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In Vox, there’s an article about the Amy Wax Brouhaha at Penn Law School that is amusing even by 2018 standards for Guilt-by-Association:

National Review’s weak attack on affirmative action

The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.

By Jane Coaston [email protected] Mar 21, 2018,

And, after a slow start, we’re off to the races: Amy Wax ~ Jason Richwine ~ Richard Spencer ~ Charles Murray ~ John Derbyshire.

 
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  1. Around Amy Wax, never relax.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosie
    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore's memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It's just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    , @Iberiano
    thread winner!

    for this beginner.

    never a poem could I write...

    But I opened my mac,

    and saw this attack,

    wow, a Jewess they did try to smite?
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  2. Ricky Vaughn [AKA "Loyal NR Reader"] says:

    David French and his wife’s black son have zero tolerance for racists.

    Read More
    • LOL: The Z Blog, AndrewR
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  3. “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.

    Read More
    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.
     
    Agreed.

    Beyond the point and sputter, her argument is essentially this:

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued. Meaning that to suspect a minority job applicant would be less qualified, even with a degree from a leading institution, would not be, in fact, “rational” but would be, as Paul Ryan might say, “the textbook definition of a racist comment.”
     
    This is just blitheringly stupid from the logical and mathematical point of view. Of course, when you admit any group of people with lower LSAT scores and grades they will ... tend to achieve lower law school grades and graduate at lower rates and tend to be cluster toward the botton of their graduation classes. (And be less like what an employer thinks of as a "U Penn quality law grad".) If you don't believe this, then you are either asserting that the these law school admissions metrics are uncorrelated with success in law school--in which case they ought to be junked--or you're just a completely innumerate bozo.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human's worth. This Jane Coaston might be perfectly capable of say of growing, nursing and nurturing some babies--a supremely important human endeavor. Or, much less importantly, maybe writing some movie reviews. But she has demonstrated that she is utterly incompetent at reporting about or commenting on any topic involving mathematical or statistical concepts. So it is arrogant and unprofessional for her to do so.
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  4. The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.

    Do you ever get the sense that the good folks at places like Vox don’t even bother to understand (much less fairly characterize) the ideas they’re arguing against?

    Read More
    • Agree: res
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Racists only ever say one thing, and they say this thing by accidentally betraying their own racism (which is deplorable by the way). Worrying about what fake point the racist was ostensibly making would be like trying to argue with a demon. If their knowledge is something we already know, then we don't need it from them, and if it is racism, then we don't want it, so burn it all.
    , @TTSSYF
    They "do" seem to use "scare quotes" quite a lot.
    , @Jake
    Certainly. They feel down in the very pit of their guts that there is no need to know, because they are correct and those who are not agreeing with them are incorrect. For the convicted Leftist there then is only one issue: which of the incorrect are able to be re-educated, and which must be sent into the Gulag.

    This is a way to help see how erroneous, and self-defeating, it is to ever compare this standard Leftist assumption of knowing it all to anything to do with Christendom's 'heresy-hunting.' Every orthodox Medieval theologian or philosopher who spoke against Nominalism and Nominalists, for example, knew Nominalist arguments backwards and forwards. They warred against Nominalism by exposing it as false to the sum reality of human existence and nefarious to the future of civilization.
    , @AndrewR
    I disagree. I think Vox writers completely understand their victims' arguments. Vox writers simply choose to mischaracterize the arguments anyway.
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  5. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:

    This is obviously a woman who despises blacks and does not view them as thinking beings:

    http://www.unz.com/video/bloggingheadstv_the-downside-to-social-uplift-glenn-loury-amy-wax-the-glenn/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Follow-up posted today (just started watching...):
    http://www.unz.com/video/bloggingheadstv_amy-wax-returns-glenn-loury-amy-wax-the-glenn-show/
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  6. Jason Richwine’s March 19th NR article mentioned there is brief but good: https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/amy-wax-affirmative-action-debate/
    To Vox’s credit (I am trying hard to be charitable), they did directly link to that NR article.

    SJWs up to their usual tricks:

    After an uproar, National Review fired Derbyshire, with editor Rich Lowry writing, “Derb has long danced around the line on these issues, but this column is so outlandish it constitutes a kind of letter of resignation. It’s a free country, and Derb can write whatever he wants, wherever he wants. Just not in the pages of NR or NRO, or as someone associated with NR any longer.”

    Six years later, similar views are being espoused by another National Review contributor, who has previously written for a site dedicating to promoting the views of the alt-right and whose views were too extreme for the very conservative Heritage Foundation.

    I’ve reached out to Lowry, National Review’s editor-in-chief, and National Review Online editor Charles C.W. Cooke for comment and will update if I receive a response.

    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.
     
    You're exaggerating the difference. NRO doesn't allow intelligent or conservative commentary.
    , @Gunner
    In the glorious Progressive Future that the Voxers imagine, comments are not allowed because they are filled with Racist Wrongthink.
    , @Barnard
    National Review's influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left. Writers like Rich Lowry and David French expend all of this energy denouncing anyone to their right on racial issues, piously virtue signalling their moral superiority. Then a writer like Jane Coaston, who they were stupid enough to let write an anti-Trump article for National Review last year, comes backs and yells "racist" at them now like an obnoxious kid on the playground. As long as the big, dumb donors keep writing checks to fund their operation, Lowry and the gang will keep playing their part.
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  7. About that Vox piece, what do you call it when a writer presents arguments he knows are persuasive while pretending they are ridiculous? Subversion? It this were the Soviet Union that guy would be in the Gulag.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Judaism.
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  8. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    This is obviously a woman who despises blacks and does not view them as thinking beings:
    http://www.unz.com/video/bloggingheadstv_the-downside-to-social-uplift-glenn-loury-amy-wax-the-glenn/
    Read More
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  9. @Anon

    The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.
     
    Do you ever get the sense that the good folks at places like Vox don't even bother to understand (much less fairly characterize) the ideas they're arguing against?

    Racists only ever say one thing, and they say this thing by accidentally betraying their own racism (which is deplorable by the way). Worrying about what fake point the racist was ostensibly making would be like trying to argue with a demon. If their knowledge is something we already know, then we don’t need it from them, and if it is racism, then we don’t want it, so burn it all.

    Read More
    • Agree: DCThrowback
    • Replies: @phil
    You put "anti-racism" above the truth. You suggest that "racism" is wrong even if Amy Wax has knowledge about black academic performance that you don't have. Race differences are real, and law students are an excellent case in point.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. “Six years later, similar views are being espoused by another National Review contributor, ”

    You say to the a-hole: F**k You go back to your “safe space”. Cunt.

    Read More
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  11. not just a problem with law students–all occupations that require cognitive firepower have a dearth of Africans. One of the more amusing thought experiment on social media is asking posters to list their favorite contemporary novelists, eg. Many SJW types will immediately cite Toni Morrison–but if you have a private discussion at a party on the same subject, no high-IQ person–black, white, Asian–will mention Morrison. We live in strange times

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes

    Many SJW types will immediately cite Toni Morrison–but if you have a private discussion at a party on the same subject, no high-IQ person–black, white, Asian–will mention Morrison. We live in strange times
     
    There's a tendency on the web to call this virtue-signaling, but I think most have lost track of the reality. It is vanity signaling--signaling to draw attention to a personal affinity and conformity to the zeitgeist. Such signaling certainly does not reflect the virtue of humility. Virtue is character and conduct, best expressed as what you do when no one is looking.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. One of those things is not like the others.

    Read More
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  13. Amy Wax is toast. Black people are sacred objects of worship in this new religion and heresy is not tolerated.

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    When was the last case when a tenured Ivy League professor was fired? I am not sure if I can recall an instance at all.
    (Hint: Larry Summers was not fired.)
    , @Stephen Paul Foster
    "Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner."

    Most likely, but all of this is very strange. Wax is clearly a very smart woman and has marinated long enough in the Ivy League juices of racial-PC orthodoxy to know that openly promulgating what all the institutional overseers privately acknowledge is tantamount to professional hari-kari. What gives with her? Just cannot stomach the mandatory lies and coerced stupidity any longer?

    As an aside: the resemblance of the antics on American university campuses gets closer every day to the work of Mao's Red Guard during the Cultural Revolution. Where is our Deng Xiaoping when we need him?
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    They can't fire her unless she staggers into class drunk and tries to rape a student in front if witnesses, but they already took her off a required course. If her elective courses don't get enough students to run, she won't have enough sections to be fully employed. When they do give her sections, they will be at odd hours and days, like a 7:30AM followed by a night class, so either she has to drive back and forth or sit in her office all day. Or they'll give her back-to-back 2-hour classes with no lunch break. In different buildings, halfway across campus, so she won't even have time to hit the bathroom, let alone hold office hours between two classes.

    And of course, they'll give her The Freeze at faculty meetings.
    , @PhysicistDave
    Whiskey wrote:

    Amy Wax is toast....

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.
     
    No, you don't understand how the game is played: firing her would surely produce a lawsuit based on tenure and would make her a martyr.

    No, what they will try to do (and have already started) is to make her life so miserable that she herself will want to quit.

    However, she certainly grasps this. She is in her mid-sixties, and Wax is no doubt playing out an end-game.

    It will be interesting to see how she has this planned.
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  14. Richwine wrote a few articles for AlternativeRight before Spencer went off the deep end. Here is one such article by Richwine that’s still relevant:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20111019105130/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/the-magazine/model-minority/

    By the way, here’s some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article “The Spectre of Weimar”:

    I mention this because there are compelling reasons to believe that we are about to experience a horrifying deflation/inflation whiplash. … I am confident that run-away inflation will occur within the next decade.

    http://web.archive.org/web/20110909193935/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/blogs/malinvestments/the-spectre-of-weimar/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    I think it's likely that there will eventually be a major economic dislocation in America / the Rest of the World. One would expect this merely from Stein's Law (When something can't go on forever, it will stop). I believe that Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt. Whether it's a default, or massive inflation, something bad seems likely to me. And it might not even happen all it once.

    But, as you imply, making predicitions about when it happens is probably a fools game.

    , @Dave Pinsen

    By the way, here’s some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article “The Spectre of Weimar”
     
    A problem political people have with investing is that they confuse what is likely to happen with what they would like to happen.
    , @YetAnotherAnon
    All that printed cash/cheap borrowing has inflated house and share prices, wrecking the life chances of many young people and their prospects of raising a family. But headline inflation's not roared ahead because

    a) the US (and UK) import deflation in the form of cheap Far Eastern manufactures, and fuel prices have remained stable thanks to great US engineering (fracking/tight oil/gas).

    b) mass immigration has forced real wages down. In the US lower male median than in 1973, in the UK lower than in 1997, I've not looked back before then.

    Reduced wages = inflation for Joe Public just as much as rising prices.
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  15. @Anon
    Around Amy Wax, never relax.

    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore’s memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It’s just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot

    If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.
     
    Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests. In 2015 on the SAT, 474 men and 346 women got scores of 2400 or 2390, despite the fact 13% more women than men took the test that year.

    The IQ gender gap I agree is fairly small overall, but does become quite large, even in more verbal IQ type tests, on the far right tail.
    , @AndrewR
    Friendly reminder: "woman" and "women" are not adjectives.
    , @Autochthon
    Women also go to law school in droves, intentionally and consciously or not, to obtain the Ms. J.D. degree: shtupping and wedding classmates and co-workers then dropping out (altogether or into cheesy make-work jobs as Michelle Obama did).

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they'd have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.

    A lot of this stuff is also just a glorified way to say: white women are more feminine than Negresses, due to predilection, opportunities, or both.
    , @ben tillman

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore’s memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It’s just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering.
     
    Women generally make bad lawyers.
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  16. There’s trolls in an earlier thread using the handles of established commentators by suffixing little punctuation marks. So if anyone sees “Corvinus_” calling for the extermination of all blacks, that’s not legitimate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    "So if anyone sees “Corvinus_” calling for the extermination of all blacks, that’s not legitimate."

    His technique is more the concern troll always asking more questions. Should be easy to tell them apart.
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  17. @res
    Jason Richwine's March 19th NR article mentioned there is brief but good: https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/amy-wax-affirmative-action-debate/
    To Vox's credit (I am trying hard to be charitable), they did directly link to that NR article.

    SJWs up to their usual tricks:

    After an uproar, National Review fired Derbyshire, with editor Rich Lowry writing, “Derb has long danced around the line on these issues, but this column is so outlandish it constitutes a kind of letter of resignation. It’s a free country, and Derb can write whatever he wants, wherever he wants. Just not in the pages of NR or NRO, or as someone associated with NR any longer.”

    Six years later, similar views are being espoused by another National Review contributor, who has previously written for a site dedicating to promoting the views of the alt-right and whose views were too extreme for the very conservative Heritage Foundation.

    I’ve reached out to Lowry, National Review’s editor-in-chief, and National Review Online editor Charles C.W. Cooke for comment and will update if I receive a response.
     
    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.

    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.

    You’re exaggerating the difference. NRO doesn’t allow intelligent or conservative commentary.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    NRO adopted a new commenting system a couple weeks ago: you can comment if you subscribe to the magazine. Before that, you commented as your Facebook account. And before that (until about two years ago) they used Disqus.

    As online comments go I think NRO's have always been above average in quality.

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  18. NRO doesn’t allow intelligent or conservative commentary.

    Well, they allow neocon commentary. Oh wait

    Read More
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  19. @Lot
    Richwine wrote a few articles for AlternativeRight before Spencer went off the deep end. Here is one such article by Richwine that's still relevant:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20111019105130/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/the-magazine/model-minority/


    By the way, here's some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article "The Spectre of Weimar":

    I mention this because there are compelling reasons to believe that we are about to experience a horrifying deflation/inflation whiplash. ... I am confident that run-away inflation will occur within the next decade.
     
    http://web.archive.org/web/20110909193935/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/blogs/malinvestments/the-spectre-of-weimar/

    I think it’s likely that there will eventually be a major economic dislocation in America / the Rest of the World. One would expect this merely from Stein’s Law (When something can’t go on forever, it will stop). I believe that Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt. Whether it’s a default, or massive inflation, something bad seems likely to me. And it might not even happen all it once.

    But, as you imply, making predicitions about when it happens is probably a fools game.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dearieme
    "... Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt." No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.
    , @anonymous
    Nobody cares what you think.

    It was Herbert Stein, not "Stein", and he would not want people like you quoting it.

    I like the little "it might not happen all at once" bit, as if you were just a simple humble guy who knows the future fairly well but does not know it all that well. You don't.

    You are a stupid person and you have no idea about what Adam Smith thought about the world.

    God loves stupid people, so there is that.

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  20. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:

    Vox — is that the progressive website founded by the left-wing JournoList guy that published a Turkheimer-Nisbitt piece last May that said “blacks obtain lower IQ sites than whites … That is simply a fact”?

    (Admittedly, they went on too say that the difference is only 10 points, and there was no evidence it was genetic.)

    Read More
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  21. Steve,

    The dogs may bark but the caravan moves on.

    Prof Wax, like the caravan, will progress unimpeded by her petty academic adversaries and the sundry SJWs yelping for her scalp. My judgement is based on the following facts:

    She’s a tough adversary unwilling to cower to the yelps of the SJW crowd. Think of her as Pennsylvania’s version of Linda Gottfredson, Delaware’s scourge of academic PC!

    If things get hot she can count on the FIRE services (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education).

    She has tenure and a designated professorship.

    And she has the financial wherewithal to hold off the baying mob (her husband is a renowned medical specialist, maybe an oncologist).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...
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  22. @Rosie
    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore's memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It's just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests. In 2015 on the SAT, 474 men and 346 women got scores of 2400 or 2390, despite the fact 13% more women than men took the test that year.

    The IQ gender gap I agree is fairly small overall, but does become quite large, even in more verbal IQ type tests, on the far right tail.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosie
    "Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests."

    Hold on a minute. The LSAT is not the same as the SAT. The LSAT does not have any math or spatial or mechanical reasoning portion at all, so you cannot compare the two tests.

    Do you have any data on high outliers in the LSAT specifically?
    , @Chase
    We’ve gone so far afield from reality that we forget that nature has laws that make sense. Men are where nature gambles: since eggs are more valuable biologically than sperm, losing five or six men due to a poor mutation is easily made up for by one positive mutation.

    At one point these things would have enjoyed a widespread consensus, which obviously means it needed to be (((subverted))).
    , @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    Any on-line normal distribution calculator will show you that either spreading/flattening the distribution, or moving the mean a bit to the right, will give you many multiples of the population at extremes (>3 SD's)
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  23. @ben tillman

    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.
     
    You're exaggerating the difference. NRO doesn't allow intelligent or conservative commentary.

    NRO adopted a new commenting system a couple weeks ago: you can comment if you subscribe to the magazine. Before that, you commented as your Facebook account. And before that (until about two years ago) they used Disqus.

    As online comments go I think NRO’s have always been above average in quality.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    The comments went downhill pretty quickly when NRO switched to Facebook comments. I quit reading them all together shortly after that happened, so I don't know what it is like now. I got the impression one of the reasons for the switch was that the comments were so critical of NRO and some of its writers.
    , @ben tillman
    They banned me years ago simply for pointing out that how "racism" is defined determines whether it's wrong. They're morons, and they don't allow any comments of value.
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  24. Read More
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  25. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey
    Amy Wax is toast. Black people are sacred objects of worship in this new religion and heresy is not tolerated.

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    When was the last case when a tenured Ivy League professor was fired? I am not sure if I can recall an instance at all.
    (Hint: Larry Summers was not fired.)

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Wow... some "Kagan-Nuland" triva: Summers was born in New Haven, both parents were UPenn profs, his paternal uncle was Paul Samuelson ($Nobel$) and his maternal uncle was Kenneth Arrow ($Nobel$).
    , @Lurker
    Perhaps (((Wax))) and (((Summers))) might have some other protections as well? No idea what it could be.
    , @Whiskey
    First time for everything. Universities might as well be seminaries for the new religion. Power beats the law every time, and the law is whatever a judge says it is.

    A judge says Wax is fired, she is fired. Heresy is not tolerated.
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  26. Amusing sidenote:When Dear Leader begin discussing Amy Wax, I assumed he was talking about Amy Chua. After all,the IQ stuff IS her bread and butter. I know she married a Jewish dude,so I thought she had adopted his name.
    Come to think of it,Amy Wax should put in a call to the wise Amy Chua and ask her for talking points.
    BTW, I respect Wax for her guts in speaking out,but I daresay she does not look like an Amy.
    Amys are shiksies,and they have long wheat colored hair,and tend to favor halter tops.
    Any way,good luck Amy. Bless you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Amy Wax should put in a call to the wise Amy Chua and ask her for talking points.
    Big mistake. Wax beats Chua any day of the week. She's also delightfully articulate and has no need to ask anyone for their talking points, but those coming from Chua would definitely be several steps down.
    , @John Derbyshire
    I'm currently reading Amy Chua's new book. It's a can't-we-all-get-along cuckfest. Nothing like as good as World on Fire. I don't think even Yellow Fever's going to get me all the way through it.
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  27. Anonymous[326] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    When was the last case when a tenured Ivy League professor was fired? I am not sure if I can recall an instance at all.
    (Hint: Larry Summers was not fired.)

    Wow… some “Kagan-Nuland” triva: Summers was born in New Haven, both parents were UPenn profs, his paternal uncle was Paul Samuelson ($Nobel$) and his maternal uncle was Kenneth Arrow ($Nobel$).

    Read More
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  28. @Lot
    Richwine wrote a few articles for AlternativeRight before Spencer went off the deep end. Here is one such article by Richwine that's still relevant:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20111019105130/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/the-magazine/model-minority/


    By the way, here's some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article "The Spectre of Weimar":

    I mention this because there are compelling reasons to believe that we are about to experience a horrifying deflation/inflation whiplash. ... I am confident that run-away inflation will occur within the next decade.
     
    http://web.archive.org/web/20110909193935/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/blogs/malinvestments/the-spectre-of-weimar/

    By the way, here’s some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article “The Spectre of Weimar”

    A problem political people have with investing is that they confuse what is likely to happen with what they would like to happen.

    Read More
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  29. @Father O'Hara
    Amusing sidenote:When Dear Leader begin discussing Amy Wax, I assumed he was talking about Amy Chua. After all,the IQ stuff IS her bread and butter. I know she married a Jewish dude,so I thought she had adopted his name.
    Come to think of it,Amy Wax should put in a call to the wise Amy Chua and ask her for talking points.
    BTW, I respect Wax for her guts in speaking out,but I daresay she does not look like an Amy.
    Amys are shiksies,and they have long wheat colored hair,and tend to favor halter tops.
    Any way,good luck Amy. Bless you.

    Amy Wax should put in a call to the wise Amy Chua and ask her for talking points.
    Big mistake. Wax beats Chua any day of the week. She’s also delightfully articulate and has no need to ask anyone for their talking points, but those coming from Chua would definitely be several steps down.

    Read More
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  30. @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    The dogs may bark but the caravan moves on.

    Prof Wax, like the caravan, will progress unimpeded by her petty academic adversaries and the sundry SJWs yelping for her scalp. My judgement is based on the following facts:

    She's a tough adversary unwilling to cower to the yelps of the SJW crowd. Think of her as Pennsylvania's version of Linda Gottfredson, Delaware's scourge of academic PC!

    If things get hot she can count on the FIRE services (Foundation for Individual Rights in Education).

    She has tenure and a designated professorship.

    And she has the financial wherewithal to hold off the baying mob (her husband is a renowned medical specialist, maybe an oncologist).

    So far her punishment is that she doesn’t have to teach an intro course …

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @JosephB
    For some faculty that is a punishment. For intro courses, you get a chance to interact with students when they're very enthusiastic, and can do a bit of talent scouting -- and know other faculty with similar views. I've even turned down grad courses in my area to teach an intro course. So it might be more of a reprimand than you think.
    , @JimBonobo
    Punishing a professor by telling her she's not allowed to teach an intro course anymore is like punishing a doctor by telling him he's no longer allowed to do rectal exams.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    So far her punishment is that she doesn’t have to teach an intro course …
     
    Would it be racist to say this denouement is remindful of Br'er Rabbit being thrown into the briar patch?
    , @Anonymous
    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I've heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they've already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.
    , @Lot
    Not "an intro course" but a possible permanent ban on teaching any of the required first year courses, which are typically contracts, civil procedure, torts, criminal law, and property.

    This is the standard punishment of tenured law professors for serious misconduct that does not reach the firing level.

    Some professors might like that and prefer to teach only electives like Securities Regulation, but most law teachers like teaching the same first year subject year after year and becoming really good at it, and also knowing the material so well little class prep is needed.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    Required courses means class guaranteed to have enough students to run. Elective courses may not, unless they're seminars with a lower class min/cap.
    , @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    It could be the first step to forcing her out completely. The way I see it, if someone really objects to being assigned to her Civ Pro section, that person can transfer to a different section. But if she teaches something like bankruptcy or administrative law or remedies, a student could claim that there are no other teachers available to teach the same subject, and therefore she should be removed from teaching that class completely. And as other commentators have pointed out, less students may sign up for her bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class simply because they heard "racist" things about her (a complaint that the law school has now legitimized) or because they were not exposed to her as a 1L.
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  31. @Mr. Anon
    I think it's likely that there will eventually be a major economic dislocation in America / the Rest of the World. One would expect this merely from Stein's Law (When something can't go on forever, it will stop). I believe that Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt. Whether it's a default, or massive inflation, something bad seems likely to me. And it might not even happen all it once.

    But, as you imply, making predicitions about when it happens is probably a fools game.

    “… Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt.” No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    Andrew Jackson paid off the US federal debt in 1835.
    , @Taco
    Make that twice. The United States was briefly debt-free during the Andrew Jackson administration.
    , @Jack D
    There is no reason for any government to ever pay off its debt entirely, any more than any corporation or homeowner needs to be completely debt free. All that is necessary is for the annual debt service costs to be less than available income. The problem that we have now is that even that is not true, especially when you add in pension costs, which are another form of debt. Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won't be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions). Now Trump (maybe rightly, but still) is pissing off the Chinese and if they stop buying Federal obligations that's yet another problem.

    According to Keynesian theory, the government is supposed to borrow a lot of money when the economy is weak and then pay it back when the economy is strong, but in modern America the government borrows a lot of money when the economy is weak and then even more when it is strong. Dems love love love government spending and Repubs love love love tax cuts and they have "compromised" by having both.
    , @Pericles
    In Sweden's case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn't get too scarce or it's not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult. So that might be a reason not to get entirely out of national debt.

    For another example, I believe Norway with its stonking great big huge oil fund still keeps a national debt.
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  32. Is it because they have been admitted using ‘affirmative action’ that they have proved to be inferior law students?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Is it because they have been admitted using ‘affirmative action’ that they have proved to be inferior law students?
     
    No. The standards for other applicants are much higher for no particular reason.
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  33. @Lot

    If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.
     
    Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests. In 2015 on the SAT, 474 men and 346 women got scores of 2400 or 2390, despite the fact 13% more women than men took the test that year.

    The IQ gender gap I agree is fairly small overall, but does become quite large, even in more verbal IQ type tests, on the far right tail.

    “Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests.”

    Hold on a minute. The LSAT is not the same as the SAT. The LSAT does not have any math or spatial or mechanical reasoning portion at all, so you cannot compare the two tests.

    Do you have any data on high outliers in the LSAT specifically?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    It is even more lopsided than the SAT.
    , @bartok
    The LSAT is more difficult than the SAT. Further, the College Board in the 1990s chopped off the extreme end of the distribution (that's why Harvard's 75% for SAT is a perfect 1600).

    The LSAT logic section works out the spatial brain lobe like a medicine ball. ~173-180 on the LSAT is the equivalent to 1600 SAT.

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  34. @Anonymous
    When was the last case when a tenured Ivy League professor was fired? I am not sure if I can recall an instance at all.
    (Hint: Larry Summers was not fired.)

    Perhaps (((Wax))) and (((Summers))) might have some other protections as well? No idea what it could be.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.

    Do you see how your starting assumptions have led you to be starkly, undeniably wrong about how the world works?

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  35. @Lot
    Richwine wrote a few articles for AlternativeRight before Spencer went off the deep end. Here is one such article by Richwine that's still relevant:

    http://web.archive.org/web/20111019105130/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/the-magazine/model-minority/


    By the way, here's some 2010 financial advice from Spencer in his article "The Spectre of Weimar":

    I mention this because there are compelling reasons to believe that we are about to experience a horrifying deflation/inflation whiplash. ... I am confident that run-away inflation will occur within the next decade.
     
    http://web.archive.org/web/20110909193935/http://www.alternativeright.com/main/blogs/malinvestments/the-spectre-of-weimar/

    All that printed cash/cheap borrowing has inflated house and share prices, wrecking the life chances of many young people and their prospects of raising a family. But headline inflation’s not roared ahead because

    a) the US (and UK) import deflation in the form of cheap Far Eastern manufactures, and fuel prices have remained stable thanks to great US engineering (fracking/tight oil/gas).

    b) mass immigration has forced real wages down. In the US lower male median than in 1973, in the UK lower than in 1997, I’ve not looked back before then.

    Reduced wages = inflation for Joe Public just as much as rising prices.

    Read More
    • Agree: ben tillman, NickG
    • Replies: @Lot
    I think that is basically right if a bit simplified.

    But Spencer said inflation will go out of control, not that asset prices would return 6-15% annualized over a decade. That's a significant difference if you are an investor.

    In general much of the right was absolutely and disastrously wrong in economic predictions in the 2008-2011 period. That era actually represented a once in a generation opportunity to buy stocks, corporate debt, and real estate at extremely low prices.

    You never heard the non mainstream right advise people to aggressively buy assets then. Instead it was sell everything except buy gold, and sometimes guns and ammo.

    I am thankful I ignored them and purchased a house in 2009, and as a result my mortgage is about half of what it costs to rent in my area and locked in for 30 years, and if I ever sell I will have at least a half a million profit, and more than doubled the money I put into the market in my retirement accounts those years.

    But the whole ZeroHedge centered anti-establishment investment advice people seem to have no shame at so confidently being so very wrong year after year and causing many good conservative people to miss out on their generation's big bull market in favor of Krugerrands that have lost a quarter of their value.
    , @ben tillman
    Yes, excellent analysis. You have a real handle on economics.
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  36. @J.Ross
    There's trolls in an earlier thread using the handles of established commentators by suffixing little punctuation marks. So if anyone sees "Corvinus_" calling for the extermination of all blacks, that's not legitimate.

    “So if anyone sees “Corvinus_” calling for the extermination of all blacks, that’s not legitimate.”

    His technique is more the concern troll always asking more questions. Should be easy to tell them apart.

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  37. @Anon

    The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.
     
    Do you ever get the sense that the good folks at places like Vox don't even bother to understand (much less fairly characterize) the ideas they're arguing against?

    They “do” seem to use “scare quotes” quite a lot.

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  38. Soviet Union might have survived if they had Vox instead of Pravda.

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  39. @Whiskey
    Amy Wax is toast. Black people are sacred objects of worship in this new religion and heresy is not tolerated.

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    “Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.”

    Most likely, but all of this is very strange. Wax is clearly a very smart woman and has marinated long enough in the Ivy League juices of racial-PC orthodoxy to know that openly promulgating what all the institutional overseers privately acknowledge is tantamount to professional hari-kari. What gives with her? Just cannot stomach the mandatory lies and coerced stupidity any longer?

    As an aside: the resemblance of the antics on American university campuses gets closer every day to the work of Mao’s Red Guard during the Cultural Revolution. Where is our Deng Xiaoping when we need him?

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  40. WSJ reports today that in Brazil, the Nation of the Future, women seeking sperm donations prefer donors from the United States, and prefer white donors at a rate of 477 to 1 over black donors. Blue, green or hazel eyes are preferred around 75% of the time.

    Tiny Duck, aren’t Brazilians the People of Color of the Future? If so, why don’t they “crave” Sperm Donors of Color? Perhaps because they haven’t had the opportunity to take your class? Or maybe no one has translated Leonard Pitts into Portuguese…

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-mixed-race-brazil-sperm-imports-from-u-s-whites-are-booming-1521711000

    Read More
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Nailed him.
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  41. @Anon

    The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.
     
    Do you ever get the sense that the good folks at places like Vox don't even bother to understand (much less fairly characterize) the ideas they're arguing against?

    Certainly. They feel down in the very pit of their guts that there is no need to know, because they are correct and those who are not agreeing with them are incorrect. For the convicted Leftist there then is only one issue: which of the incorrect are able to be re-educated, and which must be sent into the Gulag.

    This is a way to help see how erroneous, and self-defeating, it is to ever compare this standard Leftist assumption of knowing it all to anything to do with Christendom’s ‘heresy-hunting.’ Every orthodox Medieval theologian or philosopher who spoke against Nominalism and Nominalists, for example, knew Nominalist arguments backwards and forwards. They warred against Nominalism by exposing it as false to the sum reality of human existence and nefarious to the future of civilization.

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  42. @dearieme
    "... Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt." No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.

    Andrew Jackson paid off the US federal debt in 1835.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Andrew Jackson paid down the debt when the currency was gold- or silver-backed or backed by land or something real. Today we have a debt-backed or debt-based fiat currency system without anything backing it.

    In debt-based fiat currency systems any reduction in outstanding debt will lead to a contraction in the economy, or something along those lines.

    If we paid down down the US federal government debt we would skip Civil War II and head straight for Civil War III.

    Go for it. Print up the cash, pay off the debt and watch the collapse. Globalization, financialization, multiculturalism and the overseas American Empire would all end.
    , @ben tillman
    Wow! Score one for you!

    I did not know that. Another feather in Jackson's cap.
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  43. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    For some faculty that is a punishment. For intro courses, you get a chance to interact with students when they’re very enthusiastic, and can do a bit of talent scouting — and know other faculty with similar views. I’ve even turned down grad courses in my area to teach an intro course. So it might be more of a reprimand than you think.

    Read More
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  44. @Anon

    The magazine is defending a professor who suggested black law students are inferior.
     
    Do you ever get the sense that the good folks at places like Vox don't even bother to understand (much less fairly characterize) the ideas they're arguing against?

    I disagree. I think Vox writers completely understand their victims’ arguments. Vox writers simply choose to mischaracterize the arguments anyway.

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  45. @Luke Lea
    About that Vox piece, what do you call it when a writer presents arguments he knows are persuasive while pretending they are ridiculous? Subversion? It this were the Soviet Union that guy would be in the Gulag.

    Judaism.

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  46. @Rosie
    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore's memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It's just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    Friendly reminder: “woman” and “women” are not adjectives.

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  47. @Lurker
    Perhaps (((Wax))) and (((Summers))) might have some other protections as well? No idea what it could be.

    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.

    Do you see how your starting assumptions have led you to be starkly, undeniably wrong about how the world works?

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    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.
     
    Nice libel. Why don't you read something before you comment on it?
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  48. @dearieme
    "... Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt." No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.

    Make that twice. The United States was briefly debt-free during the Andrew Jackson administration.

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  49. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    Punishing a professor by telling her she’s not allowed to teach an intro course anymore is like punishing a doctor by telling him he’s no longer allowed to do rectal exams.

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    • LOL: Percy Gryce
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  50. @dearieme
    Is it because they have been admitted using 'affirmative action' that they have proved to be inferior law students?

    Is it because they have been admitted using ‘affirmative action’ that they have proved to be inferior law students?

    No. The standards for other applicants are much higher for no particular reason.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    In a strange way, this is true. As the US population has grown, Ivy enrollments have remained static while at the same time you have a whole new cadre of high IQ, test loving Asians plus now you have an equal (or even greater number) female applicants who have doubled the applicant pool (and admit rates are now down to single digits). Close to 100% of the seats were once available for white males and now it's maybe 25% and the number of seats hasn't grown. I'm not sure I could still get into some of the places I have degrees from.
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  51. @Father O'Hara
    Amusing sidenote:When Dear Leader begin discussing Amy Wax, I assumed he was talking about Amy Chua. After all,the IQ stuff IS her bread and butter. I know she married a Jewish dude,so I thought she had adopted his name.
    Come to think of it,Amy Wax should put in a call to the wise Amy Chua and ask her for talking points.
    BTW, I respect Wax for her guts in speaking out,but I daresay she does not look like an Amy.
    Amys are shiksies,and they have long wheat colored hair,and tend to favor halter tops.
    Any way,good luck Amy. Bless you.

    I’m currently reading Amy Chua’s new book. It’s a can’t-we-all-get-along cuckfest. Nothing like as good as World on Fire. I don’t think even Yellow Fever’s going to get me all the way through it.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Derbyshire is such a horndog for hot Asian women that he starting digging a hole to China to get another one. When Mrs. Derbyshire complained about John's efforts to dig a hole to China, he claimed he was converting to Mormonism to marry another one. That is the origin of the famous photo of Derbyshire in the hole with the ladder. He could also have been digging a tank trap or getting down to a septic tank to honey dip it.

    I like the bit about Telford as a bureaucratic managerialist concoction created out of the former denizens of Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Walsall.

    Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Dave Cameron and Theresa May are all ruling class puppets who push nation-wrecking mass immigration and multicultural mayhem. Plenty of Third Worlders were in Britain before Blair really opened the floodgates in 1997, but the Third Worlders are pouring into Britain now and the Tories and Labour both support mass immigration.
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  52. @International Jew
    NRO adopted a new commenting system a couple weeks ago: you can comment if you subscribe to the magazine. Before that, you commented as your Facebook account. And before that (until about two years ago) they used Disqus.

    As online comments go I think NRO's have always been above average in quality.

    The comments went downhill pretty quickly when NRO switched to Facebook comments. I quit reading them all together shortly after that happened, so I don’t know what it is like now. I got the impression one of the reasons for the switch was that the comments were so critical of NRO and some of its writers.

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  53. @Alec Leamas

    Is it because they have been admitted using ‘affirmative action’ that they have proved to be inferior law students?
     
    No. The standards for other applicants are much higher for no particular reason.

    In a strange way, this is true. As the US population has grown, Ivy enrollments have remained static while at the same time you have a whole new cadre of high IQ, test loving Asians plus now you have an equal (or even greater number) female applicants who have doubled the applicant pool (and admit rates are now down to single digits). Close to 100% of the seats were once available for white males and now it’s maybe 25% and the number of seats hasn’t grown. I’m not sure I could still get into some of the places I have degrees from.

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    • Replies: @Robert Hume
    I suspect that means that we will see substantial increase in the proportion of important scientific discoveries and patents attributable to white male non-Ivy League graduates.
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  54. @res
    Jason Richwine's March 19th NR article mentioned there is brief but good: https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/amy-wax-affirmative-action-debate/
    To Vox's credit (I am trying hard to be charitable), they did directly link to that NR article.

    SJWs up to their usual tricks:

    After an uproar, National Review fired Derbyshire, with editor Rich Lowry writing, “Derb has long danced around the line on these issues, but this column is so outlandish it constitutes a kind of letter of resignation. It’s a free country, and Derb can write whatever he wants, wherever he wants. Just not in the pages of NR or NRO, or as someone associated with NR any longer.”

    Six years later, similar views are being espoused by another National Review contributor, who has previously written for a site dedicating to promoting the views of the alt-right and whose views were too extreme for the very conservative Heritage Foundation.

    I’ve reached out to Lowry, National Review’s editor-in-chief, and National Review Online editor Charles C.W. Cooke for comment and will update if I receive a response.
     
    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.

    In the glorious Progressive Future that the Voxers imagine, comments are not allowed because they are filled with Racist Wrongthink.

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  55. @Jack D
    In a strange way, this is true. As the US population has grown, Ivy enrollments have remained static while at the same time you have a whole new cadre of high IQ, test loving Asians plus now you have an equal (or even greater number) female applicants who have doubled the applicant pool (and admit rates are now down to single digits). Close to 100% of the seats were once available for white males and now it's maybe 25% and the number of seats hasn't grown. I'm not sure I could still get into some of the places I have degrees from.

    I suspect that means that we will see substantial increase in the proportion of important scientific discoveries and patents attributable to white male non-Ivy League graduates.

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  56. @dearieme
    "... Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt." No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.

    There is no reason for any government to ever pay off its debt entirely, any more than any corporation or homeowner needs to be completely debt free. All that is necessary is for the annual debt service costs to be less than available income. The problem that we have now is that even that is not true, especially when you add in pension costs, which are another form of debt. Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won’t be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions). Now Trump (maybe rightly, but still) is pissing off the Chinese and if they stop buying Federal obligations that’s yet another problem.

    According to Keynesian theory, the government is supposed to borrow a lot of money when the economy is weak and then pay it back when the economy is strong, but in modern America the government borrows a lot of money when the economy is weak and then even more when it is strong. Dems love love love government spending and Repubs love love love tax cuts and they have “compromised” by having both.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Vice President Mike Pence says the economy is "booming." If Pence is correct, then Powell should tell his market movers to get the federal funds rate to 6 percent, the so-called "normal" rate.

    Yellen hinted that 4 percent is the new normal for the federal funds rate after she was screaming on the streets of Paris that she wanted to "normalize" the interest rates.

    Paul Volcker got the federal funds rate above 20 percent in 1981. I would love to see the federal funds rate at 10 percent. That would be enough to start Civil War II in a month or so.

    Powell might have the onions to Volckerize this economy, we'll see.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won’t be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions).
     
    About three years ago I attended a speech given by an economist from my region's Federal Reserve Bank. After his speech there was a question-and-answer period, and I had a chance to ask a question. My question was twofold: 1) If interest rates rise to historic norms, service on the national debt will rise to a point that revenue to pay for all other Federal expenditures will be lacking; and 2) If interest rates return to historic norms, the Fed's securities portfolio will fall precipitately in value, and when it is marked to market, it will wipe out a good deal if not all of the Fed's capital. What will the Fed then do?

    The man responded with some of the most opaque and convoluted verbiage I can recall hearing. I am reasonably familiar with economics and banking, having been a bank director for twenty years, yet it left me baffled. I think the Fed must operate a school to teach its spokesmen how to string words together without conveying meaning - perhaps it could be called the Alan Greenspan Academy of Persiflage.

    Sometime afterwards I asked my bank's CEO, who was also present at this speech, what he thought. He also thought the answer was creative nonsense, and said his opinion was that "they'll just change the accounting rules" to get around the problem of what rising interest rates will do to the Fed's bond portfolio, and the effect that marking-to-market will have on the Fed's capital.

    My opinion is that the current climate of relatively low interest rates will continue for as long as the Fed can control it. Neither the Treasury nor the Fed can afford to let them rise very much. However, the Fed is not in complete control. Interest rates on Treasuries are set by auction, and the ability to keep them from rising depends on the willingness of investors to continue buying bonds at prices close to par. The Fed can intervene only to a limited degree to support their prices.

    To paraphrase the 1970 movie title - suppose they held a Treasury auction and nobody bid? I remember a few years ago there was a Treasury auction that was sparsely attended because it took place just before Christmas and some of the usual bidders did not bother to show. There was an uptick of about 25 basis points just because of this. Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.
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  57. I always like to see who is lecturing me:

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  58. @res
    Jason Richwine's March 19th NR article mentioned there is brief but good: https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/amy-wax-affirmative-action-debate/
    To Vox's credit (I am trying hard to be charitable), they did directly link to that NR article.

    SJWs up to their usual tricks:

    After an uproar, National Review fired Derbyshire, with editor Rich Lowry writing, “Derb has long danced around the line on these issues, but this column is so outlandish it constitutes a kind of letter of resignation. It’s a free country, and Derb can write whatever he wants, wherever he wants. Just not in the pages of NR or NRO, or as someone associated with NR any longer.”

    Six years later, similar views are being espoused by another National Review contributor, who has previously written for a site dedicating to promoting the views of the alt-right and whose views were too extreme for the very conservative Heritage Foundation.

    I’ve reached out to Lowry, National Review’s editor-in-chief, and National Review Online editor Charles C.W. Cooke for comment and will update if I receive a response.
     
    It is telling that comments are allowed at the NR article but not at the Vox article.

    National Review’s influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left. Writers like Rich Lowry and David French expend all of this energy denouncing anyone to their right on racial issues, piously virtue signalling their moral superiority. Then a writer like Jane Coaston, who they were stupid enough to let write an anti-Trump article for National Review last year, comes backs and yells “racist” at them now like an obnoxious kid on the playground. As long as the big, dumb donors keep writing checks to fund their operation, Lowry and the gang will keep playing their part.

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    • Replies: @sayless
    "National Review's influence with the rank and file"

    I still miss the old National Review. In 1986 it still had some bite and crunch and could be hilarious. (Remember "Dear Rusty...Your pal, Al"?)

    Then all the Catholics got fired or died and it turned into just a warmongering neocon rag.
    , @ben tillman

    National Review’s influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left.
     
    Vox is not "liberal". It is hard left, left of any other "mainstream" publication.
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  59. As it’s written, the article is almost sabotage of the Vox position. It lays out all the great arguments from Richwine, Wax, and Derb via quotation, and mentions Richwine’s purge for his dissertation thesis. One wonders whether the author is actually on our side.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    One wonders whether the author is actually on our side.
     
    By all accounts the author is a SJW Triple Threat - black/female/lesbian.

    It's probably more the case that she just hadn't ever been in the company with people who would entertain the idea that affirmative action admits yield sub-par academic performances, and that employers might factor that in when making hiring decisions. The idea is simply unthinkable to her and has probably never crossed her mind. It's also the case that she seems to be a Millennial whose most potent form of argumentation is "wow, just wow." So the reader is expected to have negative emotional reactions to the statements made by the various villains and any explanation of how they could be wrong isn't necessary - it's just implied that they are wrong as a consequence of how they make the author and reader feel.
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  60. And, after a slow start, we’re off to the races: Amy Wax ~ Jason Richwine ~ Richard Spencer ~ Charles Murray ~ John Derbyshire.

    What do you mean? They left out Hitler! They left out Putin!

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  61. @Anonymous
    When was the last case when a tenured Ivy League professor was fired? I am not sure if I can recall an instance at all.
    (Hint: Larry Summers was not fired.)

    First time for everything. Universities might as well be seminaries for the new religion. Power beats the law every time, and the law is whatever a judge says it is.

    A judge says Wax is fired, she is fired. Heresy is not tolerated.

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  62. OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick’s Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy’s Day — to make a “point.” The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/17/detroit-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-detroit-st-paddys-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-make-point-m/435650002/

    I have not time now to unpack all the false and fallacious premises, though there is a bumper crop of low-hanging fruit.

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any “Irish” bars at all?

    Talk about a dogwhistle of white supremacy. And SAINT Patrick’s Day? The whole thing is innately offensive, non-inclusionary and triggering. Not who we are as a People. Etc.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    OTOH, I know a parish where they hold the St Patrick's Mass followed by Ceilidh on March 16. The priests got tired of drunk men getting in line for Communion and puking in the aisle.
    , @Dieter Kief

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any “Irish” bars at all?
     
    Yeah, it lacks a bit of logic - but that's not very un-oirish, isn't it?

    (hehe - full - : - let the circle, be unbroken - - circle - - -)

    , @ben tillman

    OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick’s Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy’s Day — to make a “point.” The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.
     
    It wasn't an Irish bar. It wasn't a bar. It was a vacant space rented by a Jew for a PR stunt.
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  63. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    So far her punishment is that she doesn’t have to teach an intro course …

    Would it be racist to say this denouement is remindful of Br’er Rabbit being thrown into the briar patch?

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  64. And, after a slow start, we’re off to the races: Amy Wax ~ Jason Richwine ~ Richard Spencer ~ Charles Murray ~ John Derbyshire.

    Wot, no Hitler?

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  65. @John Derbyshire
    I'm currently reading Amy Chua's new book. It's a can't-we-all-get-along cuckfest. Nothing like as good as World on Fire. I don't think even Yellow Fever's going to get me all the way through it.

    Derbyshire is such a horndog for hot Asian women that he starting digging a hole to China to get another one. When Mrs. Derbyshire complained about John’s efforts to dig a hole to China, he claimed he was converting to Mormonism to marry another one. That is the origin of the famous photo of Derbyshire in the hole with the ladder. He could also have been digging a tank trap or getting down to a septic tank to honey dip it.

    I like the bit about Telford as a bureaucratic managerialist concoction created out of the former denizens of Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Walsall.

    Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Dave Cameron and Theresa May are all ruling class puppets who push nation-wrecking mass immigration and multicultural mayhem. Plenty of Third Worlders were in Britain before Blair really opened the floodgates in 1997, but the Third Worlders are pouring into Britain now and the Tories and Labour both support mass immigration.

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    • Replies: @Lurker
    Crush the traitors, close the borders, deport the invaders.
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  66. Vox is one of those rare publications where the more you read the less intelligent you become.

    Amy Wax has been a professor for a long time and has noticed that the black students admitted to Penn Law struggle and underachieve compared to their non-black peers.

    This is not surprising as studies have shown that LSAT scores are predictive of performance in law school. Since black students admitted to Penn Law have lower LSAT scores than asian and white students admitted to Penn Law School once can infer that blacks will underperform compared to asian and whites.

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  67. Steve, you probably already know but Wax was back on bloggingheads.tv yesterday with Glenn Loury. Wax defends herself. There are some interesting and uncomfortable moments. Watch it and you end up feeling sorry for Loury given the arguments he is forced to make.

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    • Replies: @Jimi
    Loury often plays Devil's Advocate. He more or less admits that he agrees with Amy Wax.

    I suspect he is a secret Trump voter.
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  68. @Jack D
    There is no reason for any government to ever pay off its debt entirely, any more than any corporation or homeowner needs to be completely debt free. All that is necessary is for the annual debt service costs to be less than available income. The problem that we have now is that even that is not true, especially when you add in pension costs, which are another form of debt. Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won't be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions). Now Trump (maybe rightly, but still) is pissing off the Chinese and if they stop buying Federal obligations that's yet another problem.

    According to Keynesian theory, the government is supposed to borrow a lot of money when the economy is weak and then pay it back when the economy is strong, but in modern America the government borrows a lot of money when the economy is weak and then even more when it is strong. Dems love love love government spending and Repubs love love love tax cuts and they have "compromised" by having both.

    Vice President Mike Pence says the economy is “booming.” If Pence is correct, then Powell should tell his market movers to get the federal funds rate to 6 percent, the so-called “normal” rate.

    Yellen hinted that 4 percent is the new normal for the federal funds rate after she was screaming on the streets of Paris that she wanted to “normalize” the interest rates.

    Paul Volcker got the federal funds rate above 20 percent in 1981. I would love to see the federal funds rate at 10 percent. That would be enough to start Civil War II in a month or so.

    Powell might have the onions to Volckerize this economy, we’ll see.

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  69. Amy Wax ~ Jason Richwine ~ Richard Spencer ~ Charles Murray ~ John Derbyshire ~ Adolf Hitler.

    That’s what the SJW’s believe.

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  70. @Jack D
    There is no reason for any government to ever pay off its debt entirely, any more than any corporation or homeowner needs to be completely debt free. All that is necessary is for the annual debt service costs to be less than available income. The problem that we have now is that even that is not true, especially when you add in pension costs, which are another form of debt. Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won't be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions). Now Trump (maybe rightly, but still) is pissing off the Chinese and if they stop buying Federal obligations that's yet another problem.

    According to Keynesian theory, the government is supposed to borrow a lot of money when the economy is weak and then pay it back when the economy is strong, but in modern America the government borrows a lot of money when the economy is weak and then even more when it is strong. Dems love love love government spending and Repubs love love love tax cuts and they have "compromised" by having both.

    Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won’t be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions).

    About three years ago I attended a speech given by an economist from my region’s Federal Reserve Bank. After his speech there was a question-and-answer period, and I had a chance to ask a question. My question was twofold: 1) If interest rates rise to historic norms, service on the national debt will rise to a point that revenue to pay for all other Federal expenditures will be lacking; and 2) If interest rates return to historic norms, the Fed’s securities portfolio will fall precipitately in value, and when it is marked to market, it will wipe out a good deal if not all of the Fed’s capital. What will the Fed then do?

    The man responded with some of the most opaque and convoluted verbiage I can recall hearing. I am reasonably familiar with economics and banking, having been a bank director for twenty years, yet it left me baffled. I think the Fed must operate a school to teach its spokesmen how to string words together without conveying meaning – perhaps it could be called the Alan Greenspan Academy of Persiflage.

    Sometime afterwards I asked my bank’s CEO, who was also present at this speech, what he thought. He also thought the answer was creative nonsense, and said his opinion was that “they’ll just change the accounting rules” to get around the problem of what rising interest rates will do to the Fed’s bond portfolio, and the effect that marking-to-market will have on the Fed’s capital.

    My opinion is that the current climate of relatively low interest rates will continue for as long as the Fed can control it. Neither the Treasury nor the Fed can afford to let them rise very much. However, the Fed is not in complete control. Interest rates on Treasuries are set by auction, and the ability to keep them from rising depends on the willingness of investors to continue buying bonds at prices close to par. The Fed can intervene only to a limited degree to support their prices.

    To paraphrase the 1970 movie title – suppose they held a Treasury auction and nobody bid? I remember a few years ago there was a Treasury auction that was sparsely attended because it took place just before Christmas and some of the usual bidders did not bother to show. There was an uptick of about 25 basis points just because of this. Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    I've been told this all my life. My father tells me he's been told this all his life. Japan measures its debt in the quadrillions and they're still around. In 2008, we literally printed money and bought our own debt with it and barely hiccuped. There seems to be enough productivity in the economy at this point that the debt really is just nominal and can theoretically be rolled over forever.

    What's next--we can stop paying taxes and just have the UST print up whatever money the government needs? Maybe we can.

    Here is something I've never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit? How about the year before that, or the year before that? And if not enough private buyers show up, does the Fed follow conservative practice, buying the UST's out of actual income?

    , @ben tillman
    Good stuff, Crawfurdmuir.
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  71. Richard Spencer is another one that doesn’t take to heart the lesson of Andrew Jackson and make a big deal about the banks and the monetary system. Spencer sees the future of racial and ethnic conflict as well as anyone, but he doesn’t give a full picture of what the hell is going on.

    The globalizers are using monetary policy to concentrate wealth and power. The globalizers have also used monetary policy to buy off the greedy slobs born before 1965. This is happening in the United States, England, Australia and many other European Christian nations. The Chinese and Japanese have also gone bananas with central banking.

    Spencer should get his head out of the clouds and explain to the young people that greedy geezers are using monetary policy to stifle and hinder AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION. Spencer has yet to distill his political theories down to something more suitable for the comprehension level of the average voter. When Spencer does that, he will become one of the leaders to save European Christendom.

    Capitalism Is Dead

    Central Banker Shysterism Is The Economic System Now

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    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
    It could be that Richard "Hail Trump!" Spencer is controlled opposition. An agent of the Obama-Holder FBI.
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  72. @Meretricious
    not just a problem with law students--all occupations that require cognitive firepower have a dearth of Africans. One of the more amusing thought experiment on social media is asking posters to list their favorite contemporary novelists, eg. Many SJW types will immediately cite Toni Morrison--but if you have a private discussion at a party on the same subject, no high-IQ person--black, white, Asian--will mention Morrison. We live in strange times

    Many SJW types will immediately cite Toni Morrison–but if you have a private discussion at a party on the same subject, no high-IQ person–black, white, Asian–will mention Morrison. We live in strange times

    There’s a tendency on the web to call this virtue-signaling, but I think most have lost track of the reality. It is vanity signaling–signaling to draw attention to a personal affinity and conformity to the zeitgeist. Such signaling certainly does not reflect the virtue of humility. Virtue is character and conduct, best expressed as what you do when no one is looking.

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    • Agree: Meretricious
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  73. Jason Richwine says Charles Murray was a childhood hero? Holy shit, I though Richwine had some brains!

    Charles Murray is a mutton-headed Scottish twat born in 1943. Charles Murray has spent his career as an apologist for the evil WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire. If the plutocrats and their bankers and henchmen needed intellectual wet work or some distraction for their globalizer goals, you could count on Scottish slob Murray to bang it out in book form.

    Charles Murray must be classed in with the baby boomer sweet spot of treasonous rat scoundrels such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, George W Bush, Hillary Clinton and all the rest of the evil baby boomers of that evil era.

    Charles Murray and Newt Gingrich are treasonous rats both born in 1943.

    Jason Richwine should reconsider his former fondness for mutton-headed Murray.

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    • Replies: @Highlander
    Charles Murray and Newt Gingrich are too old to be a "baby boomers" nor do they act like boomer either as they are way too stuffy. The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.
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  74. How vigorous was Murray’s defense of Richwine? Murray went Maginot Line and then belly up.

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  75. @Rosie
    "Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests."

    Hold on a minute. The LSAT is not the same as the SAT. The LSAT does not have any math or spatial or mechanical reasoning portion at all, so you cannot compare the two tests.

    Do you have any data on high outliers in the LSAT specifically?

    It is even more lopsided than the SAT.

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    • Replies: @Rosie
    Link?

    BTW, the SAT isn't all that lopsided. I'd have guessed it would be more so, but then I have a very gender-typical cognitive profile. I couldn't find my way out of a wet paper bag and anything mechanical bores me half to tears.
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  76. Charles Murray’s weak defense of Richwine (sample portion):

    I’m sick of it. I also have no idea how to fix it. But we can light candles. Here is what I undertake to do, and I invite you to join me: Look for opportunities to praise people with whom you disagree but who have made an argument that deserves to be taken seriously. Look for opportunities to criticize allies who have used crimethink tactics against your adversaries. Identify yourself not just with those who agree with you, but with all those who stand for something and play fair.

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2013/05/defense-jason-richwine-charles-murray/

    Charles Murray has stood by and watched his nation be flooded with Third Worlders and his answer has always been the same: MORE MASS IMMIGRATION.

    Charles Murray is a money-grubbing slob who has done the bidding of the evil globalizers who have used mass immigration, trade deal scams and monetary policy to destroy the United States.

    Charles Murray then blames White Core Americans of modest means for moral failures when he knows damn well the evil globalizers were using specific governmental policies to pauperize and immiserate those people.

    Go to hell, Murray!

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    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Charles Murray is a money-grubbing slob who has done the bidding of the evil globalizers who have used mass immigration, trade deal scams and monetary policy to destroy the United States.
     
    That's another way of saying he's a hedonist. Hedonism is pleasure now at the expense of life in the future.
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  77. Anonymous[223] • Disclaimer says:

    I think this type of hall-monitor-grade journolism was really perfected back in the 90s by Slate, which unbelievably enough started out as a high-minded Bill Gates/famous-for-Georgetown publication of wider aspirations than policing con websites (reading pre-2002 Salon is also a surreal trip). It is not a good way to go, editorially speaking. I’m not saying it can’t be profitable but pretty soon everyone in your readership who’s not a harridan drifts away. Some frenemy jabbing with fellow magazines and blogs is a good thing that, like gossip, everybody enjoys even if they won’t admit it. But it’s not persuasive and it hits diminishing returns of entertainment fast. I like the idea that this is all semi-witting bonus promotion of evil secret knowledge and that Vox functions as “objectively Alt Right” in the Marxist interpretation, since no one cares about their official editorial line anyway.

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  78. @Lot

    If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.
     
    Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests. In 2015 on the SAT, 474 men and 346 women got scores of 2400 or 2390, despite the fact 13% more women than men took the test that year.

    The IQ gender gap I agree is fairly small overall, but does become quite large, even in more verbal IQ type tests, on the far right tail.

    We’ve gone so far afield from reality that we forget that nature has laws that make sense. Men are where nature gambles: since eggs are more valuable biologically than sperm, losing five or six men due to a poor mutation is easily made up for by one positive mutation.

    At one point these things would have enjoyed a widespread consensus, which obviously means it needed to be (((subverted))).

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  79. @AndrewR
    "Black law students are inferior" is not the most defensible claim. "Vox writers are inferior" is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.

    “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.

    Agreed.

    Beyond the point and sputter, her argument is essentially this:

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued. Meaning that to suspect a minority job applicant would be less qualified, even with a degree from a leading institution, would not be, in fact, “rational” but would be, as Paul Ryan might say, “the textbook definition of a racist comment.”

    This is just blitheringly stupid from the logical and mathematical point of view. Of course, when you admit any group of people with lower LSAT scores and grades they will … tend to achieve lower law school grades and graduate at lower rates and tend to be cluster toward the botton of their graduation classes. (And be less like what an employer thinks of as a “U Penn quality law grad”.) If you don’t believe this, then you are either asserting that the these law school admissions metrics are uncorrelated with success in law school–in which case they ought to be junked–or you’re just a completely innumerate bozo.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human’s worth. This Jane Coaston might be perfectly capable of say of growing, nursing and nurturing some babies–a supremely important human endeavor. Or, much less importantly, maybe writing some movie reviews. But she has demonstrated that she is utterly incompetent at reporting about or commenting on any topic involving mathematical or statistical concepts. So it is arrogant and unprofessional for her to do so.

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    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    You do know that AndrewR is a DNI troll sent to infiltrate the Alt-R, don't you?
    , @Anonymous

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human’s worth.
     
    This reflects a misunderstanding of IQ, that it's just the ability to do crosswords and Sudoku. IQ is positively correlated with a host of soft and fuzzy outcomes you wouldn't think of as "intelligence," including about half of personality traits, including in the realms of emotional stability, resilience under pressure, and leadership, as well as things you might think of as biological, such as health.

    Since pure personality traits are only testable with transparent, gameable, coachable questionnaires, the non-gameable psychometric of the IQ test becomes even more important.

    As for "black law students are inferior," you say "not defensible, agreed," and then you lay out the evidence defending it in your second to last paragraph. What's with that?

    If you think that a bar exam is a sufficient gatekeeper to keep out inferior lawyers, you are naive. You need mulitple points of filtering, and unfortunately high school grades, high school diplomas, college admissions, college grades, law school admissions, and law school grades have all been seriously compromised in myriad ways, obvious and subtle, at the institutional level and at the interpersonal level. A single test at the end cannot adequately evaluate and filter out all inferior candidates.
    , @ben tillman

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued.
     
    Everything we know about "affirmative action" tells us -- loudly -- that "affirmative action" policies will continue after the unqualified matriculate.
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  80. Drones are the future of warfare. A weakness we have is the inability to cheaply control hostile cities, drones and robots will be a major solution. Israel is now using them to drop tear gas on aggro crowds in Gaza.

    http://www.newsweek.com/israel-use-new-drones-drop-tear-gas-gaza-856293

    I keep hearing here how the coalition of the fringes is going to turn on each other, or at least on their urban white liberal masters. No evidence in the major Cal races, where high profile hispanics are way behind two white former SF mayors in California’s jungle primary for Gov and Sen.

    https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Poll-finds-Newsom-s-lead-strengthens-in-primary-12771873.php

    The only immigrant group that seems good at politics are Indians. There are not tons of them in office, but there seems to be a fair number relative to the small population of Indian Americans who are not either Muslim or have unintelligible accents. Recently in the most Asian US House district in California a tech backed Indian knocked off a long term incumbent Japanese American backed by SJW and unions. Ro Khanna v Mike Honda. Then there is Haley and Jindal.

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  81. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I’ve heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they’ve already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)

    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I’ve heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they’ve already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.
     
    First year courses are elementary legal subjects (Contracts, Property, Criminal Law, Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Torts, etc.).

    The research/writing/teaching interests of law professors are typically more refined and specialized.

    That said, there could be interest in teaching first year students if the professor is more other-directed (i.e., someone who likes the opportunity to be on a large stage and be known). Some first year law professors seem to like the Rock Star persona and to be known by a large slice of the students coming through.

    Getting Wax away from teaching first years is probably calculated to divert her teaching into elective classes where the students will be the ones who know who she is and what she wrote but chose to take her class anyway. That's going to reduce or eliminate the administrative burden of dealing with the worst of the offense-takers and the eventual allegations by black students that she's grading them more harshly to support her theses. Of course you can take issue with this approach as not being commensurate with the idea of how lawyers should be forged in fire but you can't deny that it's a path of least administrative resistance.
    , @scrivener3
    Yes I can see a scientist wanting to blow off teaching so he could do his research and publish and get a prize. But there is nothing new in the law since forever. Most influence is probably in the classroom shaping future leaders.
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  82. @Uilleam Yr Alban
    As it’s written, the article is almost sabotage of the Vox position. It lays out all the great arguments from Richwine, Wax, and Derb via quotation, and mentions Richwine’s purge for his dissertation thesis. One wonders whether the author is actually on our side.

    One wonders whether the author is actually on our side.

    By all accounts the author is a SJW Triple Threat – black/female/lesbian.

    It’s probably more the case that she just hadn’t ever been in the company with people who would entertain the idea that affirmative action admits yield sub-par academic performances, and that employers might factor that in when making hiring decisions. The idea is simply unthinkable to her and has probably never crossed her mind. It’s also the case that she seems to be a Millennial whose most potent form of argumentation is “wow, just wow.” So the reader is expected to have negative emotional reactions to the statements made by the various villains and any explanation of how they could be wrong isn’t necessary – it’s just implied that they are wrong as a consequence of how they make the author and reader feel.

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    • Agree: Antlitz Grollheim
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  83. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    Not “an intro course” but a possible permanent ban on teaching any of the required first year courses, which are typically contracts, civil procedure, torts, criminal law, and property.

    This is the standard punishment of tenured law professors for serious misconduct that does not reach the firing level.

    Some professors might like that and prefer to teach only electives like Securities Regulation, but most law teachers like teaching the same first year subject year after year and becoming really good at it, and also knowing the material so well little class prep is needed.

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    • Replies: @kimchilover
    Completely agree. I can't think of a single distinguished professor from my law school that didn't teach one of the fundamental first year courses. In fact, it's during that crazy stressful first year that you really connect with a couple of professors and look forward to taking them in their more specialized (and far smaller) elective courses during your second and third year. I could see this having a real impact on the number of students who decide to take her elective courses...they just won't know who she is and will opt for someone they're more familiar with.
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  84. @Charles Pewitt
    Derbyshire is such a horndog for hot Asian women that he starting digging a hole to China to get another one. When Mrs. Derbyshire complained about John's efforts to dig a hole to China, he claimed he was converting to Mormonism to marry another one. That is the origin of the famous photo of Derbyshire in the hole with the ladder. He could also have been digging a tank trap or getting down to a septic tank to honey dip it.

    I like the bit about Telford as a bureaucratic managerialist concoction created out of the former denizens of Birmingham, Wolverhampton and Walsall.

    Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, Dave Cameron and Theresa May are all ruling class puppets who push nation-wrecking mass immigration and multicultural mayhem. Plenty of Third Worlders were in Britain before Blair really opened the floodgates in 1997, but the Third Worlders are pouring into Britain now and the Tories and Labour both support mass immigration.

    Crush the traitors, close the borders, deport the invaders.

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  85. OT:

    The last line of this abstract immediately reminded me of a favourite Steve Sailer line:

    https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-psych-010416-044030?journalCode=psych

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  86. @Flip
    Andrew Jackson paid off the US federal debt in 1835.

    Andrew Jackson paid down the debt when the currency was gold- or silver-backed or backed by land or something real. Today we have a debt-backed or debt-based fiat currency system without anything backing it.

    In debt-based fiat currency systems any reduction in outstanding debt will lead to a contraction in the economy, or something along those lines.

    If we paid down down the US federal government debt we would skip Civil War II and head straight for Civil War III.

    Go for it. Print up the cash, pay off the debt and watch the collapse. Globalization, financialization, multiculturalism and the overseas American Empire would all end.

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  87. Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross

    Creator Dan Margulis
     
    Every. Single. Time.
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  88. @Malcolm X-Lax
    Steve, you probably already know but Wax was back on bloggingheads.tv yesterday with Glenn Loury. Wax defends herself. There are some interesting and uncomfortable moments. Watch it and you end up feeling sorry for Loury given the arguments he is forced to make.

    Loury often plays Devil’s Advocate. He more or less admits that he agrees with Amy Wax.

    I suspect he is a secret Trump voter.

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    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    I have a vague recollection that Loury stepped down from his position at the Heritage Foundation in protest of that organization's affiliation with D'Souza, after D'Souza's book The End of Racism came out back in '96. But I do like Loury and can feel his pain. His conversations with McWhorter at bloggingheads are usually pretty interesting. They're both about as honest as two mainstream black intellectuals can be in 2018 America, though some facts are too hard to face.
    , @David
    Maybe you're being too kind. Loury clearly expects Wax to care that she "hurt a lot of people" when he asks if she wants to apologize to them. She calls it an error of category for a fact to hurt someone's feelings.

    He says once admitted, blacks are now part of the club and should be regarded as equals. She says in the last year not one black scored over 1070 (or something like that) on the LSAT whereas hundreds and hundreds of both whites and Asians had. She goes on to say that the LSAT is predictive of grades, and grades are predictive of professional success.

    Loury has the wits not to challenge forcefully a sound argument, but he seems repeatedly to invite her to unsay what she said, basically because it hurts his feelings. "I'm an ivy league professor, can I stop looking over my shoulder?" he asks at one point.

    To his credit Loury said that Ruger behaved reprehensibly.
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  89. @YetAnotherAnon
    All that printed cash/cheap borrowing has inflated house and share prices, wrecking the life chances of many young people and their prospects of raising a family. But headline inflation's not roared ahead because

    a) the US (and UK) import deflation in the form of cheap Far Eastern manufactures, and fuel prices have remained stable thanks to great US engineering (fracking/tight oil/gas).

    b) mass immigration has forced real wages down. In the US lower male median than in 1973, in the UK lower than in 1997, I've not looked back before then.

    Reduced wages = inflation for Joe Public just as much as rising prices.

    I think that is basically right if a bit simplified.

    But Spencer said inflation will go out of control, not that asset prices would return 6-15% annualized over a decade. That’s a significant difference if you are an investor.

    In general much of the right was absolutely and disastrously wrong in economic predictions in the 2008-2011 period. That era actually represented a once in a generation opportunity to buy stocks, corporate debt, and real estate at extremely low prices.

    You never heard the non mainstream right advise people to aggressively buy assets then. Instead it was sell everything except buy gold, and sometimes guns and ammo.

    I am thankful I ignored them and purchased a house in 2009, and as a result my mortgage is about half of what it costs to rent in my area and locked in for 30 years, and if I ever sell I will have at least a half a million profit, and more than doubled the money I put into the market in my retirement accounts those years.

    But the whole ZeroHedge centered anti-establishment investment advice people seem to have no shame at so confidently being so very wrong year after year and causing many good conservative people to miss out on their generation’s big bull market in favor of Krugerrands that have lost a quarter of their value.

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    • Replies: @JSM
    Well bully for you.
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  90. @Crawfurdmuir

    Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won’t be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions).
     
    About three years ago I attended a speech given by an economist from my region's Federal Reserve Bank. After his speech there was a question-and-answer period, and I had a chance to ask a question. My question was twofold: 1) If interest rates rise to historic norms, service on the national debt will rise to a point that revenue to pay for all other Federal expenditures will be lacking; and 2) If interest rates return to historic norms, the Fed's securities portfolio will fall precipitately in value, and when it is marked to market, it will wipe out a good deal if not all of the Fed's capital. What will the Fed then do?

    The man responded with some of the most opaque and convoluted verbiage I can recall hearing. I am reasonably familiar with economics and banking, having been a bank director for twenty years, yet it left me baffled. I think the Fed must operate a school to teach its spokesmen how to string words together without conveying meaning - perhaps it could be called the Alan Greenspan Academy of Persiflage.

    Sometime afterwards I asked my bank's CEO, who was also present at this speech, what he thought. He also thought the answer was creative nonsense, and said his opinion was that "they'll just change the accounting rules" to get around the problem of what rising interest rates will do to the Fed's bond portfolio, and the effect that marking-to-market will have on the Fed's capital.

    My opinion is that the current climate of relatively low interest rates will continue for as long as the Fed can control it. Neither the Treasury nor the Fed can afford to let them rise very much. However, the Fed is not in complete control. Interest rates on Treasuries are set by auction, and the ability to keep them from rising depends on the willingness of investors to continue buying bonds at prices close to par. The Fed can intervene only to a limited degree to support their prices.

    To paraphrase the 1970 movie title - suppose they held a Treasury auction and nobody bid? I remember a few years ago there was a Treasury auction that was sparsely attended because it took place just before Christmas and some of the usual bidders did not bother to show. There was an uptick of about 25 basis points just because of this. Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    I’ve been told this all my life. My father tells me he’s been told this all his life. Japan measures its debt in the quadrillions and they’re still around. In 2008, we literally printed money and bought our own debt with it and barely hiccuped. There seems to be enough productivity in the economy at this point that the debt really is just nominal and can theoretically be rolled over forever.

    What’s next–we can stop paying taxes and just have the UST print up whatever money the government needs? Maybe we can.

    Here is something I’ve never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit? How about the year before that, or the year before that? And if not enough private buyers show up, does the Fed follow conservative practice, buying the UST’s out of actual income?

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Yes, I've wondered why the Feds need to collect taxes when they can just summon all they need out of thin air.

    Can you imagine all the insane wealth we'd have if the Feds took no taxes and let us keep everything? Then they could just print up what they want to spend and send it out. Would this work, I wonder.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    Here is something I’ve never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit?
     
    Yes, it will, up to whatever the amount of the debt ceiling is. The U.S. Treasury publishes monthly figures showing the total amount of Treasury securities outstanding. As of February 28, approx. $20.855 trillion was outstanding.

    See:

    https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/mspd/2018/opds022018.pdf
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  91. See Figure 11 here for a graph of LSAT scores by gender:

    https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-14-02.pdf

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    • Replies: @Rosie
    Bottom of page 2:

    " Among the Caucasian subgroup, there were more male test takers than female test takers, whereas there were more female test takers than male test takers for the African American and Asian/Pacific Islander subgroups."

    We need a White male-female comparison.
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  92. @dearieme
    "... Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt." No doubt he was right but he had only five thousand years of history to go on.

    In the 19th century the British government managed to clear its huge debts from the Napoleonic Wars. So perhaps it will happen again, once, in the next five thousand years.

    In Sweden’s case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn’t get too scarce or it’s not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult. So that might be a reason not to get entirely out of national debt.

    For another example, I believe Norway with its stonking great big huge oil fund still keeps a national debt.

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    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir

    In Sweden’s case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn’t get too scarce or it’s not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult.
     
    What's not explained here is that banks need to have bond portfolios for liquidity. Deposits have to be invested in something in order to provide banks with a sufficient net interest margin to be profitable.

    The majority of a bank's assets are loans; however, loans generally can't be called early and while some can be sold (e.g., first mortgages that are "conforming" can be sold to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac on the secondary market), others can't.

    Banks therefore buy bonds because in the event of depositor demand, they can readily be sold. A bank balance sheet might, for example, show assets 75% of which were loans, 15% of which were investment securities, and the remaining 10% of which represented cash on hand and due from banks, banking house and furniture, and everything else. Banks want to hold sovereign bonds because it is usually highly liquid and poses less risk than corporate bonds.

    Part of the initial panic in 2008 came about because many banks held significant amounts of "agencies" - bonds issued by the FHA, Ginnie Mae, and other actual government agencies, but also by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie and Freddie. It became apparent that many of the latter securities were backed by dubious mortgages, and suddenly they were not the liquid investments that the bond rating companies had promised. Liquidity was restored only by government bailouts and the Fed's acting as a buyer of last resort. It was an expensive lesson in the folly of privatizing profit while socializing risk.

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  93. @Charles Pewitt
    Richard Spencer is another one that doesn't take to heart the lesson of Andrew Jackson and make a big deal about the banks and the monetary system. Spencer sees the future of racial and ethnic conflict as well as anyone, but he doesn't give a full picture of what the hell is going on.

    The globalizers are using monetary policy to concentrate wealth and power. The globalizers have also used monetary policy to buy off the greedy slobs born before 1965. This is happening in the United States, England, Australia and many other European Christian nations. The Chinese and Japanese have also gone bananas with central banking.

    Spencer should get his head out of the clouds and explain to the young people that greedy geezers are using monetary policy to stifle and hinder AFFORDABLE FAMILY FORMATION. Spencer has yet to distill his political theories down to something more suitable for the comprehension level of the average voter. When Spencer does that, he will become one of the leaders to save European Christendom.

    Capitalism Is Dead

    Central Banker Shysterism Is The Economic System Now

    It could be that Richard “Hail Trump!” Spencer is controlled opposition. An agent of the Obama-Holder FBI.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Nah. I've spent dozens of hours listening to his podcasts, watching his videos and reading his writing. He is not controlled opposition but he is incompetent.
    , @Lagertha
    I've actually heard that rumor for more than a year. I think, what gives it away a bit, is the silly "uniform" of khakis and white polo shirts these guys wear, en masse - its just too stupid and ridiculous to pick that outfit.

    Everyone knows by now, that the Preppie look was actually, a look in the 50's-70's, before actual prepsters stopped wanting/needing to wear a uniform in prep school. Of course, simultaneously, Ralph Lauren introduced his polo shirts in sherbet colors/neon colors, etc., that everyone still wears today, with relish. I sometimes just wince when I see some man wear like a fuchsia colored Polo shirt - it's just wrong in so many ways.

    And, the funniest thing, while on a roll about fashion: city Magnet and Charter schools, all make their kids (girls can wear pleated, kilt-like waspy skirts as well) wear...khakis and polo shirts (with the schools logo) - it's compulsory. But, Spencer, suddenly having his entourage all wear the same uniform, chanting with their tiki torches, was just too suspicious (and lame) to me. But, I am cynical.

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  94. The Russian hackers story is blowing up in Zuckerberg’s face.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    This is so hilarious! After 33 long years, and no mention of TBI, perhaps her dear husband just likes F*cking Facebook literally, while he is in numerous cyber relationships with Alt-Right vixens!
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  95. @Malcolm X-Lax
    OT: Pushing the ol' No Irish or Dogs Need Apply or (((How the Irish Became White))) thing in Detroit.

    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/17/detroit-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-detroit-st-paddys-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-make-point-m/435650002/

    Creator Dan Margulis

    Every. Single. Time.

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  96. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    I've been told this all my life. My father tells me he's been told this all his life. Japan measures its debt in the quadrillions and they're still around. In 2008, we literally printed money and bought our own debt with it and barely hiccuped. There seems to be enough productivity in the economy at this point that the debt really is just nominal and can theoretically be rolled over forever.

    What's next--we can stop paying taxes and just have the UST print up whatever money the government needs? Maybe we can.

    Here is something I've never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit? How about the year before that, or the year before that? And if not enough private buyers show up, does the Fed follow conservative practice, buying the UST's out of actual income?

    Yes, I’ve wondered why the Feds need to collect taxes when they can just summon all they need out of thin air.

    Can you imagine all the insane wealth we’d have if the Feds took no taxes and let us keep everything? Then they could just print up what they want to spend and send it out. Would this work, I wonder.

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    • Replies: @RudyM
    According to proponents of modern monetary theory (MMT), taxes drive money. Being legally required to pay government-minted money back to the government, periodically, forces individuals to use that money.

    Theoretically, maybe we could all just agree to recognize government fiat currency and not be taxed, but that's not the way it's ever worked in the past.

    Incidentally, while proponents of MMT tend to be left/progressive, many of them are strongly in favor of significant tax cuts for most of the population. I think Warren Mosler has been particularly vocal about this.

    One of the classic texts arguing for the state theory of money was written by a German anti-capitalist (or at least capitalism-critical) conservative, Georg Knapp. The idea is not inherently leftist.

    I find MMT pretty persuasive, but haven't looked closely at other monetary theories to adequately argue the case.

    I would love to see more debates (videotaped or otherwise) between proponents of MMT and other monetary theories. Maybe Unz.com could sponsor that, *nudge nudge*.
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  97. OFF TOPIC

    Mark Zuckerberg Loves Black Church People, And He Loves You Too:

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    • LOL: AndrewR
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  98. @Whiskey
    Amy Wax is toast. Black people are sacred objects of worship in this new religion and heresy is not tolerated.

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    They can’t fire her unless she staggers into class drunk and tries to rape a student in front if witnesses, but they already took her off a required course. If her elective courses don’t get enough students to run, she won’t have enough sections to be fully employed. When they do give her sections, they will be at odd hours and days, like a 7:30AM followed by a night class, so either she has to drive back and forth or sit in her office all day. Or they’ll give her back-to-back 2-hour classes with no lunch break. In different buildings, halfway across campus, so she won’t even have time to hit the bathroom, let alone hold office hours between two classes.

    And of course, they’ll give her The Freeze at faculty meetings.

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    • Replies: @Meretricious
    if that were to happen Wax would sue--and win. The reality is that Penn faculty and administrators know that Negroes are mediocre. All this anti-Wax BS is just virtue signaling. Negroes are slowly losing their power over whites, which is why Trump was elected
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  99. @Anonymous
    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I've heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they've already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.

    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I’ve heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they’ve already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.

    First year courses are elementary legal subjects (Contracts, Property, Criminal Law, Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Torts, etc.).

    The research/writing/teaching interests of law professors are typically more refined and specialized.

    That said, there could be interest in teaching first year students if the professor is more other-directed (i.e., someone who likes the opportunity to be on a large stage and be known). Some first year law professors seem to like the Rock Star persona and to be known by a large slice of the students coming through.

    Getting Wax away from teaching first years is probably calculated to divert her teaching into elective classes where the students will be the ones who know who she is and what she wrote but chose to take her class anyway. That’s going to reduce or eliminate the administrative burden of dealing with the worst of the offense-takers and the eventual allegations by black students that she’s grading them more harshly to support her theses. Of course you can take issue with this approach as not being commensurate with the idea of how lawyers should be forged in fire but you can’t deny that it’s a path of least administrative resistance.

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  100. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    Required courses means class guaranteed to have enough students to run. Elective courses may not, unless they’re seminars with a lower class min/cap.

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  101. @Rosamond Vincy
    They can't fire her unless she staggers into class drunk and tries to rape a student in front if witnesses, but they already took her off a required course. If her elective courses don't get enough students to run, she won't have enough sections to be fully employed. When they do give her sections, they will be at odd hours and days, like a 7:30AM followed by a night class, so either she has to drive back and forth or sit in her office all day. Or they'll give her back-to-back 2-hour classes with no lunch break. In different buildings, halfway across campus, so she won't even have time to hit the bathroom, let alone hold office hours between two classes.

    And of course, they'll give her The Freeze at faculty meetings.

    if that were to happen Wax would sue–and win. The reality is that Penn faculty and administrators know that Negroes are mediocre. All this anti-Wax BS is just virtue signaling. Negroes are slowly losing their power over whites, which is why Trump was elected

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    She could sue, but she might not win, as long as they don't actually fire her. They're just trying to make her so miserable, she'll leave of her own accord. I've seen this done in more than one department. Not the least insult they'll try is: if the professor created a course or a program, particularly if that course or program hearkens back to classic, timeless research in that field, they will try to dismantle it and replace it with something touchy-feely. They have even done this with science subjects, which you might think would be immune to such meddling.

    This not only insults the professor's achievements, but also, most dishearteningly, cheats the students out of real, competitive knowledge in that field. Watching a department and a subject debased in such a fashion has driven more than one person to retirement, after an initial period of battling the barbarians.

    There are no bullies like academic bullies.
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  102. @Pentheus
    OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick's Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy's Day -- to make a "point." The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.


    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/17/detroit-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-detroit-st-paddys-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-make-point-m/435650002/

    I have not time now to unpack all the false and fallacious premises, though there is a bumper crop of low-hanging fruit.

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any "Irish" bars at all?

    Talk about a dogwhistle of white supremacy. And SAINT Patrick's Day? The whole thing is innately offensive, non-inclusionary and triggering. Not who we are as a People. Etc.

    OTOH, I know a parish where they hold the St Patrick’s Mass followed by Ceilidh on March 16. The priests got tired of drunk men getting in line for Communion and puking in the aisle.

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    • Replies: @OBEE
    I am interested in this parish where the caeli precedes the Mass. Where exactly can these revelries be found?
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  103. @Lot
    It is even more lopsided than the SAT.

    Link?

    BTW, the SAT isn’t all that lopsided. I’d have guessed it would be more so, but then I have a very gender-typical cognitive profile. I couldn’t find my way out of a wet paper bag and anything mechanical bores me half to tears.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    Sorry, going from my memory. But there is a lot of public information about the LSAT and demographics.

    The gender ratio of people with the top percentile of LSAT scores is about 2:1 male. As an illustration of how even verbal IQ at the extreme end is very male, you can also look at the list of top scoring students at law schools, who typically award a prize at the end of each year to the student with the highest GPA. The winners are about 25 to 1 male even those top law school classes are about 55/45 male/female.
    , @Rosie
    One exception to my gender-typical interests: I love, and am good at, mental math. It's fun to do with kids. I thought this might be typical for girls who might use deductive reasoning along with basic mathematical propositions to think through a problem in their head, like this:

    24 x 16

    (15 x 24) + 24
    15 x 24 = 240 + (1/2 x 240) = 240 + 120 = 360
    360 + 24 = 384

    OR

    (20 x 16) + (4 x 16)
    320 + (4 x 10) + (4 x 6)
    320 + 40 + 24 = 384

    This is the essence of common core math as I understand it, which I would have expected to be more girl-friendly, but at least according to this study it may not be. Table 2 suggests boys' advantage may be largest in mental math computation.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alfredo_Ardila/publication/5243133_Gender_Differences_and_Cognitive_Correlates_of_Mathematical_Skills_in_School-Aged_Children

    Does anybody know if there are any early results on how common core affected the gender gap in math? I like common core math, but I don't know anyone else who does, so I'm guessing it will be abandoned.
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  104. @Calvin X Hobbes
    See Figure 11 here for a graph of LSAT scores by gender:

    https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-14-02.pdf

    Bottom of page 2:

    “ Among the Caucasian subgroup, there were more male test takers than female test takers, whereas there were more female test takers than male test takers for the African American and Asian/Pacific Islander subgroups.”

    We need a White male-female comparison.

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  105. @Jimi
    Loury often plays Devil's Advocate. He more or less admits that he agrees with Amy Wax.

    I suspect he is a secret Trump voter.

    I have a vague recollection that Loury stepped down from his position at the Heritage Foundation in protest of that organization’s affiliation with D’Souza, after D’Souza’s book The End of Racism came out back in ’96. But I do like Loury and can feel his pain. His conversations with McWhorter at bloggingheads are usually pretty interesting. They’re both about as honest as two mainstream black intellectuals can be in 2018 America, though some facts are too hard to face.

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  106. @Anonymous
    Do we know that teaching intro is a bad thing? One thing I've heard about law school is that the third year is typically blown off by students because they've already lined up their jobs. So maybe teachers want to teach the first year students, who have high motivation.

    Yes I can see a scientist wanting to blow off teaching so he could do his research and publish and get a prize. But there is nothing new in the law since forever. Most influence is probably in the classroom shaping future leaders.

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  107. Much of the debate surrounding the dearth of women in STEM was sparked by Benbow and Stanley (1980, 1983) who showed that of 40,000 students, the male–female ratio in the early 1980s on the SAT-M was 2.1 to 1 for scores≥500 (top 0.5%), 4.1 to 1 for scores≥600, and a remarkable 13 to 1 for those scoring≥700 (top 0.01%).

    Again, this is very surprising to me. I would not have guessed that men only outnumber women by 2.1 to 1 in the top 0.5%. Presumably, the ratio would be even lower in the top 1%. However you slice it, that’s a lot of really brainy broads. That said, it is of course tremendously important that the best men not be held back by affirmative action, because they are the ones who are going to drive innovation. Moreover, I still think the most intelligent women should focus on child-bearing. That would still be the case even if there were no gap at all in this area.

    It also seems fair to say that lower-level STEM jobs don’t attract women because they’re not interested, not because they can’t do them. White men need to worry more about Asian women, who seem to be more practical in their educational choices, edging them out of STEM jobs. Feminists (i.e. white women) are going to be the least of their problems, especially given that Asian women outperform White men on SAT math section.

    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.167.7133&rep=rep1&type=pdf

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    • Replies: @Rosie
    2016 SAT math results:

    White men: 550
    Asian women: 590

    http://www.aei.org/publication/2016-sat-test-results-confirm-pattern-thats-persisted-for-45-years-high-school-boys-are-better-at-math-than-girls/
    , @Steve Sailer
    I think girls have closed some of the gap on the high ends of SAT math section since Benbow's study.
    , @res
    Everyone remember that those Benbow and Stanley numbers and percentiles are from the SMPY and based on 13 year olds taking the SAT. Be careful about comparing that information to other SAT data.
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  108. @Pentheus
    OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick's Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy's Day -- to make a "point." The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.


    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/17/detroit-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-detroit-st-paddys-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-make-point-m/435650002/

    I have not time now to unpack all the false and fallacious premises, though there is a bumper crop of low-hanging fruit.

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any "Irish" bars at all?

    Talk about a dogwhistle of white supremacy. And SAINT Patrick's Day? The whole thing is innately offensive, non-inclusionary and triggering. Not who we are as a People. Etc.

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any “Irish” bars at all?

    Yeah, it lacks a bit of logic – but that’s not very un-oirish, isn’t it?

    (hehe – full – : – let the circle, be unbroken – – circle – – -)

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  109. @Rosie

    Much of the debate surrounding the dearth of women in STEM was sparked by Benbow and Stanley (1980, 1983) who showed that of 40,000 students, the male–female ratio in the early 1980s on the SAT-M was 2.1 to 1 for scores≥500 (top 0.5%), 4.1 to 1 for scores≥600, and a remarkable 13 to 1 for those scoring≥700 (top 0.01%).
     
    Again, this is very surprising to me. I would not have guessed that men only outnumber women by 2.1 to 1 in the top 0.5%. Presumably, the ratio would be even lower in the top 1%. However you slice it, that's a lot of really brainy broads. That said, it is of course tremendously important that the best men not be held back by affirmative action, because they are the ones who are going to drive innovation. Moreover, I still think the most intelligent women should focus on child-bearing. That would still be the case even if there were no gap at all in this area.

    It also seems fair to say that lower-level STEM jobs don't attract women because they're not interested, not because they can't do them. White men need to worry more about Asian women, who seem to be more practical in their educational choices, edging them out of STEM jobs. Feminists (i.e. white women) are going to be the least of their problems, especially given that Asian women outperform White men on SAT math section.


    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.167.7133&rep=rep1&type=pdf
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  110. @SunBakedSuburb
    It could be that Richard "Hail Trump!" Spencer is controlled opposition. An agent of the Obama-Holder FBI.

    Nah. I’ve spent dozens of hours listening to his podcasts, watching his videos and reading his writing. He is not controlled opposition but he is incompetent.

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  111. @Whiskey
    Amy Wax is toast. Black people are sacred objects of worship in this new religion and heresy is not tolerated.

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    Whiskey wrote:

    Amy Wax is toast….

    Fired most likely in a few weeks if not sooner.

    No, you don’t understand how the game is played: firing her would surely produce a lawsuit based on tenure and would make her a martyr.

    No, what they will try to do (and have already started) is to make her life so miserable that she herself will want to quit.

    However, she certainly grasps this. She is in her mid-sixties, and Wax is no doubt playing out an end-game.

    It will be interesting to see how she has this planned.

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    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  112. @Barnard
    National Review's influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left. Writers like Rich Lowry and David French expend all of this energy denouncing anyone to their right on racial issues, piously virtue signalling their moral superiority. Then a writer like Jane Coaston, who they were stupid enough to let write an anti-Trump article for National Review last year, comes backs and yells "racist" at them now like an obnoxious kid on the playground. As long as the big, dumb donors keep writing checks to fund their operation, Lowry and the gang will keep playing their part.

    “National Review’s influence with the rank and file”

    I still miss the old National Review. In 1986 it still had some bite and crunch and could be hilarious. (Remember “Dear Rusty…Your pal, Al”?)

    Then all the Catholics got fired or died and it turned into just a warmongering neocon rag.

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  113. Off-topic: Arutz Sheva sympathetically reports on the #120dB movement: https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/243487

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    the #120dB movement

    What's that? A Who concert in 1974?

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  114. @The Anti-Gnostic
    Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    I've been told this all my life. My father tells me he's been told this all his life. Japan measures its debt in the quadrillions and they're still around. In 2008, we literally printed money and bought our own debt with it and barely hiccuped. There seems to be enough productivity in the economy at this point that the debt really is just nominal and can theoretically be rolled over forever.

    What's next--we can stop paying taxes and just have the UST print up whatever money the government needs? Maybe we can.

    Here is something I've never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit? How about the year before that, or the year before that? And if not enough private buyers show up, does the Fed follow conservative practice, buying the UST's out of actual income?

    Here is something I’ve never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit?

    Yes, it will, up to whatever the amount of the debt ceiling is. The U.S. Treasury publishes monthly figures showing the total amount of Treasury securities outstanding. As of February 28, approx. $20.855 trillion was outstanding.

    See:

    https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/mspd/2018/opds022018.pdf

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    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    OK. Next question: are there buyers for all this amount, every auction? Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.
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  115. @Lot
    I think that is basically right if a bit simplified.

    But Spencer said inflation will go out of control, not that asset prices would return 6-15% annualized over a decade. That's a significant difference if you are an investor.

    In general much of the right was absolutely and disastrously wrong in economic predictions in the 2008-2011 period. That era actually represented a once in a generation opportunity to buy stocks, corporate debt, and real estate at extremely low prices.

    You never heard the non mainstream right advise people to aggressively buy assets then. Instead it was sell everything except buy gold, and sometimes guns and ammo.

    I am thankful I ignored them and purchased a house in 2009, and as a result my mortgage is about half of what it costs to rent in my area and locked in for 30 years, and if I ever sell I will have at least a half a million profit, and more than doubled the money I put into the market in my retirement accounts those years.

    But the whole ZeroHedge centered anti-establishment investment advice people seem to have no shame at so confidently being so very wrong year after year and causing many good conservative people to miss out on their generation's big bull market in favor of Krugerrands that have lost a quarter of their value.

    Well bully for you.

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  116. @Pericles
    In Sweden's case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn't get too scarce or it's not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult. So that might be a reason not to get entirely out of national debt.

    For another example, I believe Norway with its stonking great big huge oil fund still keeps a national debt.

    In Sweden’s case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn’t get too scarce or it’s not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult.

    What’s not explained here is that banks need to have bond portfolios for liquidity. Deposits have to be invested in something in order to provide banks with a sufficient net interest margin to be profitable.

    The majority of a bank’s assets are loans; however, loans generally can’t be called early and while some can be sold (e.g., first mortgages that are “conforming” can be sold to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac on the secondary market), others can’t.

    Banks therefore buy bonds because in the event of depositor demand, they can readily be sold. A bank balance sheet might, for example, show assets 75% of which were loans, 15% of which were investment securities, and the remaining 10% of which represented cash on hand and due from banks, banking house and furniture, and everything else. Banks want to hold sovereign bonds because it is usually highly liquid and poses less risk than corporate bonds.

    Part of the initial panic in 2008 came about because many banks held significant amounts of “agencies” – bonds issued by the FHA, Ginnie Mae, and other actual government agencies, but also by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie and Freddie. It became apparent that many of the latter securities were backed by dubious mortgages, and suddenly they were not the liquid investments that the bond rating companies had promised. Liquidity was restored only by government bailouts and the Fed’s acting as a buyer of last resort. It was an expensive lesson in the folly of privatizing profit while socializing risk.

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    Thanks, a fine explanation. The final piece of the puzzle, I suppose, is that the bonds should also (mostly?) be denominated in the local currency so there is no risk of loss due to currencies diverging when deposits are redeemed.
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  117. @Charles Pewitt
    Jason Richwine says Charles Murray was a childhood hero? Holy shit, I though Richwine had some brains!

    Charles Murray is a mutton-headed Scottish twat born in 1943. Charles Murray has spent his career as an apologist for the evil WASP / Jew ruling class of the American Empire. If the plutocrats and their bankers and henchmen needed intellectual wet work or some distraction for their globalizer goals, you could count on Scottish slob Murray to bang it out in book form.

    Charles Murray must be classed in with the baby boomer sweet spot of treasonous rat scoundrels such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, George W Bush, Hillary Clinton and all the rest of the evil baby boomers of that evil era.

    Charles Murray and Newt Gingrich are treasonous rats both born in 1943.

    Jason Richwine should reconsider his former fondness for mutton-headed Murray.

    Charles Murray and Newt Gingrich are too old to be a “baby boomers” nor do they act like boomer either as they are way too stuffy. The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt

    The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.

     

    Wine -- Wine -- Wine

    Wine -- Wine -- Wine

    Hank Williams III(born 1972) sings Wine Spodeeodee.

    Johnny Burnette(born 1934) and Jerry Lee Lewis(born 1935) also sang this song. I don't know who wrote it or where it came from.

    Hank Williams III and The Damn Band, live in Scotland:

    https://youtu.be/ps3EwloVAgM
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  118. @stillCARealist
    Yes, I've wondered why the Feds need to collect taxes when they can just summon all they need out of thin air.

    Can you imagine all the insane wealth we'd have if the Feds took no taxes and let us keep everything? Then they could just print up what they want to spend and send it out. Would this work, I wonder.

    According to proponents of modern monetary theory (MMT), taxes drive money. Being legally required to pay government-minted money back to the government, periodically, forces individuals to use that money.

    Theoretically, maybe we could all just agree to recognize government fiat currency and not be taxed, but that’s not the way it’s ever worked in the past.

    Incidentally, while proponents of MMT tend to be left/progressive, many of them are strongly in favor of significant tax cuts for most of the population. I think Warren Mosler has been particularly vocal about this.

    One of the classic texts arguing for the state theory of money was written by a German anti-capitalist (or at least capitalism-critical) conservative, Georg Knapp. The idea is not inherently leftist.

    I find MMT pretty persuasive, but haven’t looked closely at other monetary theories to adequately argue the case.

    I would love to see more debates (videotaped or otherwise) between proponents of MMT and other monetary theories. Maybe Unz.com could sponsor that, *nudge nudge*.

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  119. @Lot
    Not "an intro course" but a possible permanent ban on teaching any of the required first year courses, which are typically contracts, civil procedure, torts, criminal law, and property.

    This is the standard punishment of tenured law professors for serious misconduct that does not reach the firing level.

    Some professors might like that and prefer to teach only electives like Securities Regulation, but most law teachers like teaching the same first year subject year after year and becoming really good at it, and also knowing the material so well little class prep is needed.

    Completely agree. I can’t think of a single distinguished professor from my law school that didn’t teach one of the fundamental first year courses. In fact, it’s during that crazy stressful first year that you really connect with a couple of professors and look forward to taking them in their more specialized (and far smaller) elective courses during your second and third year. I could see this having a real impact on the number of students who decide to take her elective courses…they just won’t know who she is and will opt for someone they’re more familiar with.

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    • Replies: @JerseyJeffersonian
    Anyone with a lick of sense will check out her (and all other faculty members', too) curriculum vitae. It is posted on Penn Law's website. When they see the stunning background and accomplishments of the woman in her diverse career, I should be amazed if they don't choose to study with her instead of with Larry Leftist the non-entity, a faculty nebbish who is currently hissing at her through his spittle-flecked lips. You want to find a way into the upper reaches of the profession? Why not study with the one who has been there?
    , @Lagertha
    I always chose the professors who were not well-liked...or had controversial opinions.
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  120. @Crawfurdmuir

    Here is something I’ve never gotten a clear answer on: the US runs a budget deficit for FY 2018, $440B. Will the Treasury actually sell $440B in bonds to cover that deficit?
     
    Yes, it will, up to whatever the amount of the debt ceiling is. The U.S. Treasury publishes monthly figures showing the total amount of Treasury securities outstanding. As of February 28, approx. $20.855 trillion was outstanding.

    See:

    https://www.treasurydirect.gov/govt/reports/pd/mspd/2018/opds022018.pdf

    OK. Next question: are there buyers for all this amount, every auction? Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.

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    • Replies: @Flip
    There are always buyers, but the interest rates may have to go up to get them to buy.
    , @Crawfurdmuir

    Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.
     
    Correct.
    , @danand
    Anti-Gnostic, the Fed "buys" as much paper as is necessary to keep the interest rate close to its chosen/stated target (I think set @ ~1.75% currently?). If outside buyers, a combination of institutional & retail, won't buy near that rate, the Fed steps in to buy until demand (those buyers)return, and resume purchases near the targeted rate. The Fed gets an opportunity to sell, from its balance, when there are too many buyers for the treasuries offered at a given auction.

    Of course by Fed buying, I mean just adding it to their balance sheet, not actually acquiring funds from somewhere, other than etherland, to purchase those treasuries. So far this system has worked out fine; the Fed has been able to reduce their balance without too much trouble when everyone from fund managers to foreign governments get "spooked", and decide it's best to shift more of their loot back into US treasuries.
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  121. OT, but check out “Demand for American Sperm is Skyrocketing in Brazil” in today’s WSJ

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  122. OT interesting but rambling piece by Vincent Gallo.

    http://www.anothermanmag.com/life-culture/10236/an-open-letter-from-vincent-gallo-unfiltered-and-unedited

    Today’s liberal mainstreamers have tried hard to eliminate antagonism and instead have cultivated a weird friendliness toward cultural radicalism. Cultural radicalism has then become completely fashionable and it is now part of the status quo.

    A year later, Sean Penn, who was at Cannes in 2003, said to me that if the film’s credits read, “Written and Directed by Chloe Sevigny,” it would have likely won the Palm D’Or. Meaning those judgmental judges would have felt the film was a feminist triumph and Chloe so brave.

    Thankfully, these days Donald Trump has at least created some doubts about everything related to the press. In 2003 I was the Donald Trump of Cannes and anything I said or did was twisted and filtered through the righteous tabloid barbarians posing as journalists and critics.

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  123. @J.Ross
    Racists only ever say one thing, and they say this thing by accidentally betraying their own racism (which is deplorable by the way). Worrying about what fake point the racist was ostensibly making would be like trying to argue with a demon. If their knowledge is something we already know, then we don't need it from them, and if it is racism, then we don't want it, so burn it all.

    You put “anti-racism” above the truth. You suggest that “racism” is wrong even if Amy Wax has knowledge about black academic performance that you don’t have. Race differences are real, and law students are an excellent case in point.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Sarcasm, phil, I was relating the SJW attitudes to the Spanish burning the Aztec codices.
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  124. @The Anti-Gnostic
    OK. Next question: are there buyers for all this amount, every auction? Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.

    There are always buyers, but the interest rates may have to go up to get them to buy.

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  125. @Jimi
    Loury often plays Devil's Advocate. He more or less admits that he agrees with Amy Wax.

    I suspect he is a secret Trump voter.

    Maybe you’re being too kind. Loury clearly expects Wax to care that she “hurt a lot of people” when he asks if she wants to apologize to them. She calls it an error of category for a fact to hurt someone’s feelings.

    He says once admitted, blacks are now part of the club and should be regarded as equals. She says in the last year not one black scored over 1070 (or something like that) on the LSAT whereas hundreds and hundreds of both whites and Asians had. She goes on to say that the LSAT is predictive of grades, and grades are predictive of professional success.

    Loury has the wits not to challenge forcefully a sound argument, but he seems repeatedly to invite her to unsay what she said, basically because it hurts his feelings. “I’m an ivy league professor, can I stop looking over my shoulder?” he asks at one point.

    To his credit Loury said that Ruger behaved reprehensibly.

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  126. A few more from Gallo

    Today, young people in the big cities in New York and California are all part of a similar social ideological consensus and all think alike. They are highly motivated in their ideological reasoning and are intolerant.

    By the way, tolerance is tolerance is tolerance. Period, you a******s. Today’s intolerant, young, liberal California/New Yorkers are only comfortable within their own shared consensus. Friends must think alike and believe the same things now. They must vote the same and defend the same ideology like zombies. Anyone who disagrees can only be evil, stupid, and wrong.

    … Mark Zuckerberg … please lie down and die.

    I like this guy.

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  127. @Rosie
    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore's memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It's just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    Women also go to law school in droves, intentionally and consciously or not, to obtain the Ms. J.D. degree: shtupping and wedding classmates and co-workers then dropping out (altogether or into cheesy make-work jobs as Michelle Obama did).

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.

    A lot of this stuff is also just a glorified way to say: white women are more feminine than Negresses, due to predilection, opportunities, or both.

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    • Replies: @Rosie

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.
     
    There is a very serious danger of these men marrying Asian classmates. White advocates need to think carefully about whether they really want White women out of STEM programs. As a matter of fact, it's probably time for White advocates to start concentrating on White advocacy again.
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  128. Someone said it here earlier, but one solution is for Trump to appoint her to a federal Circuit Court.

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  129. @The Anti-Gnostic
    OK. Next question: are there buyers for all this amount, every auction? Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.

    Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.

    Correct.

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  130. @J.Ross
    The Russian hackers story is blowing up in Zuckerberg's face.

    https://twitter.com/MsAnneBoleyn/status/976458260306735106

    This is so hilarious! After 33 long years, and no mention of TBI, perhaps her dear husband just likes F*cking Facebook literally, while he is in numerous cyber relationships with Alt-Right vixens!

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  131. @SunBakedSuburb
    It could be that Richard "Hail Trump!" Spencer is controlled opposition. An agent of the Obama-Holder FBI.

    I’ve actually heard that rumor for more than a year. I think, what gives it away a bit, is the silly “uniform” of khakis and white polo shirts these guys wear, en masse – its just too stupid and ridiculous to pick that outfit.

    Everyone knows by now, that the Preppie look was actually, a look in the 50′s-70′s, before actual prepsters stopped wanting/needing to wear a uniform in prep school. Of course, simultaneously, Ralph Lauren introduced his polo shirts in sherbet colors/neon colors, etc., that everyone still wears today, with relish. I sometimes just wince when I see some man wear like a fuchsia colored Polo shirt – it’s just wrong in so many ways.

    And, the funniest thing, while on a roll about fashion: city Magnet and Charter schools, all make their kids (girls can wear pleated, kilt-like waspy skirts as well) wear…khakis and polo shirts (with the schools logo) – it’s compulsory. But, Spencer, suddenly having his entourage all wear the same uniform, chanting with their tiki torches, was just too suspicious (and lame) to me. But, I am cynical.

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    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome


    I sometimes just wince when I see some man wear like a fuchsia colored Polo shirt

     

    Draaaag...and drop
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  132. @J. Sailerite
    Off-topic: Arutz Sheva sympathetically reports on the #120dB movement: https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/243487

    the #120dB movement

    What’s that? A Who concert in 1974?

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  133. @Rosie

    Much of the debate surrounding the dearth of women in STEM was sparked by Benbow and Stanley (1980, 1983) who showed that of 40,000 students, the male–female ratio in the early 1980s on the SAT-M was 2.1 to 1 for scores≥500 (top 0.5%), 4.1 to 1 for scores≥600, and a remarkable 13 to 1 for those scoring≥700 (top 0.01%).
     
    Again, this is very surprising to me. I would not have guessed that men only outnumber women by 2.1 to 1 in the top 0.5%. Presumably, the ratio would be even lower in the top 1%. However you slice it, that's a lot of really brainy broads. That said, it is of course tremendously important that the best men not be held back by affirmative action, because they are the ones who are going to drive innovation. Moreover, I still think the most intelligent women should focus on child-bearing. That would still be the case even if there were no gap at all in this area.

    It also seems fair to say that lower-level STEM jobs don't attract women because they're not interested, not because they can't do them. White men need to worry more about Asian women, who seem to be more practical in their educational choices, edging them out of STEM jobs. Feminists (i.e. white women) are going to be the least of their problems, especially given that Asian women outperform White men on SAT math section.


    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.167.7133&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    I think girls have closed some of the gap on the high ends of SAT math section since Benbow’s study.

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  134. @phil
    You put "anti-racism" above the truth. You suggest that "racism" is wrong even if Amy Wax has knowledge about black academic performance that you don't have. Race differences are real, and law students are an excellent case in point.

    Sarcasm, phil, I was relating the SJW attitudes to the Spanish burning the Aztec codices.

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  135. Both OT silly articles that are just too funny….I mean, anything you do these days, is suspect I suppose. NYT just realized that many countries have very old cultures! It’s like NYT just realized that Comicon, and people dressing up in their favorite avatar’s outfit, happens. I guess it was inevitable that Thor is a Nazi.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/17/world/europe/vikings-sweden-paganism-neonazis.html

    And, eating organic food is what badwhites do. Actually, one article by same writer, just plain calls organic food buyers, assholes. This is even a more cringy article than the above one.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-life-whole-foods-wedding-20180308-story.html

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    meant to add: both articles state that organic food is racist...the last sentence of the 'Vikings' article is so funny; I almost fell off my chair again.
    , @Rosamond Vincy
    So "Hell" is linked to "Heil," but not to "Hail"--as in "Hail Caesar," "Hail Columbia," or "Hail Mary," for that matter. Or even "Hale [and hearty]," as in "Wassail"--per Wikipedia: 'Old English was hál, related to the Anglo-Saxon greeting wes þú hál , meaning "be you hale"—i.e., "be healthful" or "be healthy".'

    BTW, it ain't real Viking without the lutefisk.
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  136. @Autochthon
    Women also go to law school in droves, intentionally and consciously or not, to obtain the Ms. J.D. degree: shtupping and wedding classmates and co-workers then dropping out (altogether or into cheesy make-work jobs as Michelle Obama did).

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they'd have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.

    A lot of this stuff is also just a glorified way to say: white women are more feminine than Negresses, due to predilection, opportunities, or both.

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.

    There is a very serious danger of these men marrying Asian classmates. White advocates need to think carefully about whether they really want White women out of STEM programs. As a matter of fact, it’s probably time for White advocates to start concentrating on White advocacy again.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I'm baffled.

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?

    And what's this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.

    Me, I don't care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.
    , @Brutusale
    Your stridency on this point kind of defines why the white scientists/lawyers/engineers marry their Asian classmates.
    , @danand
    Perhaps a "remedy" is for white men to move away from STEM? If they have the intellect for STEM, they likely have the metal horsepower required to work at things that would make them more appealing to the women they want.
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  137. @Anon
    Around Amy Wax, never relax.

    thread winner!

    for this beginner.

    never a poem could I write…

    But I opened my mac,

    and saw this attack,

    wow, a Jewess they did try to smite?

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Not the first time. My undergraduate mentor, Dr. Stephen Zelnick, testified at a Congressional hearing on academic freedom. The SJWs (along with other forms of bullying) dismantled his Intellectual Heritage program, which involved readings in Homer, Dante, and Milton, and replaced it with some kind of PC crap. He enjoyed battling them for a while, as a self-described "old warhorse," but eventually retired, I believe somewhat sooner than he had originally intended.
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  138. @Lagertha
    Both OT silly articles that are just too funny....I mean, anything you do these days, is suspect I suppose. NYT just realized that many countries have very old cultures! It's like NYT just realized that Comicon, and people dressing up in their favorite avatar's outfit, happens. I guess it was inevitable that Thor is a Nazi.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/17/world/europe/vikings-sweden-paganism-neonazis.html

    And, eating organic food is what badwhites do. Actually, one article by same writer, just plain calls organic food buyers, assholes. This is even a more cringy article than the above one.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-life-whole-foods-wedding-20180308-story.html

    meant to add: both articles state that organic food is racist…the last sentence of the ‘Vikings’ article is so funny; I almost fell off my chair again.

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  139. Sorry, OT, but the speech that Martin Sellner wrote for Speaker’s Corner before he was deported by the powers that be in the island once known as England deserves the widest possible distribution:

    Dear Friends, dear Britons, dear lovers of free speech.

    I assume you all are lovers of free speech because you have come to Speakers’ Corner.

    You might not understand all the fuss happening today around this speech. Honestly, I don’t understand it either.

    My name is Martin Sellner. I am an Austrian patriot, and at the moment, I’m sitting in a detention cell in Colnbrook Bypass near Heathrow. My smartphone was taken and my girlfriend Brittany was separated from me. I currently don’t know where she is. We will be deported on Sunday.

    Five minutes ago, they unlocked our cells and my fellow inmates are gathering in the prison wing. They are mostly illegals and eastern European criminals.

    What brought me into this situation? What was my crime?

    My crime was that I wanted to be here with you, to speak at Speakers’ Corner.

    But let’s start with the beginning. I was invited by UKIP to present my movement at an event last Autumn. I represent Generation Identity — a patriotic European youth movement that is raising awareness about mass immigration and Islamisation.

    Far-left people call us right-wing, people who want to shut free speech down call us “fascist,” and folks who hate their own culture call us “racist.”

    In reality, we are just a group of young patriots fed up with the system, the mainstream press and lying politicians. We use peaceful activism to make our voices heard, and contrary to our friends on the radical left, who are probably swarming you right now, we never wear masks.

    From Paris to Rome, from Vienna to London, we fight peacefully but without compromise for our freedom, our homelands, and our identity!

    This is what I wanted to speak about in Autumn. But the conference was cancelled due to threats from the radical left. The venue would not take the risk. So they rescheduled it for March, this time keeping the venue secret — but again the terror of the left prevailed, and the venue dropped out.

    But this time I did not want to let them win! It was about principles! (Also, our flights were already booked.)

    My last refuge was Speakers’ Corner. I remembered my mother telling me about that special place when I was a child. It seemed almost magical to me. A place where everyone, without exception, could just stand on a box and start to speak to those who wanted to listen. I have always loved this tradition of Speakers’ Corner, which seemed very British to me.

    But I came only to see that this tradition — the tradition of freedom of speech in the United Kingdom — is dead.

    Your Country is blocking you from challenging ideas from the outside. This is a disgrace to our democracy!

    I should be speaking in a neat, warm conference room right now, and you should be sitting in comfortable chairs. Instead, I’m in my cell and you are on the street in a standoff with the enemies of freedom of speech.

    And this is very telling! Today there is a war going on for our freedom of speech. This war is being fought on the streets, by you!

    Every man and woman showing her face today, standing shoulder to shoulder, is standing up against a new totalitarianism that has been growing for far too long. You can be proud of yourself. You might not even agree with me on every point — you are simply giving a statement that I should have the right to speak my mind freely.

    I would love to be among you now. They prevented me from it. They locked up the speaker, but I know that the speech will find a way through the iron bars. It will find a way to you and you are going to hear what you government so desperately wants to protect you from.

    Those words which they consider more harmful to you than rape gangs or terrorists who are let into your country again and again.

    I’m going to tell you something nobody has told you before. It’s the biggest, most obvious secret of our media our politicians and our powerholders: People of Britain, you are being replaced.

    There has always been immigration in your history. People coming in, assimilating.

    But what’s happening today is different: You are being replaced by massive Muslim immigration.

    You see it everywhere: in London, in Manchester, but also already in the little countryside towns. A big replacement is going on.

    And let me tell you: your politicians have no plan, no vision and no idea how to deal with the problems that come along. Problems like you have seen in Telford, Rotherham, and on Westminster Bridge.

    All across Europe, there is a shadow hanging over our heads. The French are whispering about in the Metro, the Germans murmuring about it when they feel unwatched, Italians look left and right, and if nobody is listening they tell you: “I don’t feel at home anymore in my street. We are becoming foreigners in our own country.”

    And again and again I hear: “We are not allowed to talk about it.”

    And that’s the bizarre drama of the “Strange death of Europe.” We are being replaced, conquered by radical Islam, and we are not allowed to talk about it!

    Dear Britons, defenders of free speech. Out of my cell in Colnbrook, I want to ask you something. Be honest and raise your hands.

    Who among of you has ever been in the following situation: You grab a beer after work, or you are visiting your girlfriend’s parents for the first time, or you meet other children’s parents at school — and suddenly the conversation moves to politics: radical Islam, immigration.

    Who of you in this very moment was faced with the decision between speaking his mind and facing problems, or complying and staying silent?

    Raise your hands and be honest.

    I will not be able to see the results, but every single hand is too much. This amount of fear should not exist in a society. Speech that has social costs and severe consequences is no longer free. It has a price — and our Government and the Antifa are working everyday to raise that price.

    No freedom of speech means no democracy. In front of our very eyes this country is becoming a tyranny, shutting all debates about immigration down, until demographics solves the issue by replacement. People of the UK. I might be in a cell right now, but you all are in a cell. It’s the prison of fear and silence your government and the PC tyranny has locked you in since the days of your childhood.

    I ask you, I command you, break free!

    Patriots of the UK: come out of the closet. Make your dissent visible by visible acts of resistance that inspire others. I know for certain that millions in the UK think like me. Those millions should be on the street now.

    We need a coming out of the silent majority, or Britain is lost. We need a free, open and honest debate about immigration, Islam and demographics, so we can sort these problems out together.

    And I know that the force is still in you. With your Brexit vote you stunned the world! The will and the life of the British nation is not broken.

    Initially, I asked if freedom of speech is dead in the UK. You, every one of you who came today, is a living sign that the tradition of the UK is not dead! You are the livley tradition of your nation, saving its face before history.

    People of the UK — remember who you are! Remember your glorious past, you are sons and daughters of knights, kings, explorers, philosophers and artists. Who is the sovereign in this country?

    Is it big money?

    The mainstream media?

    The politicians?

    It’s you — the people. You, the silent and invisible majority who said NO during Brexit. You can say NO again — no to Islamisation, no to mass immigration, and no to the great replacement.

    And YES to your identity — yes to your security, yes to your heritage and the future for your children.

    And all this is impossible without to freedom of speech.

    I know, if these words will find their way to the UK and even to Speakers’ Corner, it will be victory for our cause.

    If they did, and if you are hearing them now, I tell you: go further on that winning street. Don’t be afraid because we have an ally that is unbeatable: Truth.

    The battle, our battle for freedom of speech, has just begun, and Speakers’ Corner will become a symbolic place in that struggle.

    When you go home know I want you to bring the spirit of Speakers’ Corner with you.

    Every single person who raised his hand because he could relate to this moment of fear, when he did not dare to speak his mind.

    Promise me: Next time I will overcome my inner fear. Next time I will speak up!

    ~by Martin Sellner

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Thanks for posting this. We have to find ways in meatspace to let normies stumble across things from which Mark Zuckerberg wants to protect them.
    , @Lagertha
    oh my, I just feel so depressed again, after I read your comment. It is really a nightmare. I fight with stupid liberals and dumb-ass friends (word fight) almost daily, but they just don't see it like the Brits, Swedes, Danes, Gerries, Italians, Dutch, etc.

    Americans have always been considered naive, like children, and, many, really are, well, the liberals. They have been PsyOpsed for so long, now. However, slowly, people are waking up - I spend a lot of time to make placid suburbanites feel uneasy.

    Brennan & Clapper, major liars of the past 2 administrations, are fracking, losing their evil minds, and sounding like horses asses, mean-girls on TV, lately. Snowden they did banish, but now, their worst whack-a-mole reality is unfolding on them, and who knows, whom else, that they care about.

    And, some "bad/weak people" have been kicked out of the WH, so, there is that. And, more journalists have gotten braver. And, there is an angry mob of young men who could destroy people...they feel cornered, and they are gonna lash-out with a "take no prisoners" attitude; they will be worse than the original Tea Party.

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  140. @Steve Sailer
    So far her punishment is that she doesn't have to teach an intro course ...

    It could be the first step to forcing her out completely. The way I see it, if someone really objects to being assigned to her Civ Pro section, that person can transfer to a different section. But if she teaches something like bankruptcy or administrative law or remedies, a student could claim that there are no other teachers available to teach the same subject, and therefore she should be removed from teaching that class completely. And as other commentators have pointed out, less students may sign up for her bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class simply because they heard “racist” things about her (a complaint that the law school has now legitimized) or because they were not exposed to her as a 1L.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I know I have no business chiming in, but :) , as a woman, I am looking at it from another point of view because Wax has obviously, felt this way a long time, and feels, 'if not know, when?'. So, my instinct is: she has made sure the entire public now knows (sort of a MeToo moment in the making) what she said, and, the entire public now can watch what happens live. So, check mate, baby! - administrators can't make a move; supercilious professors who hate her, can't make a move. She is media savvy.
    , @Meretricious
    many students will want to take her courses because of her brave race realism--you think everyone at Penn is a liberal? LOL
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  141. @Rosie
    Link?

    BTW, the SAT isn't all that lopsided. I'd have guessed it would be more so, but then I have a very gender-typical cognitive profile. I couldn't find my way out of a wet paper bag and anything mechanical bores me half to tears.

    Sorry, going from my memory. But there is a lot of public information about the LSAT and demographics.

    The gender ratio of people with the top percentile of LSAT scores is about 2:1 male. As an illustration of how even verbal IQ at the extreme end is very male, you can also look at the list of top scoring students at law schools, who typically award a prize at the end of each year to the student with the highest GPA. The winners are about 25 to 1 male even those top law school classes are about 55/45 male/female.

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  142. @Lagertha
    I've actually heard that rumor for more than a year. I think, what gives it away a bit, is the silly "uniform" of khakis and white polo shirts these guys wear, en masse - its just too stupid and ridiculous to pick that outfit.

    Everyone knows by now, that the Preppie look was actually, a look in the 50's-70's, before actual prepsters stopped wanting/needing to wear a uniform in prep school. Of course, simultaneously, Ralph Lauren introduced his polo shirts in sherbet colors/neon colors, etc., that everyone still wears today, with relish. I sometimes just wince when I see some man wear like a fuchsia colored Polo shirt - it's just wrong in so many ways.

    And, the funniest thing, while on a roll about fashion: city Magnet and Charter schools, all make their kids (girls can wear pleated, kilt-like waspy skirts as well) wear...khakis and polo shirts (with the schools logo) - it's compulsory. But, Spencer, suddenly having his entourage all wear the same uniform, chanting with their tiki torches, was just too suspicious (and lame) to me. But, I am cynical.

    I sometimes just wince when I see some man wear like a fuchsia colored Polo shirt

    Draaaag…and drop

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  143. I don’t want anything bad to happen to Wax but for so objectively brilliant and qualified a Jew to lose her job because she hurt someone’s feelings strikes me as an overreach by the enemy. Sucks today, pays off later.
    We are clearly not doing enough to hurt the establishment, much of which looks immune to boycott. As bad as the movies are doing, they throw their lot behind big projects and then guarantee success through “charity” ticket buys. Facebook is in real trouble, not existential, but unprecedented numbers of normies are learning what Facebook always was, and there might be a court case; we should encourage this.

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  144. @Meretricious
    if that were to happen Wax would sue--and win. The reality is that Penn faculty and administrators know that Negroes are mediocre. All this anti-Wax BS is just virtue signaling. Negroes are slowly losing their power over whites, which is why Trump was elected

    She could sue, but she might not win, as long as they don’t actually fire her. They’re just trying to make her so miserable, she’ll leave of her own accord. I’ve seen this done in more than one department. Not the least insult they’ll try is: if the professor created a course or a program, particularly if that course or program hearkens back to classic, timeless research in that field, they will try to dismantle it and replace it with something touchy-feely. They have even done this with science subjects, which you might think would be immune to such meddling.

    This not only insults the professor’s achievements, but also, most dishearteningly, cheats the students out of real, competitive knowledge in that field. Watching a department and a subject debased in such a fashion has driven more than one person to retirement, after an initial period of battling the barbarians.

    There are no bullies like academic bullies.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Couldn't the Uni's be exposed of their hypocrisy? Couldn't the public be made aware to watch how prof. Wax is treated? Like a PC squad to check bad, bad, Uni administrators and nasty professors?

    I just listened to a student today, who is running for the state Senate, who has taken on the bloated administrative state of his own state U as an example of fiscal waste and well, bull shit. What I predict: more and more conservative and Independent young people will take on Universities of BS...why? The rent is just too damn high. Kids are waking up to the fact that the Uni is BS and so not worth it, worth to go to debt for. There are U's that are dropping these majors: History, Philosophy and English, some other humanities and ss!
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  145. @vinteuil
    Sorry, OT, but the speech that Martin Sellner wrote for Speaker's Corner before he was deported by the powers that be in the island once known as England deserves the widest possible distribution:


    Dear Friends, dear Britons, dear lovers of free speech.

    I assume you all are lovers of free speech because you have come to Speakers' Corner.

    You might not understand all the fuss happening today around this speech. Honestly, I don't understand it either.

    My name is Martin Sellner. I am an Austrian patriot, and at the moment, I'm sitting in a detention cell in Colnbrook Bypass near Heathrow. My smartphone was taken and my girlfriend Brittany was separated from me. I currently don't know where she is. We will be deported on Sunday.

    Five minutes ago, they unlocked our cells and my fellow inmates are gathering in the prison wing. They are mostly illegals and eastern European criminals.

    What brought me into this situation? What was my crime?

    My crime was that I wanted to be here with you, to speak at Speakers' Corner.

    But let's start with the beginning. I was invited by UKIP to present my movement at an event last Autumn. I represent Generation Identity — a patriotic European youth movement that is raising awareness about mass immigration and Islamisation.

    Far-left people call us right-wing, people who want to shut free speech down call us "fascist," and folks who hate their own culture call us "racist."

    In reality, we are just a group of young patriots fed up with the system, the mainstream press and lying politicians. We use peaceful activism to make our voices heard, and contrary to our friends on the radical left, who are probably swarming you right now, we never wear masks.

    From Paris to Rome, from Vienna to London, we fight peacefully but without compromise for our freedom, our homelands, and our identity!

    This is what I wanted to speak about in Autumn. But the conference was cancelled due to threats from the radical left. The venue would not take the risk. So they rescheduled it for March, this time keeping the venue secret — but again the terror of the left prevailed, and the venue dropped out.

    But this time I did not want to let them win! It was about principles! (Also, our flights were already booked.)

    My last refuge was Speakers' Corner. I remembered my mother telling me about that special place when I was a child. It seemed almost magical to me. A place where everyone, without exception, could just stand on a box and start to speak to those who wanted to listen. I have always loved this tradition of Speakers' Corner, which seemed very British to me.

    But I came only to see that this tradition — the tradition of freedom of speech in the United Kingdom — is dead.

    Your Country is blocking you from challenging ideas from the outside. This is a disgrace to our democracy!

    I should be speaking in a neat, warm conference room right now, and you should be sitting in comfortable chairs. Instead, I'm in my cell and you are on the street in a standoff with the enemies of freedom of speech.

    And this is very telling! Today there is a war going on for our freedom of speech. This war is being fought on the streets, by you!

    Every man and woman showing her face today, standing shoulder to shoulder, is standing up against a new totalitarianism that has been growing for far too long. You can be proud of yourself. You might not even agree with me on every point — you are simply giving a statement that I should have the right to speak my mind freely.

    I would love to be among you now. They prevented me from it. They locked up the speaker, but I know that the speech will find a way through the iron bars. It will find a way to you and you are going to hear what you government so desperately wants to protect you from.

    Those words which they consider more harmful to you than rape gangs or terrorists who are let into your country again and again.

    I'm going to tell you something nobody has told you before. It's the biggest, most obvious secret of our media our politicians and our powerholders: People of Britain, you are being replaced.

    There has always been immigration in your history. People coming in, assimilating.

    But what's happening today is different: You are being replaced by massive Muslim immigration.

    You see it everywhere: in London, in Manchester, but also already in the little countryside towns. A big replacement is going on.

    And let me tell you: your politicians have no plan, no vision and no idea how to deal with the problems that come along. Problems like you have seen in Telford, Rotherham, and on Westminster Bridge.

    All across Europe, there is a shadow hanging over our heads. The French are whispering about in the Metro, the Germans murmuring about it when they feel unwatched, Italians look left and right, and if nobody is listening they tell you: "I don't feel at home anymore in my street. We are becoming foreigners in our own country."

    And again and again I hear: "We are not allowed to talk about it."

    And that's the bizarre drama of the "Strange death of Europe." We are being replaced, conquered by radical Islam, and we are not allowed to talk about it!

    Dear Britons, defenders of free speech. Out of my cell in Colnbrook, I want to ask you something. Be honest and raise your hands.

    Who among of you has ever been in the following situation: You grab a beer after work, or you are visiting your girlfriend's parents for the first time, or you meet other children's parents at school — and suddenly the conversation moves to politics: radical Islam, immigration.

    Who of you in this very moment was faced with the decision between speaking his mind and facing problems, or complying and staying silent?

    Raise your hands and be honest.

    I will not be able to see the results, but every single hand is too much. This amount of fear should not exist in a society. Speech that has social costs and severe consequences is no longer free. It has a price — and our Government and the Antifa are working everyday to raise that price.

    No freedom of speech means no democracy. In front of our very eyes this country is becoming a tyranny, shutting all debates about immigration down, until demographics solves the issue by replacement. People of the UK. I might be in a cell right now, but you all are in a cell. It's the prison of fear and silence your government and the PC tyranny has locked you in since the days of your childhood.

    I ask you, I command you, break free!

    Patriots of the UK: come out of the closet. Make your dissent visible by visible acts of resistance that inspire others. I know for certain that millions in the UK think like me. Those millions should be on the street now.

    We need a coming out of the silent majority, or Britain is lost. We need a free, open and honest debate about immigration, Islam and demographics, so we can sort these problems out together.

    And I know that the force is still in you. With your Brexit vote you stunned the world! The will and the life of the British nation is not broken.

    Initially, I asked if freedom of speech is dead in the UK. You, every one of you who came today, is a living sign that the tradition of the UK is not dead! You are the livley tradition of your nation, saving its face before history.

    People of the UK — remember who you are! Remember your glorious past, you are sons and daughters of knights, kings, explorers, philosophers and artists. Who is the sovereign in this country?

    Is it big money?

    The mainstream media?

    The politicians?

    It's you — the people. You, the silent and invisible majority who said NO during Brexit. You can say NO again — no to Islamisation, no to mass immigration, and no to the great replacement.

    And YES to your identity — yes to your security, yes to your heritage and the future for your children.

    And all this is impossible without to freedom of speech.

    I know, if these words will find their way to the UK and even to Speakers' Corner, it will be victory for our cause.

    If they did, and if you are hearing them now, I tell you: go further on that winning street. Don't be afraid because we have an ally that is unbeatable: Truth.

    The battle, our battle for freedom of speech, has just begun, and Speakers' Corner will become a symbolic place in that struggle.

    When you go home know I want you to bring the spirit of Speakers' Corner with you.

    Every single person who raised his hand because he could relate to this moment of fear, when he did not dare to speak his mind.

    Promise me: Next time I will overcome my inner fear. Next time I will speak up!

    ~by Martin Sellner

    Thanks for posting this. We have to find ways in meatspace to let normies stumble across things from which Mark Zuckerberg wants to protect them.

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  146. @Iberiano
    thread winner!

    for this beginner.

    never a poem could I write...

    But I opened my mac,

    and saw this attack,

    wow, a Jewess they did try to smite?

    Not the first time. My undergraduate mentor, Dr. Stephen Zelnick, testified at a Congressional hearing on academic freedom. The SJWs (along with other forms of bullying) dismantled his Intellectual Heritage program, which involved readings in Homer, Dante, and Milton, and replaced it with some kind of PC crap. He enjoyed battling them for a while, as a self-described “old warhorse,” but eventually retired, I believe somewhat sooner than he had originally intended.

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  147. @vinteuil
    Sorry, OT, but the speech that Martin Sellner wrote for Speaker's Corner before he was deported by the powers that be in the island once known as England deserves the widest possible distribution:


    Dear Friends, dear Britons, dear lovers of free speech.

    I assume you all are lovers of free speech because you have come to Speakers' Corner.

    You might not understand all the fuss happening today around this speech. Honestly, I don't understand it either.

    My name is Martin Sellner. I am an Austrian patriot, and at the moment, I'm sitting in a detention cell in Colnbrook Bypass near Heathrow. My smartphone was taken and my girlfriend Brittany was separated from me. I currently don't know where she is. We will be deported on Sunday.

    Five minutes ago, they unlocked our cells and my fellow inmates are gathering in the prison wing. They are mostly illegals and eastern European criminals.

    What brought me into this situation? What was my crime?

    My crime was that I wanted to be here with you, to speak at Speakers' Corner.

    But let's start with the beginning. I was invited by UKIP to present my movement at an event last Autumn. I represent Generation Identity — a patriotic European youth movement that is raising awareness about mass immigration and Islamisation.

    Far-left people call us right-wing, people who want to shut free speech down call us "fascist," and folks who hate their own culture call us "racist."

    In reality, we are just a group of young patriots fed up with the system, the mainstream press and lying politicians. We use peaceful activism to make our voices heard, and contrary to our friends on the radical left, who are probably swarming you right now, we never wear masks.

    From Paris to Rome, from Vienna to London, we fight peacefully but without compromise for our freedom, our homelands, and our identity!

    This is what I wanted to speak about in Autumn. But the conference was cancelled due to threats from the radical left. The venue would not take the risk. So they rescheduled it for March, this time keeping the venue secret — but again the terror of the left prevailed, and the venue dropped out.

    But this time I did not want to let them win! It was about principles! (Also, our flights were already booked.)

    My last refuge was Speakers' Corner. I remembered my mother telling me about that special place when I was a child. It seemed almost magical to me. A place where everyone, without exception, could just stand on a box and start to speak to those who wanted to listen. I have always loved this tradition of Speakers' Corner, which seemed very British to me.

    But I came only to see that this tradition — the tradition of freedom of speech in the United Kingdom — is dead.

    Your Country is blocking you from challenging ideas from the outside. This is a disgrace to our democracy!

    I should be speaking in a neat, warm conference room right now, and you should be sitting in comfortable chairs. Instead, I'm in my cell and you are on the street in a standoff with the enemies of freedom of speech.

    And this is very telling! Today there is a war going on for our freedom of speech. This war is being fought on the streets, by you!

    Every man and woman showing her face today, standing shoulder to shoulder, is standing up against a new totalitarianism that has been growing for far too long. You can be proud of yourself. You might not even agree with me on every point — you are simply giving a statement that I should have the right to speak my mind freely.

    I would love to be among you now. They prevented me from it. They locked up the speaker, but I know that the speech will find a way through the iron bars. It will find a way to you and you are going to hear what you government so desperately wants to protect you from.

    Those words which they consider more harmful to you than rape gangs or terrorists who are let into your country again and again.

    I'm going to tell you something nobody has told you before. It's the biggest, most obvious secret of our media our politicians and our powerholders: People of Britain, you are being replaced.

    There has always been immigration in your history. People coming in, assimilating.

    But what's happening today is different: You are being replaced by massive Muslim immigration.

    You see it everywhere: in London, in Manchester, but also already in the little countryside towns. A big replacement is going on.

    And let me tell you: your politicians have no plan, no vision and no idea how to deal with the problems that come along. Problems like you have seen in Telford, Rotherham, and on Westminster Bridge.

    All across Europe, there is a shadow hanging over our heads. The French are whispering about in the Metro, the Germans murmuring about it when they feel unwatched, Italians look left and right, and if nobody is listening they tell you: "I don't feel at home anymore in my street. We are becoming foreigners in our own country."

    And again and again I hear: "We are not allowed to talk about it."

    And that's the bizarre drama of the "Strange death of Europe." We are being replaced, conquered by radical Islam, and we are not allowed to talk about it!

    Dear Britons, defenders of free speech. Out of my cell in Colnbrook, I want to ask you something. Be honest and raise your hands.

    Who among of you has ever been in the following situation: You grab a beer after work, or you are visiting your girlfriend's parents for the first time, or you meet other children's parents at school — and suddenly the conversation moves to politics: radical Islam, immigration.

    Who of you in this very moment was faced with the decision between speaking his mind and facing problems, or complying and staying silent?

    Raise your hands and be honest.

    I will not be able to see the results, but every single hand is too much. This amount of fear should not exist in a society. Speech that has social costs and severe consequences is no longer free. It has a price — and our Government and the Antifa are working everyday to raise that price.

    No freedom of speech means no democracy. In front of our very eyes this country is becoming a tyranny, shutting all debates about immigration down, until demographics solves the issue by replacement. People of the UK. I might be in a cell right now, but you all are in a cell. It's the prison of fear and silence your government and the PC tyranny has locked you in since the days of your childhood.

    I ask you, I command you, break free!

    Patriots of the UK: come out of the closet. Make your dissent visible by visible acts of resistance that inspire others. I know for certain that millions in the UK think like me. Those millions should be on the street now.

    We need a coming out of the silent majority, or Britain is lost. We need a free, open and honest debate about immigration, Islam and demographics, so we can sort these problems out together.

    And I know that the force is still in you. With your Brexit vote you stunned the world! The will and the life of the British nation is not broken.

    Initially, I asked if freedom of speech is dead in the UK. You, every one of you who came today, is a living sign that the tradition of the UK is not dead! You are the livley tradition of your nation, saving its face before history.

    People of the UK — remember who you are! Remember your glorious past, you are sons and daughters of knights, kings, explorers, philosophers and artists. Who is the sovereign in this country?

    Is it big money?

    The mainstream media?

    The politicians?

    It's you — the people. You, the silent and invisible majority who said NO during Brexit. You can say NO again — no to Islamisation, no to mass immigration, and no to the great replacement.

    And YES to your identity — yes to your security, yes to your heritage and the future for your children.

    And all this is impossible without to freedom of speech.

    I know, if these words will find their way to the UK and even to Speakers' Corner, it will be victory for our cause.

    If they did, and if you are hearing them now, I tell you: go further on that winning street. Don't be afraid because we have an ally that is unbeatable: Truth.

    The battle, our battle for freedom of speech, has just begun, and Speakers' Corner will become a symbolic place in that struggle.

    When you go home know I want you to bring the spirit of Speakers' Corner with you.

    Every single person who raised his hand because he could relate to this moment of fear, when he did not dare to speak his mind.

    Promise me: Next time I will overcome my inner fear. Next time I will speak up!

    ~by Martin Sellner

    oh my, I just feel so depressed again, after I read your comment. It is really a nightmare. I fight with stupid liberals and dumb-ass friends (word fight) almost daily, but they just don’t see it like the Brits, Swedes, Danes, Gerries, Italians, Dutch, etc.

    Americans have always been considered naive, like children, and, many, really are, well, the liberals. They have been PsyOpsed for so long, now. However, slowly, people are waking up – I spend a lot of time to make placid suburbanites feel uneasy.

    Brennan & Clapper, major liars of the past 2 administrations, are fracking, losing their evil minds, and sounding like horses asses, mean-girls on TV, lately. Snowden they did banish, but now, their worst whack-a-mole reality is unfolding on them, and who knows, whom else, that they care about.

    And, some “bad/weak people” have been kicked out of the WH, so, there is that. And, more journalists have gotten braver. And, there is an angry mob of young men who could destroy people…they feel cornered, and they are gonna lash-out with a “take no prisoners” attitude; they will be worse than the original Tea Party.

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  148. @Lagertha
    Both OT silly articles that are just too funny....I mean, anything you do these days, is suspect I suppose. NYT just realized that many countries have very old cultures! It's like NYT just realized that Comicon, and people dressing up in their favorite avatar's outfit, happens. I guess it was inevitable that Thor is a Nazi.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/17/world/europe/vikings-sweden-paganism-neonazis.html

    And, eating organic food is what badwhites do. Actually, one article by same writer, just plain calls organic food buyers, assholes. This is even a more cringy article than the above one.

    https://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/ct-life-whole-foods-wedding-20180308-story.html

    So “Hell” is linked to “Heil,” but not to “Hail”–as in “Hail Caesar,” “Hail Columbia,” or “Hail Mary,” for that matter. Or even “Hale [and hearty],” as in “Wassail”–per Wikipedia: ‘Old English was hál, related to the Anglo-Saxon greeting wes þú hál , meaning “be you hale”—i.e., “be healthful” or “be healthy”.’

    BTW, it ain’t real Viking without the lutefisk.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Helan Gar (Gore)! otherwise known to be the toasting call for partiers/table mates: "Drink the whole thing down!" Hela means: all, everybody, the whole. Hela tiden in Swedish is: 'the whole time', for instance. These idiots at the NYT do not realize that it is not Nazi Heil! It's basically, a Shots-ski!, hello? Plus, the Vikings were not from the Urals; they were not Aryans. And, could these authors just remember, Hail Caesar came from the Roman Empire, while Scandos still lived in caves and stone huts, with no metal tools. History, it's such a kidder.

    BTW, it ain't real Viking w/o Surstromming - even I can't eat that stuff, but have :{ - I hated the flies all over the balcony after one of those tins was openned...even in the city!

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  149. @Rosamond Vincy
    She could sue, but she might not win, as long as they don't actually fire her. They're just trying to make her so miserable, she'll leave of her own accord. I've seen this done in more than one department. Not the least insult they'll try is: if the professor created a course or a program, particularly if that course or program hearkens back to classic, timeless research in that field, they will try to dismantle it and replace it with something touchy-feely. They have even done this with science subjects, which you might think would be immune to such meddling.

    This not only insults the professor's achievements, but also, most dishearteningly, cheats the students out of real, competitive knowledge in that field. Watching a department and a subject debased in such a fashion has driven more than one person to retirement, after an initial period of battling the barbarians.

    There are no bullies like academic bullies.

    Couldn’t the Uni’s be exposed of their hypocrisy? Couldn’t the public be made aware to watch how prof. Wax is treated? Like a PC squad to check bad, bad, Uni administrators and nasty professors?

    I just listened to a student today, who is running for the state Senate, who has taken on the bloated administrative state of his own state U as an example of fiscal waste and well, bull shit. What I predict: more and more conservative and Independent young people will take on Universities of BS…why? The rent is just too damn high. Kids are waking up to the fact that the Uni is BS and so not worth it, worth to go to debt for. There are U’s that are dropping these majors: History, Philosophy and English, some other humanities and ss!

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    Which means only that those departments will get budget cuts, NOT that they will restore study of Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Plato's Republic, or the Romantic Poets. The viable departments will make Uni an expensive trade school.

    Our Western Culture is being deliberately withheld from this generation. It has been denied its just heritage by the very people it is paying to communicate that knowledge.

    What Lewis warned of in the sermon "Learning in War-Time" has come sickeningly true.
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  150. @Lot

    If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.
     
    Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests. In 2015 on the SAT, 474 men and 346 women got scores of 2400 or 2390, despite the fact 13% more women than men took the test that year.

    The IQ gender gap I agree is fairly small overall, but does become quite large, even in more verbal IQ type tests, on the far right tail.

    Any on-line normal distribution calculator will show you that either spreading/flattening the distribution, or moving the mean a bit to the right, will give you many multiples of the population at extremes (>3 SD’s)

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  151. @Rosamond Vincy
    So "Hell" is linked to "Heil," but not to "Hail"--as in "Hail Caesar," "Hail Columbia," or "Hail Mary," for that matter. Or even "Hale [and hearty]," as in "Wassail"--per Wikipedia: 'Old English was hál, related to the Anglo-Saxon greeting wes þú hál , meaning "be you hale"—i.e., "be healthful" or "be healthy".'

    BTW, it ain't real Viking without the lutefisk.

    Helan Gar (Gore)! otherwise known to be the toasting call for partiers/table mates: “Drink the whole thing down!” Hela means: all, everybody, the whole. Hela tiden in Swedish is: ‘the whole time’, for instance. These idiots at the NYT do not realize that it is not Nazi Heil! It’s basically, a Shots-ski!, hello? Plus, the Vikings were not from the Urals; they were not Aryans. And, could these authors just remember, Hail Caesar came from the Roman Empire, while Scandos still lived in caves and stone huts, with no metal tools. History, it’s such a kidder.

    BTW, it ain’t real Viking w/o Surstromming – even I can’t eat that stuff, but have :{ – I hated the flies all over the balcony after one of those tins was openned…even in the city!

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  152. @Rosie
    "Men are more likely than women to get extremely high scores on the LSAT and similar standardized tests."

    Hold on a minute. The LSAT is not the same as the SAT. The LSAT does not have any math or spatial or mechanical reasoning portion at all, so you cannot compare the two tests.

    Do you have any data on high outliers in the LSAT specifically?

    The LSAT is more difficult than the SAT. Further, the College Board in the 1990s chopped off the extreme end of the distribution (that’s why Harvard’s 75% for SAT is a perfect 1600).

    The LSAT logic section works out the spatial brain lobe like a medicine ball. ~173-180 on the LSAT is the equivalent to 1600 SAT.

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  153. @AnotherDad

    “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.
     
    Agreed.

    Beyond the point and sputter, her argument is essentially this:

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued. Meaning that to suspect a minority job applicant would be less qualified, even with a degree from a leading institution, would not be, in fact, “rational” but would be, as Paul Ryan might say, “the textbook definition of a racist comment.”
     
    This is just blitheringly stupid from the logical and mathematical point of view. Of course, when you admit any group of people with lower LSAT scores and grades they will ... tend to achieve lower law school grades and graduate at lower rates and tend to be cluster toward the botton of their graduation classes. (And be less like what an employer thinks of as a "U Penn quality law grad".) If you don't believe this, then you are either asserting that the these law school admissions metrics are uncorrelated with success in law school--in which case they ought to be junked--or you're just a completely innumerate bozo.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human's worth. This Jane Coaston might be perfectly capable of say of growing, nursing and nurturing some babies--a supremely important human endeavor. Or, much less importantly, maybe writing some movie reviews. But she has demonstrated that she is utterly incompetent at reporting about or commenting on any topic involving mathematical or statistical concepts. So it is arrogant and unprofessional for her to do so.

    You do know that AndrewR is a DNI troll sent to infiltrate the Alt-R, don’t you?

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    It's bizarre how you stalk me based on me criticizing Trump like a year ago. That's really unhealthy and off-putting behavior. It's also shameful of Sailet to allow it when he memory holes tons of completely innocuous and high quality comments.
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  154. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.
     
    Agreed.

    Beyond the point and sputter, her argument is essentially this:

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued. Meaning that to suspect a minority job applicant would be less qualified, even with a degree from a leading institution, would not be, in fact, “rational” but would be, as Paul Ryan might say, “the textbook definition of a racist comment.”
     
    This is just blitheringly stupid from the logical and mathematical point of view. Of course, when you admit any group of people with lower LSAT scores and grades they will ... tend to achieve lower law school grades and graduate at lower rates and tend to be cluster toward the botton of their graduation classes. (And be less like what an employer thinks of as a "U Penn quality law grad".) If you don't believe this, then you are either asserting that the these law school admissions metrics are uncorrelated with success in law school--in which case they ought to be junked--or you're just a completely innumerate bozo.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human's worth. This Jane Coaston might be perfectly capable of say of growing, nursing and nurturing some babies--a supremely important human endeavor. Or, much less importantly, maybe writing some movie reviews. But she has demonstrated that she is utterly incompetent at reporting about or commenting on any topic involving mathematical or statistical concepts. So it is arrogant and unprofessional for her to do so.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human’s worth.

    This reflects a misunderstanding of IQ, that it’s just the ability to do crosswords and Sudoku. IQ is positively correlated with a host of soft and fuzzy outcomes you wouldn’t think of as “intelligence,” including about half of personality traits, including in the realms of emotional stability, resilience under pressure, and leadership, as well as things you might think of as biological, such as health.

    Since pure personality traits are only testable with transparent, gameable, coachable questionnaires, the non-gameable psychometric of the IQ test becomes even more important.

    As for “black law students are inferior,” you say “not defensible, agreed,” and then you lay out the evidence defending it in your second to last paragraph. What’s with that?

    If you think that a bar exam is a sufficient gatekeeper to keep out inferior lawyers, you are naive. You need mulitple points of filtering, and unfortunately high school grades, high school diplomas, college admissions, college grades, law school admissions, and law school grades have all been seriously compromised in myriad ways, obvious and subtle, at the institutional level and at the interpersonal level. A single test at the end cannot adequately evaluate and filter out all inferior candidates.

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  155. @AnotherDad

    “Black law students are inferior” is not the most defensible claim. “Vox writers are inferior” is, on the other hand, absolutely irrefutable.
     
    Agreed.

    Beyond the point and sputter, her argument is essentially this:

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued. Meaning that to suspect a minority job applicant would be less qualified, even with a degree from a leading institution, would not be, in fact, “rational” but would be, as Paul Ryan might say, “the textbook definition of a racist comment.”
     
    This is just blitheringly stupid from the logical and mathematical point of view. Of course, when you admit any group of people with lower LSAT scores and grades they will ... tend to achieve lower law school grades and graduate at lower rates and tend to be cluster toward the botton of their graduation classes. (And be less like what an employer thinks of as a "U Penn quality law grad".) If you don't believe this, then you are either asserting that the these law school admissions metrics are uncorrelated with success in law school--in which case they ought to be junked--or you're just a completely innumerate bozo.

    Logical and mathematical reasoning is certainly not the be all and end all of a human's worth. This Jane Coaston might be perfectly capable of say of growing, nursing and nurturing some babies--a supremely important human endeavor. Or, much less importantly, maybe writing some movie reviews. But she has demonstrated that she is utterly incompetent at reporting about or commenting on any topic involving mathematical or statistical concepts. So it is arrogant and unprofessional for her to do so.

    And as Slate’s Jamelle Bouie pointed out on Twitter, affirmative action policies like those at Penn Law (the parameters of which can be reviewed here) would impact admissions, not grades or whether a degree is issued.

    Everything we know about “affirmative action” tells us — loudly — that “affirmative action” policies will continue after the unqualified matriculate.

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  156. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    It could be the first step to forcing her out completely. The way I see it, if someone really objects to being assigned to her Civ Pro section, that person can transfer to a different section. But if she teaches something like bankruptcy or administrative law or remedies, a student could claim that there are no other teachers available to teach the same subject, and therefore she should be removed from teaching that class completely. And as other commentators have pointed out, less students may sign up for her bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class simply because they heard "racist" things about her (a complaint that the law school has now legitimized) or because they were not exposed to her as a 1L.

    I know I have no business chiming in, but :) , as a woman, I am looking at it from another point of view because Wax has obviously, felt this way a long time, and feels, ‘if not know, when?’. So, my instinct is: she has made sure the entire public now knows (sort of a MeToo moment in the making) what she said, and, the entire public now can watch what happens live. So, check mate, baby! – administrators can’t make a move; supercilious professors who hate her, can’t make a move. She is media savvy.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    meant to say "if not NOW, when? I really think Wax cashed her chips in, and is counting on the public to have her back, so to speak.

    https://youtu.be/7hCoAF2G6wQ

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  157. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon
    I think it's likely that there will eventually be a major economic dislocation in America / the Rest of the World. One would expect this merely from Stein's Law (When something can't go on forever, it will stop). I believe that Adam Smith pointed out that, up to his present time, no government had ever paid off its sovereign debt. Whether it's a default, or massive inflation, something bad seems likely to me. And it might not even happen all it once.

    But, as you imply, making predicitions about when it happens is probably a fools game.

    Nobody cares what you think.

    It was Herbert Stein, not “Stein”, and he would not want people like you quoting it.

    I like the little “it might not happen all at once” bit, as if you were just a simple humble guy who knows the future fairly well but does not know it all that well. You don’t.

    You are a stupid person and you have no idea about what Adam Smith thought about the world.

    God loves stupid people, so there is that.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    relax, Steve doesn't like his "people" calling each other stupid, it is futile. Plus, we are still guessing a shit-ton, about what Adam Smith really thought, or anyone who has been dead for hundreds of years, people, even the smartest ones, were inconsistent or nuanced - we kinda' need their help, so don't make it worse, for GOD'S SAKE :)
    , @Mr. Anon

    Nobody cares what you think.
     
    I certainly don't care what you think, asshat.

    It was Herbert Stein, not “Stein”, and he would not want people like you quoting it.
     
    And how is "Stein" different from............"Stein"? Idiot. How would you know what he would want?

    You are an exceptionally stupid man. And a sh*thead, too.
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  158. @Lagertha
    I know I have no business chiming in, but :) , as a woman, I am looking at it from another point of view because Wax has obviously, felt this way a long time, and feels, 'if not know, when?'. So, my instinct is: she has made sure the entire public now knows (sort of a MeToo moment in the making) what she said, and, the entire public now can watch what happens live. So, check mate, baby! - administrators can't make a move; supercilious professors who hate her, can't make a move. She is media savvy.

    meant to say “if not NOW, when? I really think Wax cashed her chips in, and is counting on the public to have her back, so to speak.

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  159. @Rosie

    Much of the debate surrounding the dearth of women in STEM was sparked by Benbow and Stanley (1980, 1983) who showed that of 40,000 students, the male–female ratio in the early 1980s on the SAT-M was 2.1 to 1 for scores≥500 (top 0.5%), 4.1 to 1 for scores≥600, and a remarkable 13 to 1 for those scoring≥700 (top 0.01%).
     
    Again, this is very surprising to me. I would not have guessed that men only outnumber women by 2.1 to 1 in the top 0.5%. Presumably, the ratio would be even lower in the top 1%. However you slice it, that's a lot of really brainy broads. That said, it is of course tremendously important that the best men not be held back by affirmative action, because they are the ones who are going to drive innovation. Moreover, I still think the most intelligent women should focus on child-bearing. That would still be the case even if there were no gap at all in this area.

    It also seems fair to say that lower-level STEM jobs don't attract women because they're not interested, not because they can't do them. White men need to worry more about Asian women, who seem to be more practical in their educational choices, edging them out of STEM jobs. Feminists (i.e. white women) are going to be the least of their problems, especially given that Asian women outperform White men on SAT math section.


    http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.167.7133&rep=rep1&type=pdf

    Everyone remember that those Benbow and Stanley numbers and percentiles are from the SMPY and based on 13 year olds taking the SAT. Be careful about comparing that information to other SAT data.

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  160. @anonymous
    Nobody cares what you think.

    It was Herbert Stein, not "Stein", and he would not want people like you quoting it.

    I like the little "it might not happen all at once" bit, as if you were just a simple humble guy who knows the future fairly well but does not know it all that well. You don't.

    You are a stupid person and you have no idea about what Adam Smith thought about the world.

    God loves stupid people, so there is that.

    relax, Steve doesn’t like his “people” calling each other stupid, it is futile. Plus, we are still guessing a shit-ton, about what Adam Smith really thought, or anyone who has been dead for hundreds of years, people, even the smartest ones, were inconsistent or nuanced – we kinda’ need their help, so don’t make it worse, for GOD’S SAKE :)

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    Lagertha - Jeez I was just trying to help the little guy.

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.

    That does not mean constructive criticism is not worth the effort.

    It almost always is, but people who care try.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don't know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.

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  161. @Rosie
    FYI re average LSAT scores:

    Male: 151.56
    Female: 148.98
    White: 152.88
    Black: 142.26

    Racial gap dwarfs gender gap. Also, these data may overestimate the true gender gap in ability, as black women are overrepresented in the female test-taker set, while White men are overrepresented in the male set.

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore's memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It's just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering. If men had a much higher verbal, logical, and analytical intelligence ceiling than women, I would think this disparity would be larger.

    https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/research-(lsac-resources)/tr-12-03.pdf%3Fsfvrsn%3D4&ved=2ahUKEwikrK23hv_ZAhWrT98KHQA-CfYQFjACegQICRAB&usg=AOvVaw1uTUU6uv30KpOGzulS84Xv

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore’s memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It’s just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering.

    Women generally make bad lawyers.

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    • Replies: @Rosie

    Women generally make bad lawyers.
     
    (Good Lord, make it stop, please!)

    Evidence?
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  162. @International Jew
    NRO adopted a new commenting system a couple weeks ago: you can comment if you subscribe to the magazine. Before that, you commented as your Facebook account. And before that (until about two years ago) they used Disqus.

    As online comments go I think NRO's have always been above average in quality.

    They banned me years ago simply for pointing out that how “racism” is defined determines whether it’s wrong. They’re morons, and they don’t allow any comments of value.

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  163. @Lagertha
    Couldn't the Uni's be exposed of their hypocrisy? Couldn't the public be made aware to watch how prof. Wax is treated? Like a PC squad to check bad, bad, Uni administrators and nasty professors?

    I just listened to a student today, who is running for the state Senate, who has taken on the bloated administrative state of his own state U as an example of fiscal waste and well, bull shit. What I predict: more and more conservative and Independent young people will take on Universities of BS...why? The rent is just too damn high. Kids are waking up to the fact that the Uni is BS and so not worth it, worth to go to debt for. There are U's that are dropping these majors: History, Philosophy and English, some other humanities and ss!

    Which means only that those departments will get budget cuts, NOT that they will restore study of Gibbon’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Plato’s Republic, or the Romantic Poets. The viable departments will make Uni an expensive trade school.

    Our Western Culture is being deliberately withheld from this generation. It has been denied its just heritage by the very people it is paying to communicate that knowledge.

    What Lewis warned of in the sermon “Learning in War-Time” has come sickeningly true.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I am fully aware of what you just wrote. I was just trying to speculate on how prof. Wax can protect herself so she can have a decent retirement and not by ousted out by the mean girls of her Uni, like a bag of garbage.

    I was graduated in the 80's and late 80's (Master's)before the PC shit hit the Uni's, or had not arrived yet. I have done a whole ton of "homeschooling" in addition to public HS, about history/literature/art/philosophy to my sons. I started to sense the bs (thankfully, they were ahead of the red tide of Common Core) of the Cathedral. Also, my sons loved books! They still sort of half anticipate with glee; half know, "shit, this is a long one" at Christmas. I am so proud of their interest in everything and growing confidence - maybe?....... they can skip the cynicism of their mother? - naaah. I have also trained them to be warriors.

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  164. @Tyrion 2
    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.

    Do you see how your starting assumptions have led you to be starkly, undeniably wrong about how the world works?

    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.

    Nice libel. Why don’t you read something before you comment on it?

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    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a libel. That is his argument.
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  165. @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    It could be the first step to forcing her out completely. The way I see it, if someone really objects to being assigned to her Civ Pro section, that person can transfer to a different section. But if she teaches something like bankruptcy or administrative law or remedies, a student could claim that there are no other teachers available to teach the same subject, and therefore she should be removed from teaching that class completely. And as other commentators have pointed out, less students may sign up for her bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class simply because they heard "racist" things about her (a complaint that the law school has now legitimized) or because they were not exposed to her as a 1L.

    many students will want to take her courses because of her brave race realism–you think everyone at Penn is a liberal? LOL

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    • Replies: @Jeff the Donleavy Fan
    I don't see many students publicly voicing their support of her now, when she badly needs it.

    I don't think many law school students would take a bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class that they otherwise wouldn't take because the teacher is a race realist. But I do think there are students out there who would loudly proclaim that they need to take the bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class but they can't because the teacher is Wax, and therefore Wax needs to be removed from teaching that class. This argument already worked for her Civ Pro section, so why wouldn't it work again?
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  166. @YetAnotherAnon
    All that printed cash/cheap borrowing has inflated house and share prices, wrecking the life chances of many young people and their prospects of raising a family. But headline inflation's not roared ahead because

    a) the US (and UK) import deflation in the form of cheap Far Eastern manufactures, and fuel prices have remained stable thanks to great US engineering (fracking/tight oil/gas).

    b) mass immigration has forced real wages down. In the US lower male median than in 1973, in the UK lower than in 1997, I've not looked back before then.

    Reduced wages = inflation for Joe Public just as much as rising prices.

    Yes, excellent analysis. You have a real handle on economics.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    you, ben, are so Obi-Won wrapped up in Yoda-talk, tonight...love it!
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  167. @kimchilover
    Completely agree. I can't think of a single distinguished professor from my law school that didn't teach one of the fundamental first year courses. In fact, it's during that crazy stressful first year that you really connect with a couple of professors and look forward to taking them in their more specialized (and far smaller) elective courses during your second and third year. I could see this having a real impact on the number of students who decide to take her elective courses...they just won't know who she is and will opt for someone they're more familiar with.

    Anyone with a lick of sense will check out her (and all other faculty members’, too) curriculum vitae. It is posted on Penn Law’s website. When they see the stunning background and accomplishments of the woman in her diverse career, I should be amazed if they don’t choose to study with her instead of with Larry Leftist the non-entity, a faculty nebbish who is currently hissing at her through his spittle-flecked lips. You want to find a way into the upper reaches of the profession? Why not study with the one who has been there?

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  168. @Flip
    Andrew Jackson paid off the US federal debt in 1835.

    Wow! Score one for you!

    I did not know that. Another feather in Jackson’s cap.

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  169. @Rosamond Vincy
    Which means only that those departments will get budget cuts, NOT that they will restore study of Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Plato's Republic, or the Romantic Poets. The viable departments will make Uni an expensive trade school.

    Our Western Culture is being deliberately withheld from this generation. It has been denied its just heritage by the very people it is paying to communicate that knowledge.

    What Lewis warned of in the sermon "Learning in War-Time" has come sickeningly true.

    I am fully aware of what you just wrote. I was just trying to speculate on how prof. Wax can protect herself so she can have a decent retirement and not by ousted out by the mean girls of her Uni, like a bag of garbage.

    I was graduated in the 80′s and late 80′s (Master’s)before the PC shit hit the Uni’s, or had not arrived yet. I have done a whole ton of “homeschooling” in addition to public HS, about history/literature/art/philosophy to my sons. I started to sense the bs (thankfully, they were ahead of the red tide of Common Core) of the Cathedral. Also, my sons loved books! They still sort of half anticipate with glee; half know, “shit, this is a long one” at Christmas. I am so proud of their interest in everything and growing confidence – maybe?……. they can skip the cynicism of their mother? – naaah. I have also trained them to be warriors.

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    God bless you for not letting the world dumb down your kids.

    I thank God my own mother had me reading Carrol, Alcott, Dickens, and Austen for fun. NOT versions "adapted for young readers" by people who underestimate what kids are capable of, and thus limit it in the perfect self-fulfilling prophecy, but the original texts. Never occurred to me that I "wasn't ready" for them. If I wanted to know what a snood or a barouche-landau was, I looked it up.

    Common Core has pretty much wiped out literature in favor of "informational reading," but seeing a world through the eyes of a character is a great way to get in interest in history or local customs, i.e., Johnny Tremaine, Misty of Chincoteague.

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  170. @Barnard
    National Review's influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left. Writers like Rich Lowry and David French expend all of this energy denouncing anyone to their right on racial issues, piously virtue signalling their moral superiority. Then a writer like Jane Coaston, who they were stupid enough to let write an anti-Trump article for National Review last year, comes backs and yells "racist" at them now like an obnoxious kid on the playground. As long as the big, dumb donors keep writing checks to fund their operation, Lowry and the gang will keep playing their part.

    National Review’s influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left.

    Vox is not “liberal”. It is hard left, left of any other “mainstream” publication.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Ben, you are definitely, more Yoda...haha! You have an amazing amount of energy to educate and not just light-saber these guys. I would have trouble holding my temper....Vox would be a headless, dying corpse "North of the Wall" if I ever, ever had to deal with them, haha!
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  171. @ben tillman
    Yes, excellent analysis. You have a real handle on economics.

    you, ben, are so Obi-Won wrapped up in Yoda-talk, tonight…love it!

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  172. @ben tillman

    National Review’s influence with rank and file conservatives is basically gone. I have to wonder if part of the reason liberal publications like VOX still take shots at National Review is that they know how much it rankles their writers to get criticised as racists by the left.
     
    Vox is not "liberal". It is hard left, left of any other "mainstream" publication.

    Ben, you are definitely, more Yoda…haha! You have an amazing amount of energy to educate and not just light-saber these guys. I would have trouble holding my temper….Vox would be a headless, dying corpse “North of the Wall” if I ever, ever had to deal with them, haha!

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  173. @Pentheus
    OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick's Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy's Day -- to make a "point." The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.


    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/17/detroit-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-detroit-st-paddys-pub-refused-serve-irish-people-make-point-m/435650002/

    I have not time now to unpack all the false and fallacious premises, though there is a bumper crop of low-hanging fruit.

    Bottom line: According to them, why should there be any "Irish" bars at all?

    Talk about a dogwhistle of white supremacy. And SAINT Patrick's Day? The whole thing is innately offensive, non-inclusionary and triggering. Not who we are as a People. Etc.

    OT but not totally.

    Have not seen anyone in the Steve-o-sphere comment on this recent St. Patrick’s Day story.

    Irish bar refuses to serve Irish people on St. Paddy’s Day — to make a “point.” The only point, though, is virtue-signalling.

    It wasn’t an Irish bar. It wasn’t a bar. It was a vacant space rented by a Jew for a PR stunt.

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  174. @kimchilover
    Completely agree. I can't think of a single distinguished professor from my law school that didn't teach one of the fundamental first year courses. In fact, it's during that crazy stressful first year that you really connect with a couple of professors and look forward to taking them in their more specialized (and far smaller) elective courses during your second and third year. I could see this having a real impact on the number of students who decide to take her elective courses...they just won't know who she is and will opt for someone they're more familiar with.

    I always chose the professors who were not well-liked…or had controversial opinions.

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  175. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha
    relax, Steve doesn't like his "people" calling each other stupid, it is futile. Plus, we are still guessing a shit-ton, about what Adam Smith really thought, or anyone who has been dead for hundreds of years, people, even the smartest ones, were inconsistent or nuanced - we kinda' need their help, so don't make it worse, for GOD'S SAKE :)

    Lagertha – Jeez I was just trying to help the little guy.

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.

    That does not mean constructive criticism is not worth the effort.

    It almost always is, but people who care try.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don’t know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff. Not a biggie - however, I overreacted, several times, and wanted to destroy him :) until I understood the vibe he was instilling, or what this entire site is really about - it is not about fighting or calling each other stupid.

    I grew up with brothers, in a very large patriarchal family (whom I love) and, I got over victimhood when I was 7 (this is why Lagertha was such a Godsend avatar) early in my childhood. I respect people who may have a different point of view, no matter how irritating. Steve, thanks to the times we live in, simply does not have time to referee or worry about his commenters feelings - he is good to the ladies, btw :) . But, he wants to concentrate, as we say in Finland, to the meat and sinews of the problem at hand.

    , @Mr. Anon

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.
     
    You shouldn't extrapolate from your own experience. Everything you say is futile.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don’t know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.
     
    And just how old are you, old man? Not that I especially care. And I'm probably a lot smarter than you are too, though that's hardly much to crow about. Given how stupid you are.

    And choose a screen name, asshat.
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  176. @Crawfurdmuir

    Especially if interest rates ever go back up (which they will) there are many states and localities that won’t be able to fund their debt service plus pension costs (and continue to operate their government functions).
     
    About three years ago I attended a speech given by an economist from my region's Federal Reserve Bank. After his speech there was a question-and-answer period, and I had a chance to ask a question. My question was twofold: 1) If interest rates rise to historic norms, service on the national debt will rise to a point that revenue to pay for all other Federal expenditures will be lacking; and 2) If interest rates return to historic norms, the Fed's securities portfolio will fall precipitately in value, and when it is marked to market, it will wipe out a good deal if not all of the Fed's capital. What will the Fed then do?

    The man responded with some of the most opaque and convoluted verbiage I can recall hearing. I am reasonably familiar with economics and banking, having been a bank director for twenty years, yet it left me baffled. I think the Fed must operate a school to teach its spokesmen how to string words together without conveying meaning - perhaps it could be called the Alan Greenspan Academy of Persiflage.

    Sometime afterwards I asked my bank's CEO, who was also present at this speech, what he thought. He also thought the answer was creative nonsense, and said his opinion was that "they'll just change the accounting rules" to get around the problem of what rising interest rates will do to the Fed's bond portfolio, and the effect that marking-to-market will have on the Fed's capital.

    My opinion is that the current climate of relatively low interest rates will continue for as long as the Fed can control it. Neither the Treasury nor the Fed can afford to let them rise very much. However, the Fed is not in complete control. Interest rates on Treasuries are set by auction, and the ability to keep them from rising depends on the willingness of investors to continue buying bonds at prices close to par. The Fed can intervene only to a limited degree to support their prices.

    To paraphrase the 1970 movie title - suppose they held a Treasury auction and nobody bid? I remember a few years ago there was a Treasury auction that was sparsely attended because it took place just before Christmas and some of the usual bidders did not bother to show. There was an uptick of about 25 basis points just because of this. Should one or more large buyers of Treasuries refuse to bid at some future date, that will be when the U.S. economy starts down the path followed by Greece.

    Good stuff, Crawfurdmuir.

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  177. @Charles Pewitt
    Charles Murray's weak defense of Richwine (sample portion):

    I’m sick of it. I also have no idea how to fix it. But we can light candles. Here is what I undertake to do, and I invite you to join me: Look for opportunities to praise people with whom you disagree but who have made an argument that deserves to be taken seriously. Look for opportunities to criticize allies who have used crimethink tactics against your adversaries. Identify yourself not just with those who agree with you, but with all those who stand for something and play fair.

     

    https://www.nationalreview.com/2013/05/defense-jason-richwine-charles-murray/

    Charles Murray has stood by and watched his nation be flooded with Third Worlders and his answer has always been the same: MORE MASS IMMIGRATION.

    Charles Murray is a money-grubbing slob who has done the bidding of the evil globalizers who have used mass immigration, trade deal scams and monetary policy to destroy the United States.

    Charles Murray then blames White Core Americans of modest means for moral failures when he knows damn well the evil globalizers were using specific governmental policies to pauperize and immiserate those people.

    Go to hell, Murray!

    Charles Murray is a money-grubbing slob who has done the bidding of the evil globalizers who have used mass immigration, trade deal scams and monetary policy to destroy the United States.

    That’s another way of saying he’s a hedonist. Hedonism is pleasure now at the expense of life in the future.

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  178. @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    You do know that AndrewR is a DNI troll sent to infiltrate the Alt-R, don't you?

    It’s bizarre how you stalk me based on me criticizing Trump like a year ago. That’s really unhealthy and off-putting behavior. It’s also shameful of Sailet to allow it when he memory holes tons of completely innocuous and high quality comments.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    whatever...be a man. Talking about what is healthy to a stranger on the internet, is so crazy - mental. Go be a man and be honest to your effin self - probably fail!

    Once again, I learned a long time ago, you don't fight with fellow posters, here, or insult people - you have to have way bigger skin, or actually, be magnanimous (for once in your life). To be respected by people who post here, TRY TO be more erudite (extreme iSteve Games) or just plain, honest, than other people here.

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  179. @Lagertha
    I am fully aware of what you just wrote. I was just trying to speculate on how prof. Wax can protect herself so she can have a decent retirement and not by ousted out by the mean girls of her Uni, like a bag of garbage.

    I was graduated in the 80's and late 80's (Master's)before the PC shit hit the Uni's, or had not arrived yet. I have done a whole ton of "homeschooling" in addition to public HS, about history/literature/art/philosophy to my sons. I started to sense the bs (thankfully, they were ahead of the red tide of Common Core) of the Cathedral. Also, my sons loved books! They still sort of half anticipate with glee; half know, "shit, this is a long one" at Christmas. I am so proud of their interest in everything and growing confidence - maybe?....... they can skip the cynicism of their mother? - naaah. I have also trained them to be warriors.

    God bless you for not letting the world dumb down your kids.

    I thank God my own mother had me reading Carrol, Alcott, Dickens, and Austen for fun. NOT versions “adapted for young readers” by people who underestimate what kids are capable of, and thus limit it in the perfect self-fulfilling prophecy, but the original texts. Never occurred to me that I “wasn’t ready” for them. If I wanted to know what a snood or a barouche-landau was, I looked it up.

    Common Core has pretty much wiped out literature in favor of “informational reading,” but seeing a world through the eyes of a character is a great way to get in interest in history or local customs, i.e., Johnny Tremaine, Misty of Chincoteague.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    I'm making a piece about Misty and Stormy! - (my recently passed mommy was my Misty)...a whole 'lotta horse stuff - I am an artist. I will let you know (a couple of years from now) or, you will know, where it will be shown. My art is both painting and stuff. I am an old world painter, but I love my collections of stuff. Most people cling to stuff...and I revere stuff. Ok, done :)
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  180. @anonymous
    Lagertha - Jeez I was just trying to help the little guy.

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.

    That does not mean constructive criticism is not worth the effort.

    It almost always is, but people who care try.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don't know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.

    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff. Not a biggie – however, I overreacted, several times, and wanted to destroy him :) until I understood the vibe he was instilling, or what this entire site is really about - it is not about fighting or calling each other stupid.

    I grew up with brothers, in a very large patriarchal family (whom I love) and, I got over victimhood when I was 7 (this is why Lagertha was such a Godsend avatar) early in my childhood. I respect people who may have a different point of view, no matter how irritating. Steve, thanks to the times we live in, simply does not have time to referee or worry about his commenters feelings – he is good to the ladies, btw :) . But, he wants to concentrate, as we say in Finland, to the meat and sinews of the problem at hand.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    Lagertha - with all due respect - I am no midwit, and I have seen what the truth is on several of the subjects that are so vehemently discussed here .... Mr Anon is one of the stupid people who, due to a lack of humility, often bring down the conversations in which they participate. There are many who are worse than him but they are also more hopeless, so I do not see any need to mention their names.

    Feel some compassion for him., as he is now, and pray that some day he will be less stupid.

    It is not often that anyone has the opportunity to be criticized by someone much more intelligent than them. Everyone is too polite!!! All I want is for him to work harder on understanding this world (by the way, Lagertha, I could easily spend an hour explaining Adam Smith's point of view on just about any current subject. I don't, because it would be futile. I could, but I don't. The arrogance of the people who want to be reassured that nobody understands anything is what it is. They would ignore my accurate descriptions. Trust me.)

    I had more brothers than you, my young friend. Such things are so unimportant when we face the real challenges of the world, aren't they? Think about it, Lagertha - think about it. Is it not possible that I know nothing? That you know much more than me? Maybe such things are possible. But probably not.

    And, to be fair, I was a friend of a friend of a friend of P.G. Wodehouse, a friend of a friend of Pournelle, and a friend of several people at almost that level. Steve Sailer can tell me that I and people like me are not wanted here any time he wants. Nice to see you trying to help him out. You did amuse me, and I appreciate that.

    BY The way, if you like patriarchal families, you should show a little respect to me. My descendants will number in the thousands, at least , unless I am very unlucky, and in the tens of thousands or more, if my prayers are heard,

    and God, for the record, has always answered my prayers in the way that He promised.

    Thanks for reading.

    As for me and my house, God is good to us.
    , @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff.
     
    If I have attacked you, I am truly sorry.

    Anonymous of March 23, 2018 at 2:06 am, however, can go f**k himself.
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  181. @Rosamond Vincy
    God bless you for not letting the world dumb down your kids.

    I thank God my own mother had me reading Carrol, Alcott, Dickens, and Austen for fun. NOT versions "adapted for young readers" by people who underestimate what kids are capable of, and thus limit it in the perfect self-fulfilling prophecy, but the original texts. Never occurred to me that I "wasn't ready" for them. If I wanted to know what a snood or a barouche-landau was, I looked it up.

    Common Core has pretty much wiped out literature in favor of "informational reading," but seeing a world through the eyes of a character is a great way to get in interest in history or local customs, i.e., Johnny Tremaine, Misty of Chincoteague.

    I’m making a piece about Misty and Stormy! – (my recently passed mommy was my Misty)…a whole ‘lotta horse stuff – I am an artist. I will let you know (a couple of years from now) or, you will know, where it will be shown. My art is both painting and stuff. I am an old world painter, but I love my collections of stuff. Most people cling to stuff…and I revere stuff. Ok, done :)

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    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    BTW, have you noticed that the brother in that books says all kinds of snotty things about girls, and the sister just shrugs it off? Instead of getting Othered by the Patriarchy or Poisoned by Toxic Masculinity, they work together to get their pony....
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  182. @AndrewR
    It's bizarre how you stalk me based on me criticizing Trump like a year ago. That's really unhealthy and off-putting behavior. It's also shameful of Sailet to allow it when he memory holes tons of completely innocuous and high quality comments.

    whatever…be a man. Talking about what is healthy to a stranger on the internet, is so crazy – mental. Go be a man and be honest to your effin self – probably fail!

    Once again, I learned a long time ago, you don’t fight with fellow posters, here, or insult people – you have to have way bigger skin, or actually, be magnanimous (for once in your life). To be respected by people who post here, TRY TO be more erudite (extreme iSteve Games) or just plain, honest, than other people here.

    Read More
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  183. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha
    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff. Not a biggie - however, I overreacted, several times, and wanted to destroy him :) until I understood the vibe he was instilling, or what this entire site is really about - it is not about fighting or calling each other stupid.

    I grew up with brothers, in a very large patriarchal family (whom I love) and, I got over victimhood when I was 7 (this is why Lagertha was such a Godsend avatar) early in my childhood. I respect people who may have a different point of view, no matter how irritating. Steve, thanks to the times we live in, simply does not have time to referee or worry about his commenters feelings - he is good to the ladies, btw :) . But, he wants to concentrate, as we say in Finland, to the meat and sinews of the problem at hand.

    Lagertha – with all due respect – I am no midwit, and I have seen what the truth is on several of the subjects that are so vehemently discussed here …. Mr Anon is one of the stupid people who, due to a lack of humility, often bring down the conversations in which they participate. There are many who are worse than him but they are also more hopeless, so I do not see any need to mention their names.

    Feel some compassion for him., as he is now, and pray that some day he will be less stupid.

    It is not often that anyone has the opportunity to be criticized by someone much more intelligent than them. Everyone is too polite!!! All I want is for him to work harder on understanding this world (by the way, Lagertha, I could easily spend an hour explaining Adam Smith’s point of view on just about any current subject. I don’t, because it would be futile. I could, but I don’t. The arrogance of the people who want to be reassured that nobody understands anything is what it is. They would ignore my accurate descriptions. Trust me.)

    I had more brothers than you, my young friend. Such things are so unimportant when we face the real challenges of the world, aren’t they? Think about it, Lagertha – think about it. Is it not possible that I know nothing? That you know much more than me? Maybe such things are possible. But probably not.

    And, to be fair, I was a friend of a friend of a friend of P.G. Wodehouse, a friend of a friend of Pournelle, and a friend of several people at almost that level. Steve Sailer can tell me that I and people like me are not wanted here any time he wants. Nice to see you trying to help him out. You did amuse me, and I appreciate that.

    BY The way, if you like patriarchal families, you should show a little respect to me. My descendants will number in the thousands, at least , unless I am very unlucky, and in the tens of thousands or more, if my prayers are heard,

    and God, for the record, has always answered my prayers in the way that He promised.

    Thanks for reading.

    As for me and my house, God is good to us.

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  184. @Rosie

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.
     
    There is a very serious danger of these men marrying Asian classmates. White advocates need to think carefully about whether they really want White women out of STEM programs. As a matter of fact, it's probably time for White advocates to start concentrating on White advocacy again.

    I’m baffled.

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?

    And what’s this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.

    Me, I don’t care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.

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    • Replies: @Rosie

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?
     
    Sharia law, hadn't you noticed?

    And what’s this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.
     
    The alt-Right has taken a very hard line on women doing anything but having babies for some time now. Just the other day, Richard Spencer and Gregory Conte actually publicly criticized Lauren Southern for her work in South Africa. They gave her grudging credit for her work, but specifically said she should be home having babies instead.

    Me, I don’t care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.
     
    I very much agree, the question is how best to go about making that happen.
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  185. @anonymous
    Nobody cares what you think.

    It was Herbert Stein, not "Stein", and he would not want people like you quoting it.

    I like the little "it might not happen all at once" bit, as if you were just a simple humble guy who knows the future fairly well but does not know it all that well. You don't.

    You are a stupid person and you have no idea about what Adam Smith thought about the world.

    God loves stupid people, so there is that.

    Nobody cares what you think.

    I certainly don’t care what you think, asshat.

    It was Herbert Stein, not “Stein”, and he would not want people like you quoting it.

    And how is “Stein” different from…………”Stein”? Idiot. How would you know what he would want?

    You are an exceptionally stupid man. And a sh*thead, too.

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  186. @Lagertha
    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff. Not a biggie - however, I overreacted, several times, and wanted to destroy him :) until I understood the vibe he was instilling, or what this entire site is really about - it is not about fighting or calling each other stupid.

    I grew up with brothers, in a very large patriarchal family (whom I love) and, I got over victimhood when I was 7 (this is why Lagertha was such a Godsend avatar) early in my childhood. I respect people who may have a different point of view, no matter how irritating. Steve, thanks to the times we live in, simply does not have time to referee or worry about his commenters feelings - he is good to the ladies, btw :) . But, he wants to concentrate, as we say in Finland, to the meat and sinews of the problem at hand.

    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff.

    If I have attacked you, I am truly sorry.

    Anonymous of March 23, 2018 at 2:06 am, however, can go f**k himself.

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    so funny, Mr. Anon...I have been out of orbit for a while. No...you set me straight on Steve's blog, 4 years ago. I think it is difficult for new people, as it was for me, to let go of one's ego. Once you say stuff, you have to accept that stuff is thrown back at you. I believe that Steve needs the widest audience as possible...even if the "regulars" feel that newcomers are tedious or not as intelligent - we need numbers, most of all, against the real enemy, the thought police...and the legions of collectivists that are out to destroy all non-conformists! ;)
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  187. @anonymous
    Lagertha - Jeez I was just trying to help the little guy.

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.

    That does not mean constructive criticism is not worth the effort.

    It almost always is, but people who care try.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don't know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.

    OF Course everything everyone says to anyone else is usually futile.

    You shouldn’t extrapolate from your own experience. Everything you say is futile.

    Maybe Mr Anon will read up on economics, ponder the questions, read the relevant passages in the Bible, I don’t know: there is room for improvement, that is all I was saying. He is probably a third of a century younger than me, he has time to get less clueless.

    And just how old are you, old man? Not that I especially care. And I’m probably a lot smarter than you are too, though that’s hardly much to crow about. Given how stupid you are.

    And choose a screen name, asshat.

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  188. @ben tillman

    Those two made short statements of fact. Kevin MacDonald wrote an entire book which implied that Jews are inherently evil. None were fired.
     
    Nice libel. Why don't you read something before you comment on it?

    It isn’t a libel. That is his argument.

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    • Replies: @ben tillman
    You haven't read his books, and you're just making stuff up. It is a libel.
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  189. @Highlander
    Charles Murray and Newt Gingrich are too old to be a "baby boomers" nor do they act like boomer either as they are way too stuffy. The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.

    The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.

    Wine — Wine — Wine

    Wine — Wine — Wine

    Hank Williams III(born 1972) sings Wine Spodeeodee.

    Johnny Burnette(born 1934) and Jerry Lee Lewis(born 1935) also sang this song. I don’t know who wrote it or where it came from.

    Hank Williams III and The Damn Band, live in Scotland:

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    • Replies: @Highlander

    I don’t know who wrote it or where it came from.
     
    Stick McGhee wrote it when he was in the Army during WWII. Here is the original refrain which was not used when he cut a recording of the song for Harlem Records in 1947.

    Drinkin’ that mess is our delight,
    And when we get drunk, start fightin’ all night.
    Knockin’ out windows and tearin’ down doors,
    Drinkin’ half-gallons and callin’ for more.
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Pass that bottle to me!"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0lmX06odhw
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  190. @Rosie

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.
     
    There is a very serious danger of these men marrying Asian classmates. White advocates need to think carefully about whether they really want White women out of STEM programs. As a matter of fact, it's probably time for White advocates to start concentrating on White advocacy again.

    Your stridency on this point kind of defines why the white scientists/lawyers/engineers marry their Asian classmates.

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    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    What did she say that was strident? People look to marry those who they're close to. The white engineers don't encounter many white females, so they pair up with the Asian females. This doesn't support the tribalism that seems to be the desired outcome with many commenters here.

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don't marry engineers or lawyers. They're with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.

    Also anyway, no enemies to the right.
    , @Rosie
    How am I "strident"? Do tell. Accusing someone of stridency sounds to me like it means something like that: "You make relevant points and you're not wrong, but I don't want to hear it so please shut up."

    If I'm wrong, please explain what I am doing wrong so I can improve and cease giving offense.
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  191. @Tyrion 2
    It isn't a libel. That is his argument.

    You haven’t read his books, and you’re just making stuff up. It is a libel.

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    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    I have and that is his theory. He obviously got carried away when just over half-way through the trilogy and thought if he dialed it up he might have a big impact. It was clearly too much to resist for a mediocre academic in a mediocre discipline at a less than mediocre school. Silly Old MacDonald.
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  192. @Crawfurdmuir

    In Sweden’s case (about 30%), banks and others have complained that bonds mustn’t get too scarce or it’s not worth the effort to trade in them and possibly that consumer banking itself gets difficult.
     
    What's not explained here is that banks need to have bond portfolios for liquidity. Deposits have to be invested in something in order to provide banks with a sufficient net interest margin to be profitable.

    The majority of a bank's assets are loans; however, loans generally can't be called early and while some can be sold (e.g., first mortgages that are "conforming" can be sold to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac on the secondary market), others can't.

    Banks therefore buy bonds because in the event of depositor demand, they can readily be sold. A bank balance sheet might, for example, show assets 75% of which were loans, 15% of which were investment securities, and the remaining 10% of which represented cash on hand and due from banks, banking house and furniture, and everything else. Banks want to hold sovereign bonds because it is usually highly liquid and poses less risk than corporate bonds.

    Part of the initial panic in 2008 came about because many banks held significant amounts of "agencies" - bonds issued by the FHA, Ginnie Mae, and other actual government agencies, but also by government-sponsored enterprises like Fannie and Freddie. It became apparent that many of the latter securities were backed by dubious mortgages, and suddenly they were not the liquid investments that the bond rating companies had promised. Liquidity was restored only by government bailouts and the Fed's acting as a buyer of last resort. It was an expensive lesson in the folly of privatizing profit while socializing risk.

    Thanks, a fine explanation. The final piece of the puzzle, I suppose, is that the bonds should also (mostly?) be denominated in the local currency so there is no risk of loss due to currencies diverging when deposits are redeemed.

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    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir
    Yes. In the U.S., the vast majority of bonds held by banks are denominated in dollars; in the EU, in euros; and so forth. Doing otherwise would introduce an element of trading risk that conflicts with the primary object of holding bonds, which is liquidity.

    When the bank in question is a large international one such as JP Morgan Chase, managing the bond portfolio is a much more complex proposition than it would be for a regional or community bank, and the portfolio is large enough that even minor fluctuations can involve huge amounts of money. There is also a temptation to engage in speculative trading. You may remember the Morgan "whale trade" in 2012. It was initially estimated that the bank lost $2 billion, and later figures showed a much higher amount. Despite this, Morgan did not have a single quarter in a loss position, and made a profit of $21.3 billion that year, which was a record.

    The news of the "whale trade" sent JP Morgan stock down about $10/share. I was (and still am) a Morgan stockholder, and on doing a quick calculation I realized that the loss in Morgan's market cap was many times the amount of the bank's trading loss. I called my then stockbroker and asked him what his research people thought of JP Morgan. He said they rated it a buy, so I bought another block of it, and within a few months the stock was back up where it had been.

    Speculative trading in a bank's securities portfolio is a bad idea, but it's important to recognize that all banks experience paper gains and losses in their investments as they are marked to market. Actual loss occurs only if the issuer of a security defaults or if one realizes a loss on its sale. Simply holding a bond that is currently selling at a discount until it matures or is called eliminates the paper loss.

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  193. @Brutusale
    Your stridency on this point kind of defines why the white scientists/lawyers/engineers marry their Asian classmates.

    What did she say that was strident? People look to marry those who they’re close to. The white engineers don’t encounter many white females, so they pair up with the Asian females. This doesn’t support the tribalism that seems to be the desired outcome with many commenters here.

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don’t marry engineers or lawyers. They’re with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.

    Also anyway, no enemies to the right.

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    • Replies: @Rosie

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don’t marry engineers or lawyers. They’re with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.
     
    I've been thinking about this today. Please don't take offense at what I'm about to say, because I certainly don't mean to say that boys are "bad" or need to be "fixed."

    I have noticed that I find engineer-type guys to be somewhat disagreeable, and I wonder if some of them don't have a bit of a chip on their shoulder from being bullied as kids. Lacking confidence in their ability to communicate and persuade, they default to manipulation and attempts to control.

    Now obviously, this is a very gross generalization that will not be true in all or even a great majority of cases, but I think there might be something to it. I'm curious to see if anti-bullying measures make a positive difference for some boys. As far as I'm concerned, ability grouping of students would be the ideal solution to this problem, but of course we know that can't be allowed here in diversitopia because people might notice patterns, you know.
    , @Brutusale
    Maybe strident is the wrong word. Hyperbolic is probably better.

    The hyperbolic "serious danger" aside, it's good to know that these white tech guys have no agency, that proximity is all that matters. But even if it is a "serious danger", the question remains: did these tech guys abandon white women or did white women abandon tech guys?

    And here I went to a uni that was about 35% Jewish and about 20% Asian, yet almost all my relationships were with white Christian woman. As it is now.

    I would hope that cops, trainers and firemen would have more attractive wives than engineers and lawyers. Cops, trainers and firemen, given the physical demands of their professions, tend to be in better shape than your current average American. Oh, right, women marry the brain, not the body.

    I'm not part of the tribalists amongst the iSteve crowd. I love the person, hate the race.

    I have a lot of enemies to the right, starting with John Bolton.

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  194. @Autochthon
    I'm baffled.

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?

    And what's this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.

    Me, I don't care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?

    Sharia law, hadn’t you noticed?

    And what’s this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.

    The alt-Right has taken a very hard line on women doing anything but having babies for some time now. Just the other day, Richard Spencer and Gregory Conte actually publicly criticized Lauren Southern for her work in South Africa. They gave her grudging credit for her work, but specifically said she should be home having babies instead.

    Me, I don’t care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.

    I very much agree, the question is how best to go about making that happen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Oh. You're one of those folks who reckons Richard Spencer and his lot are representative of the alternative right.

    Carry on.
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  195. @Brutusale
    Your stridency on this point kind of defines why the white scientists/lawyers/engineers marry their Asian classmates.

    How am I “strident”? Do tell. Accusing someone of stridency sounds to me like it means something like that: “You make relevant points and you’re not wrong, but I don’t want to hear it so please shut up.”

    If I’m wrong, please explain what I am doing wrong so I can improve and cease giving offense.

    Read More
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  196. @ben tillman

    Because there is no shortage of women lawyers, these data would tend to support Damore’s memo. The legal profession is not more welcoming to women than tech. It’s just that women are nearly equal in the sorts of cognitive skills needed for lawyering.
     
    Women generally make bad lawyers.

    Women generally make bad lawyers.

    (Good Lord, make it stop, please!)

    Evidence?

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    It's what I've observed in many years as a lawyer.
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  197. @ben tillman
    You haven't read his books, and you're just making stuff up. It is a libel.

    I have and that is his theory. He obviously got carried away when just over half-way through the trilogy and thought if he dialed it up he might have a big impact. It was clearly too much to resist for a mediocre academic in a mediocre discipline at a less than mediocre school. Silly Old MacDonald.

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  198. @Lagertha
    I'm making a piece about Misty and Stormy! - (my recently passed mommy was my Misty)...a whole 'lotta horse stuff - I am an artist. I will let you know (a couple of years from now) or, you will know, where it will be shown. My art is both painting and stuff. I am an old world painter, but I love my collections of stuff. Most people cling to stuff...and I revere stuff. Ok, done :)

    BTW, have you noticed that the brother in that books says all kinds of snotty things about girls, and the sister just shrugs it off? Instead of getting Othered by the Patriarchy or Poisoned by Toxic Masculinity, they work together to get their pony….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    That was my brother (both of them) in a nut shell. They both provoked me all the time, and I smacked them back when they least expected it...revenge was sweet, those days. We became extremely close when I finally turned 16 (youngest) and we are still, all, very close, and, our spouses, and their siblings, like everybody, too. It is unique and fortunate. We are all in each other's wills, and, we didn't fight over issues like inheritance and shared property. I think because we fought a lot as kids, we got past that early - even if we were extremely high-strung/intense. But, if something goes horribly wrong, both of them would be on the first jet out to help me.

    Marguerite Henry was very good at writing about "normal" kids and not making her stories overly cloying and boring. I finally went to Chincoteague & Assateague Islands a few years ago - amazing that the ponies are still there. For a horse-lover like me, it was a pilgrimage.

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  199. @Rosie

    Male engineers and scientists are generally far less charming and attractive to females than are male lawyers; not many women go that route for a man, and even if they did, they’d have to stay afloat in the school and profession until they married off, and that is harder for females in technology that it is for females in law, as being charming and attractive has value for law, but not so much technology, and technology is harder for females in any event.
     
    There is a very serious danger of these men marrying Asian classmates. White advocates need to think carefully about whether they really want White women out of STEM programs. As a matter of fact, it's probably time for White advocates to start concentrating on White advocacy again.

    Perhaps a “remedy” is for white men to move away from STEM? If they have the intellect for STEM, they likely have the metal horsepower required to work at things that would make them more appealing to the women they want.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosie
    I don't think they have trouble with girls because they're in STEM. I think their trouble with girls and their career choice have a common cause. IOW it may be that whatever makes them good at STEM detracts from their social competence due to some sort of cognitive tradeoff.

    It makes next to no sense that women would dislike engineers just because they're engineers.
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  200. @Pericles
    Thanks, a fine explanation. The final piece of the puzzle, I suppose, is that the bonds should also (mostly?) be denominated in the local currency so there is no risk of loss due to currencies diverging when deposits are redeemed.

    Yes. In the U.S., the vast majority of bonds held by banks are denominated in dollars; in the EU, in euros; and so forth. Doing otherwise would introduce an element of trading risk that conflicts with the primary object of holding bonds, which is liquidity.

    When the bank in question is a large international one such as JP Morgan Chase, managing the bond portfolio is a much more complex proposition than it would be for a regional or community bank, and the portfolio is large enough that even minor fluctuations can involve huge amounts of money. There is also a temptation to engage in speculative trading. You may remember the Morgan “whale trade” in 2012. It was initially estimated that the bank lost $2 billion, and later figures showed a much higher amount. Despite this, Morgan did not have a single quarter in a loss position, and made a profit of $21.3 billion that year, which was a record.

    The news of the “whale trade” sent JP Morgan stock down about $10/share. I was (and still am) a Morgan stockholder, and on doing a quick calculation I realized that the loss in Morgan’s market cap was many times the amount of the bank’s trading loss. I called my then stockbroker and asked him what his research people thought of JP Morgan. He said they rated it a buy, so I bought another block of it, and within a few months the stock was back up where it had been.

    Speculative trading in a bank’s securities portfolio is a bad idea, but it’s important to recognize that all banks experience paper gains and losses in their investments as they are marked to market. Actual loss occurs only if the issuer of a security defaults or if one realizes a loss on its sale. Simply holding a bond that is currently selling at a discount until it matures or is called eliminates the paper loss.

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  201. @stillCARealist
    What did she say that was strident? People look to marry those who they're close to. The white engineers don't encounter many white females, so they pair up with the Asian females. This doesn't support the tribalism that seems to be the desired outcome with many commenters here.

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don't marry engineers or lawyers. They're with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.

    Also anyway, no enemies to the right.

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don’t marry engineers or lawyers. They’re with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.

    I’ve been thinking about this today. Please don’t take offense at what I’m about to say, because I certainly don’t mean to say that boys are “bad” or need to be “fixed.”

    I have noticed that I find engineer-type guys to be somewhat disagreeable, and I wonder if some of them don’t have a bit of a chip on their shoulder from being bullied as kids. Lacking confidence in their ability to communicate and persuade, they default to manipulation and attempts to control.

    Now obviously, this is a very gross generalization that will not be true in all or even a great majority of cases, but I think there might be something to it. I’m curious to see if anti-bullying measures make a positive difference for some boys. As far as I’m concerned, ability grouping of students would be the ideal solution to this problem, but of course we know that can’t be allowed here in diversitopia because people might notice patterns, you know.

    Read More
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  202. @The Anti-Gnostic
    OK. Next question: are there buyers for all this amount, every auction? Otherwise, I assume the Fed is always the buyer of last resort.

    Anti-Gnostic, the Fed “buys” as much paper as is necessary to keep the interest rate close to its chosen/stated target (I think set @ ~1.75% currently?). If outside buyers, a combination of institutional & retail, won’t buy near that rate, the Fed steps in to buy until demand (those buyers)return, and resume purchases near the targeted rate. The Fed gets an opportunity to sell, from its balance, when there are too many buyers for the treasuries offered at a given auction.

    Of course by Fed buying, I mean just adding it to their balance sheet, not actually acquiring funds from somewhere, other than etherland, to purchase those treasuries. So far this system has worked out fine; the Fed has been able to reduce their balance without too much trouble when everyone from fund managers to foreign governments get “spooked”, and decide it’s best to shift more of their loot back into US treasuries.

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  203. @Rosamond Vincy
    OTOH, I know a parish where they hold the St Patrick's Mass followed by Ceilidh on March 16. The priests got tired of drunk men getting in line for Communion and puking in the aisle.

    I am interested in this parish where the caeli precedes the Mass. Where exactly can these revelries be found?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosamond Vincy
    The Ceilhi always followed Mass, but when they held it on the day instead of the vigil, some parishioners would apparently hit every bar in town before showing up for Mass. Green beer smells bad enough on the way down.....
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  204. @Meretricious
    many students will want to take her courses because of her brave race realism--you think everyone at Penn is a liberal? LOL

    I don’t see many students publicly voicing their support of her now, when she badly needs it.

    I don’t think many law school students would take a bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class that they otherwise wouldn’t take because the teacher is a race realist. But I do think there are students out there who would loudly proclaim that they need to take the bankruptcy/administrative law/remedies class but they can’t because the teacher is Wax, and therefore Wax needs to be removed from teaching that class. This argument already worked for her Civ Pro section, so why wouldn’t it work again?

    Read More
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  205. @Rosie
    Link?

    BTW, the SAT isn't all that lopsided. I'd have guessed it would be more so, but then I have a very gender-typical cognitive profile. I couldn't find my way out of a wet paper bag and anything mechanical bores me half to tears.

    One exception to my gender-typical interests: I love, and am good at, mental math. It’s fun to do with kids. I thought this might be typical for girls who might use deductive reasoning along with basic mathematical propositions to think through a problem in their head, like this:

    24 x 16

    (15 x 24) + 24
    15 x 24 = 240 + (1/2 x 240) = 240 + 120 = 360
    360 + 24 = 384

    OR

    (20 x 16) + (4 x 16)
    320 + (4 x 10) + (4 x 6)
    320 + 40 + 24 = 384

    This is the essence of common core math as I understand it, which I would have expected to be more girl-friendly, but at least according to this study it may not be. Table 2 suggests boys’ advantage may be largest in mental math computation.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alfredo_Ardila/publication/5243133_Gender_Differences_and_Cognitive_Correlates_of_Mathematical_Skills_in_School-Aged_Children

    Does anybody know if there are any early results on how common core affected the gender gap in math? I like common core math, but I don’t know anyone else who does, so I’m guessing it will be abandoned.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosie
    So the Derb doesn't see my figures and face palm:

    16 x 24

    (16 x 25) - 16
    16 x 25 = 8 x 50 = 4 x 100 = 400
    400 - 16 = 384

    OR

    16 x 24 = 8 x 48 = (8 x 50) - (8 x 2)
    400 - 16 = 384

    Did I miss any?
    , @Highlander
    I'm not sure what constitutes common core math but my mental shortcut to get to 384 from 24*16 was to do (160+160) + 64.
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  206. @Charles Pewitt

    The upside is that they are not perpetual whiny types like most Gen Xers.

     

    Wine -- Wine -- Wine

    Wine -- Wine -- Wine

    Hank Williams III(born 1972) sings Wine Spodeeodee.

    Johnny Burnette(born 1934) and Jerry Lee Lewis(born 1935) also sang this song. I don't know who wrote it or where it came from.

    Hank Williams III and The Damn Band, live in Scotland:

    https://youtu.be/ps3EwloVAgM

    I don’t know who wrote it or where it came from.

    Stick McGhee wrote it when he was in the Army during WWII. Here is the original refrain which was not used when he cut a recording of the song for Harlem Records in 1947.

    Drinkin’ that mess is our delight,
    And when we get drunk, start fightin’ all night.
    Knockin’ out windows and tearin’ down doors,
    Drinkin’ half-gallons and callin’ for more.
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Drinkin’ wine motherfucker, drinkin’ wine!
    Goddam!
    Pass that bottle to me!”

    Read More
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  207. @OBEE
    I am interested in this parish where the caeli precedes the Mass. Where exactly can these revelries be found?

    The Ceilhi always followed Mass, but when they held it on the day instead of the vigil, some parishioners would apparently hit every bar in town before showing up for Mass. Green beer smells bad enough on the way down…..

    Read More
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  208. @Rosie

    Women generally make bad lawyers.
     
    (Good Lord, make it stop, please!)

    Evidence?

    It’s what I’ve observed in many years as a lawyer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rosie
    The usual response.

    Are there any sex differences in rates of disciplinary action?
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  209. @Rosie
    One exception to my gender-typical interests: I love, and am good at, mental math. It's fun to do with kids. I thought this might be typical for girls who might use deductive reasoning along with basic mathematical propositions to think through a problem in their head, like this:

    24 x 16

    (15 x 24) + 24
    15 x 24 = 240 + (1/2 x 240) = 240 + 120 = 360
    360 + 24 = 384

    OR

    (20 x 16) + (4 x 16)
    320 + (4 x 10) + (4 x 6)
    320 + 40 + 24 = 384

    This is the essence of common core math as I understand it, which I would have expected to be more girl-friendly, but at least according to this study it may not be. Table 2 suggests boys' advantage may be largest in mental math computation.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alfredo_Ardila/publication/5243133_Gender_Differences_and_Cognitive_Correlates_of_Mathematical_Skills_in_School-Aged_Children

    Does anybody know if there are any early results on how common core affected the gender gap in math? I like common core math, but I don't know anyone else who does, so I'm guessing it will be abandoned.

    So the Derb doesn’t see my figures and face palm:

    16 x 24

    (16 x 25) – 16
    16 x 25 = 8 x 50 = 4 x 100 = 400
    400 – 16 = 384

    OR

    16 x 24 = 8 x 48 = (8 x 50) – (8 x 2)
    400 – 16 = 384

    Did I miss any?

    Read More
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  210. @ben tillman
    It's what I've observed in many years as a lawyer.

    The usual response.

    Are there any sex differences in rates of disciplinary action?

    Read More
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  211. @Rosamond Vincy
    BTW, have you noticed that the brother in that books says all kinds of snotty things about girls, and the sister just shrugs it off? Instead of getting Othered by the Patriarchy or Poisoned by Toxic Masculinity, they work together to get their pony....

    That was my brother (both of them) in a nut shell. They both provoked me all the time, and I smacked them back when they least expected it…revenge was sweet, those days. We became extremely close when I finally turned 16 (youngest) and we are still, all, very close, and, our spouses, and their siblings, like everybody, too. It is unique and fortunate. We are all in each other’s wills, and, we didn’t fight over issues like inheritance and shared property. I think because we fought a lot as kids, we got past that early – even if we were extremely high-strung/intense. But, if something goes horribly wrong, both of them would be on the first jet out to help me.

    Marguerite Henry was very good at writing about “normal” kids and not making her stories overly cloying and boring. I finally went to Chincoteague & Assateague Islands a few years ago – amazing that the ponies are still there. For a horse-lover like me, it was a pilgrimage.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Highlander
    Those greenhead flies take serious bites out of one.
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  212. @danand
    Perhaps a "remedy" is for white men to move away from STEM? If they have the intellect for STEM, they likely have the metal horsepower required to work at things that would make them more appealing to the women they want.

    I don’t think they have trouble with girls because they’re in STEM. I think their trouble with girls and their career choice have a common cause. IOW it may be that whatever makes them good at STEM detracts from their social competence due to some sort of cognitive tradeoff.

    It makes next to no sense that women would dislike engineers just because they’re engineers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Highlander
    I don't know what you folks are talking about. When I worked in the Valley I never had any trouble getting dates and often at my place of employment. This is generally true everywhere and in any industry.
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  213. @Rosie

    White advocates do not advocate for whites anymore? Whatever are they advocating for?
     
    Sharia law, hadn't you noticed?

    And what’s this business about white advocates not wanting women to learn about technology? Is that a thing? From white advocates or anyone else? (As Steve and his commentariat and colleagues have laboriously documented, about the only thing keeping women from being more involved with technology are the predilections and abilities of women themselves. Hell, some guy named James Damore (spelling?) famously laid it all out in a thoughtful paper filled with formal citations recently.
     
    The alt-Right has taken a very hard line on women doing anything but having babies for some time now. Just the other day, Richard Spencer and Gregory Conte actually publicly criticized Lauren Southern for her work in South Africa. They gave her grudging credit for her work, but specifically said she should be home having babies instead.

    Me, I don’t care what white women do, except that they really ought to include making white babies a part of their plans if there is to be any hope for the future.
     
    I very much agree, the question is how best to go about making that happen.

    Oh. You’re one of those folks who reckons Richard Spencer and his lot are representative of the alternative right.

    Carry on.

    Read More
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  214. anonymous[179] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous
    You do care, I hope, what I think, Mr Anon, and you are welcome. It is difficult to try and help out people like you. I tried, and perhaps I had some success.

    I am not saddened that I tried.

    Sorry I used the word stupid. I actually think you are bright but misguided.

    I recommend - as I often do - that you reread those parts of the Bible that make you feel uncomfortable.

    You have no idea how amusing it is to me that someone might call me stupid.

    I suggest a good commentary (J Vernon McGee, if you are Protestant, the Navarre Bible, if you are Catholic) for the books of Proverbs and the Gospel of John.

    Good luck, my young friend. Nobody reading this will ever know if each of us wrote the other person's comments. Between the two of us we have done what we needed to do to show the benefits of listening to the word of the Lord.

    God bless you.

    (Asshat indeed! that is John C. Wright level humor!)

    (By the way, Herbert Stein was a friend of a friend, and I guarantee you he would have spoken to me with exponentially more respect than you did, and would have enjoyed our conversations. I do know what he would have wanted, even if he did not (as did better professors than Herbert did ) mention me in any of his published writings.)

    God bless you, and please - don't call people asshats more than once. Once is funny, twice is boring.

    How old am I, Mr Anon? Old enough to remember long conversations with veterans of the Spanish American War, old enough to have been an officer in the same outfit as a lieutenant (by then a 4 star) who served under Hoover, when Hoover was Commander in Chief. I love the United States, and I have served it well.

    Seriously – you never honestly thought I was “stupid”, did you?

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  215. Should you discriminate against people who do not have the ability to do something?
    Apparently not. Affirmative Action apparently doesn’t allow such discrimination.

    Did you ever think that some blacks might be better off if the Klan ran these schools?

    Read More
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  216. @stillCARealist
    What did she say that was strident? People look to marry those who they're close to. The white engineers don't encounter many white females, so they pair up with the Asian females. This doesn't support the tribalism that seems to be the desired outcome with many commenters here.

    Anyway the beautiful white females I know don't marry engineers or lawyers. They're with cops, firemen, trainers, and independent businessmen.

    Also anyway, no enemies to the right.

    Maybe strident is the wrong word. Hyperbolic is probably better.

    The hyperbolic “serious danger” aside, it’s good to know that these white tech guys have no agency, that proximity is all that matters. But even if it is a “serious danger”, the question remains: did these tech guys abandon white women or did white women abandon tech guys?

    And here I went to a uni that was about 35% Jewish and about 20% Asian, yet almost all my relationships were with white Christian woman. As it is now.

    I would hope that cops, trainers and firemen would have more attractive wives than engineers and lawyers. Cops, trainers and firemen, given the physical demands of their professions, tend to be in better shape than your current average American. Oh, right, women marry the brain, not the body.

    I’m not part of the tribalists amongst the iSteve crowd. I love the person, hate the race.

    I have a lot of enemies to the right, starting with John Bolton.

    Read More
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  217. “But even if it is a “serious danger”, the question remains: did these tech guys abandon white women or did white women abandon tech guys?”

    It’s generous of you to admit there is a question. Most guys just make assumptions based on speculative theories, evidence of which they do not feel any obligation to provide.

    Oh, right, women marry the brain, not the body.

    Read More
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  218. @Rosie
    One exception to my gender-typical interests: I love, and am good at, mental math. It's fun to do with kids. I thought this might be typical for girls who might use deductive reasoning along with basic mathematical propositions to think through a problem in their head, like this:

    24 x 16

    (15 x 24) + 24
    15 x 24 = 240 + (1/2 x 240) = 240 + 120 = 360
    360 + 24 = 384

    OR

    (20 x 16) + (4 x 16)
    320 + (4 x 10) + (4 x 6)
    320 + 40 + 24 = 384

    This is the essence of common core math as I understand it, which I would have expected to be more girl-friendly, but at least according to this study it may not be. Table 2 suggests boys' advantage may be largest in mental math computation.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alfredo_Ardila/publication/5243133_Gender_Differences_and_Cognitive_Correlates_of_Mathematical_Skills_in_School-Aged_Children

    Does anybody know if there are any early results on how common core affected the gender gap in math? I like common core math, but I don't know anyone else who does, so I'm guessing it will be abandoned.

    I’m not sure what constitutes common core math but my mental shortcut to get to 384 from 24*16 was to do (160+160) + 64.

    Read More
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  219. @Lagertha
    That was my brother (both of them) in a nut shell. They both provoked me all the time, and I smacked them back when they least expected it...revenge was sweet, those days. We became extremely close when I finally turned 16 (youngest) and we are still, all, very close, and, our spouses, and their siblings, like everybody, too. It is unique and fortunate. We are all in each other's wills, and, we didn't fight over issues like inheritance and shared property. I think because we fought a lot as kids, we got past that early - even if we were extremely high-strung/intense. But, if something goes horribly wrong, both of them would be on the first jet out to help me.

    Marguerite Henry was very good at writing about "normal" kids and not making her stories overly cloying and boring. I finally went to Chincoteague & Assateague Islands a few years ago - amazing that the ponies are still there. For a horse-lover like me, it was a pilgrimage.

    Those greenhead flies take serious bites out of one.

    Read More
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  220. @Rosie
    I don't think they have trouble with girls because they're in STEM. I think their trouble with girls and their career choice have a common cause. IOW it may be that whatever makes them good at STEM detracts from their social competence due to some sort of cognitive tradeoff.

    It makes next to no sense that women would dislike engineers just because they're engineers.

    I don’t know what you folks are talking about. When I worked in the Valley I never had any trouble getting dates and often at my place of employment. This is generally true everywhere and in any industry.

    Read More
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  221. @Giant Duck
    WSJ reports today that in Brazil, the Nation of the Future, women seeking sperm donations prefer donors from the United States, and prefer white donors at a rate of 477 to 1 over black donors. Blue, green or hazel eyes are preferred around 75% of the time.

    Tiny Duck, aren't Brazilians the People of Color of the Future? If so, why don't they "crave" Sperm Donors of Color? Perhaps because they haven't had the opportunity to take your class? Or maybe no one has translated Leonard Pitts into Portuguese...

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-mixed-race-brazil-sperm-imports-from-u-s-whites-are-booming-1521711000

    Nailed him.

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  222. @Mr. Anon

    Mr. Anon has been here a lot longer than you, sorry; or me, for that matter. And, he has attacked me for being stupid about stuff.
     
    If I have attacked you, I am truly sorry.

    Anonymous of March 23, 2018 at 2:06 am, however, can go f**k himself.

    so funny, Mr. Anon…I have been out of orbit for a while. No…you set me straight on Steve’s blog, 4 years ago. I think it is difficult for new people, as it was for me, to let go of one’s ego. Once you say stuff, you have to accept that stuff is thrown back at you. I believe that Steve needs the widest audience as possible…even if the “regulars” feel that newcomers are tedious or not as intelligent – we need numbers, most of all, against the real enemy, the thought police…and the legions of collectivists that are out to destroy all non-conformists! ;)

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