The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Washington Post: Let's Freak Out Over the Kremlin-Nicaragua Connection Again
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Washington Post:

Russia again plants its flag in Nicaragua, stirring fears in the U.S.

Three decades after Nicaragua became the prize in a Cold War battle with Washington, Russia is once again making its presence known in the Central American nation. Over the past two years, it has added muscle to its security partnership there, selling tanks and weapons and sending troops. The Russian surge appears to be part of the Kremlin’s expansionist foreign policy.

By JOSHUA PARTLOW | The Washington Post | Published: April 8, 2017

Screenshot 2017-04-09 01.22.56Granted, it’s 3,000 kilometers of bad road from Brownsville, Texas to Managua, Nicaragua.

And I thought Russia was super reactionary and Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is an old Sandinista leftist.

My impression is that there aren’t all that many “unaccompanied minors” coming from Nicaragua at the moment compared to the more rightwing banana republics.

 
Hide 61 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/washington-post-lets-freak-out-over-the-kremlin-nicaragua-connection-again/#comment-1830417
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. BenKenobi says:

    Well, we’ve got 2/3rds of the Russian coalition from Red Dawn assembled so far. It’s all falling into place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jimmyriddle
    The next remake will feature a battalion of Pepes.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    And they've got a much bigger presence in the United States already than they did in 1984!

    The Cuban officer was the most interesting character in the original Red Dawn. He didn't like what he was doing in Colorado, wrote his wife that he was resigning his commission and let the two brothers go at the end of the movie. Vaya con dios!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Ortega is now democratically elected, I thought democracies had the right to choose their allies freely, including allies from two continents away, and nearby greater powers are literally Hitler if they object to it. Apparently only Russia is literally Hitler for objecting to its neighbors joining an alliance hostile to them, it never applies to the US.

    Read More
    • Agree: inertial
    • Replies: @Federalist
    Your comment made me think: Is Trump still literally Hitler since he pissed off Putin/Russia by bombing Syria? Maybe Trump has improved his standing to only figuratively Hitler.
    , @Hector_St_Clare
    The Sandinistas were elected in 1984 as well, in elections that were more "democratic" than typical for Latin America at the time. (And that compare favourably to some of the "Colour Revolution" democracies in places like modern-day Ukraine as well: a bunch of opposition parties, some of them very vociferous, existed in Nicaragua and IIRC seven parties contested the election).

    I wouldn't call the Sandinistas democrats certainly either then or now (I don't think they would have accepted a loss in 1984 and their high command said that they saw democracy as transitional to a more traditional Communist regime), but they weren't really authoritarians either.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Yet Reagan is still regarded as some kind saint by “conservatives”.

    Apart from running up a colossal deficit and an immigration amnesty, he bankrolled Rios Montt and the 14 families and gifted you with generations of new illegal migrants.

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46, Stealth, Glossy
    • Replies: @antipater_1
    Yet Reagan is still regarded as some kind saint by “conservatives”.

    Exactly - Reagan was a dismal failure. He made a complete fool of himself in his second term especially.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. logprof says:

    Onward to Managua!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  6. @BenKenobi
    Well, we've got 2/3rds of the Russian coalition from Red Dawn assembled so far. It's all falling into place.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDXtVlG2VW0

    The next remake will feature a battalion of Pepes.

    Read More
    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Olorin
    I dunno. Over at TRS etc. the alt-right fashy kindern were immediately stinkloading their diapers over that bit of Trumpian Tomahawk Theatre in Syria and the left/Dems' online trolling in response to it (like ShariaBlue's disinfo campaigns).

    I still haven't come to any particular geopolitical conclusions per se that I'd be inclined to scribble about.

    The Pepe Moment has passed, methinks. Them scary nazi keyboard warriors are presenting themselves as nadless and easy to manipulate.

    The leadership job of the next four years--apart from making America's alter ego Veruca Salt less constantly screechy--is going to include figuring out how many and which people will step up for the 20th Century Communications Programming Makeover.

    The idea that you can toggle your selection of content from Liberal to Conservative or Progressive to Alt Right or Gen A versus Gen Z...but keep your Baldy Bezos/Big Slim/Newz Netwerk-programmed easily triggered neurons/response patterns unexamined and unaltered strikes me as problematic.

    The new/dissident/whatever right sniggers on about SJWs and how easily Triggered they are...but react exactly the same damn way.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Nicaragua has some historical grievances with Costa Rica. If there’s anything to this story, it probably involves some planned saber-rattling by Ortega directed at his southern nieghbor, which famously does not have a military.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  8. OT, this is one of the other things Trump’s base thought he would probably stop: lawsuits by the government over the bogus gender pay gap:

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2017/4/8/15229688/department-of-labor-google-gender-pay-gap

    Read More
    • Replies: @EriK
    I'm tempted to say that they should wait to stop until after they've tortured the Silicon Valley bullies, but I know that's wrong.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. Time to dust off that 1983 Bruce Cockburn classic “Nicaragua.”

    Breakfast woodsmoke on the breeze –
    On the cliff the U.S. Embassy
    Frowns out over Managua like Dracula’s tower
    The kid who guards Fonseca’s tomb
    Cradles a beat-up submachine gun –
    At age fifteen he’s a veteran of four years of war
    Proud to pay his dues
    He knows who turns the screws
    Baby face and old man’s eyes
    Blue lagoon and flowering trees –
    Bullet-packed Masaya streets
    Full of the ghosts of the heroes of Monimbo
    Women of the town laundry
    Work and gossip and laugh at me –
    They don’t believe I’ll ever send them the pictures I took
    For every scar on a wall
    There’s a hole in someone’s heart
    Where a loved one’s memory lives
    In the flash of this moment
    You’re the best of what we are –
    Don’t let them stop you now
    Nicaragua
    Sandino in his tom mix hat
    Gazes from billboards and coins
    “Sandino vive in la lucha por la paz”
    Sandino of the shining dream
    Who stood up to the U.S. Marines –
    Now Washington panics at U2 shots of “Cuban-style” latrines
    In the flash of this moment
    You’re the best of what we are –
    Don’t let them stop you now
    Nicaragua
    Managua February 1983

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  10. @BenKenobi
    Well, we've got 2/3rds of the Russian coalition from Red Dawn assembled so far. It's all falling into place.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDXtVlG2VW0

    And they’ve got a much bigger presence in the United States already than they did in 1984!

    The Cuban officer was the most interesting character in the original Red Dawn. He didn’t like what he was doing in Colorado, wrote his wife that he was resigning his commission and let the two brothers go at the end of the movie. Vaya con dios!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stealth

    ...and let the two brothers go at the end of the movie. Vaya con dios!
     
    To be fair, what he really did was allow them to die in peace, or whatever passes for peace when someone is dying of gunshot wounds in subfreezing temperatures.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. Clyde says:

    My impression is that there aren’t all that many “unaccompanied minors” coming from Nicaragua at the moment compared to the more rightwing banana republics

    True! They are always from Guatemala, Honduras….El Salvador less so||| Brilliant move by the Spanish/Hispanic conquistador class getting the Anglo/North European founded USA to take in the debris of imploded, failed Hispano-states. True cuckoldry…where “cuck” comes from. Last week Rush Limbaugh was oblivious to this and could not figure out what cuck and cuckservative means. Hopefully someone explained after the show.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  12. The Z Blog says: • Website

    …stirring fears in the U.S.

    Among whom? I was just at the market and exactly no one was whispering about this. No one looked worried. A little tired, but certainly not worried.

    What the last few years have revealed is just how divorced the Cloud People are from the rest of us. They broadcast instructions to the Dirt People like this, assuming they are received with the same level of enthusiasm with which they were created. In reality, the only people who care are those forever awoken in the middle of the night by the sound of hoof beats.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  13. Marcus says:

    For the most part Russia has maintained the Soviet era policy of sponsoring leftist movements abroad. RT, Sputnik, etc. certainly have leftist slants. The only exception has been in the EU where the left is completely onboard with the Atlanticists, so Russia has supported some “right wing” anti-establishment candidates.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hector_St_Clare
    There's a pro-Russian, Europhobic left in Eastern Europe as well.

    The Socialists in Moldova, the newly elected Socialist president of Bulgaira (Radev), and the far left Workers' Party in Hungary are all pro-Russia. So is the center-left president of the Czech Republic and the center left ruling party (Social Democracy) in Slovakia. This gives a big headache to a lot of liberals who don't know how to make sense of it, which is why you get the amusing spectacle of the New York Times describing the Moldovan Socialists as "far right" because of their opposition to immigration.

    In general, Eastern Europe seems to be the more rational half of Europe.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Flip says:

    The Soviets were trying to spread communism through the world. What are the Russians trying to spread? Conversion to Eastern Orthodoxy?

    Read More
    • Agree: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    Maybe Mayans can become honorary Slavs the way the Germans made the Japanese honorary Aryans.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. @reiner Tor
    Ortega is now democratically elected, I thought democracies had the right to choose their allies freely, including allies from two continents away, and nearby greater powers are literally Hitler if they object to it. Apparently only Russia is literally Hitler for objecting to its neighbors joining an alliance hostile to them, it never applies to the US.

    Your comment made me think: Is Trump still literally Hitler since he pissed off Putin/Russia by bombing Syria? Maybe Trump has improved his standing to only figuratively Hitler.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    I'd think that pissing off Russia has made Literally Like Hitler even MORE literally like Hitler. Think about it... The Literal Hitler fought an honest to god war with Russia. If Literally Like Hitler literally attacks Russia he'd achieve the singularity and become The Literal Hitler. Which is now literally a good thing.

    The Russian surge appears to be part of the Kremlin’s expansionist foreign policy.

    As opposed to the United States foreign policy, which can't expand anymore because we're already in everyone's business.

    My impression is that there aren’t all that many “unaccompanied minors” coming from Nicaragua at the moment compared to the more rightwing banana republics.

    I've never met a Venezuelan illegal. It's be interesting to see what percentage of each country is in the United States.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. @jimmyriddle
    Yet Reagan is still regarded as some kind saint by "conservatives".

    Apart from running up a colossal deficit and an immigration amnesty, he bankrolled Rios Montt and the 14 families and gifted you with generations of new illegal migrants.

    Yet Reagan is still regarded as some kind saint by “conservatives”.

    Exactly – Reagan was a dismal failure. He made a complete fool of himself in his second term especially.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    I think he was getting senile then, and Jim Baker ran things in the first term and Don Regan in the second one. Baker was more capable, I would guess.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. George says:

    Statistics on illegal immigrants are probably more bogus than most other statistics but:

    Nicaragua not a top 10 nation who are estimated to account for 84% of illegals.

    Demographics of Immigrants in the United States Illegally

    http://immigration.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000845

    Comparing illegal immigration from ‘Red’ countries like Venezuela and Nicaragua to Capitalist neo liberal nations like Columbia and Honduras might be interesting. Perhaps an alt right foreign policy would be sending aid to Venezuela? Would that freak out the ‘ctrl left’ or what?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. I will post this here, instead of finding the story from yesterday. Steve introduced us to the Jewish-Muslim women who are bonding together to protest anti-Semitic and anti Muslim hate crimes and good for them. Today we see that ISIS bombed two Christian churches in Egypt during Palm Sunday services. Of course, in the literal sense, this is a major hate crime, but leaving a ham on a mosque’s doorstep or painting a swastika on a wall is much worst. Thirty five dead and hundreds wounded so far.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The keyword here is Christian. Both muslim and jews could care less about them.

    ISIS is also an anti-Christian Muslim-Jew partnership, btw.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. OT: The Coalition of the Fringes shows again that they really don’t like each other. Specifically, black women don’t like Nice White Ladies.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2017/04/06/pepsi-shows-how-america-loves-to-erase-black-women/?utm_term=.4b3e3dab25fc

    This is just one long screed against white women by a black woman. She’s refreshingly open. Thank God for white guys or these people would tear each other apart.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  20. IHTG says:

    How about the Kremlin-Chabad connection? http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/the-happy-go-lucky-jewish-group-that-connects-trump-and-putin-215007

    Politico, I didn’t know you had it in you!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I heard the same story -- Trump-Kushner-Chabad-Putin -- a half week ago.
    , @El Dato
    Most interesting
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. El Dato says:

    It’s REAGAN TIME!

    I’m looking forward to “Top Gun Whatever” starring barely functional F-35 (don’t know who would be the good-looking pilot though) and “Rambo Redux 2K17″ where John Rambo Jr. liberates babies from Syria (looking suspiciously like the spanish countryside), disobeying strict orders from the Obama hierarchy.

    Seriously, can anyone drag the WaPo writers out into the street and acquaint them with School of the Americas style “quick justice”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dahlia
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/josh-rogin/wp/2017/04/09/obamas-syria-strike-plan-was-much-bigger-than-trumps/

    Those beatings need to come quickly: they posted this four hours ago...

    Trump administration officials have said they are “ready to do more.” And if Assad does use chemical weapons again, there are already plans they can use — the ones Obama and his team drew up and that Republicans criticized years ago.

     

    Disappointed tone...talk of "real test" of President Trump... What kind of manufactured dossier or intel about Trump is waiting in the pipeline at WaPo if he drags his feet with the killings? Nuke those people or we'll incite more assassination attempts let alone nuking your domestic agenda?
    , @antipater_1
    ten, twenty, thirty, forty fifty or more!
    the bloody red towel-head kept rolling up the score!
    the F-35 couldn’t end that streak!
    of the bloody red towel-head of Mozambique!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. @IHTG
    How about the Kremlin-Chabad connection? http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/the-happy-go-lucky-jewish-group-that-connects-trump-and-putin-215007

    Politico, I didn't know you had it in you!

    I heard the same story — Trump-Kushner-Chabad-Putin — a half week ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    Yeah, I saw that.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. El Dato says:
    @IHTG
    How about the Kremlin-Chabad connection? http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/the-happy-go-lucky-jewish-group-that-connects-trump-and-putin-215007

    Politico, I didn't know you had it in you!

    Most interesting

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. SteveM says:

    This latest Neocon contrived paranoia dovetails nicely with the advertised “threat” of Iran placing missiles in Venezuela and launching them into San Antonio.

    BTW, that fear-monger scenario comes to us care of the Pimp Think Tank “scholars” fronting for the Merchants of Death trying to sell domestic missile defense.

    The perpetually voracious Security State is like insurance – you can never have enough…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  25. IHTG says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I heard the same story -- Trump-Kushner-Chabad-Putin -- a half week ago.

    Yeah, I saw that.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. snorlax says:

    Speaking of:

    https://college.georgetown.edu/collegenews/anastasia-somoza-takes-center-stage.html

    August 11, 2016 — The 2016 Democratic National Convention wasn’t exactly short on big speeches.

    The four-day ceremony featured addresses from a seemingly never-ending list of prominent national politicians — including two U.S. presidents — all endorsing the first woman to run on a major-party presidential ticket in Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    But one of Philadelphia’s most poignant speeches didn’t come from a rising star legislator or party politics veteran. On Monday night, the first of the convention, New York-based disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza maneuvered her motorized chair to center stage and delivered a powerful five-minute endorsement of Clinton to a roaring crowd.

    Judging by the reaction pieces that night, the political press received the speech as well as the arena had. But for Somoza, it was only the latest big moment in a life of public service and activism that began with a childhood passion for equal rights and was shaped here at Georgetown College.

    *******

    Somoza (C’07) was born with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia, which confined her to a wheelchair from childhood. Her parents — both immigrants, of Irish and Nicaraguan descent

    You might even call them political refugees!

    — worked hard to ensure she got the same educational opportunities as other children.

    If she doesn’t get the same educational opportunities as other children, I’ll have you disappeared! I’ll send my death squad after you!

    But while Somoza could speak eloquently, her twin sister Alba’s condition rendered her almost completely nonverbal, making the fight to keep her in general education classes much more difficult.

    Outraged that the school system had shunted her sister into a special education track for a physical disability, Somoza spoke up. In 1993, she met President Bill Clinton (F’68) at a nationally televised town hall and lobbied for her sister’s cause. All of nine years old, she made her case clearly and directly to the sitting president.

    “She can use her computer to speak, and I think she should be in a regular class just like me,” Anastasia Somoza told Clinton.

    Before long, Alba was granted access to the classes she deserved.

    Having seen up close how political advocacy could change lives, Somoza continued to involve herself in politics even after Alba’s situation was resolved. She volunteered in local campaigns, from school board elections to New York Democrat Mark J. Green’s run to become the city’s first Public Advocate.

    When it came time to apply to college, Somoza knew she wanted to follow her Fordham-educated mother’s advice and find a Jesuit school — but she also knew she wanted to leave New York, eliminating her mother’s alma mater from the search. Eventually, her mother suggested she apply to Georgetown.

    “It was an instant connection,” Somoza said. “I felt really comfortable in every way.”

    *******

    Even for someone who now possesses the self-confidence to speak in front of thousands of people, the first few days of college can be nerve-wracking.

    “People may be surprised to hear this, but there was a time that I didn’t have that level of confidence,” Somoza said. “I had personal apprehensions about whether I’d be able to meet the academic standards, just like most typical teenagers.”

    Coming from a public high school, Somoza was worried that she would struggle in an academic environment with students who had had access to more advanced classes at private schools.

    What’s Spanish for “chutzpah?”

    She worried that her fellow students would be ultra-competitive, and even that making friends would be a struggle.

    “It was so not,” she said. “I found a supportive group of friends right away, and whenever I did need extra help, I remember all my professors having an open door.”

    Her parents worked hard.

    Somoza eventually decided to major in government and minor in English, but she took full advantage of the flexibility the College offers to explore as many disciplines as possible, and eventually ended up only one class short of a second minor in sociology. When she wasn’t in class or cheering on the basketball and football teams, she kept up her activist streak, getting involved with an HIV/AIDS awareness group and serving on the board of Hoyathon, a 24-hour benefit dance marathon for the Children’s Hospital of DC.

    Somoza’s experience at the College helped give direction to the drive to serve that she had felt for years. After graduation, she enrolled at the London School of Economics and Political Science and earned a Master of Science in Human Rights.

    ………

    “One of Georgetown’s biggest mottoes is to live in the service of others,” she said. “I’ve carried that with me. I tried to do it at Georgetown, and that’s a big part of the reason I pursued the graduate degree that I did.”

    *******

    Today, Somoza consults for the Shield Institute, a disability rights advocacy group based in New York. Shield supports a number of programs for people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities, many focusing on daytime physical therapy and training for those who can’t work a traditional job. She’s most familiar with the Pure Vision Arts studio, where her sister Alba is a resident artist, but she serves as a sort of jack-of-all-trades for the organization.

    “My work with them is speaking, working with their board, fundraising, and staff, parent and teacher training,” she said. “My role is really to help the staff and families remember what they’re doing beyond the paperwork.”

    But Somoza’s work isn’t limited to her paid job in New York. She’s brought her passion for service to a national and international scale, with the indirect help of a family she first met as a small child: The Clintons.

    Isn’t it funny how the Clintons’ friends are mainly third-world banana republic dictators? And wasn’t her familia Literally Hitler? I guess time (ka-ching!) heals all wounds!

    After a chance meeting with St. Cloud State University’s Dr. Kathy Johnson while interning at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting, Somoza began working on a CGI project aiming to eliminate the abandonment of children with disabilities in China. The project — a Commitment to Action, in CGI terms — will seek to establish a comprehensive resource center for parents of children with disabilities.

    In addition to her consulting and volunteer work, Somoza will serve as an official surrogate for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign this fall. She’ll hit the trail in the coming months and speak on behalf of Clinton.

    Less than a decade removed from her graduation, the woman who was nervous about even coming to Georgetown is making a tangible difference in her city, her country and halfway around the world. She’s doing exactly what it would seem she’s been destined to do since childhood, and she credits her education for helping her get there. So what does she think current Georgetown students should do to follow in her path?

    “Take every opportunity you have to pursue things that you love, but also that you never imagine you’d be interested in,” she said. “That’s the best part, realizing how many pathways there are to realizing who you are as a person. Step — or wheel — outside your comfort zone.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    Meh. Disabled kids, AIDS awareness, Children's Hospital charities . . . . would that all our millennial activists dedicated themselves to such causes.
    , @Mr. Anon
    It's funny that the acronym for the Clinton Global Initiative is CGI, another kind of illusion.
    , @Clyde
    Did you see her photos? She is pretty decent looking, enough to get married, she will do OK in this life heading useless NGOs.
    , @Hibernian
    Do we know for sure she's one of THOSE Somozas? Probably at least a distant relative, and they fled from Ortega. Same name, same country.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. Flip says:
    @antipater_1
    Yet Reagan is still regarded as some kind saint by “conservatives”.

    Exactly - Reagan was a dismal failure. He made a complete fool of himself in his second term especially.

    I think he was getting senile then, and Jim Baker ran things in the first term and Don Regan in the second one. Baker was more capable, I would guess.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. @snorlax
    Speaking of:

    https://college.georgetown.edu/collegenews/anastasia-somoza-takes-center-stage.html

    August 11, 2016 — The 2016 Democratic National Convention wasn’t exactly short on big speeches.

    The four-day ceremony featured addresses from a seemingly never-ending list of prominent national politicians — including two U.S. presidents — all endorsing the first woman to run on a major-party presidential ticket in Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    But one of Philadelphia’s most poignant speeches didn’t come from a rising star legislator or party politics veteran. On Monday night, the first of the convention, New York-based disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza maneuvered her motorized chair to center stage and delivered a powerful five-minute endorsement of Clinton to a roaring crowd.

    Judging by the reaction pieces that night, the political press received the speech as well as the arena had. But for Somoza, it was only the latest big moment in a life of public service and activism that began with a childhood passion for equal rights and was shaped here at Georgetown College.

    *******

    Somoza (C’07) was born with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia, which confined her to a wheelchair from childhood. Her parents — both immigrants, of Irish and Nicaraguan descent
     
    You might even call them political refugees!

    — worked hard to ensure she got the same educational opportunities as other children.
     
    If she doesn't get the same educational opportunities as other children, I'll have you disappeared! I'll send my death squad after you!

    But while Somoza could speak eloquently, her twin sister Alba’s condition rendered her almost completely nonverbal, making the fight to keep her in general education classes much more difficult.

    Outraged that the school system had shunted her sister into a special education track for a physical disability, Somoza spoke up. In 1993, she met President Bill Clinton (F’68) at a nationally televised town hall and lobbied for her sister’s cause. All of nine years old, she made her case clearly and directly to the sitting president.

    “She can use her computer to speak, and I think she should be in a regular class just like me,” Anastasia Somoza told Clinton.

    Before long, Alba was granted access to the classes she deserved.

    Having seen up close how political advocacy could change lives, Somoza continued to involve herself in politics even after Alba’s situation was resolved. She volunteered in local campaigns, from school board elections to New York Democrat Mark J. Green’s run to become the city’s first Public Advocate.

    When it came time to apply to college, Somoza knew she wanted to follow her Fordham-educated mother’s advice and find a Jesuit school — but she also knew she wanted to leave New York, eliminating her mother’s alma mater from the search. Eventually, her mother suggested she apply to Georgetown.

    “It was an instant connection,” Somoza said. “I felt really comfortable in every way.”

    *******

    Even for someone who now possesses the self-confidence to speak in front of thousands of people, the first few days of college can be nerve-wracking.

    “People may be surprised to hear this, but there was a time that I didn’t have that level of confidence,” Somoza said. “I had personal apprehensions about whether I’d be able to meet the academic standards, just like most typical teenagers.”

    Coming from a public high school, Somoza was worried that she would struggle in an academic environment with students who had had access to more advanced classes at private schools.
     
    What's Spanish for "chutzpah?"

    She worried that her fellow students would be ultra-competitive, and even that making friends would be a struggle.

    “It was so not,” she said. “I found a supportive group of friends right away, and whenever I did need extra help, I remember all my professors having an open door.”
     
    Her parents worked hard.

    Somoza eventually decided to major in government and minor in English, but she took full advantage of the flexibility the College offers to explore as many disciplines as possible, and eventually ended up only one class short of a second minor in sociology. When she wasn’t in class or cheering on the basketball and football teams, she kept up her activist streak, getting involved with an HIV/AIDS awareness group and serving on the board of Hoyathon, a 24-hour benefit dance marathon for the Children’s Hospital of DC.

    Somoza's experience at the College helped give direction to the drive to serve that she had felt for years. After graduation, she enrolled at the London School of Economics and Political Science and earned a Master of Science in Human Rights.
     
    ………

    “One of Georgetown’s biggest mottoes is to live in the service of others,” she said. “I’ve carried that with me. I tried to do it at Georgetown, and that’s a big part of the reason I pursued the graduate degree that I did.”

    *******

    Today, Somoza consults for the Shield Institute, a disability rights advocacy group based in New York. Shield supports a number of programs for people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities, many focusing on daytime physical therapy and training for those who can’t work a traditional job. She’s most familiar with the Pure Vision Arts studio, where her sister Alba is a resident artist, but she serves as a sort of jack-of-all-trades for the organization.

    “My work with them is speaking, working with their board, fundraising, and staff, parent and teacher training,” she said. “My role is really to help the staff and families remember what they’re doing beyond the paperwork.”

    But Somoza’s work isn’t limited to her paid job in New York. She’s brought her passion for service to a national and international scale, with the indirect help of a family she first met as a small child: The Clintons.
     
    Isn't it funny how the Clintons' friends are mainly third-world banana republic dictators? And wasn't her familia Literally Hitler? I guess time (ka-ching!) heals all wounds!

    After a chance meeting with St. Cloud State University’s Dr. Kathy Johnson while interning at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting, Somoza began working on a CGI project aiming to eliminate the abandonment of children with disabilities in China. The project — a Commitment to Action, in CGI terms — will seek to establish a comprehensive resource center for parents of children with disabilities.

    In addition to her consulting and volunteer work, Somoza will serve as an official surrogate for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign this fall. She’ll hit the trail in the coming months and speak on behalf of Clinton.

    Less than a decade removed from her graduation, the woman who was nervous about even coming to Georgetown is making a tangible difference in her city, her country and halfway around the world. She’s doing exactly what it would seem she’s been destined to do since childhood, and she credits her education for helping her get there. So what does she think current Georgetown students should do to follow in her path?

    “Take every opportunity you have to pursue things that you love, but also that you never imagine you’d be interested in,” she said. “That’s the best part, realizing how many pathways there are to realizing who you are as a person. Step — or wheel — outside your comfort zone.”
     

    Meh. Disabled kids, AIDS awareness, Children’s Hospital charities . . . . would that all our millennial activists dedicated themselves to such causes.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. @Flip
    The Soviets were trying to spread communism through the world. What are the Russians trying to spread? Conversion to Eastern Orthodoxy?

    Maybe Mayans can become honorary Slavs the way the Germans made the Japanese honorary Aryans.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. EriK says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy
    OT, this is one of the other things Trump's base thought he would probably stop: lawsuits by the government over the bogus gender pay gap:

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2017/4/8/15229688/department-of-labor-google-gender-pay-gap

    I’m tempted to say that they should wait to stop until after they’ve tortured the Silicon Valley bullies, but I know that’s wrong.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Buffalo Joe
    I will post this here, instead of finding the story from yesterday. Steve introduced us to the Jewish-Muslim women who are bonding together to protest anti-Semitic and anti Muslim hate crimes and good for them. Today we see that ISIS bombed two Christian churches in Egypt during Palm Sunday services. Of course, in the literal sense, this is a major hate crime, but leaving a ham on a mosque's doorstep or painting a swastika on a wall is much worst. Thirty five dead and hundreds wounded so far.

    The keyword here is Christian. Both muslim and jews could care less about them.

    ISIS is also an anti-Christian Muslim-Jew partnership, btw.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  32. timmm tom says:

    lurker here. retired now. i live in nicaragua w union pension. a very happy people. biggest difference is time and money. constantly late…tranquilla gringo! always bring me a receipt . to the penny. they hate the clash

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  33. timbum says:

    Lurker here. I live in
    nica ahora with union pension. A happy people, They hate the Clash

    Read More
    • Replies: @peterike

    A happy people, They hate the Clash

     

    You mean the punk band The Clash? They hate them because of that one song? I'm surprised they even know about it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. Dahlia says:
    @El Dato
    It's REAGAN TIME!

    I'm looking forward to "Top Gun Whatever" starring barely functional F-35 (don't know who would be the good-looking pilot though) and "Rambo Redux 2K17" where John Rambo Jr. liberates babies from Syria (looking suspiciously like the spanish countryside), disobeying strict orders from the Obama hierarchy.

    Seriously, can anyone drag the WaPo writers out into the street and acquaint them with School of the Americas style "quick justice"?

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/josh-rogin/wp/2017/04/09/obamas-syria-strike-plan-was-much-bigger-than-trumps/

    Those beatings need to come quickly: they posted this four hours ago…

    Trump administration officials have said they are “ready to do more.” And if Assad does use chemical weapons again, there are already plans they can use — the ones Obama and his team drew up and that Republicans criticized years ago.

    Disappointed tone…talk of “real test” of President Trump… What kind of manufactured dossier or intel about Trump is waiting in the pipeline at WaPo if he drags his feet with the killings? Nuke those people or we’ll incite more assassination attempts let alone nuking your domestic agenda?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. Mr. Anon says:

    It will be amusing if the Democrats get exercised by all of this; I remember that they were rather solicitous of the Sandanistas back in the 80s. They have already forgotten Ted Kennedy’s collusion with the Soviets in 1984 to combat their common enemy: Ronald Reagan.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  36. Mr. Anon says:
    @snorlax
    Speaking of:

    https://college.georgetown.edu/collegenews/anastasia-somoza-takes-center-stage.html

    August 11, 2016 — The 2016 Democratic National Convention wasn’t exactly short on big speeches.

    The four-day ceremony featured addresses from a seemingly never-ending list of prominent national politicians — including two U.S. presidents — all endorsing the first woman to run on a major-party presidential ticket in Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    But one of Philadelphia’s most poignant speeches didn’t come from a rising star legislator or party politics veteran. On Monday night, the first of the convention, New York-based disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza maneuvered her motorized chair to center stage and delivered a powerful five-minute endorsement of Clinton to a roaring crowd.

    Judging by the reaction pieces that night, the political press received the speech as well as the arena had. But for Somoza, it was only the latest big moment in a life of public service and activism that began with a childhood passion for equal rights and was shaped here at Georgetown College.

    *******

    Somoza (C’07) was born with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia, which confined her to a wheelchair from childhood. Her parents — both immigrants, of Irish and Nicaraguan descent
     
    You might even call them political refugees!

    — worked hard to ensure she got the same educational opportunities as other children.
     
    If she doesn't get the same educational opportunities as other children, I'll have you disappeared! I'll send my death squad after you!

    But while Somoza could speak eloquently, her twin sister Alba’s condition rendered her almost completely nonverbal, making the fight to keep her in general education classes much more difficult.

    Outraged that the school system had shunted her sister into a special education track for a physical disability, Somoza spoke up. In 1993, she met President Bill Clinton (F’68) at a nationally televised town hall and lobbied for her sister’s cause. All of nine years old, she made her case clearly and directly to the sitting president.

    “She can use her computer to speak, and I think she should be in a regular class just like me,” Anastasia Somoza told Clinton.

    Before long, Alba was granted access to the classes she deserved.

    Having seen up close how political advocacy could change lives, Somoza continued to involve herself in politics even after Alba’s situation was resolved. She volunteered in local campaigns, from school board elections to New York Democrat Mark J. Green’s run to become the city’s first Public Advocate.

    When it came time to apply to college, Somoza knew she wanted to follow her Fordham-educated mother’s advice and find a Jesuit school — but she also knew she wanted to leave New York, eliminating her mother’s alma mater from the search. Eventually, her mother suggested she apply to Georgetown.

    “It was an instant connection,” Somoza said. “I felt really comfortable in every way.”

    *******

    Even for someone who now possesses the self-confidence to speak in front of thousands of people, the first few days of college can be nerve-wracking.

    “People may be surprised to hear this, but there was a time that I didn’t have that level of confidence,” Somoza said. “I had personal apprehensions about whether I’d be able to meet the academic standards, just like most typical teenagers.”

    Coming from a public high school, Somoza was worried that she would struggle in an academic environment with students who had had access to more advanced classes at private schools.
     
    What's Spanish for "chutzpah?"

    She worried that her fellow students would be ultra-competitive, and even that making friends would be a struggle.

    “It was so not,” she said. “I found a supportive group of friends right away, and whenever I did need extra help, I remember all my professors having an open door.”
     
    Her parents worked hard.

    Somoza eventually decided to major in government and minor in English, but she took full advantage of the flexibility the College offers to explore as many disciplines as possible, and eventually ended up only one class short of a second minor in sociology. When she wasn’t in class or cheering on the basketball and football teams, she kept up her activist streak, getting involved with an HIV/AIDS awareness group and serving on the board of Hoyathon, a 24-hour benefit dance marathon for the Children’s Hospital of DC.

    Somoza's experience at the College helped give direction to the drive to serve that she had felt for years. After graduation, she enrolled at the London School of Economics and Political Science and earned a Master of Science in Human Rights.
     
    ………

    “One of Georgetown’s biggest mottoes is to live in the service of others,” she said. “I’ve carried that with me. I tried to do it at Georgetown, and that’s a big part of the reason I pursued the graduate degree that I did.”

    *******

    Today, Somoza consults for the Shield Institute, a disability rights advocacy group based in New York. Shield supports a number of programs for people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities, many focusing on daytime physical therapy and training for those who can’t work a traditional job. She’s most familiar with the Pure Vision Arts studio, where her sister Alba is a resident artist, but she serves as a sort of jack-of-all-trades for the organization.

    “My work with them is speaking, working with their board, fundraising, and staff, parent and teacher training,” she said. “My role is really to help the staff and families remember what they’re doing beyond the paperwork.”

    But Somoza’s work isn’t limited to her paid job in New York. She’s brought her passion for service to a national and international scale, with the indirect help of a family she first met as a small child: The Clintons.
     
    Isn't it funny how the Clintons' friends are mainly third-world banana republic dictators? And wasn't her familia Literally Hitler? I guess time (ka-ching!) heals all wounds!

    After a chance meeting with St. Cloud State University’s Dr. Kathy Johnson while interning at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting, Somoza began working on a CGI project aiming to eliminate the abandonment of children with disabilities in China. The project — a Commitment to Action, in CGI terms — will seek to establish a comprehensive resource center for parents of children with disabilities.

    In addition to her consulting and volunteer work, Somoza will serve as an official surrogate for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign this fall. She’ll hit the trail in the coming months and speak on behalf of Clinton.

    Less than a decade removed from her graduation, the woman who was nervous about even coming to Georgetown is making a tangible difference in her city, her country and halfway around the world. She’s doing exactly what it would seem she’s been destined to do since childhood, and she credits her education for helping her get there. So what does she think current Georgetown students should do to follow in her path?

    “Take every opportunity you have to pursue things that you love, but also that you never imagine you’d be interested in,” she said. “That’s the best part, realizing how many pathways there are to realizing who you are as a person. Step — or wheel — outside your comfort zone.”
     

    It’s funny that the acronym for the Clinton Global Initiative is CGI, another kind of illusion.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Rod1963 says:

    And why should we care?

    BFD that the Russians gave them some old tanks and buses that were basically junk.

    Of course to the Russian phobics who run our country and the MSM this must come off like impending doom or some sort of nonsense.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  38. Lugash says:
    @Federalist
    Your comment made me think: Is Trump still literally Hitler since he pissed off Putin/Russia by bombing Syria? Maybe Trump has improved his standing to only figuratively Hitler.

    I’d think that pissing off Russia has made Literally Like Hitler even MORE literally like Hitler. Think about it… The Literal Hitler fought an honest to god war with Russia. If Literally Like Hitler literally attacks Russia he’d achieve the singularity and become The Literal Hitler. Which is now literally a good thing.

    The Russian surge appears to be part of the Kremlin’s expansionist foreign policy.

    As opposed to the United States foreign policy, which can’t expand anymore because we’re already in everyone’s business.

    My impression is that there aren’t all that many “unaccompanied minors” coming from Nicaragua at the moment compared to the more rightwing banana republics.

    I’ve never met a Venezuelan illegal. It’s be interesting to see what percentage of each country is in the United States.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. Whiskey says: • Website

    Trump’s weakness was always his family, particularly his idiot daughter who cares more about the good opinion of gay fashion designers like all Upper Class women, than the good of the country or keeping her father out of prison.

    Trump is prison-bound, while the Powers that Be are happy with bombing Syria (almost wrote Serbia) they will not forgive or forget the mortal insults to God-King Obama and the multi-culti religion; much less backing from deplorables. Not even Steven Bannon’s head on a pike will suffice, the first setback in Syria/Serbia and Trump will be impeached, convicted, trundled off to prison and someone like Cuck Ryan installed or perhaps even Kamala Harris “to let the healing begin” etc. Its so obvious only a clueless Upper Class woman anxious to be liked by flaming gays in fashion (but I repeat myself) could miss it.

    I would not mind Trump taking out North Korea; as someone who works in LA daily, Kim Jonger the Donger’s #1 target these days of his nukes, so says Jonger the Donger himself, that’s a plus. If half or more of South Korea goes up in flames, I don’t care. I’m not Korean — I’m an American and I work in LA. About Syria I care even less — most of those “children” would gleefully cut my throat and every Kuffar they could find in five seconds. Again only a woman as dumb as Ivanka Trump could miss it — and the acorn did not fall far from the tree. Trump is as dumb as he looks, having won on populism he’s stupid to think that he won’t have long knives out for him just to crush and copy cats later on.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  40. vinteuil says:

    “My impression is that there aren’t all that many ‘unaccompanied minors’ coming from Nicaragua at the moment compared to the more rightwing banana republics.”

    Don’t be deceived – Nicaragua is a mess. There are huge numbers of desperately poor Nicaraguan economic migrants scratching out a subsistence living in Costa Rica. The reason we don’t see that many Nicaraguans here in the US is because they’re closer to San José than to San Diego.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  41. Sean says:

    This is an illustration of aggressive realism whereby great powers are always ldrawn int0 conflict by trying to gain an advantage. (like the US in Ukraine). Objectively, it’s the stupidest thing that Russia could possibly do, and I would not be surprised if the US strike on Assad was in part retaliation.

    The latest from the brilliant BRANDON J. WEICHERT (not only astoundingly precient on him as candidate but better than anyone on President Trump’s tactics)

    https://theweichertreport.com/2017/04/07/wars-and-rumors-of-wars/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  42. Clyde says:
    @snorlax
    Speaking of:

    https://college.georgetown.edu/collegenews/anastasia-somoza-takes-center-stage.html

    August 11, 2016 — The 2016 Democratic National Convention wasn’t exactly short on big speeches.

    The four-day ceremony featured addresses from a seemingly never-ending list of prominent national politicians — including two U.S. presidents — all endorsing the first woman to run on a major-party presidential ticket in Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    But one of Philadelphia’s most poignant speeches didn’t come from a rising star legislator or party politics veteran. On Monday night, the first of the convention, New York-based disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza maneuvered her motorized chair to center stage and delivered a powerful five-minute endorsement of Clinton to a roaring crowd.

    Judging by the reaction pieces that night, the political press received the speech as well as the arena had. But for Somoza, it was only the latest big moment in a life of public service and activism that began with a childhood passion for equal rights and was shaped here at Georgetown College.

    *******

    Somoza (C’07) was born with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia, which confined her to a wheelchair from childhood. Her parents — both immigrants, of Irish and Nicaraguan descent
     
    You might even call them political refugees!

    — worked hard to ensure she got the same educational opportunities as other children.
     
    If she doesn't get the same educational opportunities as other children, I'll have you disappeared! I'll send my death squad after you!

    But while Somoza could speak eloquently, her twin sister Alba’s condition rendered her almost completely nonverbal, making the fight to keep her in general education classes much more difficult.

    Outraged that the school system had shunted her sister into a special education track for a physical disability, Somoza spoke up. In 1993, she met President Bill Clinton (F’68) at a nationally televised town hall and lobbied for her sister’s cause. All of nine years old, she made her case clearly and directly to the sitting president.

    “She can use her computer to speak, and I think she should be in a regular class just like me,” Anastasia Somoza told Clinton.

    Before long, Alba was granted access to the classes she deserved.

    Having seen up close how political advocacy could change lives, Somoza continued to involve herself in politics even after Alba’s situation was resolved. She volunteered in local campaigns, from school board elections to New York Democrat Mark J. Green’s run to become the city’s first Public Advocate.

    When it came time to apply to college, Somoza knew she wanted to follow her Fordham-educated mother’s advice and find a Jesuit school — but she also knew she wanted to leave New York, eliminating her mother’s alma mater from the search. Eventually, her mother suggested she apply to Georgetown.

    “It was an instant connection,” Somoza said. “I felt really comfortable in every way.”

    *******

    Even for someone who now possesses the self-confidence to speak in front of thousands of people, the first few days of college can be nerve-wracking.

    “People may be surprised to hear this, but there was a time that I didn’t have that level of confidence,” Somoza said. “I had personal apprehensions about whether I’d be able to meet the academic standards, just like most typical teenagers.”

    Coming from a public high school, Somoza was worried that she would struggle in an academic environment with students who had had access to more advanced classes at private schools.
     
    What's Spanish for "chutzpah?"

    She worried that her fellow students would be ultra-competitive, and even that making friends would be a struggle.

    “It was so not,” she said. “I found a supportive group of friends right away, and whenever I did need extra help, I remember all my professors having an open door.”
     
    Her parents worked hard.

    Somoza eventually decided to major in government and minor in English, but she took full advantage of the flexibility the College offers to explore as many disciplines as possible, and eventually ended up only one class short of a second minor in sociology. When she wasn’t in class or cheering on the basketball and football teams, she kept up her activist streak, getting involved with an HIV/AIDS awareness group and serving on the board of Hoyathon, a 24-hour benefit dance marathon for the Children’s Hospital of DC.

    Somoza's experience at the College helped give direction to the drive to serve that she had felt for years. After graduation, she enrolled at the London School of Economics and Political Science and earned a Master of Science in Human Rights.
     
    ………

    “One of Georgetown’s biggest mottoes is to live in the service of others,” she said. “I’ve carried that with me. I tried to do it at Georgetown, and that’s a big part of the reason I pursued the graduate degree that I did.”

    *******

    Today, Somoza consults for the Shield Institute, a disability rights advocacy group based in New York. Shield supports a number of programs for people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities, many focusing on daytime physical therapy and training for those who can’t work a traditional job. She’s most familiar with the Pure Vision Arts studio, where her sister Alba is a resident artist, but she serves as a sort of jack-of-all-trades for the organization.

    “My work with them is speaking, working with their board, fundraising, and staff, parent and teacher training,” she said. “My role is really to help the staff and families remember what they’re doing beyond the paperwork.”

    But Somoza’s work isn’t limited to her paid job in New York. She’s brought her passion for service to a national and international scale, with the indirect help of a family she first met as a small child: The Clintons.
     
    Isn't it funny how the Clintons' friends are mainly third-world banana republic dictators? And wasn't her familia Literally Hitler? I guess time (ka-ching!) heals all wounds!

    After a chance meeting with St. Cloud State University’s Dr. Kathy Johnson while interning at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting, Somoza began working on a CGI project aiming to eliminate the abandonment of children with disabilities in China. The project — a Commitment to Action, in CGI terms — will seek to establish a comprehensive resource center for parents of children with disabilities.

    In addition to her consulting and volunteer work, Somoza will serve as an official surrogate for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign this fall. She’ll hit the trail in the coming months and speak on behalf of Clinton.

    Less than a decade removed from her graduation, the woman who was nervous about even coming to Georgetown is making a tangible difference in her city, her country and halfway around the world. She’s doing exactly what it would seem she’s been destined to do since childhood, and she credits her education for helping her get there. So what does she think current Georgetown students should do to follow in her path?

    “Take every opportunity you have to pursue things that you love, but also that you never imagine you’d be interested in,” she said. “That’s the best part, realizing how many pathways there are to realizing who you are as a person. Step — or wheel — outside your comfort zone.”
     

    Did you see her photos? She is pretty decent looking, enough to get married, she will do OK in this life heading useless NGOs.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Stealth says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    And they've got a much bigger presence in the United States already than they did in 1984!

    The Cuban officer was the most interesting character in the original Red Dawn. He didn't like what he was doing in Colorado, wrote his wife that he was resigning his commission and let the two brothers go at the end of the movie. Vaya con dios!

    …and let the two brothers go at the end of the movie. Vaya con dios!

    To be fair, what he really did was allow them to die in peace, or whatever passes for peace when someone is dying of gunshot wounds in subfreezing temperatures.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. @Marcus
    For the most part Russia has maintained the Soviet era policy of sponsoring leftist movements abroad. RT, Sputnik, etc. certainly have leftist slants. The only exception has been in the EU where the left is completely onboard with the Atlanticists, so Russia has supported some "right wing" anti-establishment candidates.

    There’s a pro-Russian, Europhobic left in Eastern Europe as well.

    The Socialists in Moldova, the newly elected Socialist president of Bulgaira (Radev), and the far left Workers’ Party in Hungary are all pro-Russia. So is the center-left president of the Czech Republic and the center left ruling party (Social Democracy) in Slovakia. This gives a big headache to a lot of liberals who don’t know how to make sense of it, which is why you get the amusing spectacle of the New York Times describing the Moldovan Socialists as “far right” because of their opposition to immigration.

    In general, Eastern Europe seems to be the more rational half of Europe.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    And the populist conservatives ruling Poland hate Putin.
    , @Marcus
    Is that why they abort everything?
    https://goo.gl/images/hlFWLu
    , @Romanian
    I read somewhere that the Communist countries started out on the same road to leftist ruin as the West but they fell behind in the innovation department like they did in every other one and they didn't have the economic surplus to tolerate the excesses of liberalism. Preparing to spread the Revolution abroad and for a confrontation with the West, they had to discard things that kept them back which weren't critical to Communism itself, which, in practice, meant having a very conservative family life and sexual mores. I read that experiments with free love in the USSR were so tragic that they ended them quickly and did not try again, after witnessing the abandoned and feral children and the destruction of families. Meanwhile, the West was chugging along to the cultural left, buoyed by a very productive economic system and by the spread of the benefits of technology. By the time we got rid of Communism, we were culturally to the right of the West, even as our economies were in tatters and needed massive reorganization.

    But, do not fret, we are swiftly moving to catch up to you, thanks to the energetic efforts of a young and "European" minority of the population whose single mindedness was bred by a National inferiority complex.

    While I'm no expert on Bulgaria, I don't get the sense that Radev is all that pro-Russian, except that he has to play with the cards he has in his hand. The Bulgarians owe the Russians money for the Belene nuclear power plant they had to abandon because of the EU. Sure, the country has numerous affinities with Russia (it was said that Bulgaria would have become part of the Soviet Union, had Romania not been between them), but they also know which side will butter their bread more in the long run, having been at the receiving end of the gas spat between Russia and Ukraine in 2009. As for Radev, any right thinking Russophile would watch him like a hawk. He graduated from the US Air Force Squadron Officer School at Maxwell AFB in 1992 and then got a Master's Degree in Strategic Studies from the same place in 2003.


    I'm not into shameless plugs, but here's a local Romanian opinion on the subject on my hobby site http://www.themarketforideas.com/the-big-misunderstanding-with-bulgaria-why-not-cross-the-danube-a123/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  45. @El Dato
    It's REAGAN TIME!

    I'm looking forward to "Top Gun Whatever" starring barely functional F-35 (don't know who would be the good-looking pilot though) and "Rambo Redux 2K17" where John Rambo Jr. liberates babies from Syria (looking suspiciously like the spanish countryside), disobeying strict orders from the Obama hierarchy.

    Seriously, can anyone drag the WaPo writers out into the street and acquaint them with School of the Americas style "quick justice"?

    ten, twenty, thirty, forty fifty or more!
    the bloody red towel-head kept rolling up the score!
    the F-35 couldn’t end that streak!
    of the bloody red towel-head of Mozambique!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  46. The main positive to take from this is upcoming media praise for right wing death squads.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  47. @Hector_St_Clare
    There's a pro-Russian, Europhobic left in Eastern Europe as well.

    The Socialists in Moldova, the newly elected Socialist president of Bulgaira (Radev), and the far left Workers' Party in Hungary are all pro-Russia. So is the center-left president of the Czech Republic and the center left ruling party (Social Democracy) in Slovakia. This gives a big headache to a lot of liberals who don't know how to make sense of it, which is why you get the amusing spectacle of the New York Times describing the Moldovan Socialists as "far right" because of their opposition to immigration.

    In general, Eastern Europe seems to be the more rational half of Europe.

    And the populist conservatives ruling Poland hate Putin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hector_St_Clare
    Yes though in fairness they dislike both Russia and Western Europe. Civic Platform dislikes *only* Russia.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. Marcus says:
    @Hector_St_Clare
    There's a pro-Russian, Europhobic left in Eastern Europe as well.

    The Socialists in Moldova, the newly elected Socialist president of Bulgaira (Radev), and the far left Workers' Party in Hungary are all pro-Russia. So is the center-left president of the Czech Republic and the center left ruling party (Social Democracy) in Slovakia. This gives a big headache to a lot of liberals who don't know how to make sense of it, which is why you get the amusing spectacle of the New York Times describing the Moldovan Socialists as "far right" because of their opposition to immigration.

    In general, Eastern Europe seems to be the more rational half of Europe.

    Is that why they abort everything?

    https://goo.gl/images/hlFWLu

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Our peoples are deeply wounded and some are in a kind of moral stupor brought on by rapid changes and the fraying of social relations. The high abortion rate (partly due to Gypsies where applicable) is only one of the symptoms.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. Hibernian says:
    @snorlax
    Speaking of:

    https://college.georgetown.edu/collegenews/anastasia-somoza-takes-center-stage.html

    August 11, 2016 — The 2016 Democratic National Convention wasn’t exactly short on big speeches.

    The four-day ceremony featured addresses from a seemingly never-ending list of prominent national politicians — including two U.S. presidents — all endorsing the first woman to run on a major-party presidential ticket in Hillary Rodham Clinton.

    But one of Philadelphia’s most poignant speeches didn’t come from a rising star legislator or party politics veteran. On Monday night, the first of the convention, New York-based disability rights advocate Anastasia Somoza maneuvered her motorized chair to center stage and delivered a powerful five-minute endorsement of Clinton to a roaring crowd.

    Judging by the reaction pieces that night, the political press received the speech as well as the arena had. But for Somoza, it was only the latest big moment in a life of public service and activism that began with a childhood passion for equal rights and was shaped here at Georgetown College.

    *******

    Somoza (C’07) was born with cerebral palsy with spastic quadriplegia, which confined her to a wheelchair from childhood. Her parents — both immigrants, of Irish and Nicaraguan descent
     
    You might even call them political refugees!

    — worked hard to ensure she got the same educational opportunities as other children.
     
    If she doesn't get the same educational opportunities as other children, I'll have you disappeared! I'll send my death squad after you!

    But while Somoza could speak eloquently, her twin sister Alba’s condition rendered her almost completely nonverbal, making the fight to keep her in general education classes much more difficult.

    Outraged that the school system had shunted her sister into a special education track for a physical disability, Somoza spoke up. In 1993, she met President Bill Clinton (F’68) at a nationally televised town hall and lobbied for her sister’s cause. All of nine years old, she made her case clearly and directly to the sitting president.

    “She can use her computer to speak, and I think she should be in a regular class just like me,” Anastasia Somoza told Clinton.

    Before long, Alba was granted access to the classes she deserved.

    Having seen up close how political advocacy could change lives, Somoza continued to involve herself in politics even after Alba’s situation was resolved. She volunteered in local campaigns, from school board elections to New York Democrat Mark J. Green’s run to become the city’s first Public Advocate.

    When it came time to apply to college, Somoza knew she wanted to follow her Fordham-educated mother’s advice and find a Jesuit school — but she also knew she wanted to leave New York, eliminating her mother’s alma mater from the search. Eventually, her mother suggested she apply to Georgetown.

    “It was an instant connection,” Somoza said. “I felt really comfortable in every way.”

    *******

    Even for someone who now possesses the self-confidence to speak in front of thousands of people, the first few days of college can be nerve-wracking.

    “People may be surprised to hear this, but there was a time that I didn’t have that level of confidence,” Somoza said. “I had personal apprehensions about whether I’d be able to meet the academic standards, just like most typical teenagers.”

    Coming from a public high school, Somoza was worried that she would struggle in an academic environment with students who had had access to more advanced classes at private schools.
     
    What's Spanish for "chutzpah?"

    She worried that her fellow students would be ultra-competitive, and even that making friends would be a struggle.

    “It was so not,” she said. “I found a supportive group of friends right away, and whenever I did need extra help, I remember all my professors having an open door.”
     
    Her parents worked hard.

    Somoza eventually decided to major in government and minor in English, but she took full advantage of the flexibility the College offers to explore as many disciplines as possible, and eventually ended up only one class short of a second minor in sociology. When she wasn’t in class or cheering on the basketball and football teams, she kept up her activist streak, getting involved with an HIV/AIDS awareness group and serving on the board of Hoyathon, a 24-hour benefit dance marathon for the Children’s Hospital of DC.

    Somoza's experience at the College helped give direction to the drive to serve that she had felt for years. After graduation, she enrolled at the London School of Economics and Political Science and earned a Master of Science in Human Rights.
     
    ………

    “One of Georgetown’s biggest mottoes is to live in the service of others,” she said. “I’ve carried that with me. I tried to do it at Georgetown, and that’s a big part of the reason I pursued the graduate degree that I did.”

    *******

    Today, Somoza consults for the Shield Institute, a disability rights advocacy group based in New York. Shield supports a number of programs for people with both intellectual and developmental disabilities, many focusing on daytime physical therapy and training for those who can’t work a traditional job. She’s most familiar with the Pure Vision Arts studio, where her sister Alba is a resident artist, but she serves as a sort of jack-of-all-trades for the organization.

    “My work with them is speaking, working with their board, fundraising, and staff, parent and teacher training,” she said. “My role is really to help the staff and families remember what they’re doing beyond the paperwork.”

    But Somoza’s work isn’t limited to her paid job in New York. She’s brought her passion for service to a national and international scale, with the indirect help of a family she first met as a small child: The Clintons.
     
    Isn't it funny how the Clintons' friends are mainly third-world banana republic dictators? And wasn't her familia Literally Hitler? I guess time (ka-ching!) heals all wounds!

    After a chance meeting with St. Cloud State University’s Dr. Kathy Johnson while interning at the 2012 Clinton Global Initiative annual meeting, Somoza began working on a CGI project aiming to eliminate the abandonment of children with disabilities in China. The project — a Commitment to Action, in CGI terms — will seek to establish a comprehensive resource center for parents of children with disabilities.

    In addition to her consulting and volunteer work, Somoza will serve as an official surrogate for Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign this fall. She’ll hit the trail in the coming months and speak on behalf of Clinton.

    Less than a decade removed from her graduation, the woman who was nervous about even coming to Georgetown is making a tangible difference in her city, her country and halfway around the world. She’s doing exactly what it would seem she’s been destined to do since childhood, and she credits her education for helping her get there. So what does she think current Georgetown students should do to follow in her path?

    “Take every opportunity you have to pursue things that you love, but also that you never imagine you’d be interested in,” she said. “That’s the best part, realizing how many pathways there are to realizing who you are as a person. Step — or wheel — outside your comfort zone.”
     

    Do we know for sure she’s one of THOSE Somozas? Probably at least a distant relative, and they fled from Ortega. Same name, same country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Yup.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somoza_family

    The Somoza family was an influential political dynasty who ruled Nicaragua as a family dictatorship from 1936 to 1979.

    Anastasio Somoza Garcia was the first president who won the presidential election and took over the country. Although they only held the presidency for 30 of those 43 years, they were the power behind the other presidents of the time through their control of the National Guard. Their regime was overthrown by the Sandinista National Liberation Front during the Nicaraguan Revolution.

    Three of the Somozas served as President of Nicaragua. They were:

    Anastasio Somoza García (1896–1956; ruled 1937–1947, 1950–1956), the father.
    Luis Somoza Debayle (1922–1967, ruled 1956–1963), his legitimate eldest son.
    Anastasio Somoza Debayle (1925–1980, ruled 1967–1972, 1974–1979), his second legitimate son.

    Other members of the Somoza family include:

    Lillian Somoza Debayle
    Hope Portocarrero, wife of Anastasio Somoza Debayle
    Anastasio Somoza Portocarrero, son of Anastasio Somoza Debayle
    Bernabé Somoza, a 19th-century rebel
    Anastasia Somoza, a 21st-century disability rights advocate who spoke on July 25, 2016, at the 2016 Democratic National Convention in support of Hillary Clinton
     
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. snorlax says:
    @Hibernian
    Do we know for sure she's one of THOSE Somozas? Probably at least a distant relative, and they fled from Ortega. Same name, same country.

    Yup.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somoza_family

    The Somoza family was an influential political dynasty who ruled Nicaragua as a family dictatorship from 1936 to 1979.

    Anastasio Somoza Garcia was the first president who won the presidential election and took over the country. Although they only held the presidency for 30 of those 43 years, they were the power behind the other presidents of the time through their control of the National Guard. Their regime was overthrown by the Sandinista National Liberation Front during the Nicaraguan Revolution.

    Three of the Somozas served as President of Nicaragua. They were:

    Anastasio Somoza García (1896–1956; ruled 1937–1947, 1950–1956), the father.
    Luis Somoza Debayle (1922–1967, ruled 1956–1963), his legitimate eldest son.
    Anastasio Somoza Debayle (1925–1980, ruled 1967–1972, 1974–1979), his second legitimate son.

    Other members of the Somoza family include:

    Lillian Somoza Debayle
    Hope Portocarrero, wife of Anastasio Somoza Debayle
    Anastasio Somoza Portocarrero, son of Anastasio Somoza Debayle
    Bernabé Somoza, a 19th-century rebel
    Anastasia Somoza, a 21st-century disability rights advocate who spoke on July 25, 2016, at the 2016 Democratic National Convention in support of Hillary Clinton

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. I know a kid, E., who is half Nicaraguan, half Palestinian. He’s a big fan of Anastasio Somoza and Yassir Arafat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Diversity Heretic
    If that's what passes for an American in California today, California secession can't come too soon!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. @Steve Sailer
    I know a kid, E., who is half Nicaraguan, half Palestinian. He's a big fan of Anastasio Somoza and Yassir Arafat.

    If that’s what passes for an American in California today, California secession can’t come too soon!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. The only Samoza I care about is that tasty fried Pakistani appetizer.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  54. snorlax says:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks! I looked but couldn't find that clip.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. @Steve Sailer
    And the populist conservatives ruling Poland hate Putin.

    Yes though in fairness they dislike both Russia and Western Europe. Civic Platform dislikes *only* Russia.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  56. @reiner Tor
    Ortega is now democratically elected, I thought democracies had the right to choose their allies freely, including allies from two continents away, and nearby greater powers are literally Hitler if they object to it. Apparently only Russia is literally Hitler for objecting to its neighbors joining an alliance hostile to them, it never applies to the US.

    The Sandinistas were elected in 1984 as well, in elections that were more “democratic” than typical for Latin America at the time. (And that compare favourably to some of the “Colour Revolution” democracies in places like modern-day Ukraine as well: a bunch of opposition parties, some of them very vociferous, existed in Nicaragua and IIRC seven parties contested the election).

    I wouldn’t call the Sandinistas democrats certainly either then or now (I don’t think they would have accepted a loss in 1984 and their high command said that they saw democracy as transitional to a more traditional Communist regime), but they weren’t really authoritarians either.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. peterike says:
    @timbum
    Lurker here. I live in
    nica ahora with union pension. A happy people, They hate the Clash

    A happy people, They hate the Clash

    You mean the punk band The Clash? They hate them because of that one song? I’m surprised they even know about it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. Olorin says:
    @jimmyriddle
    The next remake will feature a battalion of Pepes.

    I dunno. Over at TRS etc. the alt-right fashy kindern were immediately stinkloading their diapers over that bit of Trumpian Tomahawk Theatre in Syria and the left/Dems’ online trolling in response to it (like ShariaBlue’s disinfo campaigns).

    I still haven’t come to any particular geopolitical conclusions per se that I’d be inclined to scribble about.

    The Pepe Moment has passed, methinks. Them scary nazi keyboard warriors are presenting themselves as nadless and easy to manipulate.

    The leadership job of the next four years–apart from making America’s alter ego Veruca Salt less constantly screechy–is going to include figuring out how many and which people will step up for the 20th Century Communications Programming Makeover.

    The idea that you can toggle your selection of content from Liberal to Conservative or Progressive to Alt Right or Gen A versus Gen Z…but keep your Baldy Bezos/Big Slim/Newz Netwerk-programmed easily triggered neurons/response patterns unexamined and unaltered strikes me as problematic.

    The new/dissident/whatever right sniggers on about SJWs and how easily Triggered they are…but react exactly the same damn way.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. Romanian says: • Website
    @Hector_St_Clare
    There's a pro-Russian, Europhobic left in Eastern Europe as well.

    The Socialists in Moldova, the newly elected Socialist president of Bulgaira (Radev), and the far left Workers' Party in Hungary are all pro-Russia. So is the center-left president of the Czech Republic and the center left ruling party (Social Democracy) in Slovakia. This gives a big headache to a lot of liberals who don't know how to make sense of it, which is why you get the amusing spectacle of the New York Times describing the Moldovan Socialists as "far right" because of their opposition to immigration.

    In general, Eastern Europe seems to be the more rational half of Europe.

    I read somewhere that the Communist countries started out on the same road to leftist ruin as the West but they fell behind in the innovation department like they did in every other one and they didn’t have the economic surplus to tolerate the excesses of liberalism. Preparing to spread the Revolution abroad and for a confrontation with the West, they had to discard things that kept them back which weren’t critical to Communism itself, which, in practice, meant having a very conservative family life and sexual mores. I read that experiments with free love in the USSR were so tragic that they ended them quickly and did not try again, after witnessing the abandoned and feral children and the destruction of families. Meanwhile, the West was chugging along to the cultural left, buoyed by a very productive economic system and by the spread of the benefits of technology. By the time we got rid of Communism, we were culturally to the right of the West, even as our economies were in tatters and needed massive reorganization.

    But, do not fret, we are swiftly moving to catch up to you, thanks to the energetic efforts of a young and “European” minority of the population whose single mindedness was bred by a National inferiority complex.

    While I’m no expert on Bulgaria, I don’t get the sense that Radev is all that pro-Russian, except that he has to play with the cards he has in his hand. The Bulgarians owe the Russians money for the Belene nuclear power plant they had to abandon because of the EU. Sure, the country has numerous affinities with Russia (it was said that Bulgaria would have become part of the Soviet Union, had Romania not been between them), but they also know which side will butter their bread more in the long run, having been at the receiving end of the gas spat between Russia and Ukraine in 2009. As for Radev, any right thinking Russophile would watch him like a hawk. He graduated from the US Air Force Squadron Officer School at Maxwell AFB in 1992 and then got a Master’s Degree in Strategic Studies from the same place in 2003.

    [MORE]

    I’m not into shameless plugs, but here’s a local Romanian opinion on the subject on my hobby site http://www.themarketforideas.com/the-big-misunderstanding-with-bulgaria-why-not-cross-the-danube-a123/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. Romanian says: • Website
    @Marcus
    Is that why they abort everything?
    https://goo.gl/images/hlFWLu

    Our peoples are deeply wounded and some are in a kind of moral stupor brought on by rapid changes and the fraying of social relations. The high abortion rate (partly due to Gypsies where applicable) is only one of the symptoms.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. @snorlax
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGjty394oyw

    Thanks! I looked but couldn’t find that clip.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
A simple remedy for income stagnation