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James Levine, the conductor of the Metropolitan Opera of New York, had been notorious since the 1970s for running a gay sex cult for barely legal teenage boys who would do anything to be classical musicians. He finally got fired in the #MeToo purge. Now Levine’s suing on the grounds that he was really fired not for the gay sex cult stuff but for being elderly, fat, having Parkinson’s disease since 1994, in a wheelchair, and not very good at conducting anymore.

The suit accuses [Met executive] Mr. Gelb, who has been deferential to Mr. Levine in public, of engaging in “demeaning name-calling more usually associated with a childhood bully than a professional music administrator,” saying that Mr. Gelb had used the phrase the “2,000-pound elephant in the room,” which the suit interprets as a “blatant reference to Levine’s physical appearance.” It also claims that Mr. Gelb told Mr. Levine at least twice that he feared Mr. Levine was “going to have a heart attack” and die while conducting. …

Off topic, I’m always interested in how much people get paid:

As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. (Mr. Levine’s contract prohibited the Met from paying anyone more than him for performances, unless he agreed.)

The Met puts on about 225 performances per year, employing multiple conductors. From Wikipedia:

In 2005, Levine’s combined salary from the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Met made him the highest-paid conductor in the country, at $3.5 million. … Levine was paid $2.1 million by the Met in 2010. … Levine was paid $1.8 million by the Met for the 2015/16 season.

So, it looks like bigshots in the opera/classical music business make about 10% of what equivalent superstars in sports or movies makes, although their careers tend to last much longer. For example, well known opera singers tend to own a swanky apartment in a major musical city near the concert hall, then trade with their peers so that while, say, the New York soprano is in Vienna, a tenor from Milan is staying in her apartment, while a Parisian baritone is in his flat in Milan. It sounds complicated but a pretty nice way to live.

 
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  1. Ariabnb.com

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Exclusive one-on-one limited engagement: Maestro James Levine conducts The Bedbug Suite in F minor. In-room catering by Schnippers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon, Lot, BB753
    • Replies: @midtown
    You're partially correct -- I would lay a lot of blame at the cost of college. However, what they are learning in college, and increasingly in K12 before that, is also to blame. School choice and extricating the government out of college loans would go a long way.
    , @rogue-one
    >Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor.

    Not necessarily. If I were poor & underemployed, I would prefer a lower supply of labor in the job market to improve my prospects. Liberalism (as understood in modern American context, supports mass movement of labor from 3rd world to 1st world). How would increasing competition for jobs & public services help powerless, unemployed, and poor?

    Now, if you are Jeff Bezos or Zuckerberg, then being liberal helps. Your company has access to millions of more candidates for jobs and tens of millions of more consumers.
    , @Peter Akuleyev

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.
     
    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in "mini-Scandinavias" - affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don't understand why the rest of the country wouldn't want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don't understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.
    , @Almost Missouri
    "we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative."

    See, there's your problem right there. We don't own the economy anymore. They do. And they will do with it as they like.
    , @Kyle
    Mistake theory!
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  3. Mr. Gelb had used the phrase the “2,000-pound elephant in the room,”

    Does this count in anti-Semitic hate crimes’ rise?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CK
    The average weight of an adult elephant is approx. 7 tons. Mr. Gelb is elephant challenged.
    Elephants never stop growing, similarly to Mr. Levine.
    However a prepubescent elephant may indeed weigh only 2000 pounds; in which case Mr. Gelb is wicked clever.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Why would anyone want to live somewhere like Tennessee or Kentucky, far away from the high culture of Levine and Gelb?

    Read More
    • Replies: @inertial
    Music. Music is great.
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  5. @Anon
    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    You’re partially correct — I would lay a lot of blame at the cost of college. However, what they are learning in college, and increasingly in K12 before that, is also to blame. School choice and extricating the government out of college loans would go a long way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Few ideas would have such a positive and immediate impact on the US economy and politics as ending federal support for student loans.

    The system supports about two million higher ed jobs that leave lots of time for left-wing activism, radicalizes people through indoctrination, and then leaves a big share of Gen Y with massive debt that prevents them from marrying or buying a house.

    And RIGHT NOW is the best time. The economy is booming and will easily soak up all the laid off educrats and new HS grads.

    How to make sure smart middle class kids can go to college? Fixed grants to public and community colleges that keep annual tuition below $10,000 a year. That can be covered with a mix of summer jobs, family support, and small private loans.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. >>As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. <<

    Before I left New York, 7 years ago, I would attend several Lincoln Center performances per year. When I left New York I was earning about $22K per year. Lincoln center would dun me for contributions, slathering on the guilt, asserting that I positively owed a contribution to support subsides for needy others. I would explain, patiently, to the solicitors that they should charge whatever they needed to cover their costs and I would decide whether the charge was worth my paying, but, considering my income, I wouldn't contribute a dime to their fundraising. It was really hard to get the point across to them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @black sea
    My response was similar. Any institution that can afford to pay this sort of compensation to a difficult, decrepit, and aging narcissist is not seriously hard up for funds, and has no business asking for charity.

    On a related note, I discovered a couple of years ago that my alma mater was paying for Tim Wise to address the students. I concluded at that point that the school had tons of money, probably more than could productively be spent, and therefore didn't need the paltry sums I might contribute.
    , @Jack D
    I used to send a small contribution to my local (Philadelphia) public radio station. Then I found out that the director makes a million bucks.
    , @Matthew McConnagay
    It seems like every city in the western world has an orchestra, and I doubt a single one covers its costs thru ticket sales. Paying some jerk a million dollars a year just to wave a baton around might have something to do with that.
    , @prosa123
    Every single week without fail I get an e-mail from the New York Philharmonic looking for money. Two per week is not uncommon and there has been the occasional triple.
    I have attended the Philharmonic exactly once, and it was way back in 2007. That's enough, apparently, to get me on an eternal panhandling list.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Sciatica, herniated disk, torn rotator cuff, lower back pain, Parkinsons…… He has the typical ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Daniel, Well, the torn rotator cuff probably came on the down beat of the crescendo. Common classical sports injury. Should have gone on IR,
    , @Dave Pinsen
    I tore my rotator cuff doing resistance training.
    , @Karl
    7 Daniel H > ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems


    and here I was, thinking that it is as easy as keeping your mouth closed
    , @VSD
    You should probably be more specific in your recommendations. I get the impression this guy would assume "resistance training" means going after those hard-to-get boys who say they don't want to do "anything" to become orchestra players.
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  8. The Maestro broke into a sob:
    “Mr. Gelb said I’m down on the job,
    That he doesn’t like scandal,
    Treating Mozart like Handel,
    And then almost implied I’m a slob!”

    Read More
    • LOL: Luke Lea, MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Big Bill
    "And THEN he imPLIED I'm a SNOB"
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. @Anon
    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    >Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor.

    Not necessarily. If I were poor & underemployed, I would prefer a lower supply of labor in the job market to improve my prospects. Liberalism (as understood in modern American context, supports mass movement of labor from 3rd world to 1st world). How would increasing competition for jobs & public services help powerless, unemployed, and poor?

    Now, if you are Jeff Bezos or Zuckerberg, then being liberal helps. Your company has access to millions of more candidates for jobs and tens of millions of more consumers.

    Read More
    • Agree: Peter Akuleyev
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Most poor, working people cannot or will not understand your point about the supply of labour and wages. All they know is the other workers – the invaders – are poor, too, and that it's poor people against rich people because Teacher said so (and TeeVee says so, and Rappers say so, and moviestars say so...).

    Similarly, there are Cool Rich People, and they are actually not against Poor People, and never to be examined for bias or self-serving motives (Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, etc.) and then there are Uncool Rich People, who are Evil (Donald Trump, the Waltons, Rex Tillerson, etc.).

    Just as, to understand women, one must first imagine a man, then take away reason and accountability, to understand the left one must think like a credulous and very suggestible child who spends all day watching television.

    , @snorlax
    Supply and demand is a much harder topic (especially for IQ <110 people) to understand than “gimme money.” If someone’s tribe is telling them that actually all that supply and demand stuff is all wrong, they’ll probably believe it. Thinking is hard!
    , @J.Ross
    This plus I don't like "rational reasons." The thing that actually makes liberals so wrong is their rationality, their lack of skin in the game.
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  10. They make good money, but unlike other entertainers, they at least create valuable cultural products. So they deserve it more. I don’t envy them.

    Read More
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  11. @Daniel H
    >>As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. <<

    Before I left New York, 7 years ago, I would attend several Lincoln Center performances per year. When I left New York I was earning about $22K per year. Lincoln center would dun me for contributions, slathering on the guilt, asserting that I positively owed a contribution to support subsides for needy others. I would explain, patiently, to the solicitors that they should charge whatever they needed to cover their costs and I would decide whether the charge was worth my paying, but, considering my income, I wouldn't contribute a dime to their fundraising. It was really hard to get the point across to them.

    My response was similar. Any institution that can afford to pay this sort of compensation to a difficult, decrepit, and aging narcissist is not seriously hard up for funds, and has no business asking for charity.

    On a related note, I discovered a couple of years ago that my alma mater was paying for Tim Wise to address the students. I concluded at that point that the school had tons of money, probably more than could productively be spent, and therefore didn’t need the paltry sums I might contribute.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    With the exception of small, private colleges I don't understand why anyone gives small donations to schools. The large donors are buying influence, but what does a donor think he is accomplishing by giving $100 or even $1,000 a year to a school with an eight or nine figure endowment?

    In the case of a performing arts center like this, it is the bureaucracy behind the scenes raising money to support their own jobs. Although I always thought most of the money was raised from corporations, this sounds like really aggressive fundraising tactics for a symphony. The fundraiser must have been getting paid by the donation.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. @rogue-one
    >Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor.

    Not necessarily. If I were poor & underemployed, I would prefer a lower supply of labor in the job market to improve my prospects. Liberalism (as understood in modern American context, supports mass movement of labor from 3rd world to 1st world). How would increasing competition for jobs & public services help powerless, unemployed, and poor?

    Now, if you are Jeff Bezos or Zuckerberg, then being liberal helps. Your company has access to millions of more candidates for jobs and tens of millions of more consumers.

    Most poor, working people cannot or will not understand your point about the supply of labour and wages. All they know is the other workers – the invaders – are poor, too, and that it’s poor people against rich people because Teacher said so (and TeeVee says so, and Rappers say so, and moviestars say so…).

    Similarly, there are Cool Rich People, and they are actually not against Poor People, and never to be examined for bias or self-serving motives (Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, etc.) and then there are Uncool Rich People, who are Evil (Donald Trump, the Waltons, Rex Tillerson, etc.).

    Just as, to understand women, one must first imagine a man, then take away reason and accountability, to understand the left one must think like a credulous and very suggestible child who spends all day watching television.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. @Daniel H
    Sciatica, herniated disk, torn rotator cuff, lower back pain, Parkinsons...... He has the typical ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    Daniel, Well, the torn rotator cuff probably came on the down beat of the crescendo. Common classical sports injury. Should have gone on IR,

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Heh!

    He should have read more carefully those posters on the wall of the breakroom (in English and Spanish, just in case!). "12 Steps to Safe Conduction: 1) Conduct with your torso, not your back ...."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Speaking of Karl Marx (your next post), you would think the orchestra masses would rise up agains these maestro capitalist roaders. Rise up, violin section! Squeak truth to power, violas! You there, brass section, stand-up bassists, fiddlers, slide guitarist, throw off the strings of your maestros! Tell the tuxedo-decked masses about your oppression by harsh word and THE BATON!

    Really, in this technological age, couldn’t these maestros be replaced by big-ass nice-oak-finished 5 ft tall metronomes? It’s not like the thing could not be programmed now to do everything the maestro supposedly does – point to the section on the right to get louder, speed up the pokes over here with the cello, etc. It’d be a great senior group project for some mechanical engineers with some software guys, some of which know the ins and outs of orchestration. One could do well leasing them out for $1000 per performance, beating the hell out of that $27K conductor above, and requiring no 1st-class travel expenses, just a large shipping box and UPS ground.

    I don’t think we even need to start an M-1B visa program for this, as these guys are doing the jobs that possibly nobody needs to do.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  15. @Buffalo Joe
    Daniel, Well, the torn rotator cuff probably came on the down beat of the crescendo. Common classical sports injury. Should have gone on IR,

    Heh!

    He should have read more carefully those posters on the wall of the breakroom (in English and Spanish, just in case!). “12 Steps to Safe Conduction: 1) Conduct with your torso, not your back ….”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    AEN, very funny my friend.
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  16. Like a lot of things, conducting an orchestra looks easier than it is.

    Read More
    • Agree: Kylie
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  17. But does he make as much as a stagehand? (The Met stagehands are unionized and somehow each one makes hundreds of thousands of $).

    How do they get people dumb enough to fund this whole crazy cost structure? I realize there are rich people with money to burn but don’t they want some value for their money?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ
    Levine was very good at fundraising. The Met raises a lot of money and spends a lot. That was probably the main factor that kept him around so long.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. @Daniel H
    >>As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. <<

    Before I left New York, 7 years ago, I would attend several Lincoln Center performances per year. When I left New York I was earning about $22K per year. Lincoln center would dun me for contributions, slathering on the guilt, asserting that I positively owed a contribution to support subsides for needy others. I would explain, patiently, to the solicitors that they should charge whatever they needed to cover their costs and I would decide whether the charge was worth my paying, but, considering my income, I wouldn't contribute a dime to their fundraising. It was really hard to get the point across to them.

    I used to send a small contribution to my local (Philadelphia) public radio station. Then I found out that the director makes a million bucks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    WRTI is really great, but they drop blue pills and play that terrible NPR news every hour. On national women’s day, the morning host said (and I will never forget it) “men and women are the same in every way”.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. @Jack D
    I used to send a small contribution to my local (Philadelphia) public radio station. Then I found out that the director makes a million bucks.

    WRTI is really great, but they drop blue pills and play that terrible NPR news every hour. On national women’s day, the morning host said (and I will never forget it) “men and women are the same in every way”.

    Read More
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  20. @a reader

    Mr. Gelb had used the phrase the “2,000-pound elephant in the room,”
     
    Does this count in anti-Semitic hate crimes' rise?

    The average weight of an adult elephant is approx. 7 tons. Mr. Gelb is elephant challenged.
    Elephants never stop growing, similarly to Mr. Levine.
    However a prepubescent elephant may indeed weigh only 2000 pounds; in which case Mr. Gelb is wicked clever.

    Read More
    • Agree: International Jew
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  21. @G Pinfold
    Why would anyone want to live somewhere like Tennessee or Kentucky, far away from the high culture of Levine and Gelb?

    Music. Music is great.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TontoBubbaGoldstein
    The mountain men from Deliverance had music and similar predilections to Levine. They just weren't smooth talkers with money, nice clothes and good teeth.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. Wow, that fat little shit made that much!

    Read More
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  23. @black sea
    My response was similar. Any institution that can afford to pay this sort of compensation to a difficult, decrepit, and aging narcissist is not seriously hard up for funds, and has no business asking for charity.

    On a related note, I discovered a couple of years ago that my alma mater was paying for Tim Wise to address the students. I concluded at that point that the school had tons of money, probably more than could productively be spent, and therefore didn't need the paltry sums I might contribute.

    With the exception of small, private colleges I don’t understand why anyone gives small donations to schools. The large donors are buying influence, but what does a donor think he is accomplishing by giving $100 or even $1,000 a year to a school with an eight or nine figure endowment?

    In the case of a performing arts center like this, it is the bureaucracy behind the scenes raising money to support their own jobs. Although I always thought most of the money was raised from corporations, this sounds like really aggressive fundraising tactics for a symphony. The fundraiser must have been getting paid by the donation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    I've been told that the percentage of alumni contributing matters to foundations who might give to the schools.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. James Levine, the conductor of the Metropolitan Opera of New York, had been notorious since the 1970s for running a gay sex cult for barely legal teenage boys who would do anything to be classical musicians.

    Really? Notorious in which group of people? That aside, the accusations against him concern work he did in other venues, not at the Met, and were lodged in the last couple of years.

    https://nypost.com/2017/12/02/legendary-opera-conductor-molested-teen-for-years-police-report/

    http://variety.com/2017/legit/news/james-levine-suspended-metropolitan-opera-sexual-abuse-1202629375/

    He finally got fired in the #MeToo purge.

    He retired in May 2016. The Met took away his honorifics. He had scheduled performances at Juilliard and at the Cleveland Institute which these bodies cancelled.

    Read More
    • Replies: @animalogic
    Thankyou Art Deco.
    At this point in time I have got to comment 24 in the thread without anyone referring to:

    "James Levine, the conductor of the Metropolitan Opera of New York, had been notorious since the 1970s for running a gay sex cult for barely legal teenage boys who would do anything to be classical musicians. "

    I thought someone put LSD in my cheap red wine, but a better explanation is I am a moral spastic living in a morally aborted world. Notorious since the 70's ? "Gay sex cults" ? "barely legal teenage boys" ? And most seem interested in discussing his (equally ) gross pay-packet ?
    We ALL really are fucked.

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  25. @Anon
    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.

    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in “mini-Scandinavias” – affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don’t understand why the rest of the country wouldn’t want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don’t understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.

    Read More
    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    It is nice living in one of these Whitopias, it looks like 1950’s middle America. Most of the contact my neighbors have with diversity is the flood of brown and black kids who are driven into the neighborhood once a year for trick or treating because the candy is good, the kids don’t have to worry about a pit bull breaking off his chain and chewing them up, and no one will take a potshot at the parents for wearing the wrong color.
    I don’t get any feel that they know what a bubble they live in, beyond the sentiment that they will do anything they have to to live here. I wish I could take them all on a field trip to a location one and a half miles to the East. There is a high school that was closed after the baby boom generations graduated. It has now beeen reopened, doubled in capacity, and is still in a continuous building program to expand it. When school lets out you can stand on a corner, watch hundreds of kids walking away and not see one...single...White...child walk past.
    , @Lot
    Those towns are not leftist. Manhattan Beach voted 50/48 for Obama and Romney. And locally they are reactionary, try building a homeless shelter there for an example. So close to half rejected Obama in the midst of him winning LA in a huge landslide. Many rich Dem voting women vote for democrats because of abortion, environmental protection, and gay marriage.

    Move left and those issues but not on taxes and spending, and a Republican can outperform Trump/Romney so much they win the governorship of Massachusetts, California and Maryland.
    , @Anon
    http://images1.fanpop.com/images/quiz/22829_1214707622445_378_400.jpg

    https://www.counter-currents.com/2011/11/the-gilmore-girls-occupy-wall-street/
    , @Clyde
    Excellent take!
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  26. @rogue-one
    >Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor.

    Not necessarily. If I were poor & underemployed, I would prefer a lower supply of labor in the job market to improve my prospects. Liberalism (as understood in modern American context, supports mass movement of labor from 3rd world to 1st world). How would increasing competition for jobs & public services help powerless, unemployed, and poor?

    Now, if you are Jeff Bezos or Zuckerberg, then being liberal helps. Your company has access to millions of more candidates for jobs and tens of millions of more consumers.

    Supply and demand is a much harder topic (especially for IQ <110 people) to understand than “gimme money.” If someone’s tribe is telling them that actually all that supply and demand stuff is all wrong, they’ll probably believe it. Thinking is hard!

    Read More
    • Replies: @rogue-one
    I think most working people do understand the demand & supply curve, at least intuitively if not abstractly. For example, the poorer people I worked with in the UK & France, are very sensitive to increased demand on public services.

    I think mass migration is an elite driven phenomenon who have been extra-ordinarily successful in packaging it and selling it. They are channelling the resentment towards whites among other groups in order to persuade them to accept mass migration. Similarly, among whites, they are channeling the white guilt to make at least 50% of the whites support mass migration.

    I believe that supporters of mass migration (except for Bezos and his friends) do it for emotional reasons that have to do with resentment or guilt, rather than just being stupid. This is perhaps the reason that white working class, that lack resentment or guilt, do not seem to support mass migration despite being less intelligent that upper middle class whites.
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  27. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.

    Because Russia of 1916 was a so much poorer society, I don’t think that it would have been possible, except for a small handful of aristocrats, to live inside the same bubble that vast swathes of white suburbanites live in America today. That just didn’t exist. Even for those living in the best neighborhoods of St. Petersburg, as soon as you stepped out onto the street you would have seen the ubiquitous lower classes. If nothing else, the rich had many more servants than nowadays. Most of the rich had country estates with dozens of peasants who while no longer serfs were not much better off.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Yo, Jack!

    Review: ‘Old Stock,’ an Immigrant Love Story Set to Klezmer

    The setting is ostensibly a century ago, but the title is borrowed from a 2015 comment by Stephen Harper, then the Canadian prime minister, who drew a distinction between refugees and “old stock Canadians.”

    So while Ms. Moscovitch is writing about the past, she is also addressing mass migrations today and the people and countries who would oppose those migrants. A few of the play’s grimmer stories recall today’s emergencies. […]

    The play is a reminder — salutary, obvious — that there’s a face behind each immigration form, a history attached to each petition for asylum.
     
    Oy gevalt.
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  28. @Daniel H
    Sciatica, herniated disk, torn rotator cuff, lower back pain, Parkinsons...... He has the typical ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    I tore my rotator cuff doing resistance training.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Do you know any 50+ heavy lifters without bad shoulders?
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  29. A 2,000lb elephant would either be a juvenile or malnourished one.

    Read More
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  30. I don’t have the reference to link to, but years ago the WSJ had an article on the classical music business in big metropolises and they mentioned that the head stagehand for Carnegie Hall with union work rules made $400,000 that year. In a concert hall, which lacks theatrical sets, the stagehands’ jobs pretty much consist of putting out the folding chairs and music stands, rolling out the piano, then putting it all away again after the performance.
    When I decide how much to donate to LA Opera above the subscription price I factor in that if I made six figures in salary that year, the stagehands probably made at least as much.

    Read More
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  31. When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kylie
    "When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?"

    I can't imagine anyone wanting to come for Bill Clinton.
    , @Robert Hume

    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?
     
    Or Jack Kennedy
    , @njguy73

    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?
     
    I think enough people have come for him already ;)
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  32. @Peter Akuleyev

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.
     
    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in "mini-Scandinavias" - affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don't understand why the rest of the country wouldn't want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don't understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.

    It is nice living in one of these Whitopias, it looks like 1950’s middle America. Most of the contact my neighbors have with diversity is the flood of brown and black kids who are driven into the neighborhood once a year for trick or treating because the candy is good, the kids don’t have to worry about a pit bull breaking off his chain and chewing them up, and no one will take a potshot at the parents for wearing the wrong color.
    I don’t get any feel that they know what a bubble they live in, beyond the sentiment that they will do anything they have to to live here. I wish I could take them all on a field trip to a location one and a half miles to the East. There is a high school that was closed after the baby boom generations graduated. It has now beeen reopened, doubled in capacity, and is still in a continuous building program to expand it. When school lets out you can stand on a corner, watch hundreds of kids walking away and not see one…single…White…child walk past.

    Read More
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  33. @Dave Pinsen
    I tore my rotator cuff doing resistance training.

    Do you know any 50+ heavy lifters without bad shoulders?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I don't know that many personally, but it's a difficult balance to strike. If you don't lift, you're more likely to fall as you get older, and more likely to break something when you fall. So, you want to try to get stronger while avoiding injuries, but sometimes you get injured while getting stronger.
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  34. @midtown
    You're partially correct -- I would lay a lot of blame at the cost of college. However, what they are learning in college, and increasingly in K12 before that, is also to blame. School choice and extricating the government out of college loans would go a long way.

    Few ideas would have such a positive and immediate impact on the US economy and politics as ending federal support for student loans.

    The system supports about two million higher ed jobs that leave lots of time for left-wing activism, radicalizes people through indoctrination, and then leaves a big share of Gen Y with massive debt that prevents them from marrying or buying a house.

    And RIGHT NOW is the best time. The economy is booming and will easily soak up all the laid off educrats and new HS grads.

    How to make sure smart middle class kids can go to college? Fixed grants to public and community colleges that keep annual tuition below $10,000 a year. That can be covered with a mix of summer jobs, family support, and small private loans.

    Read More
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  35. I like the story of the Met being founded by nouveaux riches who couldn’t obtain subscription boxes at the old-money Academy of Music.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolitan_Opera#Origins

    Speaking of which, the actress/model/whatever track has been around for a long time…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_of_Music_(New_York_City)

    After the Civil War, an organization called the Cercle Française de l’Harmonie began using the Academy as a venue for masked balls, also called “French balls”, in which the nouveau riche men of New York society would rub elbows – and other body parts – with semi-dressed prostitutes and courtesans, with little regard for public decorum or modesty. These balls were covered by the press, which did little to dim the enthusiasm or ribald behavior of the participants. One reporter wrote that women were thrown in the air and then sexually assaulted “amid the jeers and laughter of the other drunken wretches on the floor … [with] not a whisper of shame in the crowd”. … Feminist editor Victoria Woodhull condemned the sexual hyprocrisy of the French balls in 1873 in Woodhull and Clafliin’s Weekly, complaining that the Academy of Music was being used “for the purpose of debauching debauched women; and the trustees of the Academy know this.”

    Read More
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  36. @Peter Akuleyev

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.
     
    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in "mini-Scandinavias" - affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don't understand why the rest of the country wouldn't want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don't understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.

    Those towns are not leftist. Manhattan Beach voted 50/48 for Obama and Romney. And locally they are reactionary, try building a homeless shelter there for an example. So close to half rejected Obama in the midst of him winning LA in a huge landslide. Many rich Dem voting women vote for democrats because of abortion, environmental protection, and gay marriage.

    Move left and those issues but not on taxes and spending, and a Republican can outperform Trump/Romney so much they win the governorship of Massachusetts, California and Maryland.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Gay marriage? 2012 called. They want their issues back.
    , @Brutusale
    I notice you left out Newton.

    Obama: 32,077
    Romney: 12,154

    http://www.newtonma.gov/civicax/filebank/documents/48003

    Massachusetts elects Republican governors because the unenrolled voters (no political party affiliation) want someone to temper the worst depredations of our 80%+ Democratic legislature.
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  37. @TweetWivMe
    Ariabnb.com

    Exclusive one-on-one limited engagement: Maestro James Levine conducts The Bedbug Suite in F minor. In-room catering by Schnippers.

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  38. @phil
    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    “When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?”

    I can’t imagine anyone wanting to come for Bill Clinton.

    Read More
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  39. So, it looks like bigshots in the opera/classical music business make about 10% of what equivalent superstars in sports or movies make

    It’s like pro sports in another way too: a few stars make a lot of money, and the vast majority of those who devoted their young years to making it, can’t support themselves at all as professionals.

    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around. But exactly what it is, well, that’s still controversial: https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/the-art-of-conducting/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around.

    I agree, but it's not much more. I certainly don't see why conductors become stars in the classical music world, taking the bows, the bouquets, the admiration and the giant salaries. I can only conclude - and this is based on personal experience - that classical music fans are by and large just as dumb as the rest of us, both the moneyed philistines and the trained aesthetes. Stick some clown out the front of the operation who's willing to take all the credit, and people will give it to him. It's like politics, or war: the general didn't really win the thing, but he's certainly the one getting the most medals pinned on his chest. The only difference being a general is more responsible for a good performance than a conductor, and a politician is a better frontman.
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  40. @Daniel H
    >>As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. <<

    Before I left New York, 7 years ago, I would attend several Lincoln Center performances per year. When I left New York I was earning about $22K per year. Lincoln center would dun me for contributions, slathering on the guilt, asserting that I positively owed a contribution to support subsides for needy others. I would explain, patiently, to the solicitors that they should charge whatever they needed to cover their costs and I would decide whether the charge was worth my paying, but, considering my income, I wouldn't contribute a dime to their fundraising. It was really hard to get the point across to them.

    It seems like every city in the western world has an orchestra, and I doubt a single one covers its costs thru ticket sales. Paying some jerk a million dollars a year just to wave a baton around might have something to do with that.

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  41. @International Jew

    So, it looks like bigshots in the opera/classical music business make about 10% of what equivalent superstars in sports or movies make

     

    It's like pro sports in another way too: a few stars make a lot of money, and the vast majority of those who devoted their young years to making it, can't support themselves at all as professionals.

    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around. But exactly what it is, well, that's still controversial: https://www.commentarymagazine.com/articles/the-art-of-conducting/

    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around.

    I agree, but it’s not much more. I certainly don’t see why conductors become stars in the classical music world, taking the bows, the bouquets, the admiration and the giant salaries. I can only conclude – and this is based on personal experience – that classical music fans are by and large just as dumb as the rest of us, both the moneyed philistines and the trained aesthetes. Stick some clown out the front of the operation who’s willing to take all the credit, and people will give it to him. It’s like politics, or war: the general didn’t really win the thing, but he’s certainly the one getting the most medals pinned on his chest. The only difference being a general is more responsible for a good performance than a conductor, and a politician is a better frontman.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "I don't want the band, I want the bandleader!" US de-nazification officer investigating Furtwangler in Taking Sides (Ed Harris in the movie)
    , @International Jew
    Read the article, you might learn something.
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  42. @Barnard
    With the exception of small, private colleges I don't understand why anyone gives small donations to schools. The large donors are buying influence, but what does a donor think he is accomplishing by giving $100 or even $1,000 a year to a school with an eight or nine figure endowment?

    In the case of a performing arts center like this, it is the bureaucracy behind the scenes raising money to support their own jobs. Although I always thought most of the money was raised from corporations, this sounds like really aggressive fundraising tactics for a symphony. The fundraiser must have been getting paid by the donation.

    I’ve been told that the percentage of alumni contributing matters to foundations who might give to the schools.

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  43. “and $27,000 per performance”

    I ONLY get paid for performance and one little boo boo and I don’t get paid at all. As a matter of fact it seems like 30% of the time I work for customers is for free.

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  44. @Lot
    Those towns are not leftist. Manhattan Beach voted 50/48 for Obama and Romney. And locally they are reactionary, try building a homeless shelter there for an example. So close to half rejected Obama in the midst of him winning LA in a huge landslide. Many rich Dem voting women vote for democrats because of abortion, environmental protection, and gay marriage.

    Move left and those issues but not on taxes and spending, and a Republican can outperform Trump/Romney so much they win the governorship of Massachusetts, California and Maryland.

    Gay marriage? 2012 called. They want their issues back.

    Read More
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  45. @Peter Akuleyev

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.
     
    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in "mini-Scandinavias" - affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don't understand why the rest of the country wouldn't want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don't understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.
    Read More
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  46. Yes we all knew that Levine was a chicken hawk. But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. I have known many conductors – some very well and some very famous. I can recall drunks and dopers but no other homosexual predators.

    As to Levine’s having a heart attack, the widely accepted theory is that conductors live a long time because all that arm waving exercises the heart. This is probably a silly superstition but a lot of people in music believe it.

    Conducting looks like nothing at all and at certain times in the past it was considered a sort of non=profession. It was referred to has the “guy who stood with his back to the audience”. Today of course conductors are probably over praised and over appreciated. For example Mstislav Rostropovich said that he thought there wasn’t much to conducting. He said “I’ve conducted and the audience seemed pleased. I wonder if these famous conductors could similarly play my cello”. He never talked like that of course after he himself became a conductor.

    I know from personal knowledge that I couldn’t be a conductor. I was asked to conduct the fourth Brandenburg concerto once. Normally such a small group needs no conductor but they were having trouble staying together. I made a shambles of it. My arm got tired and the players got mad. No one asked me to conduct again.

    When we did Rheingold (I sang Fasolt and Fafner) we had a woman conductor. She couldn’t conduct either. She couldn’t keep a steady tempo. She wouldn’t drink coffee the day of a performance so as to keep her pulse steady. It didn’t help. She never played the same passages at the same speed twice.

    So there is something to orchestral conducting but most famous conductors were mediocre instrumentalists. I knew quite well a world famous opera conductor he was an exception. He had been rather a mediocre vocalist. Conductors of big forces have high intelligence and superior executive skills and they may be good musicians too – or not.

    By chance, my wife and I spent the train ride from Italy into Monaco with a young Italian opera conductor. We told him we were both opera singers but he assumed that we sang some Boheme’s or Carmen’s in some provincial American opera company. He wasn’t interested in us. Only when we told him we had recently done “Cardillac” would he open up. He vented about the recent fame of his contemporary Giuseppi Sinopoli who was having his reputation sky rocketing because he didn’t know the repertoire and he played everything wrong. The critics figured he must be a genius.

    So Rostopovich was right you can’t fake the cello but you can fake conducting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    I had always understood that conducting was a lot like coaching a sports team - far more important in the preparation of the piece than in the actual performance. If the conductor has done his job he should be more or less superfluous by the time the orchestra is playing for an audience.
    , @Luke Lea
    Does Steve have the classiest commenters or what?
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  47. @Matthew McConnagay
    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around.

    I agree, but it's not much more. I certainly don't see why conductors become stars in the classical music world, taking the bows, the bouquets, the admiration and the giant salaries. I can only conclude - and this is based on personal experience - that classical music fans are by and large just as dumb as the rest of us, both the moneyed philistines and the trained aesthetes. Stick some clown out the front of the operation who's willing to take all the credit, and people will give it to him. It's like politics, or war: the general didn't really win the thing, but he's certainly the one getting the most medals pinned on his chest. The only difference being a general is more responsible for a good performance than a conductor, and a politician is a better frontman.

    “I don’t want the band, I want the bandleader!” US de-nazification officer investigating Furtwangler in Taking Sides (Ed Harris in the movie)

    Read More
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  48. @snorlax
    Supply and demand is a much harder topic (especially for IQ <110 people) to understand than “gimme money.” If someone’s tribe is telling them that actually all that supply and demand stuff is all wrong, they’ll probably believe it. Thinking is hard!

    I think most working people do understand the demand & supply curve, at least intuitively if not abstractly. For example, the poorer people I worked with in the UK & France, are very sensitive to increased demand on public services.

    I think mass migration is an elite driven phenomenon who have been extra-ordinarily successful in packaging it and selling it. They are channelling the resentment towards whites among other groups in order to persuade them to accept mass migration. Similarly, among whites, they are channeling the white guilt to make at least 50% of the whites support mass migration.

    I believe that supporters of mass migration (except for Bezos and his friends) do it for emotional reasons that have to do with resentment or guilt, rather than just being stupid. This is perhaps the reason that white working class, that lack resentment or guilt, do not seem to support mass migration despite being less intelligent that upper middle class whites.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    People of average or lower intelligence understand the concept of [scabs / wetbacks / Polacks] coming in and taking all the jobs for low money, but if you ask them why wages have gone down, they'll typically say it's because companies are greedy and don't want to pay a decent wage, and/or that companies "only want to hire" [scabs / wetbacks / Polacks].

    Both of which are true enough, but companies are always greedy and always want to pay their workforce as little as possible. Rather than understanding that an increased labor supply reduces wages, they blame lower wages or replacement by immigrants on employers becoming "greedier." If gas or rent gets more expensive, it's because oil companies and landlords are "greedier."

    To the extent they have any understanding of supply, demand or competitive pressure, it's when there are very concrete impacts on their personal finances ("Julio took my job") rather than more abstract concepts, like that immigration in general puts downward pressure on wages in general (the more often Juanita moves to California to pick strawberries, the less Sherri gets paid at the call center in Nebraska).
    , @stillCARealist
    you also have to factor in the reality that lots of immigrants are very pro-America, at least in the first generation. They understand the difference between what they left and what they've come to and that can be quite attractive to Americans like me who are completely sick of people scorning our country.

    Then, when they work hard, keep their marriages together, and have clean mouths, it gets tough to wish them away to their 3rd world. I fully understand that their kids often become little commies, but the recent immigrants I know are fabulous people (countries of origin: Colombia, Mexico, Argentina, Romania, Ukraine, Russia, Bahamas, Philippines). The only group I find to be arrogant from the landing are the Indians.
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  49. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @Pat Boyle
    Yes we all knew that Levine was a chicken hawk. But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don't think opera conductors are particularly over represented. I have known many conductors - some very well and some very famous. I can recall drunks and dopers but no other homosexual predators.

    As to Levine's having a heart attack, the widely accepted theory is that conductors live a long time because all that arm waving exercises the heart. This is probably a silly superstition but a lot of people in music believe it.

    Conducting looks like nothing at all and at certain times in the past it was considered a sort of non=profession. It was referred to has the "guy who stood with his back to the audience". Today of course conductors are probably over praised and over appreciated. For example Mstislav Rostropovich said that he thought there wasn't much to conducting. He said "I've conducted and the audience seemed pleased. I wonder if these famous conductors could similarly play my cello". He never talked like that of course after he himself became a conductor.

    I know from personal knowledge that I couldn't be a conductor. I was asked to conduct the fourth Brandenburg concerto once. Normally such a small group needs no conductor but they were having trouble staying together. I made a shambles of it. My arm got tired and the players got mad. No one asked me to conduct again.

    When we did Rheingold (I sang Fasolt and Fafner) we had a woman conductor. She couldn't conduct either. She couldn't keep a steady tempo. She wouldn't drink coffee the day of a performance so as to keep her pulse steady. It didn't help. She never played the same passages at the same speed twice.

    So there is something to orchestral conducting but most famous conductors were mediocre instrumentalists. I knew quite well a world famous opera conductor he was an exception. He had been rather a mediocre vocalist. Conductors of big forces have high intelligence and superior executive skills and they may be good musicians too - or not.

    By chance, my wife and I spent the train ride from Italy into Monaco with a young Italian opera conductor. We told him we were both opera singers but he assumed that we sang some Boheme's or Carmen's in some provincial American opera company. He wasn't interested in us. Only when we told him we had recently done "Cardillac" would he open up. He vented about the recent fame of his contemporary Giuseppi Sinopoli who was having his reputation sky rocketing because he didn't know the repertoire and he played everything wrong. The critics figured he must be a genius.

    So Rostopovich was right you can't fake the cello but you can fake conducting.

    “But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. ”

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Alexander Rybak is one successful violinist who certainly gets the ladies.
    , @Pat Boyle
    You learn the strangest things on this blog.
    , @Lot

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other.
     
    I'm skeptical researchers could obtain an accurate and statistically significant data set on the sexual orientation of orchestra players by instrument. It would be hard now, but practically impossible in the 70's or prior.

    Pianists were seldom gay
     
    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind. Quite a few black gay pianists on wikipedia I never heard of too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eastman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Bridgers
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Jackson_(pianist)

    And two more white guys I never heard of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Villa
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Tilson_Thomas
    , @njguy73

    There are modest masculinity patterns among instrumentalists. Guitarists may tend to be more masculine than keyboardists (for example, Elton John and Little Richard on the gay side; but then the super showmen Jerry Lee Lewis and Keith Emerson were straight). When Jesse Jackson was running for president in the 1980s, he was asked how he could claim to be heading a “Rainbow Coalition” open to homosexuals when he spent much of his time campaigning in black churches. He answered that lots of black churches have gay organists.
     
    http://takimag.com/article/rock_roll_reversal_steve_sailer/print#ixzz5AFqpNftS
    , @Authenticjazzman
    " Pianists were seldom gay"

    Fred Hersh, a magnificent Jazz player, pianist, is openly gay.

    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro Jazz musician.
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  50. I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.

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    • Replies: @njguy73

    I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.
     

    I would ask if it's who I think it is, but I don't know how to hide spoilers on this forum.

    BTW, three minutes of googling was all I needed.

    , @Lot
    Well done, sir.
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  51. @phil
    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    Or Jack Kennedy

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  52. @Jack D

    I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.
     
    Because Russia of 1916 was a so much poorer society, I don't think that it would have been possible, except for a small handful of aristocrats, to live inside the same bubble that vast swathes of white suburbanites live in America today. That just didn't exist. Even for those living in the best neighborhoods of St. Petersburg, as soon as you stepped out onto the street you would have seen the ubiquitous lower classes. If nothing else, the rich had many more servants than nowadays. Most of the rich had country estates with dozens of peasants who while no longer serfs were not much better off.

    Yo, Jack!

    Review: ‘Old Stock,’ an Immigrant Love Story Set to Klezmer

    The setting is ostensibly a century ago, but the title is borrowed from a 2015 comment by Stephen Harper, then the Canadian prime minister, who drew a distinction between refugees and “old stock Canadians.”

    So while Ms. Moscovitch is writing about the past, she is also addressing mass migrations today and the people and countries who would oppose those migrants. A few of the play’s grimmer stories recall today’s emergencies. […]

    The play is a reminder — salutary, obvious — that there’s a face behind each immigration form, a history attached to each petition for asylum.

    Oy gevalt.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Last night my 96 y.o. MIL was reciting family lore regarding immigration (some of it clearly wrong ) and remarked about how similar today's immigrants were to her own family. Her grandpa was a religious scholar in the old country (a high IQ occupation) and had come over (in 1906) with 10 kids. So many of the descendants have typical high IQ occupations - doctors, lawyers, college professors, journalists, etc. Pulitzer Prize winners, Oscar winners, etc. - they are really a very impressive clan (my own family are not nearly that bright - they were fishermen, not scholars).

    So when she said this, I (mumbling under my breath) said that today's refugees are just like our immigrant ancestors, minus 30 IQ points. Luckily she is a little deaf (her mind is still totally sharp) so I don't think she heard me.
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  53. @Anon
    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.”

    See, there’s your problem right there. We don’t own the economy anymore. They do. And they will do with it as they like.

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  54. @Pat Boyle
    Yes we all knew that Levine was a chicken hawk. But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don't think opera conductors are particularly over represented. I have known many conductors - some very well and some very famous. I can recall drunks and dopers but no other homosexual predators.

    As to Levine's having a heart attack, the widely accepted theory is that conductors live a long time because all that arm waving exercises the heart. This is probably a silly superstition but a lot of people in music believe it.

    Conducting looks like nothing at all and at certain times in the past it was considered a sort of non=profession. It was referred to has the "guy who stood with his back to the audience". Today of course conductors are probably over praised and over appreciated. For example Mstislav Rostropovich said that he thought there wasn't much to conducting. He said "I've conducted and the audience seemed pleased. I wonder if these famous conductors could similarly play my cello". He never talked like that of course after he himself became a conductor.

    I know from personal knowledge that I couldn't be a conductor. I was asked to conduct the fourth Brandenburg concerto once. Normally such a small group needs no conductor but they were having trouble staying together. I made a shambles of it. My arm got tired and the players got mad. No one asked me to conduct again.

    When we did Rheingold (I sang Fasolt and Fafner) we had a woman conductor. She couldn't conduct either. She couldn't keep a steady tempo. She wouldn't drink coffee the day of a performance so as to keep her pulse steady. It didn't help. She never played the same passages at the same speed twice.

    So there is something to orchestral conducting but most famous conductors were mediocre instrumentalists. I knew quite well a world famous opera conductor he was an exception. He had been rather a mediocre vocalist. Conductors of big forces have high intelligence and superior executive skills and they may be good musicians too - or not.

    By chance, my wife and I spent the train ride from Italy into Monaco with a young Italian opera conductor. We told him we were both opera singers but he assumed that we sang some Boheme's or Carmen's in some provincial American opera company. He wasn't interested in us. Only when we told him we had recently done "Cardillac" would he open up. He vented about the recent fame of his contemporary Giuseppi Sinopoli who was having his reputation sky rocketing because he didn't know the repertoire and he played everything wrong. The critics figured he must be a genius.

    So Rostopovich was right you can't fake the cello but you can fake conducting.

    I had always understood that conducting was a lot like coaching a sports team – far more important in the preparation of the piece than in the actual performance. If the conductor has done his job he should be more or less superfluous by the time the orchestra is playing for an audience.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Perhaps true enough for both mediocre conductors and mediocre orchestras, but the opposite of the case for those with real talent.
    Great conducting is a matter of inspiration, and the great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the peformance itself.

    The idea that a conductor is a mere time-beater might, again, work for the uninspired, but why go to hear them?
    Furtwangler, greatest of the great, once walked out of a Toscanini performance within minutes, saying aloud, and not merely mumbling, "A metronome!".
    , @denjae
    Like coaching . . total immersion

    Player selection — seat in violin section - 1500 applicants — Assistant Conductors’ audition 50 and present 5 to Principal Conductor — who summarily dumps first one as he “tunes.”

    Practice — Conductor takes the court — sight-reads and reduces entire orchestral score to demonstration-piece on piano — all while commenting about the ins and outs of how he wants it played.

    Game night — Conductor then uses same ten fingers to expand the individual parts of the score back at the individual players, doing eveything possible to turn the live action into a winning performance

    Post- game — Conductor calls the music librarian aside for a look at a certain player’s sheets. Was it the player or the player’s sheet that led to the playing of an ornament that’s not part of the score?

    Total immersion? See a player conducting:

    youtube: Gulda Mozart 20 26 (zsebipapa has the best upload)

    “Play as if your life depends on every note . . . Because it does.”

    (and no, he isn’t looking at the camera . . . he’s maintaining mind and eye contact with the players at the far end of the piano)
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  55. @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    Alexander Rybak is one successful violinist who certainly gets the ladies.

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  56. @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    You learn the strangest things on this blog.

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  57. @Daniel H
    >>As music director he was paid $700,000 a year, plus $50,000 for travel and expenses, and $27,000 per performance — more than the $17,000 that the Met usually describes as its top fee. <<

    Before I left New York, 7 years ago, I would attend several Lincoln Center performances per year. When I left New York I was earning about $22K per year. Lincoln center would dun me for contributions, slathering on the guilt, asserting that I positively owed a contribution to support subsides for needy others. I would explain, patiently, to the solicitors that they should charge whatever they needed to cover their costs and I would decide whether the charge was worth my paying, but, considering my income, I wouldn't contribute a dime to their fundraising. It was really hard to get the point across to them.

    Every single week without fail I get an e-mail from the New York Philharmonic looking for money. Two per week is not uncommon and there has been the occasional triple.
    I have attended the Philharmonic exactly once, and it was way back in 2007. That’s enough, apparently, to get me on an eternal panhandling list.

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  58. @Matthew McConnagay
    Conducting is more than just waving a baton around.

    I agree, but it's not much more. I certainly don't see why conductors become stars in the classical music world, taking the bows, the bouquets, the admiration and the giant salaries. I can only conclude - and this is based on personal experience - that classical music fans are by and large just as dumb as the rest of us, both the moneyed philistines and the trained aesthetes. Stick some clown out the front of the operation who's willing to take all the credit, and people will give it to him. It's like politics, or war: the general didn't really win the thing, but he's certainly the one getting the most medals pinned on his chest. The only difference being a general is more responsible for a good performance than a conductor, and a politician is a better frontman.

    Read the article, you might learn something.

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    • Replies: @Matthew McConnagay
    Meh, I already know something
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  59. @rogue-one
    I think most working people do understand the demand & supply curve, at least intuitively if not abstractly. For example, the poorer people I worked with in the UK & France, are very sensitive to increased demand on public services.

    I think mass migration is an elite driven phenomenon who have been extra-ordinarily successful in packaging it and selling it. They are channelling the resentment towards whites among other groups in order to persuade them to accept mass migration. Similarly, among whites, they are channeling the white guilt to make at least 50% of the whites support mass migration.

    I believe that supporters of mass migration (except for Bezos and his friends) do it for emotional reasons that have to do with resentment or guilt, rather than just being stupid. This is perhaps the reason that white working class, that lack resentment or guilt, do not seem to support mass migration despite being less intelligent that upper middle class whites.

    People of average or lower intelligence understand the concept of [scabs / wetbacks / Polacks] coming in and taking all the jobs for low money, but if you ask them why wages have gone down, they’ll typically say it’s because companies are greedy and don’t want to pay a decent wage, and/or that companies “only want to hire” [scabs / wetbacks / Polacks].

    Both of which are true enough, but companies are always greedy and always want to pay their workforce as little as possible. Rather than understanding that an increased labor supply reduces wages, they blame lower wages or replacement by immigrants on employers becoming “greedier.” If gas or rent gets more expensive, it’s because oil companies and landlords are “greedier.”

    To the extent they have any understanding of supply, demand or competitive pressure, it’s when there are very concrete impacts on their personal finances (“Julio took my job”) rather than more abstract concepts, like that immigration in general puts downward pressure on wages in general (the more often Juanita moves to California to pick strawberries, the less Sherri gets paid at the call center in Nebraska).

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  60. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Yo, Jack!

    Review: ‘Old Stock,’ an Immigrant Love Story Set to Klezmer

    The setting is ostensibly a century ago, but the title is borrowed from a 2015 comment by Stephen Harper, then the Canadian prime minister, who drew a distinction between refugees and “old stock Canadians.”

    So while Ms. Moscovitch is writing about the past, she is also addressing mass migrations today and the people and countries who would oppose those migrants. A few of the play’s grimmer stories recall today’s emergencies. […]

    The play is a reminder — salutary, obvious — that there’s a face behind each immigration form, a history attached to each petition for asylum.
     
    Oy gevalt.

    Last night my 96 y.o. MIL was reciting family lore regarding immigration (some of it clearly wrong ) and remarked about how similar today’s immigrants were to her own family. Her grandpa was a religious scholar in the old country (a high IQ occupation) and had come over (in 1906) with 10 kids. So many of the descendants have typical high IQ occupations – doctors, lawyers, college professors, journalists, etc. Pulitzer Prize winners, Oscar winners, etc. – they are really a very impressive clan (my own family are not nearly that bright – they were fishermen, not scholars).

    So when she said this, I (mumbling under my breath) said that today’s refugees are just like our immigrant ancestors, minus 30 IQ points. Luckily she is a little deaf (her mind is still totally sharp) so I don’t think she heard me.

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    It’s best not to rile the oldsters. :)
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  61. @Peter Akuleyev
    I had always understood that conducting was a lot like coaching a sports team - far more important in the preparation of the piece than in the actual performance. If the conductor has done his job he should be more or less superfluous by the time the orchestra is playing for an audience.

    Perhaps true enough for both mediocre conductors and mediocre orchestras, but the opposite of the case for those with real talent.
    Great conducting is a matter of inspiration, and the great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the peformance itself.

    The idea that a conductor is a mere time-beater might, again, work for the uninspired, but why go to hear them?
    Furtwangler, greatest of the great, once walked out of a Toscanini performance within minutes, saying aloud, and not merely mumbling, “A metronome!”.

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    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
    " The great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the performance itself"

    Pure unadutlterated nonsence.

    Apparently people with no musical performance experience think that players in a classical ensemble
    are able to concentrate simultaneously upon the machinations of the conductor while struggling to play the right notes, and doing their best not to hit too many clinkers.

    The conductors most "inspired insights" have no effect whatsoever upon the quality of a performance, other than to give a few tips during practice sessions which might, or might not be remembered and applied by the musicians.

    A huge amount of musical performance is dependant upon pure randomity, and nobody can really pinpoint just why one evening will be great, and the next one shitty, the same holds true regarding Jazz performing : Sometimes it just clicks and other times it falls apart, and none of the involved musicians, can really give an explanation for the disparaging results.

    Regarding conductors : In centuries past the baton had been long enough so as to reach the floor, and they, the conductors, were in fact living metronomes, beating the time with their stick on the floor, and this had been their only actual function.

    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained us Army Vet, and pro jazz musician.
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  62. @Daniel H
    Sciatica, herniated disk, torn rotator cuff, lower back pain, Parkinsons...... He has the typical ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    7 Daniel H > ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    and here I was, thinking that it is as easy as keeping your mouth closed

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  63. I have been to the Met opera three times in the past two weeks, and I highly recommend it to anyone who is at all interested. The sets, the staging, the choreography and the singing are like nothing else.

    This is a scan of two pages in the Met’s program showing who has given what recently. Note that $1 million only gets you on page 2 in small print.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.
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  64. @Jack D
    But does he make as much as a stagehand? (The Met stagehands are unionized and somehow each one makes hundreds of thousands of $).

    How do they get people dumb enough to fund this whole crazy cost structure? I realize there are rich people with money to burn but don't they want some value for their money?

    Levine was very good at fundraising. The Met raises a lot of money and spends a lot. That was probably the main factor that kept him around so long.

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  65. @phil
    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    When is the #MeToo movement going to come for Bill Clinton?

    I think enough people have come for him already ;)

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  66. @rogue-one
    >Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor.

    Not necessarily. If I were poor & underemployed, I would prefer a lower supply of labor in the job market to improve my prospects. Liberalism (as understood in modern American context, supports mass movement of labor from 3rd world to 1st world). How would increasing competition for jobs & public services help powerless, unemployed, and poor?

    Now, if you are Jeff Bezos or Zuckerberg, then being liberal helps. Your company has access to millions of more candidates for jobs and tens of millions of more consumers.

    This plus I don’t like “rational reasons.” The thing that actually makes liberals so wrong is their rationality, their lack of skin in the game.

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  67. @Jack D
    Last night my 96 y.o. MIL was reciting family lore regarding immigration (some of it clearly wrong ) and remarked about how similar today's immigrants were to her own family. Her grandpa was a religious scholar in the old country (a high IQ occupation) and had come over (in 1906) with 10 kids. So many of the descendants have typical high IQ occupations - doctors, lawyers, college professors, journalists, etc. Pulitzer Prize winners, Oscar winners, etc. - they are really a very impressive clan (my own family are not nearly that bright - they were fishermen, not scholars).

    So when she said this, I (mumbling under my breath) said that today's refugees are just like our immigrant ancestors, minus 30 IQ points. Luckily she is a little deaf (her mind is still totally sharp) so I don't think she heard me.

    It’s best not to rile the oldsters. :)

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  68. that classical music fans are by and large just as dumb as the rest of us

    There’s a range (a lot of classical music fans who talk about the details must be bright in order to do that, eg, radio hosts like Dave Wagner or Jack Goggin), but especially in the seats of the Met you get a certain amount of people just there for pure conspicuous consumption, which probably has no (or less of an) equivalent go other musical genres. Nobody’s buying a Slayer or Lol Wayne ticket who doesn’t really want to be there.
    However, a few years ago classical music reviewers were partially exposed giving different reviews to the same recording.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2125348/Pianist-Joyce-Hatto-Husband-reveals-fooled-world-fake-recordings.html

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  69. @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other.

    I’m skeptical researchers could obtain an accurate and statistically significant data set on the sexual orientation of orchestra players by instrument. It would be hard now, but practically impossible in the 70′s or prior.

    Pianists were seldom gay

    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind. Quite a few black gay pianists on wikipedia I never heard of too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eastman

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Bridgers

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Jackson_(pianist)

    And two more white guys I never heard of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Villa

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Tilson_Thomas

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    • Replies: @snorlax
    And Elton John, and lots of pop music synthesizer players.
    , @larry lurker

    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind.
     
    Sviatoslav Richter as well.

    It seems like about half of the best-known American composers have been gay: Copland, Barber, Bernstein, Cage - but not Gershwin or any of the minimalists.
    , @JMcG
    Little Richard?! Who knew?
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  70. Old Palo Altan – nice comment .

    A true artist invents a universe. Some people listen to an old Bix recording and say – ah, that reminds me of them musicians that played that Little Rascals music! – someone else listens, and an entire world that might have vanished lives again in all its glory – the Goethean or Pushkinesque changes in tempo, the glorious bursts of melodies, the unmistakable enthusiasms of genius, heard through the medium of a long-lost cornet being played in a long-vanished room with long-lost recording equipment. I am sure Furtwangler, heard live, was amazing.

    There is a Toscanini universe, too, and I can see why Furtwangler was disappointed when he tried to enter that world- the Furtwangler universe is a whole ‘nother thing – but I am not a competing maestro and I can enjoy the recordings of Toscanini without begrudging the poor little man his great fame.

    There is even a “Bob Dylan” universe which would not have existed if Bob Dylan had not had enthusiasm and a desire to be, in his humble way, a musician, and a Judy Garland universe, and many similar universes, of course not all at the Bix or Louis level, but still, worlds of music we should be grateful for.

    But if you have lived a long time and heard beautiful music in many places as several commenters on this thread clearly have – in the home, on the streets on a summer evening, in the great cities, and on board ships where a random musical genius whiles away the time entertaining her fellow passengers with effortless and spectacular unrehearsed and unbelievable singenspiels, or whatever you call such things —- well …

    That being said, please do not take this comment as implying that I know enough about conducting to say who the great ones are. Toscanini and Furtwangler, judging by the records, probably were. That is all I am saying.

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    • Replies: @Authenticjazzman
    Yes Bix , the unheralded "(German) genius who spun out implied Be-bop licks , fifteen years before they were first heard in Harlem, and then Eddie lang and Joe Venuti, both italian Americans , the folks who hinted at "Modern" jazz before the NY crew ever dreamt about it.
    JSB, his 333rd birthday being tomorrow, was actually the first Jazz musician, his roller-coaster eighth note lines being the essence of "Swing".
    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained us Army Vet, and pro jazz musician.
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  71. @inertial
    Music. Music is great.

    The mountain men from Deliverance had music and similar predilections to Levine. They just weren’t smooth talkers with money, nice clothes and good teeth.

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  72. @Anon
    What they lose in salary, they get to make up in perks.

    OT: The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes. They are politically stunted because they have never gone through any of the life stages that make you a conservative. This means it is more urgent then ever to restore the economy. Liberalism is a rational response to being powerless, unemployed, and poor. Therefore, we have to give people a rational reason to become conservative.

    Mistake theory!

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  73. @International Jew
    Read the article, you might learn something.

    Meh, I already know something

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  74. @Jim Don Bob
    I have been to the Met opera three times in the past two weeks, and I highly recommend it to anyone who is at all interested. The sets, the staging, the choreography and the singing are like nothing else.

    This is a scan of two pages in the Met's program showing who has given what recently. Note that $1 million only gets you on page 2 in small print.

    http://macqueen.us/metopera.jpg

    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.

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    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Right. And as you walk toward the Met, David Geffen Hall, formerly Avery Fisher Hall, is on your right. Geffen gave them $100 million.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Geffen_Hall
    , @peterike
    “For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.”

    And they get their name in the program. Don’t you recognize virtue signaling and bragging when you see it?
    , @J.Ross
    ... if you ever want to examine that seriously, there's literally a parable in the Gospels that explains why gentiles are not bowled over by that.
    , @anon
    It’s particularly admirable in this case (the Met) since there are virtually no Jews on stage, backstage, in the pit … and certainly none in the audience, truly a selfless act. Where are the Italo-American donors? Or the Teutonics? I thought they loved opera?
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  75. @Eustace Tilley (not)
    The Maestro broke into a sob:
    "Mr. Gelb said I'm down on the job,
    That he doesn't like scandal,
    Treating Mozart like Handel,
    And then almost implied I'm a slob!"

    “And THEN he imPLIED I’m a SNOB

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  76. @Lot

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other.
     
    I'm skeptical researchers could obtain an accurate and statistically significant data set on the sexual orientation of orchestra players by instrument. It would be hard now, but practically impossible in the 70's or prior.

    Pianists were seldom gay
     
    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind. Quite a few black gay pianists on wikipedia I never heard of too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eastman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Bridgers
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Jackson_(pianist)

    And two more white guys I never heard of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Villa
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Tilson_Thomas

    And Elton John, and lots of pop music synthesizer players.

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  77. @Jack D
    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.

    Right. And as you walk toward the Met, David Geffen Hall, formerly Avery Fisher Hall, is on your right. Geffen gave them $100 million.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Geffen_Hall

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  78. @Jack D
    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.

    “For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.”

    And they get their name in the program. Don’t you recognize virtue signaling and bragging when you see it?

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    • Replies: @ausonius
    Donors like to be acknowledged. Not a Jewish thing in particular. It's a WASP thing too.
    Giving to arts not necessarily virtue signaling either (a useful phase in danger of death by overuse). It is status driven, often, but that's not the same thing.
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  79. @Pat Boyle
    Yes we all knew that Levine was a chicken hawk. But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don't think opera conductors are particularly over represented. I have known many conductors - some very well and some very famous. I can recall drunks and dopers but no other homosexual predators.

    As to Levine's having a heart attack, the widely accepted theory is that conductors live a long time because all that arm waving exercises the heart. This is probably a silly superstition but a lot of people in music believe it.

    Conducting looks like nothing at all and at certain times in the past it was considered a sort of non=profession. It was referred to has the "guy who stood with his back to the audience". Today of course conductors are probably over praised and over appreciated. For example Mstislav Rostropovich said that he thought there wasn't much to conducting. He said "I've conducted and the audience seemed pleased. I wonder if these famous conductors could similarly play my cello". He never talked like that of course after he himself became a conductor.

    I know from personal knowledge that I couldn't be a conductor. I was asked to conduct the fourth Brandenburg concerto once. Normally such a small group needs no conductor but they were having trouble staying together. I made a shambles of it. My arm got tired and the players got mad. No one asked me to conduct again.

    When we did Rheingold (I sang Fasolt and Fafner) we had a woman conductor. She couldn't conduct either. She couldn't keep a steady tempo. She wouldn't drink coffee the day of a performance so as to keep her pulse steady. It didn't help. She never played the same passages at the same speed twice.

    So there is something to orchestral conducting but most famous conductors were mediocre instrumentalists. I knew quite well a world famous opera conductor he was an exception. He had been rather a mediocre vocalist. Conductors of big forces have high intelligence and superior executive skills and they may be good musicians too - or not.

    By chance, my wife and I spent the train ride from Italy into Monaco with a young Italian opera conductor. We told him we were both opera singers but he assumed that we sang some Boheme's or Carmen's in some provincial American opera company. He wasn't interested in us. Only when we told him we had recently done "Cardillac" would he open up. He vented about the recent fame of his contemporary Giuseppi Sinopoli who was having his reputation sky rocketing because he didn't know the repertoire and he played everything wrong. The critics figured he must be a genius.

    So Rostopovich was right you can't fake the cello but you can fake conducting.

    Does Steve have the classiest commenters or what?

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  80. @Jack D
    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.

    … if you ever want to examine that seriously, there’s literally a parable in the Gospels that explains why gentiles are not bowled over by that.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    J.Ross - come on, you do not seriously believe you understand Christian theology, do you? I mean, real Christian theology, not the second-rate stuff you obviously have been reading ....

    you probably don't even really understand what the word Gentile means, do you? You do know where the name "Ross" comes from , don't you. J. "Ross"? Well, maybe not.

    Anyway, speak for yourself. Stop being nasty when it isn't necessary, Mr Ross, loosen up on the criticism of others, look into your own heart, and stop trying to make us Christians look bad.

    Accept in your heart that Jesus came into this world to save you. Live the way St Paul exhorted you to live. Free advice, but priceless.

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  81. @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    There are modest masculinity patterns among instrumentalists. Guitarists may tend to be more masculine than keyboardists (for example, Elton John and Little Richard on the gay side; but then the super showmen Jerry Lee Lewis and Keith Emerson were straight). When Jesse Jackson was running for president in the 1980s, he was asked how he could claim to be heading a “Rainbow Coalition” open to homosexuals when he spent much of his time campaigning in black churches. He answered that lots of black churches have gay organists.

    http://takimag.com/article/rock_roll_reversal_steve_sailer/print#ixzz5AFqpNftS

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  82. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.

    I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.

    I would ask if it’s who I think it is, but I don’t know how to hide spoilers on this forum.

    BTW, three minutes of googling was all I needed.

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    • Replies: @res

    I don’t know how to hide spoilers on this forum.
     
    The MORE tag works pretty well. Just use "Insert MORE Tag" above the comment editing window.



    Spoiler.
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  83. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross
    ... if you ever want to examine that seriously, there's literally a parable in the Gospels that explains why gentiles are not bowled over by that.

    J.Ross – come on, you do not seriously believe you understand Christian theology, do you? I mean, real Christian theology, not the second-rate stuff you obviously have been reading ….

    you probably don’t even really understand what the word Gentile means, do you? You do know where the name “Ross” comes from , don’t you. J. “Ross”? Well, maybe not.

    Anyway, speak for yourself. Stop being nasty when it isn’t necessary, Mr Ross, loosen up on the criticism of others, look into your own heart, and stop trying to make us Christians look bad.

    Accept in your heart that Jesus came into this world to save you. Live the way St Paul exhorted you to live. Free advice, but priceless.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Appeals to values don't work across value systems. But you know what does, is twenty Celebration Station tokens and all the room temperature breadsticks you can carry, to knock it off with the negative vibes, plus a mystery burnable CD that might contain valuable content (or not, I don't know, it's not labeled) if you do the same schtick to him.
    Are the breadsticks charity? In any form of Christianity? No, I do not think that they are.
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  84. @Lot

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other.
     
    I'm skeptical researchers could obtain an accurate and statistically significant data set on the sexual orientation of orchestra players by instrument. It would be hard now, but practically impossible in the 70's or prior.

    Pianists were seldom gay
     
    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind. Quite a few black gay pianists on wikipedia I never heard of too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eastman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Bridgers
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Jackson_(pianist)

    And two more white guys I never heard of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Villa
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Tilson_Thomas

    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind.

    Sviatoslav Richter as well.

    It seems like about half of the best-known American composers have been gay: Copland, Barber, Bernstein, Cage – but not Gershwin or any of the minimalists.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    "Sviatoslav" can be loosely interpreted as meaning "gloriously colorful" (more properly, "famously radiant").
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  85. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.

    Well done, sir.

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  86. @Peter Akuleyev
    I had always understood that conducting was a lot like coaching a sports team - far more important in the preparation of the piece than in the actual performance. If the conductor has done his job he should be more or less superfluous by the time the orchestra is playing for an audience.

    Like coaching . . total immersion

    Player selection — seat in violin section – 1500 applicants — Assistant Conductors’ audition 50 and present 5 to Principal Conductor — who summarily dumps first one as he “tunes.”

    Practice — Conductor takes the court — sight-reads and reduces entire orchestral score to demonstration-piece on piano — all while commenting about the ins and outs of how he wants it played.

    Game night — Conductor then uses same ten fingers to expand the individual parts of the score back at the individual players, doing eveything possible to turn the live action into a winning performance

    Post- game — Conductor calls the music librarian aside for a look at a certain player’s sheets. Was it the player or the player’s sheet that led to the playing of an ornament that’s not part of the score?

    Total immersion? See a player conducting:

    youtube: Gulda Mozart 20 26 (zsebipapa has the best upload)

    “Play as if your life depends on every note . . . Because it does.”

    (and no, he isn’t looking at the camera . . . he’s maintaining mind and eye contact with the players at the far end of the piano)

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  87. #MeToo is the new Hollycaust.

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  88. Read More
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  89. @anonymous
    J.Ross - come on, you do not seriously believe you understand Christian theology, do you? I mean, real Christian theology, not the second-rate stuff you obviously have been reading ....

    you probably don't even really understand what the word Gentile means, do you? You do know where the name "Ross" comes from , don't you. J. "Ross"? Well, maybe not.

    Anyway, speak for yourself. Stop being nasty when it isn't necessary, Mr Ross, loosen up on the criticism of others, look into your own heart, and stop trying to make us Christians look bad.

    Accept in your heart that Jesus came into this world to save you. Live the way St Paul exhorted you to live. Free advice, but priceless.

    Appeals to values don’t work across value systems. But you know what does, is twenty Celebration Station tokens and all the room temperature breadsticks you can carry, to knock it off with the negative vibes, plus a mystery burnable CD that might contain valuable content (or not, I don’t know, it’s not labeled) if you do the same schtick to him.
    Are the breadsticks charity? In any form of Christianity? No, I do not think that they are.

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  90. @larry lurker

    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind.
     
    Sviatoslav Richter as well.

    It seems like about half of the best-known American composers have been gay: Copland, Barber, Bernstein, Cage - but not Gershwin or any of the minimalists.

    “Sviatoslav” can be loosely interpreted as meaning “gloriously colorful” (more properly, “famously radiant”).

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  91. How is it that, ninety comments in, no one has said anything about James Levine’s resemblance to Richard Simmons?

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    How is it that, ninety comments in, no one has said anything about James Levine’s resemblance to Richard Simmons?
     
    As in James Levine had his boy toys sweating and sweeting to the classics.
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  92. @Peter Akuleyev

    The reason why we have so many militant leftists, is because the economy is so bad that they have not been able to make the life transition into marriage, becoming parents, owning property, or paying any significant taxes.
     
    Then why are there so many leftists property owning, tax paying, child rearing mothers in places like Newton, MA or Manhattan Beach, CA?

    A lot of American leftists live in "mini-Scandinavias" - affluent towns where the government provides good services, the public schools are excellent, crime is low and despite some surface diversity, people share pretty similar core values. They see their tax money providing good value, and don't understand why the rest of the country wouldn't want the same thing. They have no need to keep a gun for protection, and don't understand why anyone else would. I have lived among these people and know them well. They literally do not understand where Trump is coming from. They have no point of reference. They literally do not understand why immigration might be a problem or parents could be upset about schools teaching different values from their own. I have a feeling the upper class in 1916 Russia was almost as clueless.

    Excellent take!

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  93. @International Jew
    How is it that, ninety comments in, no one has said anything about James Levine's resemblance to Richard Simmons?
    http://img.wennermedia.com/social/richard-simmons-where-is-podcast-read-listen-783328a0-cbc8-4fad-b393-005c03a5385a.jpg

    http://c8.alamy.com/comp/AC3NTE/james-levine-classical-music-conductor-for-editorial-use-only-AC3NTE.jpg

    How is it that, ninety comments in, no one has said anything about James Levine’s resemblance to Richard Simmons?

    As in James Levine had his boy toys sweating and sweeting to the classics.

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  94. @Brutusale
    Do you know any 50+ heavy lifters without bad shoulders?

    I don’t know that many personally, but it’s a difficult balance to strike. If you don’t lift, you’re more likely to fall as you get older, and more likely to break something when you fall. So, you want to try to get stronger while avoiding injuries, but sometimes you get injured while getting stronger.

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  95. @Art Deco
    James Levine, the conductor of the Metropolitan Opera of New York, had been notorious since the 1970s for running a gay sex cult for barely legal teenage boys who would do anything to be classical musicians.


    Really? Notorious in which group of people? That aside, the accusations against him concern work he did in other venues, not at the Met, and were lodged in the last couple of years.


    https://nypost.com/2017/12/02/legendary-opera-conductor-molested-teen-for-years-police-report/

    http://variety.com/2017/legit/news/james-levine-suspended-metropolitan-opera-sexual-abuse-1202629375/




    He finally got fired in the #MeToo purge.

    He retired in May 2016. The Met took away his honorifics. He had scheduled performances at Juilliard and at the Cleveland Institute which these bodies cancelled.

    Thankyou Art Deco.
    At this point in time I have got to comment 24 in the thread without anyone referring to:

    “James Levine, the conductor of the Metropolitan Opera of New York, had been notorious since the 1970s for running a gay sex cult for barely legal teenage boys who would do anything to be classical musicians. ”

    I thought someone put LSD in my cheap red wine, but a better explanation is I am a moral spastic living in a morally aborted world. Notorious since the 70′s ? “Gay sex cults” ? “barely legal teenage boys” ? And most seem interested in discussing his (equally ) gross pay-packet ?
    We ALL really are fucked.

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  96. @Lot

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other.
     
    I'm skeptical researchers could obtain an accurate and statistically significant data set on the sexual orientation of orchestra players by instrument. It would be hard now, but practically impossible in the 70's or prior.

    Pianists were seldom gay
     
    Liberace, Little Richard, Vladimir Horowitz all come to mind. Quite a few black gay pianists on wikipedia I never heard of too:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Eastman
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Bridgers
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Jackson_(pianist)

    And two more white guys I never heard of:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Villa
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Tilson_Thomas

    Little Richard?! Who knew?

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  97. @Jack D
    Note that of the really heavy hitter donors, maybe 1/2 or more are Jewish. For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.

    It’s particularly admirable in this case (the Met) since there are virtually no Jews on stage, backstage, in the pit … and certainly none in the audience, truly a selfless act. Where are the Italo-American donors? Or the Teutonics? I thought they loved opera?

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  98. @Lot
    Those towns are not leftist. Manhattan Beach voted 50/48 for Obama and Romney. And locally they are reactionary, try building a homeless shelter there for an example. So close to half rejected Obama in the midst of him winning LA in a huge landslide. Many rich Dem voting women vote for democrats because of abortion, environmental protection, and gay marriage.

    Move left and those issues but not on taxes and spending, and a Republican can outperform Trump/Romney so much they win the governorship of Massachusetts, California and Maryland.

    I notice you left out Newton.

    Obama: 32,077
    Romney: 12,154

    http://www.newtonma.gov/civicax/filebank/documents/48003

    Massachusetts elects Republican governors because the unenrolled voters (no political party affiliation) want someone to temper the worst depredations of our 80%+ Democratic legislature.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    I don't know anything about Newton other than it is near Boston.
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  99. @rogue-one
    I think most working people do understand the demand & supply curve, at least intuitively if not abstractly. For example, the poorer people I worked with in the UK & France, are very sensitive to increased demand on public services.

    I think mass migration is an elite driven phenomenon who have been extra-ordinarily successful in packaging it and selling it. They are channelling the resentment towards whites among other groups in order to persuade them to accept mass migration. Similarly, among whites, they are channeling the white guilt to make at least 50% of the whites support mass migration.

    I believe that supporters of mass migration (except for Bezos and his friends) do it for emotional reasons that have to do with resentment or guilt, rather than just being stupid. This is perhaps the reason that white working class, that lack resentment or guilt, do not seem to support mass migration despite being less intelligent that upper middle class whites.

    you also have to factor in the reality that lots of immigrants are very pro-America, at least in the first generation. They understand the difference between what they left and what they’ve come to and that can be quite attractive to Americans like me who are completely sick of people scorning our country.

    Then, when they work hard, keep their marriages together, and have clean mouths, it gets tough to wish them away to their 3rd world. I fully understand that their kids often become little commies, but the recent immigrants I know are fabulous people (countries of origin: Colombia, Mexico, Argentina, Romania, Ukraine, Russia, Bahamas, Philippines). The only group I find to be arrogant from the landing are the Indians.

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    • Replies: @rogue-one
    >The only group I find to be arrogant from the landing are the Indians.

    Strange.

    I live in Europe but I spent some years living in California and didn't find first generation India migrants to be arrogant. Apart from some ethnocentrism (preferring to remain together in Indian groups at workplace) and some cultural differences, I didn't have anything to complain about. They supported H1B visa, which is quite normal considering they were in the US on H1B visa though many people here would oppose it. They were also pretty political incorrect.

    That said, second generation Indian (South Asian) migrants are another case. Woke Tiger sons & daughters will give native whites a run for their money when it comes to wokeness. The son of a hedge fund manager who got into Stanford for writing "Black Lives Matter" 100 times in his essay was a Bangladeshi-American. There is some irony in watching cynical sons of Tamil Brahmins and daughters of Thakurs claiming to be "oppressed persons of color."
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  100. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Back in the 60s there was the famous Fact magazine, which was put out of business by the Goldwater lawsuit. Publisher Raph Ginzburg later went to prison for the erotic art he published in another of his magazine projects.

    Anyway, as I recall it, Fact had an article by one Anna Frankenheimer claiming that in the classical music world all the music critics in the press were homosexuals. And furthermore, to get a good review for their performances, musicians had to put out for these critics. Interesting, huh? She mentioned a few names and actual cases in the article.

    By the way, over the years I sometimes have had the feeling I am the only human on earth who read that article. Weird.

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    • Replies: @VSD
    It wouldn't surprise me.

    I have heard similar things about the visual arts, and supposedly Picasso was known to throw the most important critics a... err... bone... or two or three. And then they would always write fabulous reviews on whatever his latest work was.
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  101. @Brutusale
    I notice you left out Newton.

    Obama: 32,077
    Romney: 12,154

    http://www.newtonma.gov/civicax/filebank/documents/48003

    Massachusetts elects Republican governors because the unenrolled voters (no political party affiliation) want someone to temper the worst depredations of our 80%+ Democratic legislature.

    I don’t know anything about Newton other than it is near Boston.

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    A little hint from the local Noticers: Newton is a Garden City because there's a Rosenbloom on every corner.

    You didn't know that? An accomplished pedant like you?
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  102. @Anon
    "But while there are certainly more homosexuals in the arts than elsewhere, I don’t think opera conductors are particularly over represented. "

    Back in the 70s, C A Tripp in The Homosexual Matrix cited research that homosexuals dominated certain instruments, not other. Pianists were seldom gay, violinists almost always, etc. In the whole orchestra I suppose it would even out.

    ” Pianists were seldom gay”

    Fred Hersh, a magnificent Jazz player, pianist, is openly gay.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro Jazz musician.

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  103. @middle aged vet . . .
    Old Palo Altan - nice comment .

    A true artist invents a universe. Some people listen to an old Bix recording and say - ah, that reminds me of them musicians that played that Little Rascals music! - someone else listens, and an entire world that might have vanished lives again in all its glory - the Goethean or Pushkinesque changes in tempo, the glorious bursts of melodies, the unmistakable enthusiasms of genius, heard through the medium of a long-lost cornet being played in a long-vanished room with long-lost recording equipment. I am sure Furtwangler, heard live, was amazing.

    There is a Toscanini universe, too, and I can see why Furtwangler was disappointed when he tried to enter that world- the Furtwangler universe is a whole 'nother thing - but I am not a competing maestro and I can enjoy the recordings of Toscanini without begrudging the poor little man his great fame.

    There is even a "Bob Dylan" universe which would not have existed if Bob Dylan had not had enthusiasm and a desire to be, in his humble way, a musician, and a Judy Garland universe, and many similar universes, of course not all at the Bix or Louis level, but still, worlds of music we should be grateful for.

    But if you have lived a long time and heard beautiful music in many places as several commenters on this thread clearly have - in the home, on the streets on a summer evening, in the great cities, and on board ships where a random musical genius whiles away the time entertaining her fellow passengers with effortless and spectacular unrehearsed and unbelievable singenspiels, or whatever you call such things ---- well ...

    That being said, please do not take this comment as implying that I know enough about conducting to say who the great ones are. Toscanini and Furtwangler, judging by the records, probably were. That is all I am saying.

    Yes Bix , the unheralded “(German) genius who spun out implied Be-bop licks , fifteen years before they were first heard in Harlem, and then Eddie lang and Joe Venuti, both italian Americans , the folks who hinted at “Modern” jazz before the NY crew ever dreamt about it.
    JSB, his 333rd birthday being tomorrow, was actually the first Jazz musician, his roller-coaster eighth note lines being the essence of “Swing”.
    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained us Army Vet, and pro jazz musician.

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  104. @Old Palo Altan
    Perhaps true enough for both mediocre conductors and mediocre orchestras, but the opposite of the case for those with real talent.
    Great conducting is a matter of inspiration, and the great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the peformance itself.

    The idea that a conductor is a mere time-beater might, again, work for the uninspired, but why go to hear them?
    Furtwangler, greatest of the great, once walked out of a Toscanini performance within minutes, saying aloud, and not merely mumbling, "A metronome!".

    ” The great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the performance itself”

    Pure unadutlterated nonsence.

    Apparently people with no musical performance experience think that players in a classical ensemble
    are able to concentrate simultaneously upon the machinations of the conductor while struggling to play the right notes, and doing their best not to hit too many clinkers.

    The conductors most “inspired insights” have no effect whatsoever upon the quality of a performance, other than to give a few tips during practice sessions which might, or might not be remembered and applied by the musicians.

    A huge amount of musical performance is dependant upon pure randomity, and nobody can really pinpoint just why one evening will be great, and the next one shitty, the same holds true regarding Jazz performing : Sometimes it just clicks and other times it falls apart, and none of the involved musicians, can really give an explanation for the disparaging results.

    Regarding conductors : In centuries past the baton had been long enough so as to reach the floor, and they, the conductors, were in fact living metronomes, beating the time with their stick on the floor, and this had been their only actual function.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained us Army Vet, and pro jazz musician.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Yes, and that menial task killed poor Lully.
    After that the profession evolved.
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  105. @njguy73

    I used to know a not-famous but steadily-employed baritone, pushing 300 lbs, who had a swanky Manhattan apartment. He shared it with an obscure, Polynesian defensive lineman who kept a low profile regarding his lifestyle while in the NFL by not being very good.

    Speaking of elephants in the room, I wonder what it was like living in the apartment below those two elephants.
     

    I would ask if it's who I think it is, but I don't know how to hide spoilers on this forum.

    BTW, three minutes of googling was all I needed.

    I don’t know how to hide spoilers on this forum.

    The MORE tag works pretty well. Just use “Insert MORE Tag” above the comment editing window.

    [MORE]

    Spoiler.

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  106. @Achmed E. Newman
    Heh!

    He should have read more carefully those posters on the wall of the breakroom (in English and Spanish, just in case!). "12 Steps to Safe Conduction: 1) Conduct with your torso, not your back ...."

    AEN, very funny my friend.

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  107. @Authenticjazzman
    " The great conductor reserves his most inspired insights for the performance itself"

    Pure unadutlterated nonsence.

    Apparently people with no musical performance experience think that players in a classical ensemble
    are able to concentrate simultaneously upon the machinations of the conductor while struggling to play the right notes, and doing their best not to hit too many clinkers.

    The conductors most "inspired insights" have no effect whatsoever upon the quality of a performance, other than to give a few tips during practice sessions which might, or might not be remembered and applied by the musicians.

    A huge amount of musical performance is dependant upon pure randomity, and nobody can really pinpoint just why one evening will be great, and the next one shitty, the same holds true regarding Jazz performing : Sometimes it just clicks and other times it falls apart, and none of the involved musicians, can really give an explanation for the disparaging results.

    Regarding conductors : In centuries past the baton had been long enough so as to reach the floor, and they, the conductors, were in fact living metronomes, beating the time with their stick on the floor, and this had been their only actual function.

    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained us Army Vet, and pro jazz musician.

    Yes, and that menial task killed poor Lully.
    After that the profession evolved.

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  108. @peterike
    “For a bunch of parasites, Jews give a lot to philanthropic causes.”

    And they get their name in the program. Don’t you recognize virtue signaling and bragging when you see it?

    Donors like to be acknowledged. Not a Jewish thing in particular. It’s a WASP thing too.
    Giving to arts not necessarily virtue signaling either (a useful phase in danger of death by overuse). It is status driven, often, but that’s not the same thing.

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  109. @stillCARealist
    you also have to factor in the reality that lots of immigrants are very pro-America, at least in the first generation. They understand the difference between what they left and what they've come to and that can be quite attractive to Americans like me who are completely sick of people scorning our country.

    Then, when they work hard, keep their marriages together, and have clean mouths, it gets tough to wish them away to their 3rd world. I fully understand that their kids often become little commies, but the recent immigrants I know are fabulous people (countries of origin: Colombia, Mexico, Argentina, Romania, Ukraine, Russia, Bahamas, Philippines). The only group I find to be arrogant from the landing are the Indians.

    >The only group I find to be arrogant from the landing are the Indians.

    Strange.

    I live in Europe but I spent some years living in California and didn’t find first generation India migrants to be arrogant. Apart from some ethnocentrism (preferring to remain together in Indian groups at workplace) and some cultural differences, I didn’t have anything to complain about. They supported H1B visa, which is quite normal considering they were in the US on H1B visa though many people here would oppose it. They were also pretty political incorrect.

    That said, second generation Indian (South Asian) migrants are another case. Woke Tiger sons & daughters will give native whites a run for their money when it comes to wokeness. The son of a hedge fund manager who got into Stanford for writing “Black Lives Matter” 100 times in his essay was a Bangladeshi-American. There is some irony in watching cynical sons of Tamil Brahmins and daughters of Thakurs claiming to be “oppressed persons of color.”

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  110. @Lot
    I don't know anything about Newton other than it is near Boston.

    A little hint from the local Noticers: Newton is a Garden City because there’s a Rosenbloom on every corner.

    You didn’t know that? An accomplished pedant like you?

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  111. @Daniel H
    Sciatica, herniated disk, torn rotator cuff, lower back pain, Parkinsons...... He has the typical ailments that afflict fatties. I guess that it is kind of late now, but a dedicated program of resistance training could have warded off these problems

    You should probably be more specific in your recommendations. I get the impression this guy would assume “resistance training” means going after those hard-to-get boys who say they don’t want to do “anything” to become orchestra players.

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  112. @anonymous
    Back in the 60s there was the famous Fact magazine, which was put out of business by the Goldwater lawsuit. Publisher Raph Ginzburg later went to prison for the erotic art he published in another of his magazine projects.

    Anyway, as I recall it, Fact had an article by one Anna Frankenheimer claiming that in the classical music world all the music critics in the press were homosexuals. And furthermore, to get a good review for their performances, musicians had to put out for these critics. Interesting, huh? She mentioned a few names and actual cases in the article.

    By the way, over the years I sometimes have had the feeling I am the only human on earth who read that article. Weird.

    It wouldn’t surprise me.

    I have heard similar things about the visual arts, and supposedly Picasso was known to throw the most important critics a… err… bone… or two or three. And then they would always write fabulous reviews on whatever his latest work was.

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