your time giving you wrong directions when you are in Midwest, because they just feel compelled to be helpful even if the can't. BTW, Brits are also awful in giving directions.

    America culture demands to be very nice and friendly to each other. Thus it saps lots of energy. Staying away from people saves energy. European do not pretend to be friendly and nice to strangers, so they can handle each other better. Neighbors live w/o ver acknowledging each other. Also by not being friendly in Europe you do not feel you are risking your life.

    Rubbish

    Read More
  106. From the WSJ article: “The estimated $5 billion project commanded years of attention from top Apple executives including Chief Design Officer Jony Ive …”

    So maybe now they can focus on products for customers again?

    Read More
  107. @fitzGetty
    Interesting that Apple chose an alpha London architect to design this HQ ... in London, Apple will move into the rescued 1930s Battersea Power Station ...

    Pigs on the wing

    Read More
  108. @Autochthon
    Okay in Los Angeles?! Ha! You're forgetting that garages keep out criminals
    as well as cold and precipitation. Hell, I'd argue it's more important to have a garage than a carport in L.A. than in most parts of the states you mention.

    In the brief few months since I sold my house my vehicles have been vandalised twice, most recently to the tune of about $8,000.00.

    Carports are okay in Los Angeles! What a card! Buy this guy a drink, somebody, will ya?

    Car ports are safe north of Venice Blvd and west of Overland on the west side. I don’t know about Santa Monica.

    Read More
  109. @Clark Westwood
    I've known her valleys, I've known her mountains,
    Her missions and her courtyards and her fountains,
    The giant redwoods towering in the skies of her
    That grow as though as they know they show the size of her!
    I've often wandered her farthest reaches,
    Her deserts and her snow and, yes, her beaches.
    A land that paradise could well be jealous of,
    That's California, California, blessed by heaven from above,
    That's California, land I love!


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cp-8pS4C5fs

    It’s Always Black Hole Sunny in California :

    https://youtu.be/3mbBbFH9fAg

    When asked about the line, “Times are gone for honest men”, late Cornell said:

    It’s really difficult for a person to create their own life and their own freedom.

    “…It’s going to become more and more difficult, and it’s going to create more and more disillusioned people who become dishonest and angry and are willing to fu@k the next guy to get what they want.

    There’s so much stepping on the backs of other people in our profession.

    We’ve been so lucky that we’ve never had to do that.

    Part of it was because of our own tenacity, and part of it was because we were lucky…”

    And this would be,I guess, Sinatra’s Way:

    https://youtu.be/tnfJ6eB0duM?list=PLAvRw_pbS9nmjqcrgWWWGB-JLDu214ygR

    RIP

    Read More
  110. @Ray P
    Every pipe concealed? Doesn't sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe's derided exposed, protruding I-beams? Richard Rogers' Lloyds building is now an eighties embarrassment?

    Isn’t it asking for plumbing problems to conceal all the pipes in such a fashion?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    Not really, there are always access doors to get into the plumbing.
  111. @Rod1963
    Excellent summation of Jobs.


    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does
     
    Spot on. The whole thing of making Jobs a demi-god is rather sickening. The man was indeed talented at aesthetics and marketing, branding etc. But in terms of a human being he was a total a**hole and sociopath. His temper tantrums and acid tongue tirades were legendary in Silicon Valley by the 90's. Jobs went through all the top psychologists in the area to no avail - you can't fix a sociopath with zero social skills intelligence.

    The most overrated “genius” of all time…

    http://s1096.photobucket.com/user/gubrushadow/media/502354_460s.jpg.html

    Read More
  112. @Rod1963
    Excellent summation of Jobs.


    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does
     
    Spot on. The whole thing of making Jobs a demi-god is rather sickening. The man was indeed talented at aesthetics and marketing, branding etc. But in terms of a human being he was a total a**hole and sociopath. His temper tantrums and acid tongue tirades were legendary in Silicon Valley by the 90's. Jobs went through all the top psychologists in the area to no avail - you can't fix a sociopath with zero social skills intelligence.

    The term “reality distortion field” was coined to describe Jobs. That’s the reverse of zero social skills.

    As to his personality, he apparently also regularly parked in handicap spaces.

    Apple veteran Andy Hertzfled reports on his history of the Mac website, Folklore.org, that Jobs was constantly parking in the restricted spaces. “He seemed to think the blue wheelchair symbol meant the spot was reserved for the chairman,” Hertzfeld writes.

    In a comment to Hertzfeld’s post, Dan Cochran, who worked at Apple, noted that one day someone converted the handicapped “wheelchair” graphic into the Mercedes logo.

    “I thought it was hilarious but as I recall Steve didn’t find it particularly funny at all,” he notes.

    Quipped former Apple executive, Jean-Louis Gassee, when he saw Jobs park in a restricted spot: “I never realized those spaces were for the emotionally handicapped…” (According to Wikiquote, Jean-Louis now says morally handicapped when retelling the story.)

    http://www.cultofmac.com/2613/steve-jobs-still-parking-in-handicapped-spaces-the-pictures/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Sir Jonny Ivey says that Jobs' awfulness toward people around him was especially hard to forgive because he was the absolute opposite of unaware of the feelings of other people. He was the world's greatest salesman (and his biological sister is a talented novelist).
    , @whorefinder

    The term “reality distortion field” was coined to describe Jobs. That’s the reverse of zero social skills.
     
    Some definitions of sociopaths are such that sociopaths know exactly what emotions others are feeling, but they just don't care or have empathy. Some define sociopathy/psychopathy as a deficiency in empathy.

    Jobs knew the emotions of others, but just didn't care. His emotions were always paramount.
  113. The South Bay was so pleasant up until the Indian invasion. Silicon Valley’s best days are behind us.

    Read More
  114. @Alfa158
    I haven't been able to verify the apocryphal quote about Le Corbusier who was the supreme master of stark, un-livable, modern architecture: "He liberated architecture from the shackles of habitability" .
    On an old PBS show about architecture the host/critic took the camera crew to one of Le Corbusier's French houses, which consisted of raw concrete rectangular castings with plate glass walls, and the whole thing propped eight feet off the ground on steel posts. There was no narration for the segment, the camera simply moved through and around the house with no spoken commentary.

    Le Corbusier managed to con the city of Marseille into letting him design a moderate rent apartment complex. No one moved into it despite affordable rent because it was just so ugly and stark and the jailhouse corridors.

    The city was finally forced to move city employees in. Salaries were reduced and the amount was made up in free rent.

    The weirdest apartment building I ever saw was in Germany. It was in a rural area of small farms, rolling hills and little wooded areas. And there it was in the middle of fastness fields. The building was dark gray and about 20 stories high. It was surrounded by acres and acres of stark, bare parking lots. It looked like Darth Vader’s headquarters.

    Every apartment had a balcony. And Germany being Germany, every balcony was covered with bursts and bursts of geraniums. And they were all the same shade of light pink. I don’t know what was weirder, the Darth Vader building in a rural area or the geraniums.

    They could have built 3 story townhouse triplexes in all that space, but they had to build that Stalinesque monstrosity.

    Read More
  115. @Pericles
    The term "reality distortion field" was coined to describe Jobs. That's the reverse of zero social skills.

    As to his personality, he apparently also regularly parked in handicap spaces.

    Apple veteran Andy Hertzfled reports on his history of the Mac website, Folklore.org, that Jobs was constantly parking in the restricted spaces. “He seemed to think the blue wheelchair symbol meant the spot was reserved for the chairman,” Hertzfeld writes.

    In a comment to Hertzfeld’s post, Dan Cochran, who worked at Apple, noted that one day someone converted the handicapped “wheelchair” graphic into the Mercedes logo.

    “I thought it was hilarious but as I recall Steve didn’t find it particularly funny at all,” he notes.

    Quipped former Apple executive, Jean-Louis Gassee, when he saw Jobs park in a restricted spot: “I never realized those spaces were for the emotionally handicapped…” (According to Wikiquote, Jean-Louis now says morally handicapped when retelling the story.)
     
    http://www.cultofmac.com/2613/steve-jobs-still-parking-in-handicapped-spaces-the-pictures/

    Sir Jonny Ivey says that Jobs’ awfulness toward people around him was especially hard to forgive because he was the absolute opposite of unaware of the feelings of other people. He was the world’s greatest salesman (and his biological sister is a talented novelist).

    Read More
  116. @Opinionator
    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.

    You’re asking as if the author of this post would know… A billionaire boy he ain’t and therefore he’d be far removed from ‘their’ thinking all the while dreaming of that exclusive world while wallowing in the mud pits of Unz!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    A billionaire iSteve would be interesting, and we can begin him on the process right away.
  117. @AnotherGuessModel
    Completely OT, and not from a major news source or website, but it's still a whopper.

    Not to alarm you, but I probably want you to quit your job, or at least take a demotion. Statistically speaking, you are probably taking up room that should go to someone else. If you are a white cis man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power. That’s right, please quit.

    http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/2017/05/11/get-out-the-way/#sthash.67d17aBi.dpuf

    Author:
    Piper Harron tried really hard to play by the rules of society and academia, but she failed. Not only did she fail, but she was miserable and found that playing by the rules wouldn’t even keep her safe. After giving up completely, and after giving birth to her second child, she finally finished the first draft of her number theory PhD thesis in 2014, a mere 6 years late.

    See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/about-the-editor/#sthash.L9KA0jFa.dpuf

    When they look back at this time, they will have said that we have turned complaining into a fine art.

    But yeah, her desperate effort to reduce everyone into an atomized unit of “equality” is tragic.

    Read More
  118. @Art Deco
    I've seen vibrant downtowns and deserted ones. I think the crucial feature is security. There just isn't enough of it. The contrast between Rochester's downtown (low security) and Syracuse's (adequate security) is instructive.

    Some decentralization of commerce is to be expected with changing modes of locomotion and settlement patterns. I think the main problem has been poor planning re suburban and neighborhood commercial nodes, both in their placement and in their configuration. You have the courts, city hall, the banks, the law firms, convention centers, arenas, and hotels downtown. You have pubs and restaurants derived from this traffic. You might still have some department stores. What you'd really benefit from would not be much more downtown, but places like this:

    http://villageofpittsford.org/

    You've got common parking lots, sidewalks, and commerce within walking distance of residences.

    I’ve seen vibrant downtowns and deserted ones. I think the crucial feature is security. There just isn’t enough of it.

    Often, it’s a case of hand in glove rather than cause and effect. There’s two places with low security: high trust places where it isn’t needed and low trust places that high trust people gave up on and no longer consider worth putting security resources into. You tend to see security where high trust people are that are “flipping” downward, or upward- either way the sense of vulnerability is there. Once things have gone down enough, those people and their resources disappear.

    Read More
  119. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    To give Jobs his due — or at least to give his legend its due — it does seem like innovation at Apple came and went with his presence or absence. I was never a great fan of some of those innovations, e.g. doing away with most disk drives, many I/O ports, virtualizing the music industry, increasingly sealing off the Mac from self-upgrading or modifying, and making the Apple universe a self-reinforcing gated community.

    OTOH, the Mac itself, the iPhone, and iPad were all visionary in their ways, and one used to be able to expect a new mind-blowing Apple product every couple of years. Since Job’s departure, there’s been precious little of that and an almost complete abandonment of support for new Macs (and an accompanying abandonment of the Mac’s professional users).

    Jobs may well have been a sociopath, but he was also a genius, and I miss the genius part still being in play.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    He wasn't a genius but he was a relentless promoter of other geniuses at (Ames Research Center/Xerox PARC/Macintosh group at Apple) work. He was a maniacal salesman with good taste. I'm not a big fan of using ones finger to drag and drop apps not files.
  120. @Alfa158
    I haven't been able to verify the apocryphal quote about Le Corbusier who was the supreme master of stark, un-livable, modern architecture: "He liberated architecture from the shackles of habitability" .
    On an old PBS show about architecture the host/critic took the camera crew to one of Le Corbusier's French houses, which consisted of raw concrete rectangular castings with plate glass walls, and the whole thing propped eight feet off the ground on steel posts. There was no narration for the segment, the camera simply moved through and around the house with no spoken commentary.

    I spent a week in a Corbusier building (quite a large one, housing some 100 people living in community) in 1975. It was not particularly pleasing to the eye, but it was superbly comfortable, and I liked being inside it, looking out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    So much architecture is judged by its aesthetic value as a big piece of sculpture taking up space in the landscape but I agree that if one is going to spend any amount of time in it the comfort and general ambience are what count. I still however balk at buildings built dead on top of a hill or ridge line no matter how spectacular the 360 degree views are.
  121. Parking garages are a 20th century phenomenon which will made extinct by self driving cars. But while we have $5 billion and the need for them now, Apple could have gone a different route, the robot valet.

    Employees pull into the garage, exit their car and it is parked for them. I once worked at an auto plant with a ten story tower which held car bodies ready for final assembly. When needed on the line, a forklift crane would zoom up to the bay and retrieve the car body. No body ran it, it was all computerized. Look at the man hours wasted by very highly paid folks driving around to park and finding their car after work. It would also mean the footprint of the garage could be quite a bit smaller as you don’t need “roads” going through it.

    Porsche has a Condo building in Miami with something similar, car elevators so you can part on the 12 story outside you unit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Valet parking is fine for arriving but bad for departing.
    , @Jack D
    Even if you had a fleet of self driving cars, most people need a ride to work in the morning and then one back home at night. During the day you could keep some of the fleet moving with rides around town, but a large part of the fleet is going to need to be parked NEAR downtown so it is available to serve rush hour going home. The cars won't have to be right underneath the office towers as they are now but they are going to have to be fairly close so you don't have to spend a lot of time and fuel repositioning them to serve rush hour going home. The value of downtown parking garages will drop to the point where they are competitive with the open air lots that are at the edge of downtown.

    Conversely, nowadays people have their cars in their driveways. In the self driving era, where will these cars be parked at night?
  122. @Charles Pewitt
    Apple and the rest of the tech stocks are at the outer limits of a massive asset bubble in stocks. Apple is going to sour soon.

    https://twitter.com/RolfeWinkler/status/862362578684596224

    The Federal Reserve Bank is responsible for the huge asset bubble in tech stocks, including Apple. This is just like the tech bubble at the end of the 1990s.

    Of course, the Fed is responsible! They have been creating a financial bubble after bubble since it allowed the captains of the manufacturing industries to abscond with American jobs to China. And the loss of jobs among gun loving, owning and toting has scared the devil out of those louts and to pacify that last generation of those who remember the real American prosperity, they have inflated the US economy with bullshit, fiat dollars without true value. But when the last of those buggers is dead and their effeminate progeny no longer threaten the powers that be with guns their parents bought to be really independent from tyranny, that would be the day this sham economy will come to a sudden and abrupt end, leaving the hoi polloi to fight it out for sustenance, while the ‘elites’ are safely ensconced in their gated communities, awaiting the mayhem to end so that they can replay the whole thing over!

    Read More
  123. @Grumpy
    It was here at iSteve where I was first made aware of Gangnam Style, so I don't feel too guilty posting this.

    The music video features the most pristine parking garage I had ever seen. Are the Koreans ahead of Apple on this?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bZkp7q19f0

    I prefer the underground car park in Downfall: purring , dazzlingly clean Mercedes’ with perfectly tailored drivers wait for Himmler and other Nazi Bonzen to make their leisurely escape from Berlin and the Fuehrer whose birthday they have just celebrated for the last time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    While an SSK is more stylish a three axle AWD G4 would handle rubble strewn streets better and certainly could carry more gold.

    http://cars-mercedes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/5/mercedes-benz-g4-w31_5.jpg
  124. @Alfa158
    Could have been worse. Remember the 1984 protest at the Libyan embassy in London? Libyan security guards opened fire on the protesters from inside the embassy. An English policewoman, Yvonne Fletcher, was killed.

    Tam Dalyell MP disputed that in Parliament.

    “With the agreement of Queenie Fletcher, her mother, I raised with the Home Office the three remarkable programmes that were made by Fulcrum, and their producer, Richard Bellfield, called Murder In St. James’s.[10][11] Television speculation is one thing, but this was rather more than that, because on film was George Styles, the senior ballistics officer in the British Army, who said that, as a ballistics expert, he believed that the WPC could not have been killed from the second floor of the Libyan embassy, as was suggested.

    “Also on film was my friend, Hugh Thomas, who talked about the angles at which bullets could enter bodies, and the position of those bodies. Hugh Thomas was, for years, the consultant surgeon of the Royal Victoria hospital in Belfast, and I suspect he knows more about bullets entering bodies than anybody else in Britain. Above that was Professor Bernard Knight, who, on and off, has been the Home Office pathologist for 25 years. When Bernard Knight gives evidence on film that the official explanation could not be, it is time for an investigation.”

    Who knows though, a bizarre thing for the Libyan’s to have done.

    Read More
  125. @Mr. Anon

    It would be instructive to know what it was about California that so appealed to Steve Jobs.
     
    It's California. It's a nice place with a fantastic climate.

    California in the 1960s and 1970s of Jobs’ youth was a pretty cool place with more opportunities for personal expression than elsewhere in the country. There were also pretty girls, sunshine and employment which all make for a wonderful place to live.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Yes, back then - fortunately, for the people who lived there - California was the place where the future happens.

    Whereas today - unfortunately, for the people who live there - California is the place where the future happens.
  126. @Barnard
    Buffett's phony "Midwest frugal" persona is so insufferable. Yes, buying and holding their homes was a great deal in certain parts of the country for people in Buffett's generation. That doesn't have much to do with home ownership today.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/billionaire-buffett-says-he-caps-spending-at-mcdonalds-on-stock-markets-down-days-2017-01-05

    Here is the Zillow listing of the house across the street from Buffett, currently on the market for $1.25 million.

    https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/225-S-55th-St-Omaha-NE-68132/75811514_zpid/

    S>Buffett’s phony “Midwest frugal” persona is so insufferable

    Agree 100%. And it really annoys me when I see people who buy the act and then denigrate non-wealthy Americans for failing to be more like the (fake) persona of Warren Buffet.

    Read More
  127. @AnotherGuessModel
    Completely OT, and not from a major news source or website, but it's still a whopper.

    Not to alarm you, but I probably want you to quit your job, or at least take a demotion. Statistically speaking, you are probably taking up room that should go to someone else. If you are a white cis man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power. That’s right, please quit.

    http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/2017/05/11/get-out-the-way/#sthash.67d17aBi.dpuf

    Author:
    Piper Harron tried really hard to play by the rules of society and academia, but she failed. Not only did she fail, but she was miserable and found that playing by the rules wouldn’t even keep her safe. After giving up completely, and after giving birth to her second child, she finally finished the first draft of her number theory PhD thesis in 2014, a mere 6 years late.

    See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/about-the-editor/#sthash.L9KA0jFa.dpuf

    I saw this story and couldn’t look away.

    Continuing her bio there:
    She officially got her degree from Princeton University in January 2016, and is currently a Temporary Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

    According to the weirdest CV ever, she didn’t even have a child until after six years in her program when most people would have already finished so I’m not sure what her point is. http://www.theliberatedmathematician.com/cv/

    She has a very colorful dissertation, which includes comics about her birth stories. Maybe John Derbyshire could chime in here on whether there’s any advance in our understanding of mathematics to be found, but to me it looks like she just did a copy-paste potpourri thing. Basically the “Lost Puppy” as a metaphor for the industrial revolution scene from Billy Madison.
    http://www.theliberatedmathematician.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/PiperThesisPostPrint.pdf

    I can’t not acknowledge, however, that (1) she’s not bad with LaTeX and (2) it’s actually difficult to write so much nonsense if you have a basic grasp of math, which I think she does. Which makes her *totally* worthy of a PhD from a tippy-top-tier math department with a Fields Medal-winning advisor.

    Imagine being on her committee, having to pretend this is not insane, putting your own signature on this…

    Read More
  128. @biz
    Have you ever been to California? There are mountains right up against the ocean, enormous canyons backed by painted deserts, and forests of giant trees surrounding crystal blue alpine lakes, all right above vineyards and beaches with a perfect Mediterranean climate. Then, right in the middle of all of that, are two enormous, fascinating, chaotic cities, both built on impossible dreams, fame in one case and boundless innovation in the other, and in each the entire world of cuisine and culture is available at your fingertips.

    As long as you never have to worry about money and never have to commute during rush hour, California is a paradise on Earth, and both of those conditions applied to Steve Jobs.

    California is as beautiful and amazing as any place on this earth can be. And it is still full of wonderful people doing wonderful things.

    “The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew California was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
    ~ Eve Babitz

    “It seemed like a matter of minutes when we began rolling in the foothills before Oakland and suddenly reached a height and saw stretched out ahead of us the fabulous white city of San Francisco on her eleven mystic hills with the blue Pacific and its advancing wall of potato-patch fog beyond, and smoke and goldenness in the late afternoon of time.”
    ~ Jack Kerouac

    “This morning I saw a coyote walking through the sagebrush right at the very edge of the ocean ― next stop China. The coyote was acting like he was in New Mexico or Wyoming, except that there were whales passing below. That’s what California does for you. Come down to Big Sur and let your soul have some room to get outside its marrow.”
    ~ Richar Brautigan

    “I grew up in a utopia, I did. California when I was a child was a child’s paradise, I was healthy, well fed, well clothed, well housed. I went to school and there were libraries with all the world in them and after school I played in orange groves and in Little League and in the band and down at the beach and every day was an adventure. . . . I grew up in utopia.”
    ~ Kim Stanley

    “If you’ve had good gin on a hot day in Southern California with the people you love, you forget Nebraska. The two things cannot coexist. The stronger, better of the two wins.”
    ~ Ann Patchett

    “It was a splendid population – for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home – you never find that sort of people among pioneers – you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day – and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, ‘Well, that is California all over.’”
    ~ Mark Twain

    “California, still a magical vanity fair.”
    ~ Eileen Granfors

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it’s being invaded and destroyed, why don’t you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Too late. The majority of Californians have expressed their preferences.
    , @27 year old

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it’s being invaded and destroyed, why don’t you help us fight back and keep it ours?
     
    Un fucking believable.
    , @Eustace Tilley (not)
    I was a freshman at UCSB in the 1968-1969 school year. I lived in Montecito with my aunt and her family and commuted to Isla Vista by motorcycle, passing through Santa Barbara en route.

    I loved and still love California. And I am utterly mystified by your comment, "Why people in the eastern states rejoice in its decline puzzles me." I have never spoken to a New Yorker who rejoiced in California's decline. We see those very well-crafted tourist ads with Joe Montana and other "average Joes" and almost feel like going there; then we see the antiFa anarchists trashing buildings at Berkeley, with the "police" doing nothing to enforce the law, and realize it's just more Hollywood propaganda.

    You ask us to help you "fight back". Lord Byron wrote: "Who would be free themselves must strike the blow."
  129. @Anon
    It's a less impressive version of the GCHQ building.

    Also, apple hasn't been up to much "innovation" lately. They've ruined their Macbook line, still promote that worthless watch, and have severely damaged the Iphone brand by unnecessarily removing the headphone jack. Meanwhile, Samsung has a phone out that is better than the best quality Iphone 7.

    Apple's business strategy is in trouble, and they know it. There are rumors that they are going to branch out into other markets, perhaps buying EA or Disney. Sooner or later, their stock is coming down. Tim Cook is a competent manager but no innovator.

    Oh, what have they done to the MacBook that you don’t like?

    Read More
  130. @whorefinder
    Eh, if you buy that.

    It could be true that Woz made his money and now wants to goof around instead of running things (he's stated in interviews that when his role at Apple shifted from engineering to management he became unhappy), and certainly his lack of concrete action since supports that.

    But it's more telling that when Jobs and Woz went from creators to managers that Jobs became the arrogant-god-deity-wanna-be and Woz was given a corporate freeze out. Jobs ensconced himself in authority and ruthlessly cut out both bad designs AND anyone who could challenge him, especially after he was brought back to the company when it was on its knees.

    Jobs kept Woz on the payroll at Apple (and still is, apparently, to this day), and probably Woz has developed a few things for them along the way when he's bored. Jobs probably worked really hard to keep Woz from getting in with other companies and paying him off to remain in retirement, while Woz probably looked at Silicon Valley becoming a cutthroat West Coast Wall Street and not a gee-whiz playground and decided being a goofball millionaire inventor was better than corporate slavery and boring fights for absolute power.

    Woz has admitted on a few TWiT podcasts that Apple still cuts him a check every month. I don’t think it is so much to keep him in retirement or away from other companies, but more to keep the notion of him representing some kind of corporate history and continuity.

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company’s legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company’s legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.
     
    Doubtful. Woz has never had money troubles, at least publicly. Jobs just gave him a pittance to keep him from helping any rivals.
    , @Dan Kurt
    The tragedy of Apple vis-à-vis Woz is that soon after the SUITS took over Apple they had no use for the Woz who has a 180+ IQ and a Newton like ability to design innovative hardware, eg. low chip count designs with simplicity, often dual use, and elegance. What a waste. He warned them on the Apple III not to emulate the Apple II. They emulated and the product failed. They should have listened and had enabled direct hardware running of Apple II software. After that they should have given him a lab with a large budget and said to him design what you want and we will see what you do with the resources in time.

    Dan Kurt

  131. One of the “amazing facts” books I brought home for the kids claims that a single singing birthday card of today contains more computing power than the entire world did in 1950.

    The low-hanging fruit in this particular orchard seems to be all picked out.

    Read More
  132. @Muse
    Have you ever smelled the sweet eucalyptus mingling with the cool breeze as it blows off the Pacific as you head into Santa Cruz, or Capitola? Have you watched the sun set at the Marin Headlands, Stinson Beach or Half Moon Bay? Can you remember biting into the most lucious peach ever while standing in the farmers market in San Fran, picked yesterday from an orchard on the other side of the bay? Have you stood at the base of El Capitan, gazing up as the brilliant light bounces off the granite and forms rainbows in the mist of the waterfalls flowing into the Merced River? Have you ridden a bike down the PCH from Monterrey to Slo-town? If you have done any of these things, I don't know how you can ask this question.

    I know of no place with a more fortuitous confluence of climate, terrain and sheer natural beauty than California. Jobs had a superb aesthetic sense. None of the virtues of california were lost on him. He could see there could beauty in simple typeface, and that each person could have a tiny moment of transcendence if the materials, design and workmanship of an everyday thing like your cell phone gave you a shiver when you touched it. Having the object respond perfectly to your desire, requiring no effort or though on your part as you used it was part of his vision. How could a person like Jobs not appreciate California in the 50s and 60s? Who doesn't yearn for it now?

    Life is short. Beauty is rare and fleeting.
    Carpe Diem.

    This reminds me of:

    Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.

    Sad that I’ll never see your California. Maybe there’ll be others.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Rutger Hauer ad-libbed those great lines. They were not in the original script.
  133. @Mr Mack Bolan
    I lived there back in the early seventies, in the Monterey bay area.
    One thing that always stuck with me was, after going through Utah and up through the mountains, the sight looking down into the Salinas Valley wa.s amazing. The dusty brown from the other side of mountains turns to many different shades of lush green. It was like another planet with all of the strange plants and insects. Once we got close to the coast, the bumper to bumper traffic, the litter so thick along the roadsides it looks like snow from a distance. The people weren't too kind to their fellow man, if you happen to be looking at someone you get the middle finger instead of hi more often than not. The people take away from the paradise it could be.
    It's been thirty years and I would like to go back, just to see how far it has deteriorated.

    There’s not much litter nowadays.

    Read More
  134. @Muse
    Have you ever smelled the sweet eucalyptus mingling with the cool breeze as it blows off the Pacific as you head into Santa Cruz, or Capitola? Have you watched the sun set at the Marin Headlands, Stinson Beach or Half Moon Bay? Can you remember biting into the most lucious peach ever while standing in the farmers market in San Fran, picked yesterday from an orchard on the other side of the bay? Have you stood at the base of El Capitan, gazing up as the brilliant light bounces off the granite and forms rainbows in the mist of the waterfalls flowing into the Merced River? Have you ridden a bike down the PCH from Monterrey to Slo-town? If you have done any of these things, I don't know how you can ask this question.

    I know of no place with a more fortuitous confluence of climate, terrain and sheer natural beauty than California. Jobs had a superb aesthetic sense. None of the virtues of california were lost on him. He could see there could beauty in simple typeface, and that each person could have a tiny moment of transcendence if the materials, design and workmanship of an everyday thing like your cell phone gave you a shiver when you touched it. Having the object respond perfectly to your desire, requiring no effort or though on your part as you used it was part of his vision. How could a person like Jobs not appreciate California in the 50s and 60s? Who doesn't yearn for it now?

    Life is short. Beauty is rare and fleeting.
    Carpe Diem.

    Beautiful post!
    And the perfect cover of the perfect California song:
    https://youtu.be/Oe3VBoE3g4k

    Read More
  135. @Art Deco
    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts.

    Housing developments take up only a single-digit share of available land. The trouble has been that developers and planners created places for automobiles with human cargo, not places for people. (Mark Hinshaw discusses some aspects of this in True Urbanism). This has gone on all over the country.

    A lot of land in CA isn’t meant for housing, it’s either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    Traffic isn’t a issue unless you’re commuting to Los Angeles – then it is.

    The problem is over development of rural areas and the destruction it brings to the quality of life in a town or region.

    End result, a rural town goes from nice place to live to overly developed and expensive suburban shit hole and where everyone is miserable. This went on all through Southern California from the late 90′s to the mid 2000′s and still is.

    The housing built were often nothing but cookie cutter tracts, closely packed and totally bland. Most had little in the way of a back yard or front yard. Which had the habit of forcing children to either stay inside or wander the streets. Some have the distinction of not even having sidewalks.

    A lot of the fault can be laid at the developers feet. They often put forth housing tracts that violated a multitude of zoning laws and the general plan and used bribes and lawsuits to get their way. They even sued locals who publicly opposed them (SLAPP lawsuits).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    In the summer of 1962 we lived in a rented tract house while my father looked for just the right place in Los Gatos.
    This little horror was on the Los Gatos/San Jose border (the dreaded flatlands, as we learned to call them later) and I still get the willies thinking about it: no trees front or back; small, slapdash rooms, an arid wasteland of scorched streets as far as the eye could see as soon as one walked out the front door, a scarcity (no, an absence) of any sort of community life. In every way unlike the Hamilton Avenue in Palo Alto which we had just left.
    Thank God my mother noticed my increasing distress and packed me off to stay with her parents down in LA for the duration. The Beverly Hills public library was a walk away, and I calmed down soon enough.
    So yes, those tracts are hell, and I feel sorry indeed for those who actually had to spend their formative years in one.
    , @Alden
    True story about Dolger a big developer in N California. The farm fields were parceled into 25 ft lots, 24 lots to a block.

    Dolger skimmed a foot off each lot and got 25 lots per block. They also skimmed the materials for the 25th house from the other houses. So the 25th house on each block was pure profit except for labor
    , @Art Deco
    A lot of land in CA isn’t meant for housing, it’s either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    I see your point. The thing is, if I'm counting correctly, the land area outside the mountains and desert (i.e. where the default ecosystem is coastal forest or chaparral) is about 44,000 sq. miles. The entire non-agricultural population could be stuffed into tract developments at ordinary suburban densities (say, 2,300 persons per sq. mi) and you'd fill up perhaps 16,000 sq miles. And people do live (at low densities) in the 119,000 sq miles of mountain and desert.
  136. @Buck
    Parking garages are a 20th century phenomenon which will made extinct by self driving cars. But while we have $5 billion and the need for them now, Apple could have gone a different route, the robot valet.

    Employees pull into the garage, exit their car and it is parked for them. I once worked at an auto plant with a ten story tower which held car bodies ready for final assembly. When needed on the line, a forklift crane would zoom up to the bay and retrieve the car body. No body ran it, it was all computerized. Look at the man hours wasted by very highly paid folks driving around to park and finding their car after work. It would also mean the footprint of the garage could be quite a bit smaller as you don't need "roads" going through it.

    Porsche has a Condo building in Miami with something similar, car elevators so you can part on the 12 story outside you unit.

    Valet parking is fine for arriving but bad for departing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    A properly done automated system could have your car to you faster than you could walk to it. At least if not everyone wanted their cars at the same time. With a robot valet, you could give the thing prewarning and they could queue up your car so it would be there when you needed it. If everyone leaves work or the show at exactly the same time, it becomes a very difficult problem.

    VW has its AutoTürme - think of it like a disk drive for cars that allows random access.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7_LPZVCNSg

    The problem with stuff like this is that it is not cheap compared to rolling some asphalt onto a field and painting some stripes.

    , @Buck
    There's an app for that. Or would have been. You call for your car as you are walking toward the door, the app shoots back the time your car will be sitting in lane 7 (or whatever). It's like an automated version of the rental car pickup/drop off.

    Regardless, in astronomical real estate markets like the Bay area or Manhattan, it seems like parking is an area ripe for disruption.
    , @Old Palo Altan
    Last time I was at Musso Frank's there was no problem either end.
    For those who don't know it: Hollywood Boulevard, opened 1919, unchanged since.
    Drop everything and go there NOW.
  137. @Pachyderm Pachyderma
    You're asking as if the author of this post would know... A billionaire boy he ain't and therefore he'd be far removed from 'their' thinking all the while dreaming of that exclusive world while wallowing in the mud pits of Unz!

    A billionaire iSteve would be interesting, and we can begin him on the process right away.

    Read More
  138. @Steve Sailer
    Valet parking is fine for arriving but bad for departing.

    A properly done automated system could have your car to you faster than you could walk to it. At least if not everyone wanted their cars at the same time. With a robot valet, you could give the thing prewarning and they could queue up your car so it would be there when you needed it. If everyone leaves work or the show at exactly the same time, it becomes a very difficult problem.

    VW has its AutoTürme – think of it like a disk drive for cars that allows random access.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7_LPZVCNSg

    The problem with stuff like this is that it is not cheap compared to rolling some asphalt onto a field and painting some stripes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon

    At least if not everyone wanted their cars at the same time.
     
    Sounds like a brilliant system since everyone doesn't generally leave huge buildings filled with thousands of offices en masse at roughly 1700 every day.
  139. @Buck
    Parking garages are a 20th century phenomenon which will made extinct by self driving cars. But while we have $5 billion and the need for them now, Apple could have gone a different route, the robot valet.

    Employees pull into the garage, exit their car and it is parked for them. I once worked at an auto plant with a ten story tower which held car bodies ready for final assembly. When needed on the line, a forklift crane would zoom up to the bay and retrieve the car body. No body ran it, it was all computerized. Look at the man hours wasted by very highly paid folks driving around to park and finding their car after work. It would also mean the footprint of the garage could be quite a bit smaller as you don't need "roads" going through it.

    Porsche has a Condo building in Miami with something similar, car elevators so you can part on the 12 story outside you unit.

    Even if you had a fleet of self driving cars, most people need a ride to work in the morning and then one back home at night. During the day you could keep some of the fleet moving with rides around town, but a large part of the fleet is going to need to be parked NEAR downtown so it is available to serve rush hour going home. The cars won’t have to be right underneath the office towers as they are now but they are going to have to be fairly close so you don’t have to spend a lot of time and fuel repositioning them to serve rush hour going home. The value of downtown parking garages will drop to the point where they are competitive with the open air lots that are at the edge of downtown.

    Conversely, nowadays people have their cars in their driveways. In the self driving era, where will these cars be parked at night?

    Read More
  140. @Romanian
    This reminds me of:

    Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.
     
    Sad that I'll never see your California. Maybe there'll be others.

    Rutger Hauer ad-libbed those great lines. They were not in the original script.

    Read More
  141. @Rod1963
    A lot of land in CA isn't meant for housing, it's either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    Traffic isn't a issue unless you're commuting to Los Angeles - then it is.

    The problem is over development of rural areas and the destruction it brings to the quality of life in a town or region.

    End result, a rural town goes from nice place to live to overly developed and expensive suburban shit hole and where everyone is miserable. This went on all through Southern California from the late 90's to the mid 2000's and still is.

    The housing built were often nothing but cookie cutter tracts, closely packed and totally bland. Most had little in the way of a back yard or front yard. Which had the habit of forcing children to either stay inside or wander the streets. Some have the distinction of not even having sidewalks.

    A lot of the fault can be laid at the developers feet. They often put forth housing tracts that violated a multitude of zoning laws and the general plan and used bribes and lawsuits to get their way. They even sued locals who publicly opposed them (SLAPP lawsuits).

    In the summer of 1962 we lived in a rented tract house while my father looked for just the right place in Los Gatos.
    This little horror was on the Los Gatos/San Jose border (the dreaded flatlands, as we learned to call them later) and I still get the willies thinking about it: no trees front or back; small, slapdash rooms, an arid wasteland of scorched streets as far as the eye could see as soon as one walked out the front door, a scarcity (no, an absence) of any sort of community life. In every way unlike the Hamilton Avenue in Palo Alto which we had just left.
    Thank God my mother noticed my increasing distress and packed me off to stay with her parents down in LA for the duration. The Beverly Hills public library was a walk away, and I calmed down soon enough.
    So yes, those tracts are hell, and I feel sorry indeed for those who actually had to spend their formative years in one.

    Read More
  142. @Steve Sailer
    Valet parking is fine for arriving but bad for departing.

    There’s an app for that. Or would have been. You call for your car as you are walking toward the door, the app shoots back the time your car will be sitting in lane 7 (or whatever). It’s like an automated version of the rental car pickup/drop off.

    Regardless, in astronomical real estate markets like the Bay area or Manhattan, it seems like parking is an area ripe for disruption.

    Read More
  143. @Steve in Greensboro
    I was born in the same year as Jobs and grew up in the Almaden Valley (due South of San Jose and Southeast of Cupertino). We had the perfect California climate and a view of the lovely, redwood-covered Santa Cruz Mountains. Driving North toward San Jose, we would pass groves of plums, apricots and walnuts and strawberry truck farms.

    Santa Clara County from 1955 to 1972 was a veritable heaven.

    Where are the heaven-like places in the US now?

    Read More
  144. @Darwinian Arminian
    “During a period of exciting discovery or progress there is no time to plan the perfect headquarters. The time for that comes later, when all the important work has been done. Perfection, we know, is finality; and finality is death.”

    If this is true, then it provides an interesting parallel with another innovator that Steve Jobs frequently gets compared to: Walt Disney. He originally headquartered his animation studio in a converted organ factory on Hyperion Avenue, in large part because he couldn't afford anything better. Employees from that era almost universally remember the site as dilapidated, overheated, and disorganized, with entire departments that were sometimes located blocks away from the central location -- but in the ten years spent on that site Disney's company introduced, sound, color, and numerous other innovations to animated cartoons and produced Snow White, Pinnocchio, and Fantasia. When Snow White brought the studio record-breaking ticket sales and made Walt a rich man, he decided to re-invest some of his profits into a new, state-of-the-art studio for his animation team located on better property in Burbank. By 1940, the new campus had been completed and the company moved in. The result? Less than two years after arriving, the animators attempted to unionize, then went on strike, and many of the company's best talents ultimately left to go to work for other studios. Disney himself largely turned his back on the art form he had done so much to develop and spent the rest of his career mostly focusing on live action, then television, and theme park design. Through 1942, every winner of the Oscar for best animated short except for one was a Disney production; They would win that same award only once more during the nearly three decades that passed before Walt died. The animation studio that had once been regarded as the top of its class was reduced to a being another cog in a Hollywood machine, more valuable for the merchandising opportunities it could provide than for the ticket sales it could generate.

    Thank you. That was an interesting post about Walt Disney.

    Read More
  145. @AnotherGuessModel
    Completely OT, and not from a major news source or website, but it's still a whopper.

    Not to alarm you, but I probably want you to quit your job, or at least take a demotion. Statistically speaking, you are probably taking up room that should go to someone else. If you are a white cis man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power. That’s right, please quit.

    http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/2017/05/11/get-out-the-way/#sthash.67d17aBi.dpuf

    Author:
    Piper Harron tried really hard to play by the rules of society and academia, but she failed. Not only did she fail, but she was miserable and found that playing by the rules wouldn’t even keep her safe. After giving up completely, and after giving birth to her second child, she finally finished the first draft of her number theory PhD thesis in 2014, a mere 6 years late.

    See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/about-the-editor/#sthash.L9KA0jFa.dpuf

    The left always confuses institutions with people. They think if Harvard University was turned over to a band of Irish Travellers, it would still be Harvard University, and all those ex-professors would suddenly have to go on welfare.

    Read More
  146. @biz
    Have you ever been to California? There are mountains right up against the ocean, enormous canyons backed by painted deserts, and forests of giant trees surrounding crystal blue alpine lakes, all right above vineyards and beaches with a perfect Mediterranean climate. Then, right in the middle of all of that, are two enormous, fascinating, chaotic cities, both built on impossible dreams, fame in one case and boundless innovation in the other, and in each the entire world of cuisine and culture is available at your fingertips.

    As long as you never have to worry about money and never have to commute during rush hour, California is a paradise on Earth, and both of those conditions applied to Steve Jobs.

    And don’t need to drink water. Southern California is a semi-desert, and survives only by draining the water from major rivers until they no longer reach the sea. What happens if anything – disastrous bad weather, climate change, a big earthquake – disrupts those systems?

    California isn’t a paradise, unless it’s one for fools.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Among other things, what probably happens is you stop eating nearly as many nuts, vegetables, and fruits, unless you are entrenched in some kind of self-sufficient geodesic dome reserved for smug people who don't rely on modern irrigation and transportation for a great deal of life's necessities and conveniences, like us benighted fools.

    What also happens is those of us with brains in our skulls will fight our way to safer areas just as you would if a great disaster struck your geodesic home. Or is it also an impermeable fortress?
    , @Alden
    S. California gets most of it's water from snow melt in the mountains.
  147. @Jack D
    BTW, the places with the "good" schools are now often heavily Asian (both East and South). Those schools are so "good" that white people sometime avoid them because the atmosphere is too competitive. White people are like Goldilocks - they want their schools not too hard and not too soft.

    People here make fun of Asians as being mindless drones without creativity but the next generation of soft, lazy white people are going to get their lunch eaten by Asians, both here and abroad. People have NO idea what China is planning, nor do the Chinese want you to know. It will make what Japan did in the '30s look like a joke. And this time the Asians have their own nukes. The Chinese would much rather that America destroy itself with political infighting and worrying about whether Trump is Putin's gay lover and whether Black Lives Matter. For now they are biding their time because they still need trade with the West. By the time people realize what hit them, it will be too late.

    It’s not a cop out to remind people that the Asian almost always chooses well-established stability over chaos because that’s really their only salient target.
    [Now visualize all white people represented by an image of Charlie Day shouting the word "WILDCARD!"]

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    As I recall, Charlie tried to pull the same "Wildcard, bitches!" trick twice, and the second time his friends were able to anticipate him. Perhaps the Yellow Peril has learned to anticipate Whitey, who is in a rut lately.
  148. @Jack D
    A properly done automated system could have your car to you faster than you could walk to it. At least if not everyone wanted their cars at the same time. With a robot valet, you could give the thing prewarning and they could queue up your car so it would be there when you needed it. If everyone leaves work or the show at exactly the same time, it becomes a very difficult problem.

    VW has its AutoTürme - think of it like a disk drive for cars that allows random access.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7_LPZVCNSg

    The problem with stuff like this is that it is not cheap compared to rolling some asphalt onto a field and painting some stripes.

    At least if not everyone wanted their cars at the same time.

    Sounds like a brilliant system since everyone doesn’t generally leave huge buildings filled with thousands of offices en masse at roughly 1700 every day.

    Read More
  149. @Melendwyr
    And don't need to drink water. Southern California is a semi-desert, and survives only by draining the water from major rivers until they no longer reach the sea. What happens if anything - disastrous bad weather, climate change, a big earthquake - disrupts those systems?

    California isn't a paradise, unless it's one for fools.

    Among other things, what probably happens is you stop eating nearly as many nuts, vegetables, and fruits, unless you are entrenched in some kind of self-sufficient geodesic dome reserved for smug people who don’t rely on modern irrigation and transportation for a great deal of life’s necessities and conveniences, like us benighted fools.

    What also happens is those of us with brains in our skulls will fight our way to safer areas just as you would if a great disaster struck your geodesic home. Or is it also an impermeable fortress?

    Read More
  150. @Ray P
    Every pipe concealed? Doesn't sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe's derided exposed, protruding I-beams? Richard Rogers' Lloyds building is now an eighties embarrassment?

    Every pipe concealed? Doesn’t sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe’s derided exposed, protruding I-beams?

    Hiding the working parts under a glossy, mostly-impenetrable exterior is right in line with Apple’s core aesthetic.

    Read More
  151. @Anonymous
    Is anyone noticing that Apple's voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand "Americans" with thick foreign accents?

    Is anyone noticing that Apple’s voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand “Americans” with thick foreign accents?

    This is a very interesting question.

    Mrs Calvinist is not a native English speaker. Although she’s very fluent, voice recognition software sometimes lets her down. She then has to hand me her phone and so I can repeat, in my utterly mainstream Iowa-American accent, what she wants recognized. It never fails to register perfectly.

    But there are hundreds of millions of people — not just in the USA — trying to use voice recognition in English who don’t have textbook midwestern pronunciation. Overcoming these often-significant variations in pronunciation can’t be a trivial problem.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buck
    Iowa- American accent? I'm confused. Iowans are the only native English speakers which don't have accents. The rest of you sound like slur-gurgling. Enunciate, that's all we ask.
  152. anonymous says: • Website     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Alden
    Cracker box apartment buildings are bad enough but the carports turn them from ugly to hideous. They're ultra hideous when the car ports are in the front right on the street.

    Another horrible Wright innovation was the main entrance of single family homes placed around the side which forced every visitor to come in through the kitchen.

    Another bad thing about those cracker box apartments with car ports is that they get soooo shabby so quickly. Even in ghetto sections the apartments built 120 years ago still look presentable from the street.

    20th century architecture was horrible and 21st century architecture will be worse.

    Growing up in Kalamazoo (Michiana), I knew two families living in the Parkwyn FLW houses. All the Kzoo houses had carports. Besides the car outside thing there was no place to put the garbage cans. Your garbage was always on display at the main entrance of your house.

    Read More
  153. @Laugh Track

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.
     
    To give Jobs his due — or at least to give his legend its due — it does seem like innovation at Apple came and went with his presence or absence. I was never a great fan of some of those innovations, e.g. doing away with most disk drives, many I/O ports, virtualizing the music industry, increasingly sealing off the Mac from self-upgrading or modifying, and making the Apple universe a self-reinforcing gated community.

    OTOH, the Mac itself, the iPhone, and iPad were all visionary in their ways, and one used to be able to expect a new mind-blowing Apple product every couple of years. Since Job's departure, there's been precious little of that and an almost complete abandonment of support for new Macs (and an accompanying abandonment of the Mac's professional users).

    Jobs may well have been a sociopath, but he was also a genius, and I miss the genius part still being in play.

    He wasn’t a genius but he was a relentless promoter of other geniuses at (Ames Research Center/Xerox PARC/Macintosh group at Apple) work. He was a maniacal salesman with good taste. I’m not a big fan of using ones finger to drag and drop apps not files.

    Read More
  154. @Old Palo Altan
    I prefer the underground car park in Downfall: purring , dazzlingly clean Mercedes' with perfectly tailored drivers wait for Himmler and other Nazi Bonzen to make their leisurely escape from Berlin and the Fuehrer whose birthday they have just celebrated for the last time.

    While an SSK is more stylish a three axle AWD G4 would handle rubble strewn streets better and certainly could carry more gold.

    http://cars-mercedes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/5/mercedes-benz-g4-w31_5.jpg

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Absolutely.
    Any still around? I would travel quite some distance to gawk at one.
    , @Jack D
    A G4 is not all wheel drive. Only the back 4 wheels are driven. In Hogan's Heroes, "General Burkhalter" is often seen in one. (Most of the "Nazis" on Hogan's Heroes, including the General, were German Jews who had fled to Hollywood in the '30s). There were supposedly only 3 in existence but then a few years ago someone was selling 3 of them (one of them the Hollywood car) so there must be at least 5 (One in Spain - a gift from Hitler to Franco and one in the Czech Republic that had been turned into a fire engine after the war).
  155. @Whoever
    California is as beautiful and amazing as any place on this earth can be. And it is still full of wonderful people doing wonderful things.

    “The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew California was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
    ~ Eve Babitz

    “It seemed like a matter of minutes when we began rolling in the foothills before Oakland and suddenly reached a height and saw stretched out ahead of us the fabulous white city of San Francisco on her eleven mystic hills with the blue Pacific and its advancing wall of potato-patch fog beyond, and smoke and goldenness in the late afternoon of time.”
    ~ Jack Kerouac

    “This morning I saw a coyote walking through the sagebrush right at the very edge of the ocean ― next stop China. The coyote was acting like he was in New Mexico or Wyoming, except that there were whales passing below. That’s what California does for you. Come down to Big Sur and let your soul have some room to get outside its marrow.”
    ~ Richar Brautigan

    “I grew up in a utopia, I did. California when I was a child was a child's paradise, I was healthy, well fed, well clothed, well housed. I went to school and there were libraries with all the world in them and after school I played in orange groves and in Little League and in the band and down at the beach and every day was an adventure. . . . I grew up in utopia.”
    ~ Kim Stanley

    “If you've had good gin on a hot day in Southern California with the people you love, you forget Nebraska. The two things cannot coexist. The stronger, better of the two wins.”
    ~ Ann Patchett

    “It was a splendid population - for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home - you never find that sort of people among pioneers - you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day - and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, 'Well, that is California all over.'”
    ~ Mark Twain

    “California, still a magical vanity fair.”
    ~ Eileen Granfors

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it's being invaded and destroyed, why don't you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    Too late. The majority of Californians have expressed their preferences.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Given that those preferences are funded via taxes deductible from federal taxes - de facto "free" - if that deduction, or that federation, should change look for different preferences.
  156. @Melendwyr
    And don't need to drink water. Southern California is a semi-desert, and survives only by draining the water from major rivers until they no longer reach the sea. What happens if anything - disastrous bad weather, climate change, a big earthquake - disrupts those systems?

    California isn't a paradise, unless it's one for fools.

    S. California gets most of it’s water from snow melt in the mountains.

    Read More
  157. not a gorgeous building from the outside, but parking in this miami beach parking garage felt pretty cool https://static01.nyt.com/images/2011/01/24/us/JP-GARAGE-2/JP-GARAGE-2-jumbo.jpg

    it’s on the florida chapter of the AIA’s list of the top 100 buildings in the state

    Read More
  158. @Rod1963
    A lot of land in CA isn't meant for housing, it's either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    Traffic isn't a issue unless you're commuting to Los Angeles - then it is.

    The problem is over development of rural areas and the destruction it brings to the quality of life in a town or region.

    End result, a rural town goes from nice place to live to overly developed and expensive suburban shit hole and where everyone is miserable. This went on all through Southern California from the late 90's to the mid 2000's and still is.

    The housing built were often nothing but cookie cutter tracts, closely packed and totally bland. Most had little in the way of a back yard or front yard. Which had the habit of forcing children to either stay inside or wander the streets. Some have the distinction of not even having sidewalks.

    A lot of the fault can be laid at the developers feet. They often put forth housing tracts that violated a multitude of zoning laws and the general plan and used bribes and lawsuits to get their way. They even sued locals who publicly opposed them (SLAPP lawsuits).

    True story about Dolger a big developer in N California. The farm fields were parceled into 25 ft lots, 24 lots to a block.

    Dolger skimmed a foot off each lot and got 25 lots per block. They also skimmed the materials for the 25th house from the other houses. So the 25th house on each block was pure profit except for labor

    Read More
  159. @Faraday's Bobcat
    The left always confuses institutions with people. They think if Harvard University was turned over to a band of Irish Travellers, it would still be Harvard University, and all those ex-professors would suddenly have to go on welfare.

    You mean it hasn’t?

    Read More
  160. @Mr Mack Bolan
    I lived there back in the early seventies, in the Monterey bay area.
    One thing that always stuck with me was, after going through Utah and up through the mountains, the sight looking down into the Salinas Valley wa.s amazing. The dusty brown from the other side of mountains turns to many different shades of lush green. It was like another planet with all of the strange plants and insects. Once we got close to the coast, the bumper to bumper traffic, the litter so thick along the roadsides it looks like snow from a distance. The people weren't too kind to their fellow man, if you happen to be looking at someone you get the middle finger instead of hi more often than not. The people take away from the paradise it could be.
    It's been thirty years and I would like to go back, just to see how far it has deteriorated.

    I’ve never seen litter on highways or anywhere but Mexican sections of Los Angeles.

    Read More
  161. @Old fogey
    Isn't it asking for plumbing problems to conceal all the pipes in such a fashion?

    Not really, there are always access doors to get into the plumbing.

    Read More
  162. @Art Deco
    Why not use expensive concrete in the parking garages of a $5 billion project? Seriously, everybody starts and finishes their workday in the company parking garage, so why not make it a little nicer than a parking garage at LAX?

    It would have been agreeable over the years had municipal governments made more use of community parking - say, land use regulations that created public spaces which commercial developers would build around so that the rear of their establishments would be adjacent to a common municipal parking lot and the front would be smack on the sidewalk - in order that streets of a given width be able to handle more traffic and the aesthetics of the streetscape would be much improved. In higher density areas, you might have had community parking garages maintained by the municipality, something you see only in central business districts. With regard to the interiors, engineering, security, and organization of space (so that motorists could find their vehicle and find the entrance readily) would be the priority. The facade would properly be decorative, so the garage does not mar the streetscape. Over the postwar period, planning agencies and real estate developers could have done a much better job at integrating automobiles into urban life.

    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape. When the lots are between the street and the stores, there is a lot less crime in the parking lots.

    The obsolete farm equipment brought from Africa in the colonial period made parking lots behind the stores playgrounds for criminals. They ruin everything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape.


    It's called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.
    , @Truth

    They ruin everything.
     
    Except lonely Caucasoid lady's Saturday evenings...

    Ask Jimbo Christian, he'll tell you!

  163. @Jefferson
    "After dark and on weekends you could shoot a cannon down the main streets in the downtown business district and not hit anyone."

    Here in Northern California that describes downtown Sacramento. 8pm there looks like it's 4am in the morning. That's how dead it is there as soon as it gets dark. It looks like the Will Smith film I Am Legend.

    A city with a population of almost 500,000 thousand people like Sactown should not be so dead. I can't imagine a European city with a similar population size as Sacramento being so lifeless in it's downtown area.

    We could call this “the Putnam Effect,” after Harvard’s Robert Putnam, who wrote Bowling Alone.

    Putnam found that racial diversity is adverse to social capital.

    In response, here is a Berman and her assistants cheering for the decline of social capital — because functioning societies are “dangerous” for the Founders of Morality:

    http://slate.me/1DMAbJn

    Is that one reason why we can’t have nice things?

    Read More
  164. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Is anyone noticing that Apple’s voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand “Americans” with thick foreign accents?

     

    This is a very interesting question.

    Mrs Calvinist is not a native English speaker. Although she's very fluent, voice recognition software sometimes lets her down. She then has to hand me her phone and so I can repeat, in my utterly mainstream Iowa-American accent, what she wants recognized. It never fails to register perfectly.

    But there are hundreds of millions of people -- not just in the USA -- trying to use voice recognition in English who don't have textbook midwestern pronunciation. Overcoming these often-significant variations in pronunciation can't be a trivial problem.

    Iowa- American accent? I’m confused. Iowans are the only native English speakers which don’t have accents. The rest of you sound like slur-gurgling. Enunciate, that’s all we ask.

    Read More
  165. @Art Deco
    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts.

    Housing developments take up only a single-digit share of available land. The trouble has been that developers and planners created places for automobiles with human cargo, not places for people. (Mark Hinshaw discusses some aspects of this in True Urbanism). This has gone on all over the country.

    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    From what I read, Mr. Buffet spends most of his time in Manhattan or Palm Beach.

    The humble Wizard of Omaha stuff is a contrived public image.

    By the way, His Buffetness recently sold a big load of IBM stock.

    IBM used to be big, big. Apple looks to be the next IBM.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    My post wasn't about Buffett. I know nothing about Buffett.
  166. @Art Deco
    Getting to be like Tourette's with you. Why not just write 'bear scat' each time? More concise.

    Getting to be like Tourette’s with you. Why not just write ‘bear scat’ each time? More concise.

    Strange you should mention Tourette’s, given that your every post is a spewing forth of contempt.

    But, if you think that s**t is an apt summary description of your posts, I’ll defer to your judgement on this matter.

    Read More
  167. @new handle
    California in the 1960s and 1970s of Jobs' youth was a pretty cool place with more opportunities for personal expression than elsewhere in the country. There were also pretty girls, sunshine and employment which all make for a wonderful place to live.

    Yes, back then – fortunately, for the people who lived there – California was the place where the future happens.

    Whereas today – unfortunately, for the people who live there – California is the place where the future happens.

    Read More
  168. @Alden
    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape. When the lots are between the street and the stores, there is a lot less crime in the parking lots.

    The obsolete farm equipment brought from Africa in the colonial period made parking lots behind the stores playgrounds for criminals. They ruin everything.

    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape.

    It’s called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    It’s called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.
     
    Suburban Loci? You mean "suburbs", you pretentious clown.
  169. @David Davenport
    Mr. Buffett has lived in the same, suburban, stucco house in Omaha for decades.

    From what I read, Mr. Buffet spends most of his time in Manhattan or Palm Beach.

    The humble Wizard of Omaha stuff is a contrived public image.

    By the way, His Buffetness recently sold a big load of IBM stock.

    IBM used to be big, big. Apple looks to be the next IBM.

    My post wasn’t about Buffett. I know nothing about Buffett.

    Read More
  170. Maybe Apple is the next IBM. Or maybe they are poised for a huge opportunity in AI and AR (Augmented Reality). Remember the Pokemon Go craze a few years ago where people would wander around to “collect” Pokemon on their phones with AR displaying a Pokemon character on the camera screen of their phone?

    Now imagine a system where the phone acts as a base computer, some have up to 4 GB of RAM and are fairly powerful, connected to a whole lot of servers on the back end for heavy processing, but most being done locally on the phone. To say, provide AI assistance in recognizing threats while driving. Say you have an Iphone, connected via Bluetooth with “Apple Glasses” that feed images live to your phone that provides DRIVING ASSISTANCE. It basically HELPS NOTICING, an Isteve Theme. And it can notice more than you can.

    It doesn’t get tired, it does not get sleepy, it does not get preoccupied. If it sees a pattern that could indicate danger it could flash a red circle on the problematic object on your glasses. That’s Assistive AI aimed directly at the consumer.

    Now, Apple is not a pioneer in anything. They did not invent the MP3 player, smart phone, tablet computer, or GUI computing. They just made it the most stylish and easy to use, and most integrated, at the highest price point.

    The Apple Watch is a dud; though Tim Cook talks it up. As noted, while Apple has neglected its Macbook Pro line, most all developers pay a lot to use them — and many businesses do as well because the total cost of Macs is less than PCs when labor costs are factored in for support, downtime, etc. Windows lost decisively the server wars, almost every app either phone or company related will run on some Linux virtual machine spun up on Amazon Web Services or some other service. Microsoft is even desperately trying to compete with Apple by offering terminal Linux services on Windows 10, even though its incomplete and Windows itself is a massive pain to deal with — interminable install times, even worse software updates, malware galore, sluggish like Hillary before her five o clock pick-me-up.

    HOWEVER … Apple has open source Swift. IBM and others now offer Swift web development frameworks like Kitura, Vapor, Perfect, that match Rails and other mature frameworks in features and beat it in speed. Yes there are build packs for Heroku. Cocoa and other dependencies for IOS development are not open sourced, you still need a Mac and Xcode to develop for IOS, but what if Apple Open Sourced Xcode and allowed Linux development?

    They’d gain critical developer share as they rush to make the Iphone the defacto platform for Consumer Assistive AI. What would you pay for an Iphone and set of glasses that could help you avoid accidents? By paying attention with you, as you drive? There are many other applications as well in Assistive AI.

    Android is a non-player; its development environment is not compiled Swift/Objective C, but rather JAVA. Moreover, fragmented hardware, and very short lifespans for phones makes it a nightmare to support. Google pushes Android to Hardware vendors like Samsung, who load it up with crapware and modify it extensively to spy on you, and then the carriers modify it and load it further with non removable crapware that spys on you. Which makes update cycles basically one in the first six months of the phone’s existence, meaning if you get a phone towards the end of its manufacturing cycle (most manufacturers stop after about a year and move to a new model) there are no more updates for you. Not even a one. Because of the complexity just sending a standard Android update would likely brick the phone — remember the vendor and carrier each modify Android to spy on their customers.

    Apple is the only one spying on you with IOS, so things just work. And the code is much faster as its compiled. And hardware support is easier. I’m not saying Apple WILL Open Source Xcode and allow IOS development for AI on Linux. But they could, and their moves are not inconsistent with at least dipping their toes in the waters. Certainly if I had to bet on the first company to deliver a usable and desirable Assistive AI it would be Apple, not Google or Microsoft or Amazon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Open sourcing all of Mac OS would make business sense, but is improbable.

    I expect Apple to lose half its market cap before Trump's first term ends. It'll still be huge.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Have to say, its nice to see you blog on other ideas and concepts.
  171. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Whiskey
    Maybe Apple is the next IBM. Or maybe they are poised for a huge opportunity in AI and AR (Augmented Reality). Remember the Pokemon Go craze a few years ago where people would wander around to "collect" Pokemon on their phones with AR displaying a Pokemon character on the camera screen of their phone?

    Now imagine a system where the phone acts as a base computer, some have up to 4 GB of RAM and are fairly powerful, connected to a whole lot of servers on the back end for heavy processing, but most being done locally on the phone. To say, provide AI assistance in recognizing threats while driving. Say you have an Iphone, connected via Bluetooth with "Apple Glasses" that feed images live to your phone that provides DRIVING ASSISTANCE. It basically HELPS NOTICING, an Isteve Theme. And it can notice more than you can.

    It doesn't get tired, it does not get sleepy, it does not get preoccupied. If it sees a pattern that could indicate danger it could flash a red circle on the problematic object on your glasses. That's Assistive AI aimed directly at the consumer.

    Now, Apple is not a pioneer in anything. They did not invent the MP3 player, smart phone, tablet computer, or GUI computing. They just made it the most stylish and easy to use, and most integrated, at the highest price point.

    The Apple Watch is a dud; though Tim Cook talks it up. As noted, while Apple has neglected its Macbook Pro line, most all developers pay a lot to use them -- and many businesses do as well because the total cost of Macs is less than PCs when labor costs are factored in for support, downtime, etc. Windows lost decisively the server wars, almost every app either phone or company related will run on some Linux virtual machine spun up on Amazon Web Services or some other service. Microsoft is even desperately trying to compete with Apple by offering terminal Linux services on Windows 10, even though its incomplete and Windows itself is a massive pain to deal with -- interminable install times, even worse software updates, malware galore, sluggish like Hillary before her five o clock pick-me-up.

    HOWEVER ... Apple has open source Swift. IBM and others now offer Swift web development frameworks like Kitura, Vapor, Perfect, that match Rails and other mature frameworks in features and beat it in speed. Yes there are build packs for Heroku. Cocoa and other dependencies for IOS development are not open sourced, you still need a Mac and Xcode to develop for IOS, but what if Apple Open Sourced Xcode and allowed Linux development?

    They'd gain critical developer share as they rush to make the Iphone the defacto platform for Consumer Assistive AI. What would you pay for an Iphone and set of glasses that could help you avoid accidents? By paying attention with you, as you drive? There are many other applications as well in Assistive AI.

    Android is a non-player; its development environment is not compiled Swift/Objective C, but rather JAVA. Moreover, fragmented hardware, and very short lifespans for phones makes it a nightmare to support. Google pushes Android to Hardware vendors like Samsung, who load it up with crapware and modify it extensively to spy on you, and then the carriers modify it and load it further with non removable crapware that spys on you. Which makes update cycles basically one in the first six months of the phone's existence, meaning if you get a phone towards the end of its manufacturing cycle (most manufacturers stop after about a year and move to a new model) there are no more updates for you. Not even a one. Because of the complexity just sending a standard Android update would likely brick the phone -- remember the vendor and carrier each modify Android to spy on their customers.

    Apple is the only one spying on you with IOS, so things just work. And the code is much faster as its compiled. And hardware support is easier. I'm not saying Apple WILL Open Source Xcode and allow IOS development for AI on Linux. But they could, and their moves are not inconsistent with at least dipping their toes in the waters. Certainly if I had to bet on the first company to deliver a usable and desirable Assistive AI it would be Apple, not Google or Microsoft or Amazon.

    Open sourcing all of Mac OS would make business sense, but is improbable.

    I expect Apple to lose half its market cap before Trump’s first term ends. It’ll still be huge.

    Read More
  172. @J.Ross
    It's not a cop out to remind people that the Asian almost always chooses well-established stability over chaos because that's really their only salient target.
    [Now visualize all white people represented by an image of Charlie Day shouting the word "WILDCARD!"]

    As I recall, Charlie tried to pull the same “Wildcard, bitches!” trick twice, and the second time his friends were able to anticipate him. Perhaps the Yellow Peril has learned to anticipate Whitey, who is in a rut lately.

    Read More
  173. @Ray P
    Every pipe concealed? Doesn't sound very let-it-all-hang-out Californian. Prissy. What happened to bowellism in architecture and Tom Wolfe's derided exposed, protruding I-beams? Richard Rogers' Lloyds building is now an eighties embarrassment?

    Ah, “expressed structure.” Because covering up pipes makes you a liar! Probably with a small penis.

    Did ancient Greek temples conceal their plumbing? Didn’t think so.

    Read More
  174. @Alfa158
    I haven't been able to verify the apocryphal quote about Le Corbusier who was the supreme master of stark, un-livable, modern architecture: "He liberated architecture from the shackles of habitability" .
    On an old PBS show about architecture the host/critic took the camera crew to one of Le Corbusier's French houses, which consisted of raw concrete rectangular castings with plate glass walls, and the whole thing propped eight feet off the ground on steel posts. There was no narration for the segment, the camera simply moved through and around the house with no spoken commentary.

    Ah, Corbu. I bought an art book of his stuff. Gives me the same sense of thrill I get watching a horror movie.

    Read More
  175. @Pericles
    The term "reality distortion field" was coined to describe Jobs. That's the reverse of zero social skills.

    As to his personality, he apparently also regularly parked in handicap spaces.

    Apple veteran Andy Hertzfled reports on his history of the Mac website, Folklore.org, that Jobs was constantly parking in the restricted spaces. “He seemed to think the blue wheelchair symbol meant the spot was reserved for the chairman,” Hertzfeld writes.

    In a comment to Hertzfeld’s post, Dan Cochran, who worked at Apple, noted that one day someone converted the handicapped “wheelchair” graphic into the Mercedes logo.

    “I thought it was hilarious but as I recall Steve didn’t find it particularly funny at all,” he notes.

    Quipped former Apple executive, Jean-Louis Gassee, when he saw Jobs park in a restricted spot: “I never realized those spaces were for the emotionally handicapped…” (According to Wikiquote, Jean-Louis now says morally handicapped when retelling the story.)
     
    http://www.cultofmac.com/2613/steve-jobs-still-parking-in-handicapped-spaces-the-pictures/

    The term “reality distortion field” was coined to describe Jobs. That’s the reverse of zero social skills.

    Some definitions of sociopaths are such that sociopaths know exactly what emotions others are feeling, but they just don’t care or have empathy. Some define sociopathy/psychopathy as a deficiency in empathy.

    Jobs knew the emotions of others, but just didn’t care. His emotions were always paramount.

    Read More
  176. @Jack D
    BTW, the places with the "good" schools are now often heavily Asian (both East and South). Those schools are so "good" that white people sometime avoid them because the atmosphere is too competitive. White people are like Goldilocks - they want their schools not too hard and not too soft.

    People here make fun of Asians as being mindless drones without creativity but the next generation of soft, lazy white people are going to get their lunch eaten by Asians, both here and abroad. People have NO idea what China is planning, nor do the Chinese want you to know. It will make what Japan did in the '30s look like a joke. And this time the Asians have their own nukes. The Chinese would much rather that America destroy itself with political infighting and worrying about whether Trump is Putin's gay lover and whether Black Lives Matter. For now they are biding their time because they still need trade with the West. By the time people realize what hit them, it will be too late.

    The Chinese are the least aggressive nation on Earth, and Russian schools are as competitive as any Chinese school despite being “white”.

    Your mental model of the world is very off.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ch%27ongch%27on_River

    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren't that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome. The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse. The White Death is nothing compared to the # of Russians that drink themselves to death. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2014/03/numbers-vladimir-putin-doesnt-want-you-to-see

    The root causes are similar. Almost makes you nostalgic for the Cold War where we all kept busy building weapons that no one would ever use. Maybe that wasn't such a bad idea after all.
  177. @Anonymous
    Is anyone noticing that Apple's voice recognition is worse than it was in past years? I wonder if their IT wizards have become too diverse, or maybe they are trying to make Siri understand "Americans" with thick foreign accents?
    Read More
  178. @AnotherGuessModel
    Completely OT, and not from a major news source or website, but it's still a whopper.

    Not to alarm you, but I probably want you to quit your job, or at least take a demotion. Statistically speaking, you are probably taking up room that should go to someone else. If you are a white cis man (meaning you identify as male and you were assigned male at birth) you almost certainly should resign from your position of power. That’s right, please quit.

    http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/2017/05/11/get-out-the-way/#sthash.67d17aBi.dpuf

    Author:
    Piper Harron tried really hard to play by the rules of society and academia, but she failed. Not only did she fail, but she was miserable and found that playing by the rules wouldn’t even keep her safe. After giving up completely, and after giving birth to her second child, she finally finished the first draft of her number theory PhD thesis in 2014, a mere 6 years late.

    See more at: http://blogs.ams.org/inclusionexclusion/about-the-editor/#sthash.L9KA0jFa.dpuf

    Wonderful blog, and at the AMS of all places. There furthermore seems to be numerous other examples beyond the one above, like “Supremum/Supremacy” or editor Adriana Salerno complaining about how she was so busy in the racist patriarchal horror she inhabits that she didn’t think about getting her car maintained (“A Different Kind of Problem”).

    Now that even math has slipped its moorings of seriousness and departed for exciting new political goals, such as the tearing down of outdated monuments and provision of good safe jobs for women and minorities at the expense of stale pale males — can we say the infection is complete?

    Read More
  179. @The Man From K Street
    Woz has admitted on a few TWiT podcasts that Apple still cuts him a check every month. I don't think it is so much to keep him in retirement or away from other companies, but more to keep the notion of him representing some kind of corporate history and continuity.

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company's legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company’s legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.

    Doubtful. Woz has never had money troubles, at least publicly. Jobs just gave him a pittance to keep him from helping any rivals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Woz has appeared at Apple II conventions like Kansasfest (which is actually in Missouri) and Oz Kfest in Australia. You'll also meet a number of female programmers and engineers, a couple of which quite obviously are not chromosomally female, and some of which sure look real to me.
  180. @Whoever
    California is as beautiful and amazing as any place on this earth can be. And it is still full of wonderful people doing wonderful things.

    “The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew California was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
    ~ Eve Babitz

    “It seemed like a matter of minutes when we began rolling in the foothills before Oakland and suddenly reached a height and saw stretched out ahead of us the fabulous white city of San Francisco on her eleven mystic hills with the blue Pacific and its advancing wall of potato-patch fog beyond, and smoke and goldenness in the late afternoon of time.”
    ~ Jack Kerouac

    “This morning I saw a coyote walking through the sagebrush right at the very edge of the ocean ― next stop China. The coyote was acting like he was in New Mexico or Wyoming, except that there were whales passing below. That’s what California does for you. Come down to Big Sur and let your soul have some room to get outside its marrow.”
    ~ Richar Brautigan

    “I grew up in a utopia, I did. California when I was a child was a child's paradise, I was healthy, well fed, well clothed, well housed. I went to school and there were libraries with all the world in them and after school I played in orange groves and in Little League and in the band and down at the beach and every day was an adventure. . . . I grew up in utopia.”
    ~ Kim Stanley

    “If you've had good gin on a hot day in Southern California with the people you love, you forget Nebraska. The two things cannot coexist. The stronger, better of the two wins.”
    ~ Ann Patchett

    “It was a splendid population - for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home - you never find that sort of people among pioneers - you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day - and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, 'Well, that is California all over.'”
    ~ Mark Twain

    “California, still a magical vanity fair.”
    ~ Eileen Granfors

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it's being invaded and destroyed, why don't you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it’s being invaded and destroyed, why don’t you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    Un fucking believable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    He doesn't understand why you beknighted stump-toothed hicks in your "nothing states" don't share his grief at the decline of his beloved californian paradise. Gosh, I wonder why people might feel that way? It's inexplicable, isn't it.

    I love California too. I lived there for a time. But it's pretty obvious why a lot of "flyover country" doesn't like California.....................it's because of Californians.
  181. @whorefinder
    Jeez, Jobs was such an insufferable prima donna/enfant terrible.

    This reads like an obsequious toady to Charles Foster Kane lavishing praise on Xanadu. Jobs clearly hired people who were as bootlicking little turds and purged Apple of all who didn't worship him as genius incarnate, and set it up after his death to make sure his final arrogance was worshiped.

    It's why Steve Wozniak is no longer the face of Apple, despite being just as important as Jobs, just as how Kane's domineering drove away his friend and conscience Jedediah Leland to be left with only servants and other people held firmly under his thumb (until they run away, too).

    Jobs was a design freak in an industry that didn't have much aesthetic ability, and so is worshiped as some sort of demigod at this point, but really, this is just disgustingly wasted worship and vomit-worthy. It strikes me that if Jobs hadn't been born and raised the way he was he would've ended up an avant-garde artist in New York, the heir to Andy Warhol, and thus be remembered as another pretentious turd in a black turtleneck.

    Jobs was a genius who deserves praise, but this Roman-Emperor-esque raising of him to a god-like status makes me question the sanity of everyone who does so.

    I’m not really an Apple fan, but to give the man his due (or at least explain the popularity):

    1. His is a great story. Help found a great company. Make some mistakes. Get betrayed by your hand-picked man. Get kicked out. Spend some time in the wilderness while fools run it to the ground. Return. Expel the fools. Turn that company into the most valuable one in the world. Then die before your time.

    Though he was a jerk, that just makes him more of a flawed, tragic hero. And he appears to have grown enough not to let those flaws sink him the second time around as they did the first.

    2. The fact that he left, came back, and succeeded is something rare among the founders of the largest companies. He might have gotten lucky the first time, but it’s hard to say he got lucky the second. I doubt that Bill Gates, for example, could have ever done anything close to what Jobs did, had Microsoft followed a similar trajectory. He got lucky with MS-DOS, saw the potential to make it the standard for computing, and then simply rode that one success to becoming the richest man in the world.

    Jobs was tested and passed.

    3. Jobs built the world’s most valuable company by designing consumer products that many people just plain liked a lot more than the competition. This will take you far in popularity contests compared to companies that become valuable by building B2B products, or by using market power to crush the competition, or by taking advantage of government contracts or some loophole in a system.

    Read More
  182. Why Doesn’t Apple’s State-of-the-Art New Campus Include a Day Care?

    http://amp.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2017/05/16/apple_s_new_headquarters_apple_park_has_no_child_care_center_despite_costing.html

    Why isn’t the garage fully automated? The design sounds like 20th century tech to me.

    Did they make room for food trucks?

    Read More
  183. @Whiskey
    Maybe Apple is the next IBM. Or maybe they are poised for a huge opportunity in AI and AR (Augmented Reality). Remember the Pokemon Go craze a few years ago where people would wander around to "collect" Pokemon on their phones with AR displaying a Pokemon character on the camera screen of their phone?

    Now imagine a system where the phone acts as a base computer, some have up to 4 GB of RAM and are fairly powerful, connected to a whole lot of servers on the back end for heavy processing, but most being done locally on the phone. To say, provide AI assistance in recognizing threats while driving. Say you have an Iphone, connected via Bluetooth with "Apple Glasses" that feed images live to your phone that provides DRIVING ASSISTANCE. It basically HELPS NOTICING, an Isteve Theme. And it can notice more than you can.

    It doesn't get tired, it does not get sleepy, it does not get preoccupied. If it sees a pattern that could indicate danger it could flash a red circle on the problematic object on your glasses. That's Assistive AI aimed directly at the consumer.

    Now, Apple is not a pioneer in anything. They did not invent the MP3 player, smart phone, tablet computer, or GUI computing. They just made it the most stylish and easy to use, and most integrated, at the highest price point.

    The Apple Watch is a dud; though Tim Cook talks it up. As noted, while Apple has neglected its Macbook Pro line, most all developers pay a lot to use them -- and many businesses do as well because the total cost of Macs is less than PCs when labor costs are factored in for support, downtime, etc. Windows lost decisively the server wars, almost every app either phone or company related will run on some Linux virtual machine spun up on Amazon Web Services or some other service. Microsoft is even desperately trying to compete with Apple by offering terminal Linux services on Windows 10, even though its incomplete and Windows itself is a massive pain to deal with -- interminable install times, even worse software updates, malware galore, sluggish like Hillary before her five o clock pick-me-up.

    HOWEVER ... Apple has open source Swift. IBM and others now offer Swift web development frameworks like Kitura, Vapor, Perfect, that match Rails and other mature frameworks in features and beat it in speed. Yes there are build packs for Heroku. Cocoa and other dependencies for IOS development are not open sourced, you still need a Mac and Xcode to develop for IOS, but what if Apple Open Sourced Xcode and allowed Linux development?

    They'd gain critical developer share as they rush to make the Iphone the defacto platform for Consumer Assistive AI. What would you pay for an Iphone and set of glasses that could help you avoid accidents? By paying attention with you, as you drive? There are many other applications as well in Assistive AI.

    Android is a non-player; its development environment is not compiled Swift/Objective C, but rather JAVA. Moreover, fragmented hardware, and very short lifespans for phones makes it a nightmare to support. Google pushes Android to Hardware vendors like Samsung, who load it up with crapware and modify it extensively to spy on you, and then the carriers modify it and load it further with non removable crapware that spys on you. Which makes update cycles basically one in the first six months of the phone's existence, meaning if you get a phone towards the end of its manufacturing cycle (most manufacturers stop after about a year and move to a new model) there are no more updates for you. Not even a one. Because of the complexity just sending a standard Android update would likely brick the phone -- remember the vendor and carrier each modify Android to spy on their customers.

    Apple is the only one spying on you with IOS, so things just work. And the code is much faster as its compiled. And hardware support is easier. I'm not saying Apple WILL Open Source Xcode and allow IOS development for AI on Linux. But they could, and their moves are not inconsistent with at least dipping their toes in the waters. Certainly if I had to bet on the first company to deliver a usable and desirable Assistive AI it would be Apple, not Google or Microsoft or Amazon.

    Have to say, its nice to see you blog on other ideas and concepts.

    Read More
  184. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Too late. The majority of Californians have expressed their preferences.

    Given that those preferences are funded via taxes deductible from federal taxes – de facto “free” – if that deduction, or that federation, should change look for different preferences.

    Read More
  185. @Art Deco
    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape.


    It's called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.

    It’s called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.

    Suburban Loci? You mean “suburbs”, you pretentious clown.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.
  186. @Art Deco
    Getting to be like Tourette's with you. Why not just write 'bear scat' each time? More concise.

    Well, if you think that ‘excrement’ is an apt summary description of your posts, I’ll defer to your judgement on this matter.

    Read More
  187. @27 year old

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it’s being invaded and destroyed, why don’t you help us fight back and keep it ours?
     
    Un fucking believable.

    He doesn’t understand why you beknighted stump-toothed hicks in your “nothing states” don’t share his grief at the decline of his beloved californian paradise. Gosh, I wonder why people might feel that way? It’s inexplicable, isn’t it.

    I love California too. I lived there for a time. But it’s pretty obvious why a lot of “flyover country” doesn’t like California…………………it’s because of Californians.

    Read More
  188. @Rod1963
    Well up until 1990 CA was a beautiful state that had it all, that is until white liberals and businessmen decided to flood the state with illegals.

    Of course all the cities and towns helped spoil things by letting developers run amok and just absolutely destroy regions with over development. Really, soul sucking housing tracts that guarantee to turn people into Xanax and Opioid addicts. These tracts are so bad you don't even want to go outside because all you see is the same mass produced bland crap.

    You go back to the 70's and it was paradise once you left LA.

    As I posted once before, watch Rockford Files reruns to see how California used to be.
    And how much it has changed .
    It was not that long ago .
    Read VDH’s Mexifornia.
    The rapidity of change is literally mind boggling.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    I keep suggesting a 'Rockford Files' retrospective by Steve but I guess he was never a fan.

    Atlanta, most of Georgia, is the same way. I cannot believe what we have deliberately engineered for ourselves.
  189. @Whoever
    California is as beautiful and amazing as any place on this earth can be. And it is still full of wonderful people doing wonderful things.

    “The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew California was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
    ~ Eve Babitz

    “It seemed like a matter of minutes when we began rolling in the foothills before Oakland and suddenly reached a height and saw stretched out ahead of us the fabulous white city of San Francisco on her eleven mystic hills with the blue Pacific and its advancing wall of potato-patch fog beyond, and smoke and goldenness in the late afternoon of time.”
    ~ Jack Kerouac

    “This morning I saw a coyote walking through the sagebrush right at the very edge of the ocean ― next stop China. The coyote was acting like he was in New Mexico or Wyoming, except that there were whales passing below. That’s what California does for you. Come down to Big Sur and let your soul have some room to get outside its marrow.”
    ~ Richar Brautigan

    “I grew up in a utopia, I did. California when I was a child was a child's paradise, I was healthy, well fed, well clothed, well housed. I went to school and there were libraries with all the world in them and after school I played in orange groves and in Little League and in the band and down at the beach and every day was an adventure. . . . I grew up in utopia.”
    ~ Kim Stanley

    “If you've had good gin on a hot day in Southern California with the people you love, you forget Nebraska. The two things cannot coexist. The stronger, better of the two wins.”
    ~ Ann Patchett

    “It was a splendid population - for all the slow, sleepy, sluggish-brained sloths stayed at home - you never find that sort of people among pioneers - you cannot build pioneers out of that sort of material. It was that population that gave to California a name for getting up astounding enterprises and rushing them through with a magnificent dash and daring and a recklessness of cost or consequences, which she bears unto this day - and when she projects a new surprise the grave world smiles as usual and says, 'Well, that is California all over.'”
    ~ Mark Twain

    “California, still a magical vanity fair.”
    ~ Eileen Granfors

    A lot of what was wonderful about California has gone. It once was the crown jewel of the Union and can be again. Why people in those eastern nothing states rejoice in its decline puzzles me. It belongs to them, too, and it used to be solidly can-do American. If it's being invaded and destroyed, why don't you help us fight back and keep it ours?

    I was a freshman at UCSB in the 1968-1969 school year. I lived in Montecito with my aunt and her family and commuted to Isla Vista by motorcycle, passing through Santa Barbara en route.

    I loved and still love California. And I am utterly mystified by your comment, “Why people in the eastern states rejoice in its decline puzzles me.” I have never spoken to a New Yorker who rejoiced in California’s decline. We see those very well-crafted tourist ads with Joe Montana and other “average Joes” and almost feel like going there; then we see the antiFa anarchists trashing buildings at Berkeley, with the “police” doing nothing to enforce the law, and realize it’s just more Hollywood propaganda.

    You ask us to help you “fight back”. Lord Byron wrote: “Who would be free themselves must strike the blow.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104
    Propaganda indeed. California is nearly 40% Hispanic and 15% Asian but those populations are absent from the ads. Instead California is using white celebrities, including German cyclist Jens Voigt (LINK), to market to white people.
  190. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    No doubt California is beautiful and perhaps the most beautiful of states but there is boundless beauty all over the United States. Denizens of Hawaii’s several islands might even take issue with California’s place as the most beautiful. Have you seen New England in fall? Maine’s rocky shores? The cays of Southeast Florida? The Chesapeake? If you flip the land area of California to the East Coast you’d have a lot of impressive natural beauty all in one state as well, spanning from New England to South Carolina. I personally couldn’t be without an Autumn every year.

    I think a lot of the schadenfreude about California’s demise has to do with its role as the source of a lot of the Cultimarx ills that beset the nation for the last few decades. I myself can make a distinction between what California was and the termites who hollowed it out and exported their rot to the rest of the United States but it’s hard to fault people for feeling the other way at this point, especially given the 55 electoral votes that hang over every GOP Presidential candidate like a sword of Damocles.

    Read More
  191. @The Man From K Street
    Woz has admitted on a few TWiT podcasts that Apple still cuts him a check every month. I don't think it is so much to keep him in retirement or away from other companies, but more to keep the notion of him representing some kind of corporate history and continuity.

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company's legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.

    The tragedy of Apple vis-à-vis Woz is that soon after the SUITS took over Apple they had no use for the Woz who has a 180+ IQ and a Newton like ability to design innovative hardware, eg. low chip count designs with simplicity, often dual use, and elegance. What a waste. He warned them on the Apple III not to emulate the Apple II. They emulated and the product failed. They should have listened and had enabled direct hardware running of Apple II software. After that they should have given him a lab with a large budget and said to him design what you want and we will see what you do with the resources in time.

    Dan Kurt

    Read More
  192. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    I was a freshman at UCSB in the 1968-1969 school year. I lived in Montecito with my aunt and her family and commuted to Isla Vista by motorcycle, passing through Santa Barbara en route.

    I loved and still love California. And I am utterly mystified by your comment, "Why people in the eastern states rejoice in its decline puzzles me." I have never spoken to a New Yorker who rejoiced in California's decline. We see those very well-crafted tourist ads with Joe Montana and other "average Joes" and almost feel like going there; then we see the antiFa anarchists trashing buildings at Berkeley, with the "police" doing nothing to enforce the law, and realize it's just more Hollywood propaganda.

    You ask us to help you "fight back". Lord Byron wrote: "Who would be free themselves must strike the blow."

    Propaganda indeed. California is nearly 40% Hispanic and 15% Asian but those populations are absent from the ads. Instead California is using white celebrities, including German cyclist Jens Voigt (LINK), to market to white people.

    Read More
  193. @Mr. Anon

    It’s called lighting and security cameras. The reference here is to suburban loci where the major concern is home burglaries.
     
    Suburban Loci? You mean "suburbs", you pretentious clown.

    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.
     
    No, you meant suburbs. That wasn't "precision", it was pedantry - your stock and trade. You seem to think that Googling is some kind of superpower.

    But - hey - you've aquired a fan and admirer in "Truth", a commenter who believes the Earth is flat and that cars can be fueled with water. So, you've got that going for you, Ralph Wiggum.
    , @Mr. Anon
    Nobody is going to believe that. You meant "suburbs", and sought the most pretentious way of saying it.

    But, hey, you've made a fan and admirer out of "Truth", who believes in the Flat Earth and thinks that cars can be fueled with water, so you've got that to brag about. I guess he likes the cut of your jive.
    , @Mr. Anon
    No, you meant "suburbs"; you just used the most round-about, pretentious way of saying it.

    BTW, you've found a fan and admirer in the commenter known as "Truth" - a man who thinks the Earth is flat, and that cars can be fueled with water. So, you got that going for you.
  194. @Alec Leamas
    Am I out of my gourd for thinking this thing looks not a little like a rounded off, aluminum Pentagon?

    There probably are some advantages to a circular building with no corners - there are no corner offices for little Napoleons to fight over.

    The Nihilgon.

    Read More
  195. @Rod1963
    A lot of land in CA isn't meant for housing, it's either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    Traffic isn't a issue unless you're commuting to Los Angeles - then it is.

    The problem is over development of rural areas and the destruction it brings to the quality of life in a town or region.

    End result, a rural town goes from nice place to live to overly developed and expensive suburban shit hole and where everyone is miserable. This went on all through Southern California from the late 90's to the mid 2000's and still is.

    The housing built were often nothing but cookie cutter tracts, closely packed and totally bland. Most had little in the way of a back yard or front yard. Which had the habit of forcing children to either stay inside or wander the streets. Some have the distinction of not even having sidewalks.

    A lot of the fault can be laid at the developers feet. They often put forth housing tracts that violated a multitude of zoning laws and the general plan and used bribes and lawsuits to get their way. They even sued locals who publicly opposed them (SLAPP lawsuits).

    A lot of land in CA isn’t meant for housing, it’s either harsh desert, mountains, park land, farm land. This greatly reduces the amount of land available for development.

    I see your point. The thing is, if I’m counting correctly, the land area outside the mountains and desert (i.e. where the default ecosystem is coastal forest or chaparral) is about 44,000 sq. miles. The entire non-agricultural population could be stuffed into tract developments at ordinary suburban densities (say, 2,300 persons per sq. mi) and you’d fill up perhaps 16,000 sq miles. And people do live (at low densities) in the 119,000 sq miles of mountain and desert.

    Read More
  196. @James Richard
    While an SSK is more stylish a three axle AWD G4 would handle rubble strewn streets better and certainly could carry more gold.

    http://cars-mercedes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/5/mercedes-benz-g4-w31_5.jpg

    Absolutely.
    Any still around? I would travel quite some distance to gawk at one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    Out of 57 built three are left. Two in museums and the third is in Hollywood ready and waiting for your next production featuring the Third Reich!
  197. @Steve Sailer
    Valet parking is fine for arriving but bad for departing.

    Last time I was at Musso Frank’s there was no problem either end.
    For those who don’t know it: Hollywood Boulevard, opened 1919, unchanged since.
    Drop everything and go there NOW.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Whoever
    Musso & Frank's is great.
    One of the best stories my family has about it is when my father was on leave after participating in Linebacker II as part of TF77 and my mother had just returned home after working with CMRI, and they stopped in at Musso's. They didn't have a reservation and were told they could wait and see if there was a cancellation. As they were waiting, a waiter came over and said a gentleman had asked them to join him. It was Telly Savalas. A few minutes later, David Carradine came over and joined them, and then Robert Vaughn stopped by. My dad knew Carradine from having done some stunt work on his TV show Shane when he was in college and Vaughn from working on Bullit.
    They ended up having a three-hour dinner, paid for by Savalas, who said he had invited them over because he hated to see a young couple looking as tired and forlorn as they did. Heh.
    We have a photo of my great-grandfather and a bunch of T4M drivers celebrating at Musso's in 1929 after they got back from their success at Fleet Problem IX, where they surprised the defenders of the Panama Canal and were deemed to have destroyed its locks. They all look very happy.
  198. @Mr. Anon
    Yes, back then - fortunately, for the people who lived there - California was the place where the future happens.

    Whereas today - unfortunately, for the people who live there - California is the place where the future happens.

    Very good, sir, very good indeed.

    Read More
  199. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @whorefinder

    The parallel would be when the Sears empire in the 30s and 40s found an elderly and mostly-impoverished Roebuck, long since bought out although still on the company’s legal name, and hired him to make appearances at ribbon-cuttings and the like.
     
    Doubtful. Woz has never had money troubles, at least publicly. Jobs just gave him a pittance to keep him from helping any rivals.

    Woz has appeared at Apple II conventions like Kansasfest (which is actually in Missouri) and Oz Kfest in Australia. You’ll also meet a number of female programmers and engineers, a couple of which quite obviously are not chromosomally female, and some of which sure look real to me.

    Read More
  200. […] Sailer, the influential journalist and blogger, touched on the theme in a post on Thursday (“What has Apple been up to since Steve Jobs […]

    Read More
  201. @Art Deco
    Getting to be like Tourette's with you. Why not just write 'bear scat' each time? More concise.

    LMFAO!

    Three things are constant in this world:

    1.Death.
    2. Taxes.
    3. People hating Nymph Anon’s guts.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Actually, the one who seems to be universally despised hereabouts is you "Truth". Although I imagine that Art "Spergtard" Deco isn't far behind. You need to up your game.
  202. @Alden
    Problem with parking in lots behind the stores is robberies, car theft and rape. When the lots are between the street and the stores, there is a lot less crime in the parking lots.

    The obsolete farm equipment brought from Africa in the colonial period made parking lots behind the stores playgrounds for criminals. They ruin everything.

    They ruin everything.

    Except lonely Caucasoid lady’s Saturday evenings…

    Ask Jimbo Christian, he’ll tell you!

    Read More
  203. @Old Palo Altan
    Last time I was at Musso Frank's there was no problem either end.
    For those who don't know it: Hollywood Boulevard, opened 1919, unchanged since.
    Drop everything and go there NOW.

    Musso & Frank’s is great.
    One of the best stories my family has about it is when my father was on leave after participating in Linebacker II as part of TF77 and my mother had just returned home after working with CMRI, and they stopped in at Musso’s. They didn’t have a reservation and were told they could wait and see if there was a cancellation. As they were waiting, a waiter came over and said a gentleman had asked them to join him. It was Telly Savalas. A few minutes later, David Carradine came over and joined them, and then Robert Vaughn stopped by. My dad knew Carradine from having done some stunt work on his TV show Shane when he was in college and Vaughn from working on Bullit.
    They ended up having a three-hour dinner, paid for by Savalas, who said he had invited them over because he hated to see a young couple looking as tired and forlorn as they did. Heh.
    We have a photo of my great-grandfather and a bunch of T4M drivers celebrating at Musso’s in 1929 after they got back from their success at Fleet Problem IX, where they surprised the defenders of the Panama Canal and were deemed to have destroyed its locks. They all look very happy.

    Read More
  204. @pepperinmono
    As I posted once before, watch Rockford Files reruns to see how California used to be.
    And how much it has changed .
    It was not that long ago .
    Read VDH's Mexifornia.
    The rapidity of change is literally mind boggling.

    I keep suggesting a ‘Rockford Files’ retrospective by Steve but I guess he was never a fan.

    Atlanta, most of Georgia, is the same way. I cannot believe what we have deliberately engineered for ourselves.

    Read More
  205. @Old Palo Altan
    I spent a week in a Corbusier building (quite a large one, housing some 100 people living in community) in 1975. It was not particularly pleasing to the eye, but it was superbly comfortable, and I liked being inside it, looking out.

    So much architecture is judged by its aesthetic value as a big piece of sculpture taking up space in the landscape but I agree that if one is going to spend any amount of time in it the comfort and general ambience are what count. I still however balk at buildings built dead on top of a hill or ridge line no matter how spectacular the 360 degree views are.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    An interesting reply: you seem to have divined what building I was talking about.
    I hadn't looked at pictures of it in years: truly hideous. But I can only repeat that it was quite delightful to live in.
  206. @anonymous coward
    The Chinese are the least aggressive nation on Earth, and Russian schools are as competitive as any Chinese school despite being "white".

    Your mental model of the world is very off.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ch%27ongch%27on_River

    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren’t that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome. The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse. The White Death is nothing compared to the # of Russians that drink themselves to death. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2014/03/numbers-vladimir-putin-doesnt-want-you-to-see

    The root causes are similar. Almost makes you nostalgic for the Cold War where we all kept busy building weapons that no one would ever use. Maybe that wasn’t such a bad idea after all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren’t that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome.

    The Jewish population in late Soviet Russia amounted to 0.7% of the total.

    There are currently 1.6 million live births in Russia and 24 million children under 15 (out of a population of 142 million). The total fertility rate for Russia is currently 1.7 children per woman per lifetime, a bit higher the European mean. Russia reproduced at replacement level (on balance) from 1960 to 1990. The tfr rapidly declined after 1988, reaching its nadir in 1999 at 1.17. It climbed to 1.7 over the next 15 years as the economy improved. Abiding and severe deficits in fertility in the context of prosperity (as in Germany or Japan) or rapid economic improvement (as in south Korea) have not been the story in Russia.

    Some spot studies indicate that some degree of fetal alcohol syndrome is the mode in Russian orphanages, but orphanages encompass < 2% of Russia's child population. There was a literature review published last year on studies of the prevalence of fetal alcoholism syndrome. The abstract notes particularly high rates in South Africa (11.3% of live births) and Croatia (4.3%). Russia is not mentioned.
    , @Art Deco
    The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse.

    Total fertility rates have never been far below replacement level in the U.S. (1.76 at the pit of the baby bust in 1976, with 2.0 the median since 1970). Life expectancy at birth has increased by 8 years since 1970; life expectancy at age 65 has increased by 4 years in that time.
  207. @Old Palo Altan
    Absolutely.
    Any still around? I would travel quite some distance to gawk at one.

    Out of 57 built three are left. Two in museums and the third is in Hollywood ready and waiting for your next production featuring the Third Reich!

    Read More
  208. @James Richard
    While an SSK is more stylish a three axle AWD G4 would handle rubble strewn streets better and certainly could carry more gold.

    http://cars-mercedes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/5/mercedes-benz-g4-w31_5.jpg

    A G4 is not all wheel drive. Only the back 4 wheels are driven. In Hogan’s Heroes, “General Burkhalter” is often seen in one. (Most of the “Nazis” on Hogan’s Heroes, including the General, were German Jews who had fled to Hollywood in the ’30s). There were supposedly only 3 in existence but then a few years ago someone was selling 3 of them (one of them the Hollywood car) so there must be at least 5 (One in Spain – a gift from Hitler to Franco and one in the Czech Republic that had been turned into a fire engine after the war).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    As I am sure you know, "Col. Klink" was the son of the conductor Otto Klemperer. Unlike his father, however, he was only half-Jewish by blood, and a Catholic by upbringing.
    As for the general, he was so Jewish that his last name was actually Aschkenasy. I ask you.
  209. @Jack D
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ch%27ongch%27on_River

    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren't that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome. The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse. The White Death is nothing compared to the # of Russians that drink themselves to death. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2014/03/numbers-vladimir-putin-doesnt-want-you-to-see

    The root causes are similar. Almost makes you nostalgic for the Cold War where we all kept busy building weapons that no one would ever use. Maybe that wasn't such a bad idea after all.

    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren’t that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome.

    The Jewish population in late Soviet Russia amounted to 0.7% of the total.

    There are currently 1.6 million live births in Russia and 24 million children under 15 (out of a population of 142 million). The total fertility rate for Russia is currently 1.7 children per woman per lifetime, a bit higher the European mean. Russia reproduced at replacement level (on balance) from 1960 to 1990. The tfr rapidly declined after 1988, reaching its nadir in 1999 at 1.17. It climbed to 1.7 over the next 15 years as the economy improved. Abiding and severe deficits in fertility in the context of prosperity (as in Germany or Japan) or rapid economic improvement (as in south Korea) have not been the story in Russia.

    Some spot studies indicate that some degree of fetal alcohol syndrome is the mode in Russian orphanages, but orphanages encompass < 2% of Russia's child population. There was a literature review published last year on studies of the prevalence of fetal alcoholism syndrome. The abstract notes particularly high rates in South Africa (11.3% of live births) and Croatia (4.3%). Russia is not mentioned.

    Read More
  210. @Jack D
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ch%27ongch%27on_River

    The very top Russian schools in Moscow and St. Petersburg are good but it goes downhill after that, especially since much of the Jewish population has decamped for Israel and the US. The main problem is that there aren't that many children to begin with, at least those not damaged by fetal alcohol syndrome. The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse. The White Death is nothing compared to the # of Russians that drink themselves to death. http://www.vanityfair.com/news/2014/03/numbers-vladimir-putin-doesnt-want-you-to-see

    The root causes are similar. Almost makes you nostalgic for the Cold War where we all kept busy building weapons that no one would ever use. Maybe that wasn't such a bad idea after all.

    The picture in the US is also dismal but Russia is even worse.

    Total fertility rates have never been far below replacement level in the U.S. (1.76 at the pit of the baby bust in 1976, with 2.0 the median since 1970). Life expectancy at birth has increased by 8 years since 1970; life expectancy at age 65 has increased by 4 years in that time.

    Read More
  211. @Art Deco
    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.

    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.

    No, you meant suburbs. That wasn’t “precision”, it was pedantry – your stock and trade. You seem to think that Googling is some kind of superpower.

    But – hey – you’ve aquired a fan and admirer in “Truth”, a commenter who believes the Earth is flat and that cars can be fueled with water. So, you’ve got that going for you, Ralph Wiggum.

    Read More
  212. @Truth
    LMFAO!

    Three things are constant in this world:

    1.Death.
    2. Taxes.
    3. People hating Nymph Anon's guts.

    Actually, the one who seems to be universally despised hereabouts is you “Truth”. Although I imagine that Art “Spergtard” Deco isn’t far behind. You need to up your game.

    Read More
  213. @Jack D
    A G4 is not all wheel drive. Only the back 4 wheels are driven. In Hogan's Heroes, "General Burkhalter" is often seen in one. (Most of the "Nazis" on Hogan's Heroes, including the General, were German Jews who had fled to Hollywood in the '30s). There were supposedly only 3 in existence but then a few years ago someone was selling 3 of them (one of them the Hollywood car) so there must be at least 5 (One in Spain - a gift from Hitler to Franco and one in the Czech Republic that had been turned into a fire engine after the war).

    As I am sure you know, “Col. Klink” was the son of the conductor Otto Klemperer. Unlike his father, however, he was only half-Jewish by blood, and a Catholic by upbringing.
    As for the general, he was so Jewish that his last name was actually Aschkenasy. I ask you.

    Read More
  214. @James Richard
    So much architecture is judged by its aesthetic value as a big piece of sculpture taking up space in the landscape but I agree that if one is going to spend any amount of time in it the comfort and general ambience are what count. I still however balk at buildings built dead on top of a hill or ridge line no matter how spectacular the 360 degree views are.

    An interesting reply: you seem to have divined what building I was talking about.
    I hadn’t looked at pictures of it in years: truly hideous. But I can only repeat that it was quite delightful to live in.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard
    The Lick Observatory? I must relax my prejudices against mountaintop buildings when it comes to astronomy and the Lick looks stunningly beautiful especially in late winter when the top of Mt. Hamilton is covered in snow while the lower slopes are bright green with new grass. I have never been in an observatory that wasn't cold and drafty though!
  215. @Art Deco
    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.

    Nobody is going to believe that. You meant “suburbs”, and sought the most pretentious way of saying it.

    But, hey, you’ve made a fan and admirer out of “Truth”, who believes in the Flat Earth and thinks that cars can be fueled with water, so you’ve got that to brag about. I guess he likes the cut of your jive.

    Read More
  216. @Old Palo Altan
    An interesting reply: you seem to have divined what building I was talking about.
    I hadn't looked at pictures of it in years: truly hideous. But I can only repeat that it was quite delightful to live in.

    The Lick Observatory? I must relax my prejudices against mountaintop buildings when it comes to astronomy and the Lick looks stunningly beautiful especially in late winter when the top of Mt. Hamilton is covered in snow while the lower slopes are bright green with new grass. I have never been in an observatory that wasn’t cold and drafty though!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    No, nothing from my native state, but the Couvent de La Tourette near Toulouse, by Corbusier.
    It is on a steep slope , rather as you described.
    A bunch of us Frat brats went up to the Lick once, back in the late '60s - something to do with a sophomoric prank, and a trail of clues. We ended up on the beach in Santa Cruz.
  217. @Jack D
    BTW, the places with the "good" schools are now often heavily Asian (both East and South). Those schools are so "good" that white people sometime avoid them because the atmosphere is too competitive. White people are like Goldilocks - they want their schools not too hard and not too soft.

    People here make fun of Asians as being mindless drones without creativity but the next generation of soft, lazy white people are going to get their lunch eaten by Asians, both here and abroad. People have NO idea what China is planning, nor do the Chinese want you to know. It will make what Japan did in the '30s look like a joke. And this time the Asians have their own nukes. The Chinese would much rather that America destroy itself with political infighting and worrying about whether Trump is Putin's gay lover and whether Black Lives Matter. For now they are biding their time because they still need trade with the West. By the time people realize what hit them, it will be too late.

    This reminds me of Ron Unz’s article.

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/chinas-rise-americas-fall/

    However, although American micro-corruption is rare, we seem to suffer from appalling levels of macro-corruption, situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.

    Perhaps Americans really do prefer that their broadcasters provide Happy News and that their political campaigns constitute amusing reality shows. Certainly the cheering coliseum crowds of the Roman Empire favored their bread and circuses over the difficult and dangerous tasks that their ancestors had undertaken during Rome’s rise to world greatness. And so long as we can continue to trade bits of printed paper carrying presidential portraits for flat-screen TVs from Chinese factories, perhaps all is well and no one need be too concerned about the apparent course of our national trajectory, least of all our political leadership class.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.

    That's true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute 'macrocorruption'.
  218. @JohnnyWalker123
    This reminds me of Ron Unz's article.

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/chinas-rise-americas-fall/

    However, although American micro-corruption is rare, we seem to suffer from appalling levels of macro-corruption, situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.
     

    Perhaps Americans really do prefer that their broadcasters provide Happy News and that their political campaigns constitute amusing reality shows. Certainly the cheering coliseum crowds of the Roman Empire favored their bread and circuses over the difficult and dangerous tasks that their ancestors had undertaken during Rome’s rise to world greatness. And so long as we can continue to trade bits of printed paper carrying presidential portraits for flat-screen TVs from Chinese factories, perhaps all is well and no one need be too concerned about the apparent course of our national trajectory, least of all our political leadership class.
     

    situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.

    That’s true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute ‘macrocorruption’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    That’s true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute ‘macrocorruption’.
     
    No, large scale corruption constitutes "macro-corruption". Just because dull-minded conformists like you don't recognize it, doesn't mean it isn't real.
  219. @Art Deco
    No, I mean spots within suburbs. Sorry precision bothers you.

    No, you meant “suburbs”; you just used the most round-about, pretentious way of saying it.

    BTW, you’ve found a fan and admirer in the commenter known as “Truth” – a man who thinks the Earth is flat, and that cars can be fueled with water. So, you got that going for you.

    Read More
  220. @Art Deco
    situations in which our various ruling elites squander or misappropriate tens or even hundreds of billions of dollars of our national wealth, sometimes doing so just barely on one side of technical legality and sometimes on the other.

    That's true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute 'macrocorruption'.

    That’s true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute ‘macrocorruption’.

    No, large scale corruption constitutes “macro-corruption”. Just because dull-minded conformists like you don’t recognize it, doesn’t mean it isn’t real.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Art Deco
    Just because dull-minded conformists l

    I suppose were I a sharp-minded non-conformist, two-thirds of my remarks would consist of cack-handed insults directed at other posters.
  221. @James Richard
    The Lick Observatory? I must relax my prejudices against mountaintop buildings when it comes to astronomy and the Lick looks stunningly beautiful especially in late winter when the top of Mt. Hamilton is covered in snow while the lower slopes are bright green with new grass. I have never been in an observatory that wasn't cold and drafty though!

    No, nothing from my native state, but the Couvent de La Tourette near Toulouse, by Corbusier.
    It is on a steep slope , rather as you described.
    A bunch of us Frat brats went up to the Lick once, back in the late ’60s – something to do with a sophomoric prank, and a trail of clues. We ended up on the beach in Santa Cruz.

    Read More
  222. @Mr. Anon

    That’s true if you fancy that policy prescriptions Mr. Unz does not favor constitute ‘macrocorruption’.
     
    No, large scale corruption constitutes "macro-corruption". Just because dull-minded conformists like you don't recognize it, doesn't mean it isn't real.

    Just because dull-minded conformists l

    I suppose were I a sharp-minded non-conformist, two-thirds of my remarks would consist of cack-handed insults directed at other posters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    No, just something worth reading, rather than the insufferable drivel you post.

    Two thirds of my remarks are not insults. Though about 100% of my replies to you are. Insults are the only fitting reply to you. If you receive a lot of insults, perhaps that's down to you.

    , @Mr. Anon
    Two thirds of my comments are not insults. Merely all of my replies to you. Insults are pretty much all you rate.
  223. @Art Deco
    Just because dull-minded conformists l

    I suppose were I a sharp-minded non-conformist, two-thirds of my remarks would consist of cack-handed insults directed at other posters.

    No, just something worth reading, rather than the insufferable drivel you post.

    Two thirds of my remarks are not insults. Though about 100% of my replies to you are. Insults are the only fitting reply to you. If you receive a lot of insults, perhaps that’s down to you.

    Read More
  224. @Art Deco
    Just because dull-minded conformists l

    I suppose were I a sharp-minded non-conformist, two-thirds of my remarks would consist of cack-handed insults directed at other posters.

    Two thirds of my comments are not insults. Merely all of my replies to you. Insults are pretty much all you rate.

    Read More
Current Commenter says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?