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I don’t watch much TV, but here are a couple I’ve seen this year:

Patriot on Amazon is a stylized spy show about a soulful, burned-out CIA assassin, like if Bourne or 24 were made by Wes Anderson (Grand Budapest Hotel). It’s a curious, fairly original combination of odd stuff. Whether it’s more a comedy or a drama, I’m still not sure.

The showrunner Steve Conrad doesn’t believe in doing research, he believes writers should just make stuff up. Thus the hero has a cover job working for a giant Milwaukee multinational corporation in the piping industry, an industry that I’m still not sure actually exists. Much of the dialogue during the office scenes consists of engineering gibberish about “retrowashing splurve joints” and the like, which I presume is made up, but who can tell?

Okay, here’s Kurtwood Smith of That 70s Show:

So, yeah, it’s made up.

For another example, in one episode, the hero needs a gun in France to shoot somebody. But the gun control laws are so strict over there that there is only one gun in all of France, a famous antique solid gold gun once owned by Napoleon that’s in the Louvre. So they break in to the Louvre, Ocean’s 11 style, and steal it.

The showrunner admitted that after the episode aired he got an email from a Frenchman pointing out that, actually, you can buy a hunting rifle at most sporting goods stores in France. He replied, “So what?”

(Or something like that. I could have researched what Conrad’s actual anecdote was, but instead I just made one up for him.)

Peep Show is an old (2003-2015) British sitcom on Hulu that is hilarious. It’s about two flatmates in London, one a talentless musician in the Nigel Tufnel mode and the other an MBA yuppie who’d rather be a military historian (a little like Ricky Gervais), who suffer through the indignities of various Lucky Jim-like English microaggressions, while in return inflicting poorly thought-through mesoaggressions. It’s a pretty normal sitcom other than the gimmick that it periodically switches to a point of view shot through the main characters’ eyes (thus the title) and you can hear their inappropriate thoughts.

Here’s David Mitchell explaining why Peep Show was not a good title:

They only made 54 half-hour episodes of Peep Show over 12 years, so the quality of scripts is quite high. In one recent list, it was ranked the 13th best British sitcom ever. Number 1 on the list was Fawlty Towers, of which only 12 episodes were ever made.

There is not much to say about Peep Show other than it is extremely funny.

 
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  1. Anon[101] • Disclaimer says:

    The new HBO/Sky mini-series Chernobyl is amazing.

  2. I used to watch the old-school British shows on NPT. Those were great.

    They may as well pinch Napoleon’s stuff in a museum. They’ve already let Notre Dame burn down.

  3. Mr. Anon says:

    The showrunner Steve Conrad doesn’t believe in doing research, he believes writers should just make stuff up.

    Mitchell and Webb have already been there:

  4. Utopia, a British dark comedy from Channel 4, Season 1&2 (2013-2014 ) :

    Contains spoilers and strong violence:

    Utopia Soundtrack- Main Theme (30-min Long) :

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  5. Jeff Spicoli explains the loser lead character of Patriot at 0:35:

    It’s a shame that a cool dude like Sean Penn ultimately turned out to be a total square.

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
  6. The Inspector Morse prequel ‘Endeavour’ is the best series I’ve seen in years. Highly recommended.

  7. Anon[256] • Disclaimer says:

    Your recent post accounting for your daily time use did not mention television.

    What else are you doing that you haven’t disclosed to us?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @J.Ross
  8. OT
    Any plans to move your blog to the Space Internet?

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
  9. I was really annoyed that Peep Show retconned Jeremy gay in the last season. It really made rewatching the old seasons impossible–if you took it seriously.

  10. “They only made 54 half-hour episodes of Peep Show over 12 years, so the quality of scripts is quite high”

    Actually, the Brits’ sitcoms (and many other shows) have always had fewer episodes in their seasons. For example, the BBC’s ’70’s/’80’s “Are you Being Served?” only had about 5-6 episodes made per season, whereas the US counterpart would have had about 24-26 episodes per season. During the ’60’s , “The Saint”, and “The Avengers” had about 12 episodes made per season, while in the US some shows averaged about 26-30 episodes per season.

    But you can see it throughout the decades, (at least since the ’70’s). BBC’s “As Time Goes By”, only averaged about 6 episodes per season.

    I know, right? Like, why don’t they produce more episodes per season? Doesn’t add up nor from a financial perspective, make much sense. In the US, a sitcom that’s about to get cancelled in mid season will have at least managed to produce about 6-12 episodes. Only producing 6-12 episodes in the US for network TV is definitely seen as a failed series, not a hit. Otherwise, they’d be picked up for a full season of 24 episodes per season.

    • Replies: @anon
  11. Steve, you’re in the movie business, or know some neighbors and kids that went to your elementary school in the movie business or something, right? You bring up a good question. Why DON’T these writers or directors just hire for a few hundred or a thousand bucks a day some people that are in the fields and endeavors that are part of their movies? What the heck is so hard about that?

    I know something about aviation, and then I notice the movie tower-controller clearing a plane for take-off on runway “three-niner”, while the plane is already moving at 100 knots. Even one of the two 9/11 movies on TV showed the 757 most of the time, and then switched to a scarebus for a scene or two.

    I don’t think it takes “research” in any sense of the word I know. Just give the screenwriter a small budget to hire a few experts or just regular guys that he can trust to fix the details (before they film, I guess.) Why make something that just encourages viewers to think of you as a retard?

    • Agree: Simply Simon
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @SFG
  12. The Office is pretty good.

  13. Oh, and The Rockford Files.

  14. tr says: • Website
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    One thing that impressed me about Endeavour, especially the early seasons, was how pretty the photography (cinematography? videography?) is—it’s like somebody finally realized that our televisions are no longer limited to 525 lines and decided to take advantage of it.

  15. theMann says:

    Tastes differ so it is hard to really recommend anything as having universal appeal. I watch 90% SciFi and Martial Arts so I will stay away from recommendations in those genres, as they have no shortage of fanboys anyway.

    The one show I have seen lately that I really liked, and was surprised that I really liked, is the Amazon Prime show “Sneaky Pete”. I started watching it just marking time for The Expanse, but since Amazon is apparently NEVER going to get around to season four of that series, I ended up binging the whole Sneaky Pete series so far. Don’t get me wrong, Sneaky Pete is ridiculous and you know it is ridiculous, but it is still genuine fun to watch.

    And while I won’t recommend any SciFI, I will pan one show:

    The Netflix reboot of Lost in Space is quiet possibly the worst show ever made. I would literally gouge my eyeballs out with a melon baller that watch that show again. I don’t want to be sexist about women writers, but so help me, they had all of the Characters sit down and talk about their feelings in an imminent survival situation. Astronaut Robinson is now completely pussy whipped, Dr. Smith is an (unbelievably unconvincing) woman, not a single character has any curiosity about the life on the planet they tumble down to (because scientists don’t learn things, they huddle up and TALK ABOUT THEIR FEELINGS), and every one of the characters in the show has about as much common sense as a neurotic menopausal harpy on a Prozac overdose.

    And just reading my summation of that show, I haven’t even gotten near to doing justice to how bad it is.

    • Replies: @tr
    , @Clyde
  16. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I also recommend Inspector Morse spinoff Lewis, or Inspector Lewis, as it was broadcast on PBS (beware—in American broadcasts I believe the episodes were truncated for time to push PBS hourly promos. WTF).

    Interesting characters, especially Lewis and Hathaway—each with a sometimes awkward reserve, combined with generational differences that made for some comedic tension. The plots, as I remember, were intriguing. Plus the shots of Oxford (city and colleges) are magnificent.

    • Replies: @Uilleam Yr Alban
  17. Anonymous[679] • Disclaimer says:

    The showrunner Steve Conrad doesn’t believe in doing research, he believes writers should just make stuff up.

    Is this necessarily a bad idea? If you want to learn stuff, read non-fiction. It’s a lot more efficient and likely to be correct than reading fiction.

    Besides, in the case of espionage, contrary to the cliche that “truth is stranger/more interesting/etc. than fiction,” as far as I can tell fictional spycraft is way cooler and more interesting than actual history. For instance, you know the awesome OSS of WW2 fame, led by the legendary badass Wild Bill Donovan? Well, at least according to Max Hastings in The Secret War, they actually contributed almost nothing of value to the war effort. They did a lot of kooky stuff like “send one of Tolstoy’s grandkids on a top secret mission to Tibet” that makes for fun fiction, but they didn’t have a whole lot of successful, materially consequential operations to their name. (The same goes for SOE and resistance movements in western/northern Europe.)

    Likewise, we hear a lot about the awesome, terrifying power of the CIA, but what exactly have they accomplished that is so impressive? At least judging from the work of authors like John Prados and Tim Weiner, it seems like CIA operations are 80% complete failures (e.g. Albania and Tibet), 10% ultimately inconsequential local successes (e.g. the Hmong) and 10% short term successes that become long term disasters (e.g. Guatemala, Iran and Afghanistan).

    I found the comedic tone (and lack of interest in espionage) of Burn After Reading so off-putting that I decided to read some non-fiction books about real spies with real, serious accomplishments. Sadly, my reading seems to suggest that the Coen brothers actually perfectly nailed the absurd and inconsequential nature of at least the vast majority of spy work.

    I think, as far as spy fiction goes, I’ll happily stick to the entertaining fantasies of Kingsman, James Bond and Alfred Hitchcock, rather than well-researched and accurate depictions of how much intelligence services suck and how little they matter.

    Peep Show is an old (2003-2015) British sitcom on Hulu that is hilarious

    If you liked Peep Show, consider checking out White Gold and (the British version of) The Inbetweeners, both of which I think are on Netflix.

    Also, I have to credit Steve with characteristically perceptive judgement in not watching a lot of TV, in an age when we hear so much about how great/culturally important TV is. TV is overrated!

  18. Jjggjj says:

    “Grand Hotel Budapest” should be “Grand Budapest Hotel.” I experience enough ‘Net-induced dyslexia that I cannot rag on you too much, but is this a sign that you’ve finally been replaced by your Russian equivalent? “Peep Show” is a distant cousin of “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and, on the side of reliably progressive political incorrectness, “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.” Some dissident out there could write a classic AV Club-style article about how the group’s treatment of Rickety Cricket and his subsequent degeneration are intended as an object lessons in the predominance of nurture over nature.

  19. Drugs birds and physical labor. Thems me specialties.

  20. There’s a piping industry. Halliburton relies on it, among others. Hopefully they paid someone $1k to look up lingo like “splurge joints,” which is the difference between a great show and one where disbelief refuses to suffer suspension.

  21. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    “Interesting characters, especially Lewis and Hathaway—each with a sometimes awkward reserve”

    The definition of the English.

  22. Sam Patch says:

    Oh man. Peep Show — and David Mitchell more generally — are close to my and my better half’s hearts. In particular, we’ve gotten a lot of mileage out of Mitchell’s advice regarding baby names:

  23. Polynikes says:

    Tried to get into Patriot, but couldn’t. Like the premise. Maybe the writing detail was the problem???

    • Replies: @Currahee
  24. Steve, when did you find Peepshow? I’m glad you did. Olivia Colman will always be Sophie to me.

    ‘That Mitchell and Webb Look’ isn’t as good, but they have their moments. Your ‘Patriot’ show-runner reminds me of their ‘Lazy Writers’ bit:

  25. Kyle says:

    I don’t think I could ever watch a production with amazon branding, or Netflix. It seems so cheap and gimmicky. But I do like that guy who played John Locke in lost, he’s a good tv actor. So is Eric’s dad from that 70’s show. Peeps looks funny, maybe I should check it out.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  26. Well, if you guys say there’s something worth watching, I’ll take your word for it. Holiday weekend so there are guests in the house and they turn on their favorite shows, all of which seem to feature sadistic white guys torturing virtuous POCs and trying to kill immigrants.

    Forced to repair to another room so I can enjoy music. It occurs to me that the tiny ducks of the world get their ideas from somewhere. Open-concept houses are the spawn of satan BTW.

  27. Lurker says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    I do enjoy it yet I’ve never actually watched Morse itself.

    However it seems to be suffering from creeping wokeness. Saw a 2018 episode last week – a girl is murdered on an army base. Whoudunnit? Well a black soldier is vaguely implied to be a suspect in the early stages of the episode. Laughable in the current year since he’s obviously incapable of such a crime and [spoiler] it transpires he didn’t.

  28. prosa123 says:

    For many years French law severely restricted the ownership of hunting rifles that were chambered in any calibers that had ever been used by any country’s military. This meant that such popular hunting rounds as the 308 and 30-06 were off-limits. I believe this restriction finally went away a few years ago.

    • Replies: @Ray Huffman
  29. jim jones says:
    @Anon

    They got the worn out hopelessness of the Soviet Union exactly right.

  30. Chewie111 says:

    Girls Und Panzer is great for its sheer trolling of World War II. Since It’s a Japanese show they don’t hold anything related to the Wehrmacht or Nazi Germany with the kind of contempt the west does.
    And BOY DOES IT SHOW. haha

    • Agree: Tusk
    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Fidelios Automata
  31. “I don’t watch much TV”

    reduce it down to zero then, and feel the positive effects.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @anonymous
  32. Mr. Anon says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    ‘That Mitchell and Webb Look’ isn’t as good, but they have their moments.

    A lot of moments, in my opinion. I found M&W Look to be pretty damned hilarious.

  33. Nathan says:

    Didn’t they steal that gun gag from Shaun of the Dead, where they go to the Winchester until the whole thing blows over?

    If that show isn’t clearly a comedy, then it’s probably just really badly written.

  34. Whiskey says: • Website

    Most of the rural French are believed to have squirreled away all sorts of weapons, certainly the Arabs and Africans in urban France seem to have no shortage of fully auto AK-47s when they shoot up Jewish supermarkets, concerts, bars, magazine offices, and the like.

    The Amazon series “the Boys” seems fairly interesting. It has “Dredd” star Karl Urban (rumor has it he may play the character again in another streaming series, maybe on Amazon). Its written by comic book legend Garth Ennis and concerns a group of mercenaries taking down superheroes who are super, but not so much heroes.

    Youtube has season 2 of Kobra Kai on now, the first season was amazing. [Its the Karate Kid reunion show with William Zabka (the more interesting character) and Ralph Macchio. Zabka is amazing, and his character is as much the hero as Macchio’s is, and both have major flaws explored in a dramedy way.

    The Netflix Marvel shows now canceled were save Defenders rather dull … they suffer “decompression” which is a Manga technique used to draw out a particular dramatic scene in many panels. In tv parlance it means nothing much but angst happens for two or three episodes as the show runs out of fight coordinator money. Defenders is much more action packed and has all four heroes together so there is that.

    Most of the rest of the stuff, broadcast or streaming, is less entertaining, less well written, and less well acted than the Dukes of Hazzard or CHIPs. Almost everything on TV is made for women and gays. Both of whom are notorious for lousy taste.

  35. The best Peep Show episode is the one with the canal and the dog … “Mummy!”

  36. For many years French law severely restricted the ownership of hunting rifles that were chambered in any calibers that had ever been used by any country’s military. This meant that such popular hunting rounds as the 308 and 30-06 were off-limits. I believe this restriction finally went away a few years ago.

    On the other hand, they hosted two world wars on their soil in the last 105 years. Mostly on farmland. You’re going to tell me every one of those weapons issued to eventual casualties has been accounted for?

    What’s the French for “Yeah, right”?

  37. I just finished watching season 1 of Designated Survivor on Netflix. It’s liberal porn. Once you get to the actual conspiracy, it becomes laughable but I continued to watch to see just how bad it gets. The scene in the final episode of season 1 where the 100 lb female FBI agent beats up the highly trained and motivated Navy Seal Lozano is the perfect coda to a ridiculous series. On the other hand, Chernobyl, as the first comment points out, is quite good. Episode 4 airs on the 27th.

    • Replies: @tr
    , @Simon
  38. Patriot sucks. The writers’ indifference to facts carries over in the weak-ass, pathetically unfunny scripts. If it’s spies you want, it’s gotta be Archer.

    • Replies: @TWS
  39. AnonAnon says:

    I tried to watch Patriot but it became annoying after a few episodes – the main character has to overcome stupid f*ckups and the pacing was too slow to maintain my interest. A much better Amazon show is Bosch, among the best shows I’ve ever watched. Good stories and great acting. It’s set in LA and the city is practically a character in the show, shown honestly instead of glamorously – potholes, weeds, trash on the streets. Catastrophe is another good Amazon show, a funny British import about love and marriage. I can’t wait for my guilty pleasure show, Yellowstone – the Kevin Costner/Taylor Sheridan Dynasty-for-cable to start again.

  40. Thus the hero has a cover job working for a giant Milwaukee multinational corporation in the piping industry, an industry that I’m still not sure actually exists.

    The 1941 WPA guide doesn’t mention pipes:

    Industrially, Milwaukee is known across the face of the earth. The metal trades and meat packing are closely followed in productiveness by tanning (more topside calf is tanned in Milwaukee than in any other city in the world), and the manufacture of liquor, malt, knit goods, boots and shoes.

    Out of the city’s vast machine shops come products that range from turbines weighing 1,200,000 pounds to parts so minute as to be assembled only with the aid of magnifying glasses. Milwaukee steam shovels dug the Panama Canal; Milwaukee turbines harnessed Niagara Falls; Milwaukee tractors are in the fields of most of the world’s agricultural regions; herring-bone gears made in Milwaukee operate mines in Africa and Mexico, sugar mills in South America, and rolling mills in Japan, India, and Australia. It was beer, however, as the advertising slogan said, that made Milwaukee famous.

    But 1941 Milwaukee was part of a different world:

    where an efficient fire department makes possible the lowest fire insurance rates of any American city but Detroit

    Bill Kauffman wrote that Seneca Falls once made one out of every four pumps in the world. We celebrate that village for the wrong reasons.

  41. Ok. You suck and you aren’t Steve Sailer, not that Sailer necessarily didn’t exude suckiness himself. But even a gun novice like myself knows you can make a pipe into an impromptu gun if the need arises. Also, I’d like to point out the difference between pipe vs piping. The latter is generally used to refer to trim on clothing and bedding; the former gets called plumbing when it’s being connected or pipe when it’s not.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  42. Google ‘mitchell and webb cheese argument’.

  43. @Reg Cæsar

    What’s the French for “Yeah, right”?

    “Mais bien sûr, hon hon hon.”

    • Replies: @bored identity
  44. BenKenobi says:
    @Lugash

    It’s easy to see why this program is England’s longest running at six episodes.

  45. LondonBob says:

    Peep Show is very funny.

    Guns are easy to acquire in France if you are a criminal. Balkan gangs will happily supply them, as they have done for a number of Islamist terror attacks, including the Bataclan attack.

  46. @Reg Cæsar

    What’s the French for “Yeah, right”?

    A safe guess would be “quand même”, which has about five different meanings. One of them is “oh spare me”.

  47. I have mixed feelings about making stuff up for TV shows. It can be impossible to please the geek crowd and most people really don’t care. I’ve heard you have to be careful with historical fiction because those readers really care about accuracy (like if you get something wrong about saddles in the 13th century they go ape). So maybe it’s better to not even try?

    If it’s too fake, sure, that’s a problem. But I’m more interested in the gist of the story. Then again, I hated Tom Clancy novels with their hundreds of pages devoted to accurately depicting every last bolt on a battleship.

  48. Jliw says:

    Peep Show is the funniest and best show In The Universe, IMO. I periodically rewatch it, although I almost never rewatch anything; nothing else has quite captured that mix of charm, cringe, and pure hilarity that gives me so much joy to watch. Fantastic.

  49. @prosa123

    This seems to be common in Napoleonic Code jurisdictions. It was Mexican demand which kept the .38 Super alive for decades after it had fallen by the wayside elsewhere, because .38 super was the most powerful non-military caliber in .38 caliber, which was the largest caliber permitted.

    OT, but .38 super is a great caliber and it deserves to be much more popular than it is today.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  50. The only TV show really worth watching in recent memory was “Adventure Time” in its prime, roughly seasons two through five or so. After that it kinda ran out of steam. But man, that is some serious high-class Art.

    Bob’s Burgers is also good, in a formalist sort of way. A good Gene line is a marvel to behold. But not serious art in the way Adventure Time was at its peak.

  51. Patriot on Amazon is a stylized spy show about a soulful, burned-out CIA assassin, like if Bourne or 24 were made by Wes Anderson (Grand Hotel Budapest). It’s a curious, fairly original combination of odd stuff. Whether it’s more a comedy or a drama, I’m still not sure.

    Grosse Point Blank would be the quintessential example here.

  52. @miss marple

    You mean, Steve Conrad just MAKES STUFF UP???

    • Replies: @bored identity
    , @CCZ
  53. @AnonAnon

    I read one Michael Connelly “Bosch” detective novel. It was pretty good.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  54. Once again I’m astonished at how little I share Mr. Sailer’s opinion on movies and television shows, even while his usual fare continues to delight me.

  55. OT – Recently in The Boston Globe:

    Racism allegations put MFA in the spotlight

    How the city’s cultural institutions are attempting to confront racism

    Fake racial brouhaha involving the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Supposedly some future high achievers from an urban public school were verbally abused by other visitors, and maybe staff, for no reason.

    Reading between the lines: The youths probably were acting like they were at Chuck E. Cheese’s. The woke solution to such alleged tone policing: Envibrantize the cultural centers, where there’s …

    … an uncomfortable truth: The vast majority of those leading and patronizing the city’s most famous cultural centers are white, while Boston itself is majority non-white. MFA officials have said in the past, for example, that 79 percent of visitors in 2015 were white, as well as about 80 percent of staff.

    Museums, theaters, and galleries across the city have attempted to tackle racism with a wide range of approaches, from antibias training to altering the very art on display.

    “There’s no magic silver bullet that solves the problem — the lack of brown people who go to places that are historically occupied by white people,” said Lyndsay Allyn Cox, the director of theatre arts at the Boston Center for the Arts.

    In Cox’s view, one of the most important actions cultural centers can take is to hire more people of color to leadership positions. Of the non-white employees at MFA, only 14 percent in 2015 were in “professional” jobs, a category that includes curators, conservators, educators, and management.

    “I can’t make a racist person change their mind about being racist,” Cox, who is black, said. “What I can do is continue to occupy those spaces, and be in those spaces, and be unapologetically black in those spaces.”

    Galleries and works like the one below no doubt make “unapologetically black” blacks feel a bit uncomfortable and inadequate. It’ll have to go.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    , @prosa123
  56. Tusk says:

    Here’s a classic

  57. @Kyle

    But I do like that guy who played John Locke in lost, he’s a good tv actor. So is Eric’s dad from that 70’s show.

    They’re both good in Patriot. Eric’s dad, Kurtwood Smith, starts out as the Boring Boss character, but he’s so good that it’s inevitable he has a bizarre backstory as a legend in the piping industry.

    • Replies: @bored identity
  58. @Anonymous

    I found the comedic tone (and lack of interest in espionage) of Burn After Reading so off-putting that I decided to read some non-fiction books about real spies with real, serious accomplishments. Sadly, my reading seems to suggest that the Coen brothers actually perfectly nailed the absurd and inconsequential nature of at least the vast majority of spy work.

    I didn’t like Burn After Reading at first, but 10 years later it seems awfully perceptive about the spy biz. My advice to myself: Never bet that you’re brighter than the Coen Brothers.

  59. @Anon

    Obviously, I must have a secret life to account for the huge amounts of time I’m not sitting at my computer typing.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Lot
    , @SunBakedSuburb
  60. So there are two English David Mitchells, the comedian and the author, of roughly similar ages and levels of celebrity?

  61. Anonymous[253] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: I just enjoyed a Les Claypool and Sean Lennon song about Jack Parsons, who was an extremely interesting guy.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Parsons_(rocket_engineer)

  62. @Steve Sailer

    “Never bet that you’re brighter than the Coen Brothers”

    You think somebody who married Frances McDormand is smarter than you?

    Okay, fine. Fer sure, for sure.

    I’ll grant you the splendid moment of The Dude petulantly snarking “Hey, there’s a /beverage/ here!” but beyond that……

  63. Realist says:
    @Anon

    Most of the crap on TV is propaganda.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  64. Anon[255] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I found the comedic tone (and lack of interest in espionage) of Burn After Reading so off-putting that I decided to read some non-fiction books about real spies with real, serious accomplishments. Sadly, my reading seems to suggest that the Coen brothers actually perfectly nailed the absurd and inconsequential nature of at least the vast majority of spy work.

    I recommend Spycraft: The Secret History of the CIA’s Spytechs, from Communism to Al-Qaeda. The author is the former director of the CIA’s Office of Technical Service. George Tenet wrote the forward, and the CIA censored part of it.

    This is the real stuff, although the best, most detailed information is from decades ago, of course.

    They have employees who are simply burglars, for instance. They fly around the world, staying in cheap hotels, burgle some place (maybe bribing guards), get drunk, and fly back.

    Battery tech was a big problem. You get a bug inside an embassy, and then you have to keep going back in to change the battery. Mallory worked on this for the CIA, they of the flashlight used by backpackers in the 1970s. It turns out a lot of battery tech was secretly financed by the CIA.

  65. BB753 says:

    The Man in the High Castle is worth watching. On Amazon Prime.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  66. SFG says:
    @Chewie111

    WW2 was fought by schoolgirls?

    I had heard the Japanese were into surrealism, but oh boy.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  67. SFG says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    I LOL’ed.

    The anti-Nazi half of the commentariat should google ‘Are we the baddies?’

  68. Anonymous[998] • Disclaimer says:

    Have ‘The League of Gentlemen’ or ‘The Fast Show ‘ ever been broadcast on US television?

    Or, come to think of it sitcoms from the golden age of UK TV comedy such as Steptoe & Son, On The Buses, The Goodies, Love Thy Neighbour, Rising Damp, Porridge, Dad’s Army, It Ain’t Alf Hot Mum etc etc?

  69. slumber_j says:
    @Anon

    The new HBO/Sky mini-series Chernobyl is amazing.

    Last night a friend was telling me to get HBO for exactly this reason. Now I fear he may be right. Dammit.

    Thus the hero has a cover job working for a giant Milwaukee multinational corporation in the piping industry, an industry that I’m still not sure actually exists.

    A friend of mine who was large in every way before he died got a job teaching English in Japan right after college with Nippon Steel Pipe. There’s a funny story about his interview for that job, but I don’t think it can be communicated in writing.

  70. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer

    Yes! TV not only dumbs down, it also fires up Americans. Does anyone think that Gillette will sell more of its products with the bizarre ads I’ve learned about here? Like politics, these contrived culture wars are a divide & conquer strategy to channel and harmlessly blow off dissent. When people go about their business in their part of the real world, they don’t even know about these “issues.”

    These sporadic posts at Unz about TV, movies, spectator sports, and other mass culture are my only exposure. I renounced all of it years ago, and don’t miss a thing. Even when someone brings some exceptionally worthy item to my attention and I sit through it, I’m never tempted to look for more. Putting up with the ads, preachiness, et cetera, isn’t worth knowing that I’m helping to keep the garbage barge afloat.

    Even when you give them your time & dime selectively, it all feeds the same beast.

    Starve it.

    • Replies: @Western
  71. @Steve Sailer

    bored identity met Kurtwood Smith few years ago and was surprised that his civilian persona – he had fedora, short, rapier-tin braided pony tail, unkempt goatee, bunch of leather & wood beads bracelets, and some hippieish patterned shirt – was way off his typecast assortment of tv/movie appearances.

    He was all smiles for hours, and his jokes were dry and witty.

    But then bored identity was laconically reminded by his merciless children:

    ” That’s why they call them actors, dad.”

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  72. @The Wild Geese Howard

    And it’s also a shame that square Sean Penn gets hotter women than those Spicolli only dreamed about.

    • Replies: @Anon87
  73. anon[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    America has like 5 or 6 times as many people as the UK

    All things being equal we should expect seasons to be 5 or 6 times shorter

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
  74. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Or he could choose Urbit. That’s Moldbug’s feudal web thingy.

  75. donut says:
    @Anon

    You don’t need HBO , usually after a month or two you can by the season on Amazon , or you can just do a trial month watch the show and cancel HBO when you’re done .

    • Replies: @jim jones
  76. @Steve Sailer

    Wasn’t it CIA Director John Brennan who claimed to have first suspected Trump was colluding with the Russians when Trump joked, “Hey, Russia, Russia, if you’re listening, maybe you can find Hillary’s missing emails, and then you could tell the U.S. media. They might be very interested, although I doubt it.”

    It made Brennan sound like an idiot, though probably he was just trying to find some shred of evidence to justify his spying on the Trump campaign. Either way, definitely Coen brothers-worthy material.

    • Replies: @Lot
  77. Anon87 says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Square Sean Penn realized the ladies like muscles, so he pumps iron and could thrash Spicoli Sean Penn. You’d think he’d be more rightist, but then Arnold went wimpy too.

  78. Currahee says:
    @Polynikes

    Yeah, same. Stuck it out until the end of the first episode. Never went back.
    What was the point?

  79. OT, but it’s always nature and nurture … if only those who didn’t win could get the right nurture!

    https://qz.com/africa/1628684/why-kenyans-keep-winning-marathons-long-distance-races/

  80. Hunsdon says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Garands, M1 carbines, StG44s, MP42s, Sten guns, to say nothing of “native species.”

  81. @Achmed E. Newman

    Because most viewers are retards.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  82. tr says: • Website
    @theMann

    It’s truly hard to imagine that they could have made the remake be worse than the original, but I’ll take your word for it.

  83. TWS says:

    Wasn’t there a couple seasons of Faulty Towers? There’s several seasons of funny in there.

  84. @Anonymous

    Yeah, per their own history, the OSS’s Burma operations seemed pretty blah, and the book I read kept mentioning how they were eager to demonstrate they were able to do something, which makes it seem even more like they didn’t do much. Some derring-do and harrowing experiences, but nothing very important it seemed. However, always, maybe the juicy stuff is still TOP SECRET-EYES ONLY.

  85. Clyde says:
    @theMann

    Sneaky Pete, the first season is the best, partly due to the vicious Bryan Cranston. Season two is OK. Season three is much better than season two

  86. tr says: • Website
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    it becomes laughable but I continued to watch to see just how bad it gets.

    That’s why I finished reading A Handmaid’s Tale. Needless to say,I have no desire to watch the series.

    • Agree: Malcolm X-Lax
  87. El Dato says:
    @SFG

    Well, at least they are not android schoolgrils.

    I think it’s more like an inter-school rivalry/competition thing with real WWII tanks. The tanks are clearly drawn via CGI, which is why there are extensive scenes of the same.

    • Replies: @SFG
  88. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    The youths probably were acting like they were at Chuck E. Cheese’s.

    For whatever reason, this reminded me of The Churchmice Adrift, a book I enjoyed as a child. It probably reinforced my natural dislike of destructive behavior. The churchmice illustrated books are inconsistent, but some are fun and send up both old prigs and young hippies.

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/375276581424840345/

  89. @Steve Sailer

    You mean, Steve Conrad just MAKES STUFF UP???

    Dunno.

    His heart of darkness is pretty strong on anecdotal level (Conrad’s Barris is very good), while Conrad’s spiraling down the LexisNexis Mondo Bizz-hole produces rather decent plausibility factor (Conrad’s Baross is even better *):

    Oi to all of our Brazilians in Luxembourg! Are you interested in getting to know fellow Brazilian expats in Luxembourg?

    Are you looking for advice from other Brazilians, e.g. which bars in Luxembourg will broadcast your favorite team’s upcoming match or where in town to go for feijoada?

    Among the members of our international expat network, there is also a vibrant circle of Brazilian expats, coming from Brasilia, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and all regions of Brazi

    https://www.internations.org/luxembourg-expats/brazilians

    At least one of the Irmãos Barros could have worked here:

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g190356-d743797-r537648589-Batucada-Luxembourg_City.html

    The rest of them are probably busy running this Brazilian Jiu Jitsu parlor:

    https://www.aresbjjluxembourg.com/

    (* Luxembourg City has 76,000 inhabitants)

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
  90. LondonBob says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Mitchell and Webb didn’t write Peep Show, they are drearily left wing. It was actually written by Jesse Armstrong and Sam Bain, politics unknown.

  91. SFG says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    If it’s a small enough field, nobody will care. Lots of things are done for dramatic purposes rather than realism as the general audience has no idea about aviation.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  92. TWS says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Archer is the best spy show there is.

    • Agree: Kylie
  93. prosa123 says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    In the last year or so I’ve made two weekday visits to the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. The crowds were similar demographically on both visits: about 60% white, 35% Asian (mostly East), 5% black. Very few visible Hispanics but I occasionally heard Spanish spoken.

    • Replies: @Lot
  94. I don’t really watch TV too often, but I do see all of these TV shows with black doctors, surgeons and whatnot a lot. So many new ads for these shows as well. I feel like there are far more blacks playing TV roles in these positions then there are real life black doctors

  95. Yes! Fawlty Towers rules! John Cleese is perhaps the funniest man on the planet.

  96. @Chewie111

    Judging by the title, this sounds pretty dumb, but I may have to check it out!

  97. Lot says:
    @Steve Sailer

    “huge amounts of time I’m not sitting at my computer typing”

    Everyone needs some time out of the closet.

  98. Lot says:
    @prosa123

    “I occasionally heard Spanish spoken.”

    The most “Spanish” museums outside a Spanish speaking country I remember were the Vatican museums and Rome in general. Spanish, white Latin Americans, and prosperous/conservative looking mestizos all.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  99. Lot says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    The spooks were looking into Flynn for a long time.

    When he wanted to cash in like so many retired generals do, he wasn’t that careful about it. The story below about him features him dining with Putin and Jill Stein, as well as the phrase “erotic postcard sent by Joseph Stalin.”

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4370168/Flynn-dismissal-linked-meeting-Cambridge-graduate.html

    He had a jr league version of Manafort’s foreign influence peddling starting up when he joined team Trump.

    Ann Coulter’s early take on this I still think is correct: the elites boycotted Trump’s campaign and foreign policy team, so he ended up with 2nd tier grifters like Manafort and Flynn. That’s not “collusion with Russia” however.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @utu
  100. Anon7 says:

    OT: Periscope show with Scott Adams, who very early on predicted that Trump would win the election in 2016, now believes Trump has 0% chance of winning in 2020 due to social network manipulation. When I watched this Periscope, someone commented that Google learned censorship from China, which I think is spot on.

    Skip ahead to 3:30 if you like, where he discusses how he and others are shadow banned if they mention certain individuals.

    Initially, Google stayed out of China, partly because Sergey Brin’s parents escaped the former Soviet Union.

    https://qz.com/1347623/without-sergey-brin-google-has-lost-its-fear-of-authoritarian-china/

  101. JimB says:

    The Peepshow preview makes me sad. The Brits seemed to imported the worst of American comedy, including stupid sex, poop, and drug jokes, PC sensibility, and idiotic self-loathing by a people who 150 years ago were the most powerful nation on earth, largely because of the character of its people. Just one more reason I refused to pay for Hulu when it stopped being free.

  102. Sparkon says:
    @SFG

    Lots of things are done for dramatic purposes rather than realism.

    Yes, and this observation should elicit the question: Why are humans such suckers for fiction?

  103. Off topic: The article says this went “viral” but I don’t recall seeing anything about it. I wonder what was edited out.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5500779/Mans-passionate-debate-Jewish-aunt-non-Jewish-girlfriend.html#comments

  104. Lab Rat says:

    @Steve Sailer
    You should really try Person of Interest. It’s just well written fun.

  105. @Jenner Ickham Errican

    Très magnifique!

    (since Unz Proprietary Slothware discriminates against bored identity’s right to lol, agrrrree, etc )

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  106. Counterpart, Gommorah and Shingeki no Kyojin for me. Been catching up to Better Call Saul too. Other than those, TV these days is dross.

    If a modern ‘Godfather’ without honour is your thing, then I cannot recommend Gommorah enough. The only Brit shows I keep up with religiously are Peaky Blinders and The Last Kingdom. The Brits virtual signal way too much, that and their ‘series’ then to go off a massive cliff in the second season. Killing Eve being a recent one to burn me.

  107. Svigor says:

    Whether it’s more a comedy or a drama, I’m still not sure.

    That reminds me, I didn’t realize how good The Handmaid’s Tale is until I realized it’s a comedy. Funniest shit ever. The endless closeups on her ugly face during her lamentations of the microaggressions are the crown jewel.

    OT:

    What did the rebbe mean by this?

    Funny how westboro goy is national headlines material, but the rebbe…

    • Replies: @Anon
  108. So sad to see how many of you guys are paying for and watching our enemies’ propaganda. Seriously—HBO, the child molester channel, who pump out hundreds of hours of pro-commie propaganda each month?

    I guess you guys value being entertained with bread and circuses than actually saving Western civ. Pathetic.

    • Replies: @donut
  109. @AnonAnon

    A much better Amazon show is Bosch, among the best shows I’ve ever watched. Good stories and great acting. It’s set in LA and the city is practically a character in the show, shown honestly instead of glamorously – potholes, weeds, trash on the streets.

    I’ll second the Bosch recommendation. Well-written show with strong performances from most of the principals. Titus Welliver is great in the title role. It is a bit jarring to see the actor who played Marlo on the Wire as a homicide detective.

    OTOH, there are too many perfectly spoken vibrants in positions of power and the main villains in seasons 1-4 are all white save for one or two pale Latinx types.

  110. @Lot

    Spanish women/South American women have a fetishization of Italian men (from Italy) that’s humorous.

  111. Art Deco says:
    @Lot

    Manafort was hired for a discrete purpose, then cut loose. No clue why Gen. Flynn is deemed ‘2d tier’ or a ‘grifter’. Who is Coulter’s idea of ‘1st tier’?

  112. BenKenobi says:
    @Steve Sailer

    the absurd and inconsequential nature

    I couldn’t dig it up, but this reminds me of a meme that’s out there:

    CIA – what you expect [picture of Pierce Brosnan as James Bond]
    CIA – what you get [picture of Evan McMuffin]

  113. Simon says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    Yes, that series is really comic-book stuff, and nauseatingly p.c. The second episode featured a villainous army general who, after the Capitol is blown up by unknown terrorists, immediately begins plotting a war with Iran; newsreels of policemen in Michigan kicking to death a Muslim teenager and, on the governor’s orders, rounding up and arresting innocent Muslims; and sneering cops in D.C. harassing a dark-skinned speechwriter (played by the odious Kal Penn), who’s incidentally depicted as the wisest and cleverest man in Washington.

    And oh yeah, that 100-pound female FBI agent (Asian, natch) warns her superiors, “Wait, maybe it’s NOT really that Muslim terrorist group behind the bombing. Maybe we’re just supposed to THINK it’s them.” And of course her warnings are ignored.

    I’m disgusted with myself for not tuning out sooner.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
    , @Autochthon
  114. Mr. Anon says:

    Kurtwood Smith’s technobabble speech sounds like it’s channeling this (in certain circles) famous archetype of the genre:

    The Turbo-Encabulator

  115. Lot says:

    Flynn was a grifter because he devoted the prior 2 years to hoovering up Turkish cash, and Russian money but with more limited success.

    I agree on Manafort’s limited purpose.

    Who are the top tier? Good question. Anyway search Coulter’s site for Flynn to find her articles on the topic. I found it convincing.

  116. @The Last Real Calvinist

    The Inspector Morse prequel ‘Endeavour’ is the best series I’ve seen in years. Highly recommended.

    Agree Calvinist. AnotherMom and I are enjoying this series quite a bit as well.

    The heart of it–beyond the excellent job the writers do, weaving these complicated-to-sort-out mysteries into the scripts–is that the actor Shaun Evans does an excellent job portraying the very sharp, but really too sharp to quite fit in comfortably, character who will believeably become the older Morse.

    But the other big pleasure is the attempt at recreating 60s Oxford, and in particular recreating a time when the women, and in particular the *girls* that young Morse is attracted to, are distinctly feminine and just way, way more attractive than young women today.

    I think this opportunity to observe and enjoy actual distinct masculine and particularly feminine characters is a big appeal of these period pieces for both men and women.

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Art Deco
  117. Neoconned says:

    https://www.theyucatantimes.com/2019/05/american-expats-say-money-they-had-at-monex-is-gone-and-the-bank-isnt-helping-them/

    Steve, American expats in Mexico find their retirement funds suddenly gone, with little recourse…..

  118. “…like so many retired generals do, …

    A Lot of crock and wishful thinking ;

    First of all, Flynn wasn’t just any of many generals– he was in charge of DIA.

    Second of all, President Kenyata was overdue on his jubilee burnt offering tribute to Donorstein Family Global Fondation For Peace, Prosperity, and Samson Option.

    Seymour M. Hersh on US intelligence sharing in the Syrian war

    Barack Obama’s repeated insistence that Bashar al-Assad must leave office – and that there are ‘moderate’ rebel groups in Syria capable of defeating him – has in recent years provoked quiet dissent, and even overt opposition, among some of the most senior officers on the Pentagon’s Joint Staff.

    Their criticism has focused on what they see as the administration’s fixation on Assad’s primary ally, Vladimir Putin.

    The military’s resistance dates back to the summer of 2013, when a highly classified assessment, put together by the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, then led by General Martin Dempsey, forecast that the fall of the Assad regime would lead to chaos and, potentially, to Syria’s takeover by jihadi extremists, much as was then happening in Libya.

    A former senior adviser to the Joint Chiefs told me that the document was an ‘all-source’ appraisal, drawing on information from signals, satellite and human intelligence, and took a dim view of the Obama administration’s insistence on continuing to finance and arm the so-called moderate rebel groups.

    By then, the CIA had been conspiring for more than a year with allies in the UK, Saudi Arabia and Qatar to ship guns and goods – to be used for the overthrow of Assad – from Libya, via Turkey, into Syria.

    The new intelligence estimate singled out Turkey as a major impediment to Obama’s Syria policy. The document showed, the adviser said, ‘that what was started as a covert US programme to arm and support the moderate rebels fighting Assad had been co-opted by Turkey, and had morphed into an across-the-board technical, arms and logistical programme for all of the opposition, including Jabhat al-Nusra and Islamic State.

    The so-called moderates had evaporated and the Free Syrian Army was a rump group stationed at an airbase in Turkey.’ The assessment was bleak: there was no viable ‘moderate’ opposition to Assad, and the US was arming extremists.

    Lieutenant General Michael Flynn, director of the DIA between 2012 and 2014, confirmed that his agency had sent a constant stream of classified warnings to the civilian leadership about the dire consequences of toppling Assad.

    The jihadists, he said, were in control of the opposition. Turkey wasn’t doing enough to stop the smuggling of foreign fighters and weapons across the border.

    ‘If the American public saw the intelligence we were producing daily, at the most sensitive level, they would go ballistic,’ Flynn told me.

    ‘We understood Isis’s long-term strategy and its campaign plans, and we also discussed the fact that Turkey was looking the other way when it came to the growth of the Islamic State inside Syria.’ The DIA’s reporting, he said, ‘got enormous pushback’ from the Obama administration. ‘I felt that they did not want to hear the truth.’

    ‘Our policy of arming the opposition to Assad was unsuccessful and actually having a negative impact,’ the former JCS adviser said.

    ‘The Joint Chiefs believed that Assad should not be replaced by fundamentalists.

    The administration’s policy was contradictory. They wanted Assad to go but the opposition was dominated by extremists. So who was going to replace him? To say Assad’s got to go is fine, but if you follow that through – therefore anyone is better. It’s the “anybody else is better” issue that the JCS had with Obama’s policy.’

    The Joint Chiefs felt that a direct challenge to Obama’s policy would have ‘had a zero chance of success’.

    So in the autumn of 2013 they decided to take steps against the extremists without going through political channels, by providing US intelligence to the militaries of other nations, on the understanding that it would be passed on to the Syrian army and used against the common enemy, Jabhat al-Nusra and Islamic State.

    Germany, Israel and Russia were in contact with the Syrian army, and able to exercise some influence over Assad’s decisions – it was through them that US intelligence would be shared.

    Each had its reasons for co-operating with Assad: Germany feared what might happen among its own population of six million Muslims if Islamic State expanded; Israel was concerned with border security; Russia had an alliance of very long standing with Syria, and was worried by the threat to its only naval base on the Mediterranean, at Tartus.

    ‘We weren’t intent on deviating from Obama’s stated policies,’ the adviser said. ‘But sharing our assessments via the military-to-military relationships with other countries could prove productive.

    It was clear that Assad needed better tactical intelligence and operational advice.

    The JCS concluded that if those needs were met, the overall fight against Islamist terrorism would be enhanced.

    Obama didn’t know, but Obama doesn’t know what the JCS does in every circumstance and that’s true of all presidents.’

    Once the flow of US intelligence began, Germany, Israel and Russia started passing on information about the whereabouts and intent of radical jihadist groups to the Syrian army; in return, Syria provided information about its own capabilities and intentions.

    There was no direct contact between the US and the Syrian military; instead, the adviser said, ‘we provided the information – including long-range analyses on Syria’s future put together by contractors or one of our war colleges – and these countries could do with it what they chose, including sharing it with Assad.

    We were saying to the Germans and the others: “Here’s some information that’s pretty interesting and our interest is mutual.” End of conversation.

    The JCS could conclude that something beneficial would arise from it – but it was a military to military thing, and not some sort of a sinister Joint Chiefs’ plot to go around Obama and support Assad.

    It was a lot cleverer than that. If Assad remains in power, it will not be because we did it. It’s because he was smart enough to use the intelligence and sound tactical advice we provided to others.’

    (…)

    General Dempsey and his colleagues on the Joint Chiefs of Staff kept their dissent out of bureaucratic channels, and survived in office. General Michael Flynn did not.

    ‘Flynn incurred the wrath of the White House by insisting on telling the truth about Syria,’ said Patrick Lang, a retired army colonel who served for nearly a decade as the chief Middle East civilian intelligence officer for the DIA.

    ‘He thought truth was the best thing and they shoved him out.

    He wouldn’t shut up.’

    Flynn told me his problems went beyond Syria.

    ‘I was shaking things up at the DIA – and not just moving deckchairs on the Titanic.

    It was radical reform.

    I felt that the civilian leadership did not want to hear the truth. I suffered for it, but I’m OK with that.’

    In a recent interview in Der Spiegel, Flynn was blunt about Russia’s entry into the Syrian war:

    ‘We have to work constructively with Russia.

    Whether we like it or not, Russia made a decision to be there and to act militarily.

    They are there, and this has dramatically changed the dynamic.

    So you can’t say Russia is bad; they have to go home. It’s not going to happen.

    Get real.’

    https://www.lrb.co.uk/v38/n01/seymour-m-hersh/military-to-military

  119. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I’ve watched the first three seasons of “Endeavour” and agree that those are wonderful. Sara Vickers is angelic.

    At the beginning of season 4, we began to get lectures (from out of nowhere) about how wonderful it is to have England be invaded by South Asians and what a bad person Enoch Powell was. I stopped watching.

    I started on another Brit police drama that came highly recommended — “The Unforgotten”. Right from the start, the main message is how very, very bad it was for the native British to have any doubts about Indians and Pakistanis invading their country. Bailed on that one too.

    According to the interweb, it was Sam Goldwyn that said “if you want to send a message, use Western Union”.

  120. SFG says:
    @AnotherDad

    I think this opportunity to observe and enjoy actual distinct masculine and particularly feminine characters is a big appeal of these period pieces for both men and women.

    Indeed. I suspect this is a big part of the appeal of stuff like Mad Men (for Americans). We vaguely know this is the way things were supposed to work, before things went off the rails in the Summer of Love.

    I kind of wonder if a lot of that Golfocaust stuff the showrunner brought up was his way of looking PC in front of the reviewers, when spending so much time on hairstyles and clothing of an era you really hated is kind of counterintuitive. Sort of like those bloody slasher stories that would toss on a moral lesson at the end, or those exposes of the kinky underbelly of society that were supposed to warn you of the dark side even as they titillated you with it.

    Look at Game of Thrones–they’ll toss in a little female empowerment to be PC, the way they used to put in a Christian moral, when we have lots of men looking manly and wielding swords and dispatching each other in bloody ways.

  121. Art Deco says:
    @AnotherDad

    If you say so. The women in Endeavour all seem rather plain to me.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  122. @The Last Real Calvinist

    An interviewer once asked Colin Dexter how much research he did on police procedure. Short answer: None!

  123. Mr. Anon says:

    OT: A US Army Twitter account invites people to share how the Army has influenced their lives. This little propaganda stunt doesn’t turn out the way they thought it would:

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Alden
  124. Andy says:

    A bit off-topic, Steve, have you seen the news about the anti-white “bias training” to teachers in NYC public school system? It’s pretty outrageous:

    https://nypost.com/2019/05/25/teachers-allegedly-told-to-treat-black-students-as-victims-punish-whites/

  125. @Steve in Greensboro

    I’ve never watched any of the shows you mentioned, Steve, but you gave me a flashback to a night when had to go to my 3rd movie choice (on DVD) to get to one that didn’t have a “message”. These messages were about white people treating black people badly. After I watched the 3rd movie for 10 minutes, I finally realized why I liked it – it was from the 1960’s! (My first clue was “hey, that guy Jerry the dentist from Bob Newhart sure looks young in this movie”)

    I ended up with a blog post, at least, “Tried to watch a movie – here’s 3 reviews in one!”

    I like that spirit of yours of just turning them the hell off. Good job.

  126. CCZ says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Perhaps not made up, just very out to date:

    In 1927, the A. O. Smith Company perfected “a method of economically forming and welding large-diameter steel line pipe. This new mass production technique was instrumental in launching the natural gas industry and transcontinental oil pipeline business. A. O. Smith was a leading supplier of line pipe until it exited the business in 1972.” [A.O. Smith Corporate History]

    The large diameter (30 to 36 inches) welded “line pipe,” as it was called, was manufactured at an A. O. Smith pipe mill in Milwaukee, the largest pipe mill in the United States. The company opened a second pipe mill in Texas in 1949, described as the “second largest mill.” [Green Bay Press, July 18, 1934; LaCrosse (Wisconsin) Tribune, September 25, 1949; Daily Advertiser (Lafayette, Louisiana), August 17, 1950; History of Line Pipe Manufacturing in North America by J. F. Kiefner and Edward B. Clark, ASME, 1996]

    During World War II the pipe mill was converted to produce bomb casings and more than 3,500 miles of “pipe” was converted to almost 5 million bomb casings (80% of total war needs). [Waco (Texas) News Tribune, December 29, 1965; World War II Milwaukee by Meg Jones, The History Press, 2015]

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  127. @BengaliCanadianDude

    Is that where the phrase “I’m not a doctor but I play one on TV” comes from?

    [MORE]

    No, OK, it was really from a TV commercial that featured the actor from “Trapper John, M.D.”

  128. J.Ross says: • Website

    Jews in Germany have been warned not to publicly identify as Jews or wear kippot (yarmulkes) because of “the rise of white supremacism” and not, say, a new and violent population of openly anti-Semitic Muslims.
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-48411735

  129. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon

    Wow, this manages to be the creepiest comment in a while.

  130. @Redneck farmer

    Fair enough, but my thinking is that this total disregard for the truth carries over into everything these people create in media. That’s why I see the media as spreading lies, whether it’s the news, a sitcom, or movies.

    How can you be like that? You know you have something completely wrong in the movie that can be fixed easily, yet you still leave it in. I hate when I realize later that I’ve told someone something wrong, even if it’s a minor detail. I’ll usually remember to tell him next time I see him. Same for right here on this blog – just haven’t been wrong enough to have done this much ;-}

  131. @CCZ

    A.O. Smith made water heaters in McBee (pronounced Mac-bee, 1st-syllable accented), S. Carolina, until recently. Now they seem to be made in Mexico.

  132. SFG says:
    @Mr. Anon

    This is why every war gets an anti-war movement if it goes on long enough.

    Everyone should read that thread for memorial day. They have stories going back to WW2.

  133. SFG says:
    @El Dato

    I googled it. Apparently tank-fighting is a school sport in the world of the anime.

    I stand by my statement on surrealism.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  134. @Simon

    I hear ya. One of the things that kept me in was the evil Republican Gov of Michigan. He’s played by a guy I know personally. We grew up in the same small town. His name is Mike Gaston and he’s in a ton of stuff; though for me, most notably, he was the first guy in the very first episode of the Sopranos that Tony beats the shit out of.

    Also, they list Kal Penn as a “consultant”. My guess is two of his other contributions are the constant leitmotif of “islamophobia” and the natural fact that hot white females (like the reporter) find him attractive. My understanding is that he and the super cute Chief of Staff have some kind of romantic relationship in season 2. But the eye-rolling has become too much for me and I won’t be watching season 2 or 3.

    Basically, if the Deep State were to create a TV drama about the Deep State, this would be it.

    • Replies: @Simon
    , @R.G. Camara
  135. donut says:
    @R.G. Camara

    “I guess you guys value being entertained with bread and circuses than actually saving Western civ.”

    That’s a valid point of view but on the other hand someone else might make the argument that bread and circuses are one of the foundations of Western civ.

  136. J.Ross says: • Website

    Two remarkably stupid NPR pieces on right now: Michigan public radio is doing a red-lining scholar claiming that the GI Bill was a racist conspiracy to effect white separarist suburbs, with whining that until you pay your home off you’re effectively just renting, and meanwhile are responsible for the upkeep of the house (OVIAS). The Bezos Blog writer is actually trying to make a more serious case for reparations. He claims that Washington freeing his slaves was a norm. The interviewer decides to bring up Israel — not for the idea that there are any illegally occupied people who might have some sort of reparations claim thereabouts — but because Germany had paid proper reparations to still-living wronged parties (and so the example is totally irrelevant to the slavery reparation joke). The writer’s name rhymes with “another cheesy stoat.”
    The other stupid thing, which is too stupid to deserve detailing, is a laughably weak effort from the frenetic yet lazy (sloppiness means wasting energy) RadioLab, contrasting the Heroic Trudeau to the Ee Vull Trump.
    Earlier on BBC Radio there was a disturbing but worth a listen Reith Lecture in which a law lord acknowledged the wholesale abandonment of English law in a reptilian, clinical, narrating-your-own-rape-to-you manner. His advice to a woman who had been harassed by the rape-enabling twitter police for enabling her husband’s medical suicide was, as brainlessly and irresponsibly as any out-of-it eurocrat advising people to simply not get touched in public, to break the law. Presumably he was drunk.
    The other stupid thing on BBC Radio was a remarkably dishonest piece advocating censorship — remarkably dishonest even for BBC — rehashing the already-published claims of a fired YouTube algorithm sorcerer. The presupposition of the censorship advocacy piece was that the years and years of much lamented shadowbanning and non-recomendation were not already happening. Given such a presupposition, the fired YouTube sorcerer was able to claim that the success of dissident views was a simple product of recommended views that never happened, and that shadowbanning (which was already happening) could be newly brought in to erase political thought. All of which sidesteps the laughable ineffectiveness of YouTube’s reliably insane recommendations and the defeat of shadowbanning by direct search. The example the dishonest censorship advocacy piece offered as representative of the dissident right was flat earthers, illustrated with a cherry-picked clip of Alex Jones screaming one of his (completely vindicated by the way) claims about water pollution.
    Mainstream public radio is still trash, so as trash as TV is, TV is probably marginally better.

  137. Alden says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Most non black men who went into the army learned to hate blacks very, very quickly.

  138. donut says:

    Did anybody watch “People of Earth” from TBS ? It was only two seasons but I liked it . It was a comedy about a support group for alien abductees , they prefer the term “experiencers” . Even the aliens were likable . Maybe that’s why it was only on for two seasons , no social justice agenda .

    • Replies: @Danindc
  139. J.Ross says: • Website
    @SFG

    Girls und Panzer is one of the best anime TV shows available today and it’s safe for kids. The writing and humor is brilliant (they explain girls in tanks by simply making it a societal norm) and the moral values taught are rock solid. At one point the protagonists suspect the opponents of cheating, but instead of crying to the authorities or resorting to cheating themselves, they resolve to play through. If that sounds like it’s not remarkable, consider that American cartoons have for years pushed grievance and dependence propaganda.
    A few years ago the consistently dishonest BBC decided to “expose” the 2-D yellow peril. Did they go after porn, or tentacle porn, or literally Satanic porn? No, they went after GuP, so ignorant Westerners will think it’s hentai and be afraid of it. The series creator, confronted by the BBC, fought back. BBC decried him as evil Nazi but also made no attempt to continue harassing him.

  140. @bored identity

    Merci! C’est un panthéon classique des grenouilles.

  141. Western says:
    @anonymous

    TV is unwatchable for the drug ads alone. Radio is just as bad. Why do I want to think about cancer every day?

    I got in the car in the morning going to work and was in an ok mood then an ad comes on that says my child was diagnosed with brain cancer so I took her to this hospital.

    Sporting events are obsessed with disease and death too.

    I would like to get away from all media including the internet. I did that a few days while in Europe. Your mind is so much better without it.

    • Replies: @Anon
  142. Art Deco says:

    The interviewer decides to bring up Israel — not for the idea that there are any illegally occupied people who might have some sort of reparations claim thereabouts

    1. Whose law do you fancy Israel is violating?

    2. Precisely where? (Hint “Gaza” is not a correct answer).

    3. Arab politicians have had two opportunities in the last 20 years to sign an agreement which would have ended Israeli security patrols on the West Bank and ceded the settlements. How many opportunities do they have to pass up before the ‘occupation’ isn’t an issue with you?

    • Troll: BengaliCanadianDude
  143. @Art Deco

    If you say so. The women in Endeavour all seem rather plain to me.

    Maybe in part personal taste. I find Miss Thursday is quite attractive. (For me, perhaps because she bears some resemblance to my mom–who was a pretty brunette as well. I.e.–the imprinting worked on me.)

    Obviously these actresses–in whatever show filmed now–are contemporary women, usually with well above average looks.

    But what i think you mean by “plain” is to me “girl next door”. But 60s and feminine girls-next-door, which i find appealing.

    There are plenty of “hot” actresses. But i don’t find their characters–nor contemporary young women–to generally be very attractive. Perhaps “hot”, but not actually “attractive”. I don’t need–or want–the butt kicking babes, the you-go-girls, the drama queens, nor the tattooed or pierced or pink-haired, or punk or goth or weird, nor the single moms, the tramps.

    When it comes to actual romance–as opposed to “hey let’s have a roll in the hay”–the relevant question a woman is “answering” is “Is she a girl i could commit to and build a life together with”. The ones who provide an inducement to answer “yes” are the ones who are actually “attractive” and induce emotional reponse beyond “bangable”.

    Far fewer modern women seem to provide a “yes” answer to that question. In fact, i don’t think most moden women even understand that is the question they must answer, nor how to behave and live their life to engender a “yes”.

    • Agree: Autochthon
  144. @bored identity

    Wazzat? Never joke about feijoada. That’s serious 😉

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
  145. utu says:
    @Lot

    The spooks were looking into Flynn for a long time.

    It was Flynn who was looking into the spooks. When he was in charge of DIA when General Dempsey was Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff he opened channels to Assad in Syria via Tel Aviv, Ankara and Moscow partly to undermine CIA project of destabilization of Syria. Flynn’s DIA intercepted some weapon shipment to Al Qaeda and Al Nusra and replaced them with a defective weapons (via Turkey route, iirc) to gain the trust of Assad.

    Before Trump inauguration Flynn contacted Russian ambassador because he was asked by Netanyahu to see whether Russia would stop the UN resolution condemning Israel that Obama as his last anti-Israel parting shot instructed Samantha Powers to abstain from vetoing which used to be a standard operating procedure for the US when it comes to anti-Israel resolutions. So this Russian collusion was on behalf of Israel. That Trump let Flynn go at that time using a pretense that Flynn lied to the VP was Trump’s first grave mistake.

  146. Simon says:
    @Malcolm X-Lax

    Usually the actors who play evil right-wing bigots — like the actor from your hometown — turn out to be, in real life, typical sanctimonious libs, like almost everyone else in Hollywood. Still, I have to admire actors brave enough to play modern-day hate figures (or, as you mentioned, Soprano victims; I’ve always wondered whether Ned Beatty has any regrets about being forever identified as the rape victim in Deliverance).

    (P.S. Speaking of “eye-rolling,” Natascha McElhone’s huge lascivious smirk and weird eye-rolling as the hero’s wife in Designated Survivor gave me the willies.)

    Let me recommend, to one and all, Happy Valley, a British crime series from a few years back that I found so powerful and compelling that, for once, I barely noticed that it was somewhat p.c. Granted, all the men in it are weak; all the strong characters are female, including the protagonist, an unglamorous overweight middle-aged policewoman. And it’s the creation of a woman whose latest series, Gentleman Jack, celebrates an obnoxiously pugnacious Victorian dyke. Still, Happy Valley has enough great characters — villains, victims, and heroine — that it deserved to run for more than two seasons.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
  147. @Kibernetika

    Sorry, that was the wrong clip. Here’s the original:

  148. Mr. Anon says:
    @bored identity

    Utopia, a British dark comedy from Channel 4, Season 1&2 (2013-2014 ) :

    Aren’t all cable TV shows “dark”? Dark, sinister, perverse, amoral, nihlistic, degenerate,……………or some combination of some or all of the above. They’re all so edgy and cynical in TV nowadays. It’s all killers, vampires, demons, drug dealers, serial killers, etc. You’d think that anything that is essentially positive, wholesome, and uplifting would be anti-matter to the modern TV producer, writer, or show-runner. If they even caught even a minute of Benji or Born Free they’d burst into flame.

  149. Mr. Anon says:
    @AnotherDad

    Tastes differ. Art Deco’s is likely poor. It’s not like I would trust his judgement in anything.

  150. @AnotherDad

    There are plenty of “hot” actresses. But i don’t find their characters–nor contemporary young women–to generally be very attractive. Perhaps “hot”, but not actually “attractive”. I don’t need–or want–the butt kicking babes, the you-go-girls, the drama queens, nor the tattooed or pierced or pink-haired, or punk or goth or weird, nor the single moms, the tramps.

    Great reply, AD. I think Miss Thursday’s a doll, myself — as you say, girl-next-door type with lots of appeal.

    Her character arc is interesting. Not to give too much away, but Miss Thursday struggles, shall we say, finding her place in late-60s Brit culture. Her forays into doing things ‘modern’ girls are supposed to do comprise a fairly biting indictment of that culture.

  151. I loved Mitchell and Webb until I discovered Armstrong and Miller.

    But Homeopathic A&E is an absolute classic:

  152. I have all the good movies. If you were my friends, I’d let you borrow them.

  153. @Steve in Greensboro

    I think Endeavour’s quality dropped for a couple of episodes at the beginning of season 4, but it recovers soon thereafter.

    I agree the producers throw out occasional PC bones to placate the SJWs, but compared to most media these days, it’s not too bad. I find that the series’ many other virtues far outweigh a minute or two of annoyance now and then.

  154. @Malcolm X-Lax

    Also, they list Kal Penn as a “consultant”. My guess is two of his other contributions are the constant leitmotif of “islamophobia” and the natural fact that hot white females (like the reporter) find him attractive.

    Penn swings from the other side of the plate, but in an open-secret kind of way. He’s still in the closet. So this might be either a meta-joke by the show or else an attempt to keep the average schmo from figuring it out—the way Rock Hudson or Tab Hunter would be portrayed as ladies’ men.

    • Replies: @Malcolm X-Lax
  155. @Simon

    Just did some reading on Happy Valley and it sounds like something I would enjoy. One reviewer said it was a little like the series Fargo (based on the movie) which I enjoyed, the first two seasons especially. I’ll have to hunt it down somehow. And you’re right about right wing characters being lefties in real life. I follow Mike Gaston on Twitter–or used to, as I’ve been permabanned for crimethink–and even by Hollywood standards, he’s quite leftwing.

  156. @anon

    Japan is about twice the size in population as the UK (and obviously smaller in population size as the US), and yet for the longest while Japanese Television series episodes were roughly the equivalent of the US, about 24-26 episodes per season.

    If you build it, they will come. If at one time the BBC/Brit Network shows produced twice the number of episodes for their popular shows and it appeared to work, then they can do so again.

    Imagine if in the realm of non-fiction, say, that British television aired about 10-12 Premier League Matches per year and not a match more. How would the UK sports fans react? In other words, if they can do so for sports and air more and more matches, then they can do so for popular TV shows and air more episodes. Must be lacking in resolve and need some Yanks to come along and show them how it’s done.

    • Replies: @Yngvar
  157. @R.G. Camara

    That’s the first I’ve heard that but now that you mention it, I can see it. Of course, it wouldn’t be the first time he’s lied.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/kal-penn-gets-stoned/

  158. J.Ross says: • Website

    I just finished Deutschland ’83 and, holy cow, it’s the best thing that’s been on TV since the homeless comic book artist episode of House, MD. Tension and pacing perfect, acting perfect, period details to my inexpert eyes perfect. There are absolute slam dunk jokes I will not spoil but they’re the sort of thing Hollywood used to know how to do. It is leftist propaganda, but not stupidly indulgently so — in an environment of Mary Sues and Black Jesus figures, the overall bias of the show is clearly coming from a leftist place, but within parameters that did not originate in a pharmacalogically-augmented Spirit Quest in Sonoma. The people are saying things that people at the time actually said. The commie trick of showing your guy in the best possible light without flat-out lying is applied to walking abortion Hohnecker, which is really something, but it’s still monumentally less dishonest than Handmaid or anything else. God I wish this had 54 episodes, I would wear their T-shirt.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  159. Danindc says:
    @donut

    I got the idea to watch it from a comment on this site probably yours. I put it as a reminder in my phone to recur monthly. I keep seeing it come up…every month… but haven’t seen it yet.

  160. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ray Huffman

    This seems to be common in Napoleonic Code jurisdictions. It was Mexican demand which kept the .38 Super alive for decades after it had fallen by the wayside elsewhere, because .38 super was the most powerful non-military caliber in .38 caliber, which was the largest caliber permitted.

    I know a salesperson at a big box sporting goods place who tells me she sells 6 to 12 .38 Super 1911s a year, almost all to mestizos with legal paperwork-state DL and the check come back OK. Usually they want nickel plate or polished stainless.

    They also request single action revolvers in .38 Super, but no one makes them. No good reason why.

    She figures they are going to Mexico but as long as they give no indications of illegal intent or “straw man sale” it is not her legal or moral concern.

    It’s a reasonable round but I hate to see 1911s in anything but .45 ACP since the frame and slide are both different. You could build a universal frame and slide, which frames for barrels with the feed ramp all on the barrel are, but the slide needs a different bolt face or a very flexible extractor to reliably extract and eject .38 or 9mm. There is a noninterchngeable .45 cartridge that is legal in many Napoleonic Code jurisdictions but I don’t know if Mexico is one. There is also the excellent .38/45 that is a necked down .45 brass with .355 bullet diameter that uses .45 magazines and all 1911 standard.45 parts but the barrel-you can just swap barrels-but it has died out.

    The real purpose of prohibiting military calibers is to stop or reduce pilferage from military arsenals.

  161. jim jones says:
    @donut

    Chernobyl is also on the Pirate Bay for people who like to stick it to The Man

    • Replies: @Clyde
  162. @Mr. Anon

    You’re absolutely right.

    The beauty of ordinary things is elusive to triple-parenthetically confined triple sixers.

    Of course, the real threat to West. Civ. & Humanities 101 is deviant crime-thinking of few Flattering Earthers:

    https://stuffgate.com/truthsetfreetv.com

  163. > Retrowashing splurve joints

    A Bit of Fry and Laurie‘s, The Hardware Shop:

  164. Clyde says:
    @AnonAnon

    Bosch is solid and for all the reasons that you state. Though the latest season which is number five, dragged for me because the subject matter was a downer. Opioid drugs and the disgusting, slimy people who are involved. The sellers and the users. Despite this season five was a 7 out of 10 compared to the mindless movies that Hollywood mindlessly pumps out.
    See “The Bodyguard” if you can. An English production. It shows how de-balled and run by women and back-stabbers the British establishment is. Or at least the terrorism fighting sector.

  165. @Steve Sailer

    All the Bosch novels are good, and the Amazon show Bosch does them justice. +10 on both.

  166. Clyde says:
    @jim jones

    Czech out the Asia alt version of PB which is the most reliable/up all the time/ and Czech out ETTV too. Sky Torzzzzzents too.

  167. Clyde says:
    @J.Ross

    Homeland exudes female biased suck-itude but the best season, and it is really good, is number five which takes place in Berlin, Germany. High bad guy body count, It is worth getting hold of and has the maximum Peter Quinn offing bad mofos, and they are bad n ugly mofos of various ethnic backgrounds.

    Homeland was Obama endorsed while he was in office.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  168. Clyde says:
    @Mr. Anon

    Aren’t all cable TV shows “dark”? Dark, sinister, perverse, amoral, nihlistic, degenerate….

    You included vampires but omitted zombies as in Walking Dead. If you want evidence of IQ decline just see all the vampire and zombie shows and movies there are out there for the great unwashed to take in.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  169. @BB753

    The Man in the High Castle is an excellent show.

    There are many aspects of the alternate timeline that are very intriguing and desirable.

  170. @bored identity

    Sounds like Robert DeNiro, who is famed for playing all kinds of hardboiled, on-point criminals, yet comes off as an absent-minded hippie in interviews.

  171. @BengaliCanadianDude

    The first on-screen black doctor I can remember is in Bullitt (yes, the Steve McQueen one). They actually converted his skin color into a significant point of contention between McQueen and Robert Vaughn’s characters.

    I’ve actually had a black doctor in real life. Never again.

  172. jill says:

    “Fauda” on Netflix is outstanding. Very intense and very well done. Actors were excellent with most speaking multiple languages.

    Also, enjoyed “Bodyguard” and “Secret City” on Netflix. Nice to know British and Australian screen writers hate the deep state as much as I do.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  173. A gender swapped US version of Peep Show is being made. I’m betting this will be even more cringe-worthy than the US version of Red Dwarf.

    It looks like people are starting to believe their own propaganda about men and women not being essentially different.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-48423181

  174. @The Wild Geese Howard

    More than 2.5 decades ago, I was in grade 2. I remember going to a black optometrist, who told me to just wear glasses even though I had and still have excellent eyesight. We went because my mom was keen on the doctors and specialists and this was right besides our house then. After wearing the glasses, I began to experience vision troubles(for the first time in my life!)so I told my mom and we went to another opto.. this time an Indian one…Indian-canadian lol… she basically told me to take the glasses off that instant and to never put it on again, because my eyesight would be permanently hindered and diminished by it, and she told us that we were smart to have come earlier on, as it might have been worse later on. Crazy stuff

  175. • Replies: @J.Ross
  176. Clyde says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    I’ve actually had a black doctor in real life. Never again.

    Same here but was with a black lawyer. He even blew off a mediation date.

  177. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Clyde

    Homeland is literally Israeli government propaganda adapted to the American market to defame any veterans who question our glorious war effort (which of course never had anything to do with Israel).

  178. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Cagey Beast

    Aren’t there already twenty shows nobody watches about two quirky female friends who comment snarkily on life? I just linked a story about a new one the other day which had Asians, and there’s one that Al Yankovic guest appeared on, and Crazy Ex-Girlfiend roughly counts. And that’s narrative ficfional TV shows, it wouldn’t include the army of podcasts which met that description.
    If there is any market for this in the first place, it’s surely saturated.

  179. J.Ross says: • Website
    @jill

    Have you seen Utopia? It has one Mary Sue and one race-mixing scene, and after those imprimaturs it’s as though it takes its story ideas from Alex Jones. It’s interesting that they’ll let you talk about Big Pharma if you include racemixing.

  180. One point I left out about Bosch– I concur with all the other posters who mention that the show does a great job of presenting the city of Los Angeles. They really found some great locations and did an excellent job filming them.

    The cinematographers on the show also do a great job of capturing that unique, golden, West Coast light at many points throughout the show.

    This show really is a no-brainer watch if you have some form of Amazon Prime. It’s included as part of your subscription.

  181. Mr. Anon says:
    @Clyde

    Yeah – good catch – I forgot about the zombies. What Sunday evening in the old family room would be complete without graphic depictions of people having axes buried in their skulls or people being beaten to death with barbed-wire-wrapped baseball bats.

    Wholesome family entertainment.

  182. Yngvar says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    If you build it, they will come. If at one time the BBC/Brit Network shows produced twice the number of episodes for their popular shows and it appeared to work, then they can do so again.

    The BBC is financed by the TV-license. Every episode aired is a cost, not a revenue source.
    The final sequence in the final episode of Blackadder Goes Forth had to be recorded in one take because the BBC didn’t have the money to give it another shot.

  183. @Mr. Anon

    I find, at any given time, there may be one programme airing which is not garbage. For some time, that programme has been Bojack Horseman.*

    One must pay attention, and think, because it could seem like more of the degeneracy you write of, just as, say, Tom Jones could to an undiscerning reader, but Bojack Horseman is full of pathos for those doing their best, failure after failure, an understanding of the absurd horrors of modernity and GloboHomo, and the sadness and ultimate waste of hedonism or any life without children. On top of all that, it’s hilarious and has some of the only innovative artistry you’ll find in a modern teleplay.

    *Rick & Morty is pretty amazing, too:

    You may argue either of these are nihilistic and cynical, but their advocacy for persevering in the face of existential dread is more uplifting than the saccharine likes of Benji, just as Kierkegaard offers more solace than that shyster Olsteen ever did.

  184. @Simon

    I’m happy to say I’ve no idea who or what Kal Penn is, but I’m pretty sure it should be a middling state university if it is not. It could hang out with Conn Bama and their pal Miss Mass….

  185. Old Prude says:
    @Realist

    You really said something there, brother.

  186. Call me in as a fan of the Patriot, dark humor at it’s finest. A sweater wearing, bicycle riding, depressed folk singer as a spy, whats not to like? Then pretending to be an engineer on something he knows nothing about and pushing the far better Asian engineering job candidate in front the truck so he will get the job is ROFL for sure.

  187. Jeeves says:

    Fawlty Towers is ranked No. 1? I recently re-watched a couple of episodes on my local PBS station. I can’t believe I ever thought it was funny.

  188. Anon[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Svigor

    Is this something to do with that anti-circumcision law last year?

  189. Anon[100] • Disclaimer says:
    @Western

    An aging society with a lot of geezers will be obsessed with disease and health. It’s natural.

  190. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

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