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Vanity Fair: "Decoding Stephen Miller's Nationalist Mind"
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It’s often said that the finest minds of this generation are working on making online advertising monetizable. But they don’t seem to be succeeding all that well. So, high-end dead tree magazines aimed at luxury brand advertisers like The New Yorker and Vanity Fair remain viable. Vanity Fair seems to use its lucre to look for independent-minded journalists, such as business writer Michael Lewis, war correspondent Sebastian Junger, and pundit T.A. Frank.

From Vanity Fair:

DECODING STEPHEN MILLER’S NATIONALIST MIND

Trumpism, which was formed in rebellion against the dominant mindset, is actually an unusually thought-out political ideology. Refuting it requires similar clarity.

BY T.A. FRANK
FEBRUARY 6, 2017 5:00 AM

… A few years back, Stephen Miller, a White House senior policy adviser at whose feet much of the tumult resulting from Trump’s immigration order has been laid, made some brief remarks at a conservative gathering in Palm Beach. “One of the things that we’re missing from our political dialogue right now is the idea that the United States is a home,” said Miller …

With its push for ever-lower barriers to migration or trade, he explained, Washington was abandoning the “real flesh-and-blood citizens who together create this body politic, this nation, this home, represented by that flag.” This has been a staple of the belief system among Trump’s senior staffers: America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.

What Miller left unsaid, but implied, was also the contrast between home and doctrine. For the past two decades, prevailing opinion has embraced the idea of the United States as an “experiment,” a “propositional nation” or “creedal nation,” as Irving Kristol described it in 1995. …

It’s therefore notable, but not coincidental, that many of Trump’s senior staffers have strong ties to California, ground zero of rapid transformation at the hands of commerce and migration. …

The ideologues in the White House assume that Americans care—and should care—most about fellow Americans.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. I often disagree with T. A. Frank, but he is usually very interesting and, indeed, independent-minded. He is definitely right about the California connection among Trump’s staffers, which I think you already discussed here before. (Well, maybe it was more about how many unorthodox thinkers of the American right lived in California, as opposed to Trump’s staffers specifically.)

    • Replies: @Neoconned
    I'm often amazed when I go to California and it literally feels like I'm in a foreign nation.

    Like Austin - a few whites and an army ofnhispanics 'n the background
  2. He is definitely right about the California connection among Trump’s staffers, which I think you already discussed here before.

    That particular coal mine is just about fresh out of any air for those canaries to breathe.

  3. “Meanwhile, the most pressing question faced by Decius and others on the right has remained unchanged since the rise of Trump: Even if the existential threat to “home” posed by the Establishment is as severe as you feared, at what point do the actions taken by the leader you’ve chosen leave us without a home to defend?”

    Leave who exactly without a home?

    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    What home?

    The United States is rapidly becoming an economic zone with a boarding house. That's not a home. The only hope is creating your own "home" within that mess. Jews have shown the way. Create a parallel society (with an escape hatch) so you don't have to worry too much about what's going on in the general society.

    Whites haven't had to fight for their place in the sun for a long time. We'll see if we still have it in us.
    , @415 reasons
    Those most important Americans: Somali refugees and Iranian filmmakers, duh.
  4. The ideologues in the White House assume that Americans care—and should care—most about fellow Americans.

    WTF? Only “ideologues” believe this?

    Proposition nations fail because they should. Loving everyone else’s children as much as your own is insane and should be breed out of existence.

    This article reminds me once again that this “country” is utterly and truly screwed – and, frankly, should be screwed. Occassionally, I have some hope that we’ll muddle through, but then something like this smacks me in the face.

    Please, someone, define an “American.” You can’t. Not in any tangible way. Someone who believes in democracy. Bullshit. Mexicans, Chinese, Africans, Muslims, etc., streaming across the border don’t give a rat’s ass about democracy. Freedom? Same thing. They want stuff – your stuff. That’s it. That’s what this country’s future is built upon.

    Now, define a citizen of Japan. Easy, someone of Japanese decent. There, see how easy that was. You can’t play with that definition. Let the clever silly Jew or white SJW try to tell the Japanese that some African is just as Japanese as they are. They’ll laugh their asses off – as they should.

    The whole idea of “American” has become a joke.

    This won’t last. I used to think that we’ll just decend into being a Brazil of the North, but I’m wondering if that’s optomistic. I don’t think that I’ll live to see the answer – and I’ve got three or four decades to go – but my (let’s hope) future grandkids are going to see the answer by my age.

    To them, I apologize for leaving this mess. Maybe I can help out before I die, or, at least, give them an escape hatch.

    • Agree: NickG
    • Replies: @Abe

    Now, define a citizen of Japan. Easy, someone of Japanese decent. There, see how easy that was. You can’t play with that definition. Let the clever silly Jew or white SJW try to tell the Japanese that some African is just as Japanese as they are. They’ll laugh their asses off – as they should.
     
    Reminds of the brief hissy-fit over "racist" laundry soap commercials in China about a year back (Chinese woman pushes some repulsive, dingy black man into her washer, out comes a sparkling, kissable Chinese dude). Some mewling manlet in I think THE WASHINGTON POST actually began his piece by mentioning how sizable the Africa-dervied population of China was. All 70,000 of them! "Africans have always been part of China!"

    Please, someone, define an “American.” You can’t. Not in any tangible way. Someone who believes in democracy. Bullshit. Mexicans, Chinese, Africans, Muslims, etc., streaming across the border don’t give a rat’s ass about democracy. Freedom? Same thing. They want stuff – your stuff. That’s it. That’s what this country’s future is built upon.
     
    That's what I was thinking when that shambling Igorette Samantha Power was giving her valedictory interview on PBS. How we have to confront Russia because- well, not because they threaten vital interests of the American people who don't even exist, ha-ha you silly thing! But because they violate some Platonic ideal of multiculturalism, and pro-Muslimism, and pro-Pussy Riotism they we must risk nuclear annihilation to defend. Because that's just who we are!
  5. @newrouter
    "Meanwhile, the most pressing question faced by Decius and others on the right has remained unchanged since the rise of Trump: Even if the existential threat to “home” posed by the Establishment is as severe as you feared, at what point do the actions taken by the leader you’ve chosen leave us without a home to defend?"


    Leave who exactly without a home?

    What home?

    The United States is rapidly becoming an economic zone with a boarding house. That’s not a home. The only hope is creating your own “home” within that mess. Jews have shown the way. Create a parallel society (with an escape hatch) so you don’t have to worry too much about what’s going on in the general society.

    Whites haven’t had to fight for their place in the sun for a long time. We’ll see if we still have it in us.

    • Replies: @Thea
    And the Amish and several other religious communities.

    Notice they aren't actively trying to protect white identity yet it gets protected.

    Mark 8:35

    For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel's, the same shall save it.

    Feat God and He will protect you but perhaps not in a way you intend
  6. @Philippe Lemoine
    I often disagree with T. A. Frank, but he is usually very interesting and, indeed, independent-minded. He is definitely right about the California connection among Trump's staffers, which I think you already discussed here before. (Well, maybe it was more about how many unorthodox thinkers of the American right lived in California, as opposed to Trump's staffers specifically.)

    I’m often amazed when I go to California and it literally feels like I’m in a foreign nation.

    Like Austin – a few whites and an army ofnhispanics ‘n the background

  7. Yes, patriotism is a well-thought out idea with a long and glorious tradition. A “propositional nation” or “creedal nation” is a mindless platitude and not thought out at all. In fact, do the people who promote the idea of a “propositional nation” really care if the newcomers share America’s founding creed; do they see to it that they understand the principles this country was founded upon; the duties and responsibilities of citizenship? No, open borders/illegal immigration is even against the idea of a “propositional nation”. Muslims promoting Sharia Law can hardly be said to share the Founding ideals.

    Patriotism is ever united with humanity and compassion. This noble affection which impels us to sacrifice everything dear, even life itself, to our country, involves in it a common sympathy and tenderness for every citizen, and must ever have a particular feeling for one who suffers in a public cause. Thoroughly persuaded of this, I need not add a word to engage your compassion and bounty towards a fellow-citizen who, with long-protracted anguish, falls a victim to the relentless rage of our common enemies.”
    John Hancock, The Boston Massacre

    But what can be said of the feelings produced by Globalism? What feelings and affections does it inspire? Is anyone moved to great causes and achievements by globalism?

    • Replies: @guest
    I give them the benefit of the doubt, in that they believe in the efficacy of the hammer of propaganda upon the anvil of culture. This has nothing to do with the "founding creed," which was abandoned long ago. But whatever Current Year fads and principles dating back no further than the Progressive Era they feel like cobbling together, that's what binds us as a nation. Our ruling class does actually want newcomers to be indoctrinated in those, eventually.

    Neocons would like it to happen faster, while the PC brigade prefers a stage of multiculturalism, lasting indefinitely, to help destroy the majority culture. Both want a global monoculture, though not the same one exactly. They're restraining themselves, barely, in the meantime.

    This is more of a hopey-wishy thing. The idea is that the newcomers will become good democratic capitalist liberal universalists, but they don't insist on it. You get to come in, and maybe you'll pick up the propositions, or your kids will. Or maybe they won't, who knows? The ones who don't aren't thrown back.

    Immigration is the blunt fact, whereas continued nationhood (if you can call a proposition nation a nation) is iffy. So I can see where you'd get the idea that the "proposition nation" proposition is a crock. It is and it isn't. People do truly believe in it, but they don't insist upon it. Which may be no different from not believing in it; I'm not sure.

  8. In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.

    Roy Cohn was an early mentor of Trump so maybe Miller reminds him of his dear departed friend.

    • Replies: @ben tillman

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.
     
    Somehow, that's about what I would expect.
    , @Abe

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.
     
    So what? Miller, who's basically almost a kid age-wise, has done more to save this country than anyone since- OK, saying "Reagan" may be a stretch JUST NOW, but probably since, say, Senators Nunn & Lugar tirelessly campaigned to secure all the former-USSR's loose nuclear goodies. If only my beautiful, lustrous locks were still at their Georgian dictator finest I'd gladly donate half my scalp to Stephen in gratitude for all he's already done.
  9. little steps but progress all the same

    • Agree: G Pinfold
  10. The problem with a “proposition nation” (aside from the fact that a “proposition” is the offer a hooker makes to you) is that it is not tied to any particular place and it is not immutable. It’s like a card member agreement you get from a credit card company. Next week they could send you a different “proposition” with less favorable terms or a different card company could make a better offer. A nation has to be more that a “proposition”. Lincoln said that America was dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal, but he also spoke about the mystic chords of memory that bind us together. When a nation is overwhelmed with immigration, those chords may be drowned out by loud salsa music.

  11. Sorry. I am not reading anything by a guy who wrote a book called What’s the Matter with Kansas. Lewis and Junger are ok; this guy is just a liberal d**k.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What’s_the_Matter_with_Kansas%3F

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Wrong T. Frank.
  12. @Jim Don Bob
    Sorry. I am not reading anything by a guy who wrote a book called What's the Matter with Kansas. Lewis and Junger are ok; this guy is just a liberal d**k.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What's_the_Matter_with_Kansas%3F

    Wrong T. Frank.

    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Are you liking this T.A. Frank? Aka Terribly Abstruse Frank? Or is that Terrifically Asinine Frank? I have already excluded Teats and Arse Frank and The son of Abraham Frank, but maybe you just want to be accurate?

    poisonous and cynical blanket ban on Muslim entry back in late 2015
     
    But given that passage, I am happy to consign him to the nearest ash heap or spittoon within sight. After all, this is a classic case of projection. "poisonous and cynical" indeed.
  13. ” AxelHose • 10 minutes ago

    And once they succeed in correcting the national narrative what exactly will they have remaining worth calling a nation.”

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/256695/#comment-3143508375

  14. I wish it were a longer article. I thought he was just getting started.

    • Agree: 415 reasons
    • Replies: @415 reasons
    Indeed it seems at the outwet like the structure will be: here is why Miller's philosophy appears to be so internally consistent and compelling but actually here is the fatal flaw followed by a few thousand word clear eyed defense of open immigration. Instead the structure is: here is why Miller's philosophy is consistent and compelling but Trump is still so mean.
    , @Boomstick
    I think Frank is a little tempted by the Decius proposition, not least because there's overlap with anti-globalist, anti-free trade, and localist thinking on the left over the last three decades.

    He repeats some affirmations to ward off evil, and the wording is annoying in places--"They want people who are already here to have a stronger say in what goes on than those who aren’t yet here"--but I suspect he can hear Lucifer whispering in his ear. He doesn't develop a sustained argument about why what the Prince of Darkness is saying is wrong.

    As mentioned, elites no longer promote a creed for the US, either. "Diversity" is the negation of a creed, an argument that hey, whatever, dude.
    , @G Pinfold
    Yes. You could see the structure of the piece very early. So when he was laying out the obvious superiority of the nationalist position I kept wondering how he was going to walk it all back in the latter part of the column. The walkback turned out to be suitably lame. I scrolled around looking for the defence of creedalism, but there was nothing other than a feint praising link to Brooks' pap.
    The ending was more abrupt than a Sailer piece on Takimag.
  15. @Steve Sailer
    Wrong T. Frank.

    Are you liking this T.A. Frank? Aka Terribly Abstruse Frank? Or is that Terrifically Asinine Frank? I have already excluded Teats and Arse Frank and The son of Abraham Frank, but maybe you just want to be accurate?

    poisonous and cynical blanket ban on Muslim entry back in late 2015

    But given that passage, I am happy to consign him to the nearest ash heap or spittoon within sight. After all, this is a classic case of projection. “poisonous and cynical” indeed.

  16. @newrouter
    "Meanwhile, the most pressing question faced by Decius and others on the right has remained unchanged since the rise of Trump: Even if the existential threat to “home” posed by the Establishment is as severe as you feared, at what point do the actions taken by the leader you’ve chosen leave us without a home to defend?"


    Leave who exactly without a home?

    Those most important Americans: Somali refugees and Iranian filmmakers, duh.

  17. @Jack D
    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.

    Roy Cohn was an early mentor of Trump so maybe Miller reminds him of his dear departed friend.

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.

    Somehow, that’s about what I would expect.

  18. @Luke Lea
    I wish it were a longer article. I thought he was just getting started.

    Indeed it seems at the outwet like the structure will be: here is why Miller’s philosophy appears to be so internally consistent and compelling but actually here is the fatal flaw followed by a few thousand word clear eyed defense of open immigration. Instead the structure is: here is why Miller’s philosophy is consistent and compelling but Trump is still so mean.

    • LOL: Opinionator
  19. Um, yes, OK, get this line of his:

    Americans have never achieved the social cohesion of, say, 1940s England, where an unconscious patriotism and a sense of family offered what George Orwell called a “substitute for a world-view.”

    Well, yes, except England is part of the United Kingdom. So you’d need to compare oranges to oranges. You’d need to compare England with say, New England.

    But I’d say White America certainly achieved the social cohesion of a 1940s England. It wasn’t like you all were shy about showing up at the recruiting stations the day after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

    Fine, I’m not American. So I accept I could be wrong.

    But I find that claim pretty dubious.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    1940 England was being blasted to smithereens by Luftwaffe bombing--something that intensely focuses the mind. A reaction most certainly not unconscious. Call it patriotism, a sense of family, or a "substitute for a world-view," I dare say fighting for one's survival will do that to you. It's called war.

    Should the achievement of social cohesion be measured against that when on a war-footing?

    Dubious, indeed.
  20. This line is especially odd:

    The ideologues in the White House assume that Americans care—and should care—most about fellow Americans. They want people who are already here to have a stronger say in what goes on than those who aren’t yet here.

    So you’re an “ideologue” if you believe Americans should have a “stronger say” in what happens in their country than foreigners who might grace them with their presence?

    WTF?

    • Replies: @guest
    I assume "ideologue" is supposed to be insulting, but it lacks all its Marxist sting, here. Because what you're seeing with Trump is the death of ideology, and its replacement with identity politics. Which the other side started, because it likes to play with fire.

    Probably there are ideologues in the Trump House, because ideas coalesce and you can't make everything up as you go. (That's a lot harder than it sounds.) It comforts anti- or non-Trumpers to think of the Trump Happening as just another set of ideas, like Obamanian socialism or Reaganian supply-sideism, trampling through Washington, having their 15 minutes.

    But Trump is not ideas. There are Trump ideas, obviously, and they are more to thank for his election than the ideas motivating any president in my lifetime, actually. But that's not what he represents. He represents anti-ideology.

    Don't look for Trumpism. Look for "legacy America," and Trumpism will be there.

    The ascendant ideology, such as it is, is ad hoc and not the Important Thing.

  21. Trumpism, which was formed in rebellion against the dominant mindset, is actually an unusually thought-out political ideology. Refuting it requires similar clarity.

    Does it ever occur to the author that perhaps it is better thought-out than his own, makes more sense, and ought to be embraced?

    With its push for ever-lower barriers to migration or trade, he explained, Washington was abandoning the “real flesh-and-blood citizens who together create this body politic, this nation, this home, represented by that flag.” This has been a staple of the belief system among Trump’s senior staffers: America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.

    Sounds perfectly reasonable, moral, and just to me.

    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Does it ever occur to the author that perhaps it is better thought-out than his own, makes more sense, and ought to be embraced?
     
    It will be, it just won't be acknowledged. Republican hegemony is unthinkably terrible.
    , @guest
    These thinkersons think to much, and like by bundles of ideas they can play around with. The thought-out-est, the better. Because then someone can pay them to counter-think.

    Thing is, as I said above Trumpism is ad hoc. He pulled together many disparate things, but three Big Issues got him elected, I think: immigration, trade, and "isolationism" (I'm going to use the opposition's curse word for convenience's sake). He didn't pick up on ideas prepackaged by paleocons, the alt-right, neoreaction, libertarianism, or anything like that. No, it wasn't thinky like that.

    Look at the Big Three and notice what they have in common. They appeal to class of people, one which has been ignored by the ruling class. They either are an identity, a set of identities, or will become one. The right is finally in the identity politics game, as the left has always accused it of secretly being. Fudge ideology.
  22. @Jack D
    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.

    Roy Cohn was an early mentor of Trump so maybe Miller reminds him of his dear departed friend.

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.

    So what? Miller, who’s basically almost a kid age-wise, has done more to save this country than anyone since- OK, saying “Reagan” may be a stretch JUST NOW, but probably since, say, Senators Nunn & Lugar tirelessly campaigned to secure all the former-USSR’s loose nuclear goodies. If only my beautiful, lustrous locks were still at their Georgian dictator finest I’d gladly donate half my scalp to Stephen in gratitude for all he’s already done.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Indeed. Miller is a righteous dude; he has done more to save this country than nearly every Republican member of Congress.
    , @Jack D
    I like the guy too. My point was that VF carefully selected a photo that made him look evil. It's a standard MSM technique. See the current Newsweek cover with it's freakishly distorted picture of Melania. Meanwhile Moochelle who was built like a linebacker was always pictured as the essence of femininity.

    The guy definitely has a prematurely receding hairline, but they could have picked a much more flattering picture:
    http://static2.politico.com/dims4/default/cd60414/2147483647/resize/1003x%3E/quality/90/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.politico.com%2Fac%2F50%2Faa29bab54324929cc179dc7ca33a%2F160626-stephen-miller-mag-ap-1160.jpg

    BTW, a much deeper profile of Miller here, by our friend Julia Ioffe:

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/stephen-miller-donald-trump-2016-policy-adviser-jeff-sessions-213992

    It wasn't too much of a hit job. I think that when it was written last June, Miller was more an object of anthropological interest than a real threat to the Establishment. Or so they thought.
  23. Funny, in brainstorming memes/slogans while tossing and turning the other night the “America as home” thing occurred to me as well! It was in the context of appropriating the “come home, America” slogan of the anti-Vietnam War left and was prompted by the news that several oh-so-sage former-Secretaries of State had come out claiming the “Muslim ban” would put US soldiers abroad at greater risk. Well the whole point of the Muslim ban is so that US soldiers don’t have to go abroad (and stay there forever) anymore!

    “Destroy America as home, so that America can’t come home.” OK, needs work, but Trump really needs to hammer home the point now that he is the peace President, and Democrats are the war party. He is anti-war, pro-Republic, they are pro-war, pro-Empire. Trump gets these conceptual leaps when someone really smart like Miller explains them to him, so now that he owns the patriotic right, he should court the Bernie Bros and logical left by stressing how his platform gives them a lot of what they want too. Instead of bragging about his dump truck-sized balls because he’d bring back waterboarding and “black sites”, stress the US would never need to resort to them again because there’d virtually be no terrorism on US soil once we’ve reformed our immigration/refugee system.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
  24. @Luke Lea
    I wish it were a longer article. I thought he was just getting started.

    I think Frank is a little tempted by the Decius proposition, not least because there’s overlap with anti-globalist, anti-free trade, and localist thinking on the left over the last three decades.

    He repeats some affirmations to ward off evil, and the wording is annoying in places–“They want people who are already here to have a stronger say in what goes on than those who aren’t yet here”–but I suspect he can hear Lucifer whispering in his ear. He doesn’t develop a sustained argument about why what the Prince of Darkness is saying is wrong.

    As mentioned, elites no longer promote a creed for the US, either. “Diversity” is the negation of a creed, an argument that hey, whatever, dude.

  25. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    The ideologues in the White House assume that Americans care—and should care—most about fellow Americans.


    WTF? Only "ideologues" believe this?

    Proposition nations fail because they should. Loving everyone else's children as much as your own is insane and should be breed out of existence.

    This article reminds me once again that this "country" is utterly and truly screwed - and, frankly, should be screwed. Occassionally, I have some hope that we'll muddle through, but then something like this smacks me in the face.

    Please, someone, define an "American." You can't. Not in any tangible way. Someone who believes in democracy. Bullshit. Mexicans, Chinese, Africans, Muslims, etc., streaming across the border don't give a rat's ass about democracy. Freedom? Same thing. They want stuff - your stuff. That's it. That's what this country's future is built upon.

    Now, define a citizen of Japan. Easy, someone of Japanese decent. There, see how easy that was. You can't play with that definition. Let the clever silly Jew or white SJW try to tell the Japanese that some African is just as Japanese as they are. They'll laugh their asses off - as they should.

    The whole idea of "American" has become a joke.

    This won't last. I used to think that we'll just decend into being a Brazil of the North, but I'm wondering if that's optomistic. I don't think that I'll live to see the answer - and I've got three or four decades to go - but my (let's hope) future grandkids are going to see the answer by my age.

    To them, I apologize for leaving this mess. Maybe I can help out before I die, or, at least, give them an escape hatch.

    Now, define a citizen of Japan. Easy, someone of Japanese decent. There, see how easy that was. You can’t play with that definition. Let the clever silly Jew or white SJW try to tell the Japanese that some African is just as Japanese as they are. They’ll laugh their asses off – as they should.

    Reminds of the brief hissy-fit over “racist” laundry soap commercials in China about a year back (Chinese woman pushes some repulsive, dingy black man into her washer, out comes a sparkling, kissable Chinese dude). Some mewling manlet in I think THE WASHINGTON POST actually began his piece by mentioning how sizable the Africa-dervied population of China was. All 70,000 of them! “Africans have always been part of China!”

    Please, someone, define an “American.” You can’t. Not in any tangible way. Someone who believes in democracy. Bullshit. Mexicans, Chinese, Africans, Muslims, etc., streaming across the border don’t give a rat’s ass about democracy. Freedom? Same thing. They want stuff – your stuff. That’s it. That’s what this country’s future is built upon.

    That’s what I was thinking when that shambling Igorette Samantha Power was giving her valedictory interview on PBS. How we have to confront Russia because- well, not because they threaten vital interests of the American people who don’t even exist, ha-ha you silly thing! But because they violate some Platonic ideal of multiculturalism, and pro-Muslimism, and pro-Pussy Riotism they we must risk nuclear annihilation to defend. Because that’s just who we are!

    • Agree: Clyde
  26. @Luke Lea
    I wish it were a longer article. I thought he was just getting started.

    Yes. You could see the structure of the piece very early. So when he was laying out the obvious superiority of the nationalist position I kept wondering how he was going to walk it all back in the latter part of the column. The walkback turned out to be suitably lame. I scrolled around looking for the defence of creedalism, but there was nothing other than a feint praising link to Brooks’ pap.
    The ending was more abrupt than a Sailer piece on Takimag.

    • Replies: @Romanian

    The ending was more abrupt than a Sailer piece on Takimag.

     

    Microaggression alert!
  27. @Abe

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.
     
    So what? Miller, who's basically almost a kid age-wise, has done more to save this country than anyone since- OK, saying "Reagan" may be a stretch JUST NOW, but probably since, say, Senators Nunn & Lugar tirelessly campaigned to secure all the former-USSR's loose nuclear goodies. If only my beautiful, lustrous locks were still at their Georgian dictator finest I'd gladly donate half my scalp to Stephen in gratitude for all he's already done.

    Indeed. Miller is a righteous dude; he has done more to save this country than nearly every Republican member of Congress.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  28. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    What home?

    The United States is rapidly becoming an economic zone with a boarding house. That's not a home. The only hope is creating your own "home" within that mess. Jews have shown the way. Create a parallel society (with an escape hatch) so you don't have to worry too much about what's going on in the general society.

    Whites haven't had to fight for their place in the sun for a long time. We'll see if we still have it in us.

    And the Amish and several other religious communities.

    Notice they aren’t actively trying to protect white identity yet it gets protected.

    Mark 8:35

    For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.

    Feat God and He will protect you but perhaps not in a way you intend

  29. @celt darnell
    Um, yes, OK, get this line of his:

    Americans have never achieved the social cohesion of, say, 1940s England, where an unconscious patriotism and a sense of family offered what George Orwell called a “substitute for a world-view.”
     
    Well, yes, except England is part of the United Kingdom. So you'd need to compare oranges to oranges. You'd need to compare England with say, New England.

    But I'd say White America certainly achieved the social cohesion of a 1940s England. It wasn't like you all were shy about showing up at the recruiting stations the day after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

    Fine, I'm not American. So I accept I could be wrong.

    But I find that claim pretty dubious.

    1940 England was being blasted to smithereens by Luftwaffe bombing–something that intensely focuses the mind. A reaction most certainly not unconscious. Call it patriotism, a sense of family, or a “substitute for a world-view,” I dare say fighting for one’s survival will do that to you. It’s called war.

    Should the achievement of social cohesion be measured against that when on a war-footing?

    Dubious, indeed.

  30. Even if the existential threat to “home” posed by the Establishment is as severe as you feared, at what point do the actions taken by the leader you’ve chosen leave us without a home to defend?

    A non sequitur.

    The Establishment was destroying the home. The actions proposed by Trump is to leave us with a home worth defending.

  31. OT: My libtard neighbors were excitedly sharing the news that Rosie O’Donnell has volunteered to play Steve Bannon on Saturday Night Live. Set your DVRs!

  32. America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.

    I’ve saying this for almost 15 years now. I’m delighted to see I’m not the only one who caught the bug.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    James Goldsmith was saying it 23 years ago.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PQrz8F0dBI
  33. @Abe

    In the photo, Miller looks like a cross between Roy Cohn and Goebbels.
     
    So what? Miller, who's basically almost a kid age-wise, has done more to save this country than anyone since- OK, saying "Reagan" may be a stretch JUST NOW, but probably since, say, Senators Nunn & Lugar tirelessly campaigned to secure all the former-USSR's loose nuclear goodies. If only my beautiful, lustrous locks were still at their Georgian dictator finest I'd gladly donate half my scalp to Stephen in gratitude for all he's already done.

    I like the guy too. My point was that VF carefully selected a photo that made him look evil. It’s a standard MSM technique. See the current Newsweek cover with it’s freakishly distorted picture of Melania. Meanwhile Moochelle who was built like a linebacker was always pictured as the essence of femininity.

    The guy definitely has a prematurely receding hairline, but they could have picked a much more flattering picture:

    BTW, a much deeper profile of Miller here, by our friend Julia Ioffe:

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/stephen-miller-donald-trump-2016-policy-adviser-jeff-sessions-213992

    It wasn’t too much of a hit job. I think that when it was written last June, Miller was more an object of anthropological interest than a real threat to the Establishment. Or so they thought.

    • Replies: @Abe

    I like the guy too.
     
    OK, gotcha. Sorry, I read/reply from a pretty basic news reader client, so it's hard for me to follow links or watch videos (my wife hardly suspects I've been alt-right for 10 years now and I want to keep it that way!) and so get that bit of extra context to someone's post.
  34. @Mr. Anon

    Trumpism, which was formed in rebellion against the dominant mindset, is actually an unusually thought-out political ideology. Refuting it requires similar clarity.
     
    Does it ever occur to the author that perhaps it is better thought-out than his own, makes more sense, and ought to be embraced?

    With its push for ever-lower barriers to migration or trade, he explained, Washington was abandoning the “real flesh-and-blood citizens who together create this body politic, this nation, this home, represented by that flag.” This has been a staple of the belief system among Trump’s senior staffers: America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.
     
    Sounds perfectly reasonable, moral, and just to me.

    Does it ever occur to the author that perhaps it is better thought-out than his own, makes more sense, and ought to be embraced?

    It will be, it just won’t be acknowledged. Republican hegemony is unthinkably terrible.

  35. @G Pinfold
    Yes. You could see the structure of the piece very early. So when he was laying out the obvious superiority of the nationalist position I kept wondering how he was going to walk it all back in the latter part of the column. The walkback turned out to be suitably lame. I scrolled around looking for the defence of creedalism, but there was nothing other than a feint praising link to Brooks' pap.
    The ending was more abrupt than a Sailer piece on Takimag.

    The ending was more abrupt than a Sailer piece on Takimag.

    Microaggression alert!

  36. Reading about Miller as Sessions staffer, I couldn’t help but marvel at the fact that out of the Senator’s little monastery of nationalism grew a presidential campaign that captured the United States.

    Maybe the lefties are on to something, with their need for absolute hegemony. They left one sapling un-burned, and look what happens.

  37. @Jack D
    I like the guy too. My point was that VF carefully selected a photo that made him look evil. It's a standard MSM technique. See the current Newsweek cover with it's freakishly distorted picture of Melania. Meanwhile Moochelle who was built like a linebacker was always pictured as the essence of femininity.

    The guy definitely has a prematurely receding hairline, but they could have picked a much more flattering picture:
    http://static2.politico.com/dims4/default/cd60414/2147483647/resize/1003x%3E/quality/90/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.politico.com%2Fac%2F50%2Faa29bab54324929cc179dc7ca33a%2F160626-stephen-miller-mag-ap-1160.jpg

    BTW, a much deeper profile of Miller here, by our friend Julia Ioffe:

    http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/stephen-miller-donald-trump-2016-policy-adviser-jeff-sessions-213992

    It wasn't too much of a hit job. I think that when it was written last June, Miller was more an object of anthropological interest than a real threat to the Establishment. Or so they thought.

    I like the guy too.

    OK, gotcha. Sorry, I read/reply from a pretty basic news reader client, so it’s hard for me to follow links or watch videos (my wife hardly suspects I’ve been alt-right for 10 years now and I want to keep it that way!) and so get that bit of extra context to someone’s post.

  38. @tanabear
    Yes, patriotism is a well-thought out idea with a long and glorious tradition. A “propositional nation” or “creedal nation” is a mindless platitude and not thought out at all. In fact, do the people who promote the idea of a “propositional nation” really care if the newcomers share America's founding creed; do they see to it that they understand the principles this country was founded upon; the duties and responsibilities of citizenship? No, open borders/illegal immigration is even against the idea of a “propositional nation”. Muslims promoting Sharia Law can hardly be said to share the Founding ideals.

    "Patriotism is ever united with humanity and compassion. This noble affection which impels us to sacrifice everything dear, even life itself, to our country, involves in it a common sympathy and tenderness for every citizen, and must ever have a particular feeling for one who suffers in a public cause. Thoroughly persuaded of this, I need not add a word to engage your compassion and bounty towards a fellow-citizen who, with long-protracted anguish, falls a victim to the relentless rage of our common enemies."
    John Hancock, The Boston Massacre

    But what can be said of the feelings produced by Globalism? What feelings and affections does it inspire? Is anyone moved to great causes and achievements by globalism?

    I give them the benefit of the doubt, in that they believe in the efficacy of the hammer of propaganda upon the anvil of culture. This has nothing to do with the “founding creed,” which was abandoned long ago. But whatever Current Year fads and principles dating back no further than the Progressive Era they feel like cobbling together, that’s what binds us as a nation. Our ruling class does actually want newcomers to be indoctrinated in those, eventually.

    Neocons would like it to happen faster, while the PC brigade prefers a stage of multiculturalism, lasting indefinitely, to help destroy the majority culture. Both want a global monoculture, though not the same one exactly. They’re restraining themselves, barely, in the meantime.

    This is more of a hopey-wishy thing. The idea is that the newcomers will become good democratic capitalist liberal universalists, but they don’t insist on it. You get to come in, and maybe you’ll pick up the propositions, or your kids will. Or maybe they won’t, who knows? The ones who don’t aren’t thrown back.

    Immigration is the blunt fact, whereas continued nationhood (if you can call a proposition nation a nation) is iffy. So I can see where you’d get the idea that the “proposition nation” proposition is a crock. It is and it isn’t. People do truly believe in it, but they don’t insist upon it. Which may be no different from not believing in it; I’m not sure.

  39. @celt darnell
    This line is especially odd:

    The ideologues in the White House assume that Americans care—and should care—most about fellow Americans. They want people who are already here to have a stronger say in what goes on than those who aren’t yet here.
     
    So you're an "ideologue" if you believe Americans should have a "stronger say" in what happens in their country than foreigners who might grace them with their presence?

    WTF?

    I assume “ideologue” is supposed to be insulting, but it lacks all its Marxist sting, here. Because what you’re seeing with Trump is the death of ideology, and its replacement with identity politics. Which the other side started, because it likes to play with fire.

    Probably there are ideologues in the Trump House, because ideas coalesce and you can’t make everything up as you go. (That’s a lot harder than it sounds.) It comforts anti- or non-Trumpers to think of the Trump Happening as just another set of ideas, like Obamanian socialism or Reaganian supply-sideism, trampling through Washington, having their 15 minutes.

    But Trump is not ideas. There are Trump ideas, obviously, and they are more to thank for his election than the ideas motivating any president in my lifetime, actually. But that’s not what he represents. He represents anti-ideology.

    Don’t look for Trumpism. Look for “legacy America,” and Trumpism will be there.

    The ascendant ideology, such as it is, is ad hoc and not the Important Thing.

  40. @Mr. Anon

    Trumpism, which was formed in rebellion against the dominant mindset, is actually an unusually thought-out political ideology. Refuting it requires similar clarity.
     
    Does it ever occur to the author that perhaps it is better thought-out than his own, makes more sense, and ought to be embraced?

    With its push for ever-lower barriers to migration or trade, he explained, Washington was abandoning the “real flesh-and-blood citizens who together create this body politic, this nation, this home, represented by that flag.” This has been a staple of the belief system among Trump’s senior staffers: America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.
     
    Sounds perfectly reasonable, moral, and just to me.

    These thinkersons think to much, and like by bundles of ideas they can play around with. The thought-out-est, the better. Because then someone can pay them to counter-think.

    Thing is, as I said above Trumpism is ad hoc. He pulled together many disparate things, but three Big Issues got him elected, I think: immigration, trade, and “isolationism” (I’m going to use the opposition’s curse word for convenience’s sake). He didn’t pick up on ideas prepackaged by paleocons, the alt-right, neoreaction, libertarianism, or anything like that. No, it wasn’t thinky like that.

    Look at the Big Three and notice what they have in common. They appeal to class of people, one which has been ignored by the ruling class. They either are an identity, a set of identities, or will become one. The right is finally in the identity politics game, as the left has always accused it of secretly being. Fudge ideology.

  41. The writer displays amazing naivety about Islam, a highly alien political ideology with a slight religious gloss.

    Of course, not even everyone born a Muslim will grow up to became a believer. Some fraction of those will assimilate.

    But the rest won’t. Even worse they’ll start assimilating Americans to Islam (“We can’t get married unless you convert to Islam.”)

  42. @Svigor

    America is a home, not an economy, and the economy must serve the home, not the other way around.
     
    I've saying this for almost 15 years now. I'm delighted to see I'm not the only one who caught the bug.

    James Goldsmith was saying it 23 years ago.

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