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I was going to say, “I’ve seen that movie,” except I’ve never actually seen any of the three versions of The Thing. But I have read John W. Campbell’s 1938 sci-fi story Who Goes There? upon which the movies are based: a scientific crew wintering in isolation in the Antarctic digs up a crashed flying saucer from under the ice. Trouble ensues.

That this is an all-time classic is obvious too teens.

Campbell mostly gave up writing fiction after this, turning to being the most influential of sci-fi editors, publishing new writers like Asimov, Heinlein, Sturgeon, and Clarke.

 
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  1. Probably fetch big bucks in Japan, especially if it’s deadly.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  2. syonredux says:

    Campbell mostly gave up writing fiction after this, turning to being the most influential of sci-fi editors, publishing new writers like Asimov, Heinlein, Sturgeon, and Clarke.

    Of course, Campbell, like DW Griffith and HP Lovecraft, is in rather bad odor these days:

    The John W. Campbell Award For Best New Writer is being renamed. The award’s sponsor announced today that the award would be given a new name after this year’s winner, Jeannette Ng, condemned the award’s namesake for his fascist and racist beliefs during their acceptance speech at the 2019 Hugo Awards ceremony. Starting next year, the award will be called the Astounding Award for Best New Writer.

    In his announcement, Analog Science Fact and Fiction editor Trevor Quachri said that “Campbell’s provocative editorials and opinions on race, slavery, and other matters often reflected positions that went beyond just the mores of his time and are today at odds with modern values, including those held by the award’s many nominees, winners, and supporters.”

    Ah yes,being provocative, the sin against the Holy Ghost….

    Past award recipients praised the move on Twitter. Kowal said that the change “makes me even more proud to be an Astounding Award Winner,” and thanked Ng for their “passionate, beautiful speech which drove this change.” John Scalzi, who earned the award in 2006, said that it’s “proof that you can change things when you speak.”

    https://www.tor.com/2019/08/27/dell-magazines-is-changing-the-name-of-the-john-w-campbell-award/

    Wonder how long it will be before Jack London Square gets renamed….

  3. syonredux says:

    I was going to say, “I’ve seen that movie,” except I’ve never actually seen any of the three versions of The Thing.

    The first and the second are good. The third one is boring and redundant.

  4. Yikes, that is right up there with “No! Don’t go in there!” and “We’ve traced those calls and they seem to be coming from INSIDE YOUR HOUSE.”

  5. Clyde says:

    That is a frozen slug from outer space nothing more.

  6. Those guys clearly haven’t read Smilla’s Feeling for Snow.

    Most guys haven’t. Okay, I have. A meteorite digs up killer parasite worms from deep within the Arctic ice.

    Come to think of it, they might not have seen Alien, either. Scientists are not nearly as steeped in nerd culture as Big Bang Theory would have us believe.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  7. Scientist?

    More like Alchemist Stoner…

    Can someone please revoke this 13th Monkey’s passport before it’s too late?

  8. It looks like nothing more than a deformed jellyfish. Just to be on the safe side, I’d recommend not having gay sex with that particular scientist. That is some serious ice-fishing though, what with an 8.500 ft line!

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
    , @sayless
  9. res says:

    Here’s a review of the biography of John W. Campbell released last year: https://www.counter-currents.com/2019/01/pulp-puppies-competent-men/

    If anyone wants to check out his writing, this is a good collection: https://www.amazon.com/Best-John-W-Campbell/dp/0345249607
    Who Goes There? is included of course. LA public library has a copy.

  10. anonymous[154] • Disclaimer says:

    Scream, scream for your lives! The Tingler is loose in this theater!

    • LOL: Cortes
    • Replies: @Cortes
  11. anonymous[154] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    “Sense of snow?”

  12. @syonredux

    Ah yes,being provocative, the sin against the Holy Ghost….

    Eternal damnation is an unpleasant destination for the unrighteous no? But hey, if you only have the blood of 100 million innocents on your head, what can go wrong?

  13. J.Ross says:

    The basic story of the Thing/Who Goes There is roughly a simplification of HP Lovecraft’s greatest work, At the Mountains of Madness. In both cases Antarctic expeditions encounter a hostile shape-shifter. Campbell’s is much easier to adapt to film because its scale is smaller. HPL thought in terms of civilizations and went to into great (and, for a “racist,” sympathetic) detail about yet another race (very highly evolved starfish, with five-way body symmetry, beautifully visualized by WD Barlowe) who had genetically engineered the shape-shifters as slaves. Campbell and adaptations remove the Lovecraftian hysterics and just has a not-shoggoth pop out of a UFO. Among the things Campbell trims is a connection to Poe: HPL’s Antarctic monsters make the same cry as the unexplained white giant in Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. This is not to say that Campbell plagiarized HPL (they are very different stories, and I happen to like the 80s German Major Tom song as all-around better than Bowie’s Space Oddity). But there are unavoidably fundamental similarities.
    And with those protuberances in front (face tentacles?), anyway, that definitely looks less like a starfishy Elder Thing and more like a baby Xothian.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  14. It’s express.co.uk. They may well have made the whole thing up.

    • Agree: Gordo
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  15. Kronos says:

    H.P. Lovecraft wrote a story titled “The Mountains of Madness” based on finding a dead (well almost) alien city in Antarctica that existed millions of years ago.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @FozzieT
  16. NUKE IT FROM SPACE!!! IT’S THE ONLY WAY TO BE SURE!!!

    If we choose not to, maybe the Houthis could send some drones…

  17. @syonredux

    Wonder how long it will be before Jack London Square gets renamed…

    To “We Built a Big-Assed Fire Circle, with Privileged White-Ass Kindling.”

  18. bgates says:

    I’d be a lot more concerned about the discovery of what might be an intelligent and deeply hostile form of life capable of assuming human form if I didn’t already know they’ve been running the government for the past few decades.

  19. Anon[798] • Disclaimer says:

    It’s all explained in Lovecraft’s “The Mountains of Madness.”

    Actually, it’s just a run of the mill deep-sea sea cucumber, as the article makes clear at the end, New York Times style. Upside down journalism is all the rage.

  20. syonredux says:
    @Kronos

    Was Poe the Father of Antarctic Horror? His Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym is the oldest example that I can think of. It also has a killer ending:

    March 22d. The darkness had materially increased, relieved only by the glare of the water thrown back from the white curtain before us. Many gigantic and pallidly white birds flew continuously now from beyond the veil, and their scream was the eternal Tekeli-li! as they retreated from our vision. Hereupon Nu-Nu stirred in the bottom of the boat; but upon touching him we found his spirit departed. And now we rushed into the embraces of the cataract, where a chasm threw itself open to receive us. But there arose in our pathway a shrouded human figure, very far larger in its proportions than any dweller among men. And the hue of the skin of the figure was of the perfect whiteness of the snow.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  21. J.Ross says:
    @Faraday's Bobcat

    There was a Chinese newscaster who broadcast a story about a new kind of mushroom, a strange, thick, rubbery one with a central channel, the walls of which were textured or beaded. Eventually someone pointed out that this was a discarded sex toy. This may have been a hoax because it’s hard to imagine any local news station deciding that “new mushroom discovered” is a good story idea.

  22. MEH 0910 says:

    Gremlins 2: The New Batch – re:View

    Published on Sep 18, 2019
    Mike and Jay talk about Gremlins 2 for nearly an hour. Enjoy!

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  23. Kronos says:
    @syonredux

    But Lovecraft had giant blind penguins! Try bumping into those is pitch blackness.

  24. BenjaminL says:

    I’m sure it’s no big deal…

  25. @syonredux

    this year’s winner, Jeannette Ng, condemned the award’s namesake for his fascist and racist beliefs

    Eeny meeny miney mo,
    Catch a Ng by the toe.
    If she hollers– you know she will–
    Make her take a yellow pill.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    , @bomag
  26. MEH 0910 says:
    @MEH 0910

    John Carpenter’s The Thing – re:View

    Published on Jul 13, 2018
    Jay and Colin talk about The Thing! They also briefly touch on The Thing (1951) as well as The Thing (2011).

  27. Impolitic says:

    The Carpenter movie is great.

    • Agree: LondonBob, dfordoom
  28. I’d be more concerned about the animals you can find in places like Minneapolis.

    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    , @anonymous
  29. @syonredux

    ‘Wonder how long it will be before Jack London Square gets renamed….’

    Now you’ve done it. They might never have noticed.

    It is in Oakland — a place with a decided lack of historical notables to choose from. I suppose ‘Gertrude Stein Square’ would be suitably dreary…or perhaps one of the Black Panthers was actually born in Oakland.

  30. Mr. Anon says:

    I was going to say, “I’ve seen that movie,” except I’ve never actually seen any of the three versions of The Thing.

    The John Carpenter version from 1982 is the scariest damned movie I’ve ever seen. The only thing that’s come close to it was The Night Strangler

    As for those scientists in Antarctica who found that creepy looking translucent thing – remember, nobody go anywhere alone.

    Actually it’s somewhat reminiscent of this classic:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcF7uHPqorw

  31. Cortes says:
    @anonymous

    Superb!

    The placing of the buzzers under random seats in cinemas showing that film was genius.

  32. if it bleeds, we can kill it.

    oh wait, wrong alien movie.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  33. syonredux says:
    @Colin Wright

    It is in Oakland — a place with a decided lack of historical notables to choose from. I suppose ‘Gertrude Stein Square’ would be suitably dreary…or perhaps one of the Black Panthers was actually born in Oakland.

    That would be an interesting choice:

    She took us to see her granddaughter who was teaching in the Dominican convent in San Raphael, we went across the bay on a ferry, that had not changed but Goat Island might just as well not have been there, anyway what was the use of my having come from Oakland it was not natural to have come from there yes write about it if I like or anything if I like but not there, there is no there there.

    -Gertrude Stein, Everybody’s Autobiography

    .

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  34. I was going to say, “I’ve seen that movie,” except I’ve never actually seen any of the three versions of The Thing.

    I got very excited when I read this, thinking that there was some new version I was unaware of. I’m a huge The Thing fan. I must have seen the 1982 version a dozen times, and I’ve seen the 2011 version–kind of redundant, but still good–three or four times too. But when I looked it up I realized the “third” (aka first) version referred to the 1951 production. Meh, can’t be bothered. I just can’t get into black and white movies.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @J.Ross
  35. @Reg Cæsar

    “Ng” sounds like the sort of thing you’d expect a Lovecraft alien to say.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  36. Then there are things they don’t tell you about ….

  37. Hail says: • Website

    John W. Campbell’s 1938 sci-fi story Who Goes There? upon which the movies are based: a scientific crew wintering in isolation in the Antarctic digs up a crashed flying saucer from under the ice.

    – Aug. 1938: John W. Campbell story about the discovery of a crashed alien spaceship (saucer?) is published in Astounding Science Fiction magazine, featuring saucer[?] buried in ice and a four-foot alien
    – Dec. 1938 to April 1939: German expedition to Antarctica
    – Nov. 1939 to Feb. 1941: US expedition to Antarctica
    – July 1947: Roswell incident, involves crashed flying saucer and four-foot alien

  38. @Buzz Mohawk

    It’s interesting how many of those men have what the Japanese call “sanpaku” eyes and notable facial asymmetry — almost to the point of deformity in some cases.

    • Replies: @CMC
  39. tyrone says:

    That little thing could never wreak havoc on humanity…………disappointed again

  40. It looks like the monster-egg from Venus in the 1957 film 20 Million Miles to Earth. The egg was found by the same Italian kid (((Bart Braverman))) who said “She’s-a their birthday, too” on I Love Lucy.

  41. Simon says:

    Campbell’s original “Who Goes There?” is terrific. So are, I’d argue, all three film versions; none of them is “redundant.” (We’re talking about entertainment, for God’s sake, not works of scholarship.) And someday we’ll certainly see a big-budget film of “At the Mountains of Madness.”

    What interests me is whether the city of Providence is ever going to erect a statue to Lovecraft — something that’s been talked about for years. I’ve seen photos of the prototype — HPL, Necronomicon, cats at his feet — but it’s hard to believe that so p.c. a city (in so left-leaning a state) would ever countenance something honoring him.

  42. njguy73 says:
    @Colin Wright

    If Oakland hasn’t yet named a street after M.C. Hammer, then they shouldn’t be allowed to have streets.

  43. I loved that John Carpenter movie called The Thing!

    I saw it at the movie theater on a big screen with good sound and it was good. I also saw Apocalypse Now on a big screen with good sound. I was young and they were great fun!

    The absence of women is not an absence of evidence about women in both The Thing and Apocalypse Now. Apocalypse Now had beautiful ladies dancing rather nicely and naughtily and the director’s cut that I saw much later on had the most delightful French actress I have ever seen and her name is Aurore Clément.

    We have to admit it’s all about the bass line.

    The Thing had a great bass line theme music soundtrack.

    Bass Line From The Thing:

    Bass line from BUSTA JONES from Eno/Byrne My Life in the Bush of Ghosts:

  44. @prime noticer

    Too bad Arnie didn’t have that zeal for getting rid of aliens when he was Governor.

  45. Both versions of The Thing are fantastic, both are brilliant ensemble pieces. The first one is low budget and funny, with the typical Hawksian fast dialog and cool chicks. The excellent cast never did much else, and nothing A-list–the most famous person in the movie is Arness, as the monster. The movie also had a lot to say about the changing nature of excellence, how in the post WW2 world there were going to be a lot of opportunities for smart guys (note how the lead NCO has pretty much every good idea in the movie) and that famous scientists are often dangerous, while good ones can be great colleagues (note the difference between the tall, rangy calm guy and the twitchy famous one). The exchanges reward several listenings. (“You know, Captain, I got a worry.” “Report from the front, Capn, MacPherson has a worry.” “What if this thing can read minds?” “Then he’s gonna be real mad when he gets to mine.”)

    The 1982 version is big budget and grim, although the Donald Moffat line ending the middle third of the movie is so famously hilarious that many people (including me) retweeted the clip on his death. But the humor in that scene derives from the plot itself, whereas the first one is just rapid fire humor from all directions. You don’t remember many other lines, but there are images that are just indelible, and not all of them filled with horror. And the cast–every single person in that movie is still well known today as a character actor working in respectable Alist movies or TV.

    Both are must-sees.

    • Agree: syonredux
    • Replies: @ROBERT MORGAN
  46. snorlax says:
    @Colin Wright

    You mean Gertrude Stein, the literal Nazi?

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  47. @YetAnotherAnon

    “Ng” sounds like the sort of thing you’d expect a Lovecraft alien to say.

    Or the Knights in the Cantonese dub of Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

  48. John Scalzi, who earned the award in 2006, said that it’s “proof that you can change things when you speak.”

    That Scalzi won the award is proof that it’s no longer worthy of Campbell’s name.

  49. @snorlax

    ‘You mean Gertrude Stein, the literal Nazi?’

    That’s impossible. Gertrude Stein was a lesbian, and lesbians are good. Nazis were bad.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  50. syonredux says:
    @silviosilver

    But when I looked it up I realized the “third” (aka first) version referred to the 1951 production. Meh, can’t be bothered. I just can’t get into black and white movies.

    You’re missing a lot of good stuff…..

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  51. bomag says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    this year’s winner, Jeannette Ng, condemned the award’s namesake

    So she’s British by way of China (Hong Kong). If we lived in a fair world, I should be able to get an internationally acclaimed award in China and use the platform to trash some historical Chinese person to further my political and ethnic goals.

    Never mind that said figure did some exceptional things to warrant remembrance.

  52. Actually writing Campbell’s allegedly retrograde views about democracy, race and sex into stories set in “the future” makes sense if you assume that enough time has passed to show that many of the utopian social experiments inspired by the Enlightenment have failed, and eventually the people in power stopped and abandoned them. The force of experience would require them to acknowledge that traditional, pre-Woke beliefs about government, human biodiversity and women worked to promote human flourishing for good reasons the first time around.

    • Agree: bomag
  53. I’m a little surprised you’ve never seen any of THE THING films. I used to watch the John Carpenter version way too many times, on laser disc player (over at my next-door neighbor’s house in Los Gatos, circa 1983). It’s the best one, by far. Most people don’t really appreciate the 1951 version anymore, but it’s also rather good. If you’ve never seen any of these films, then they’re probably just not your cup of tea. But in any event, if you do wind up seeing these two, and enjoy them, you needn’t worry about the 2011 version.

  54. @Achmed E. Newman

    It looks like nothing more than a deformed jellyfish

    .

    What it looks like, is a semi-translucent cuttlefish. Which is perhaps notable, based on the several references in Lovecraft’s writing to Cthulhu being, in some undefined manner, “cuttlefish-like”.

    Not that I’m remotely worried. Cthulhu is old hat. All the occult cognoscenti know the true threat emanates from Gla’aki.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuttlefish

  55. Ragno says:
    @syonredux

    Once again, Vox Day called it…while the rest of us looked for reasons not to like him very much.

  56. Anonymous[160] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    As in the modern American military, until recently when most have come out, closeted lesbians were a substantial administrative asset to the Party and military in NS Germany. I think fewer of any were uniformed military than in the Allied forces, as Hitler disapproved of female military ideologically. I am no expert on this-I know a couple others here really are.

  57. @Buzz Mohawk

    Such a dynamic and productive culture sprang forth from that archipelago. Heavy weirdness, the sublime, and ninjas and samurais. The Japanese are an interesting bunch.

  58. The Thing (1982) is one of the best Sci-Fi and Horror movies ever made, right up there with Alien. The practical effects looked way better than the CGIed crap you see today (see the 2011 prequel for instance). And it’s brilliant in that it doesn’t give you a lot of the answers and keeps you guessing even after it’s over. My only complaint would be that the ending feels rushed, almost as though they ran out of money (which very well may have been the case).

    John Carpenter also made two other films with similar Lovecraftian themes: “Prince of Darkness” and “In the Mouth of Madness”. The former was great, the latter not so much so.

  59. @J.Ross

    “I happen to like the 80s German Major Tom song as all-around better than Bowie’s Space Oddity”

    Me too; although both are good. Play both with Bowie’s 70s sensibilities followed by Peter Schilling’s 80s synth explosion which ends with that beautiful chorus. HP Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness is an epic of weird adventure despite its novelette size. And shape-shifter slaves? Of course that’s going to end badly. Pretty dumb gods, them Old Ones.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  60. @syonredux

    “You’re missing a lot of good stuff ….. ”

    Including The Night of the Hunter (1955). A cinematic work of art in beautiful black and white.

    • Agree: syonredux
  61. anonymous[422] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    Like the greedy dwarves in LOTR, (((they))) are digging too deeply.

  62. CMC says:
    @Cloudbuster

    I don’t know about the facial asymmetry, but why are 7 of them apparently head leaning to their left? What’s going on there?

  63. The Thing is the best horror movie ever made. surprised Steve hasn’t seen it.

    if you go in cold, it’s terrifying. it’s been out too long now for people to go in cold, everybody has seen the best parts on the internet by now. but i saw it cold one night at my friend’s house decades ago, long before the internet, and i was afraid to go out to my car later. i’ve never been that scared during a movie. the surprises are shocking, the effects are horrifying, and the sense of dread as the movie goes on is like nothing else ever. add in the soundtrack and this movie makes you feel like you’d rather die than face The Thing. and indeed by halfway thru the movie some of the characters are trying to kill themselves.

    of course having seen it dozens of times now i realize how good the acting and directing are too.

    they don’t make ’em like that anymore.

    Rob Bottin was part of the physical effects geniuses of the time period, an era from the 70s to 90s with the best effects in movies that will never come back.

    John Carpenter’s career wasn’t that long relative to other master directors, but god did he deliver some masterpieces.

  64. J.Ross says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Elders things aren’t Outer Gods or Great Old Ones, they were the men of their time. Mi-go, Yithians, deep ones, dholes, ghouls, gugs, zoogs, night gaunts, shantaks, byahkee, R’lyehians (apart from the big one), Tcho-Tcho, Lengian spiders, and lunar frogs aren’t gods or old ones either.
    There’s only a few gods because otherwise it gets silly.

  65. J.Ross says:
    @silviosilver

    The 1951 Thing was really aberrantly good, it was the one sci-fi monster movie of that era that was an objectively good movie by normal cinematic standards: no camp, realistic and well-thought-out characters, suspense which holds up, good camera work, no dopey special effects. Its director was kind of a big deal.
    It may have inspired the completely different garbage that followed it, the way John Milius’ Conan the Barbarian was actually a good movie (the people calling it stupid are simply missing exposition, it’s very complex and satirical but explains almost nothing) wrongly convinced many mid-1980s movie producers, most of them Italian, that a cheap and easy hit could be theirs if they filmed a shirtless guy running around rocks.
    There is one thing about the ’51 iteration: there is a photojournalist character depiction which struck me as mildly anti-Semitic, he’s played a little Lewisy and gets grief from the jockish pilots for being nerdy or weak. I may have read too much into that.

  66. @J.Ross

    Conan has a wonderful music.

    • Replies: @johnd
  67. @J.Ross

    No, he doesn’t get grief for being nerdy or weak. Quite the opposite. Don’t you remember at the beginning, when the copilot said hey, last saw you in Accra (Ghana). He was a frontline war correspondent.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  68. Anonymous[130] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    I was impressed by the dialog in that movie. A lot of it seems ad-libbed but of course can’t have been. That took talented writing and acting.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  69. @education realist

    “The excellent cast never did much else…” Actually, Margaret Sheridan is the only cast member who “never did much else.” Dewey Martin co-starred in Hawks’ “The Big Sky” and “Land of the Pharaohs.” and Wyler’s “The Desperate Hours” with Bogart, then segued into TV. Kenneth Tobey starred in plenty of memorable B-movies, and was the lead in “Whirlybirds,” which ran for three seasons in the late 50s and got plenty of reruns. The other cast members are outstanding character actors with tons of credits, not non-entities. Paul Frees’ credits alone (mostly voice work, but occasionally in-person, as here) would fill dozens of pages.

    • Replies: @education realist
  70. johnd says: • Website
    @Joe Stalin

    crom rewards you!.. or to hell with you crom!

  71. sayless says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    He’s insane to hold that thing without wearing gloves.

  72. J.Ross says:
    @education realist

    Isn’t there a point where they advise him to get back but none of them are moving? And there’s something else where it definitely looks like an emphasizing of different status.

    • Replies: @education realist
  73. @ROBERT MORGAN

    I said, ” never did much else, and nothing A-list”. I submit that your categorization confirms my description. The very best career of anyone other than Arness is maybe comparable to Joel Polis or Peter Maloney, and even that’s a stretch.

    By the way, you’re missing Kenneth Toby’s most notable performance, outside The Thing, which was the leading guest role in that terrific Deep Space 9 episode about the holographic village. Not a top-ranked episode, but a definite mid-ranked good one.

    I don’t know why Dewey Martin didn’t do better; I thought he had real presence in that movie.

  74. @J.Ross

    Well, he is a reporter as opposed to a soldier. He doesn’t pretend to be as tough as they are. Just not afraid. But while he was ribbed for his obsession about a story, he’s clearly respected by the group. And he refused to get back at the end, even though he found it so horrifying he fainted after it was over. (which was treated as reasonable although a bit humorous, not mocking).

  75. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    I remember being struck by how well they captured the “intelligent enlisted pogue” idea which the Air Force was modelling at the time, which is sort of an ultimate opposite to a cartoon of a grunt. There was a lot of stuff going around about our military being smarter than it had been in the past, but then this would be the smart guys who ended up going into Vietnam so take it with a grain of salt. The interactions look exactly like real ones between an intelligent and motivated technician and an officer who recognizes what he’s talking about and lets him propose ideas. It’s definitely one of the best acted and dialogued movies of the fifties and it’s a monster flick!
    But then, as you see in Only Angels Have Wings, Hawks was a real culturally full-time pilot, hung out with other pilots all the time, so this is like if Jacques Cousteau made a movie about divers. There happens to be a sea monster, but there’s an investment in the humans far beyond being something for the monster to eat or spout exposition. Somehow that didn’t come through for Coleman Francis with skydiving or Ed Wood for wearimg angora.

  76. Muggles says:

    The Thing? Isn’t that one of those newly created genders we’ve been hearing about?

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