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It’s pretty easy to do. Just read my old stuff for ideas, look up some data, and publish. From Science News:

Immigrants pave the way for the gentrification of black neighborhoods

A study shows Asian and Hispanic immigrants alter U.S. neighborhood demographics
BY SUJATA GUPTA 8:00AM, APRIL 18, 2019

… Many think of gentrification today as wealthy, white millennials moving into low-income, minority neighborhoods and driving up housing costs. Yet a new study suggests that another group may play a key role in the process: immigrants.

Gentrification, in which affluent outsiders settle and renovate rundown neighborhoods, generally decreases in white neighborhoods when immigrants from Asia and Latin America move in. The opposite is true in black neighborhoods, where rising immigrant numbers increase the odds an area will be gentrified.

Next, somebody might do a breakthrough paper on how rising numbers of gay men increase the odds an area will be gentrified.

All this might almost have something to do with crime …

“Changing the ethnoracial composition might make neighborhoods seem more amenable for [white] people to move in,” suggests study coauthor and sociologist Jackelyn Hwang of Stanford University, who presented her findings April 11 at the annual meeting of the Population Association of America in Austin, Texas. …

In 2015, Hwang showed that, even in the 1970s and ’80s, black neighborhoods were more likely to be gentrified following the arrival of Asian and Hispanic immigrants. With the number of U.S. immigrants growing from 9.7 million in 1970 to 42.4 million in 2014, Hwang suspected her earlier observations might still hold true.

In a new analysis involving 151 U.S. cities with populations over 100,000, Hwang used census data from 1990, 2000 and 2010, as well as estimates from the 2010–2014 American Community Surveys tracking demographic trends (referred to in the study collectively as 2012 data). Within those cities, Hwang isolated census tracts, which serve as proxies for neighborhoods of about 4,000 people, that had a median household income below the city’s 1990 median household income. These tracts could be gentrified, she theorized.

Next, Hwang broke those gentrifying tracts down by race. She found that, in the 1990s, an influx of immigrants decreased the odds of gentrification in nonblack neighborhoods, but slightly increased those odds in predominantly black neighborhoods. From 2000 to 2012, a 1 percent increase in immigrants to a black neighborhood increased the likelihood of gentrification by 9 percent. Conversely, the presence of immigrants in white and other nonblack neighborhoods decreased the likelihood of gentrification by 4 to 5 percent.

The research underlines that “gentrification is a much more complicated phenomenon than a white hipster moving into a black neighborhood,” says Mahesh Somashekhar, a sociologist at the University of Illinois at Chicago not involved with the study.

However, sociologist Derek Hyra suggests immigration trends may not be a main driver of gentrification. Instead, he wonders if all people, including blacks, whites and recent immigrants from Asia and Latin America, are simply following new jobs that happen to be located near historically black neighborhoods.

But everybody knows that there aren’t any jobs located near historically black neighborhoods such as Harlem, Brooklyn, the District of Columbia, downtown Los Angeles, etc. Everybody knows blacks got redlined out of the really booming places like Dubuque.

 
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  1. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:

    But everybody knows that there aren’t any jobs located near historically black neighborhoods such as Harlem, Brooklyn, the District of Columbia, downtown Los Angeles, etc. Everybody knows blacks got redlined out of the really booming places like Dubuque.

    This is such a good point.

  2. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    But everybody knows that there aren’t any jobs located near historically black neighborhoods such as Harlem, Brooklyn, the District of Columbia, downtown Los Angeles, etc.

    It’s not that there aren’t any jobs. There aren’t enough job fairs:

  3. Wait, you’re anecdotes lacking in data and #science turned up as empirically validated #science studies? We must alert the Cato Institute!

  4. data point #893 that the HBD perspective is the most accurate prediction model we have.

    but as i’ve posted in the past, not only is there no reward or personal benefit to being way, way ahead on these topics, the result is actually that you are punished severely for correctly predicting what the future will be like.

    it’s been interesting watching sites like breitbart, zerohedge, ann coulter’s twitter, and others slowly turn into vdare/isteve/amren from 20 years ago. however, i seem to find that i haven’t been paid millions of dollars or rewarded with super models for decades of effort at saving the west. i have been called every name in the book and forced to never talk about any of this in public though around the people i’d like to save. that gets old after decades.

    jared taylor in particular has been pretty much obliterated. seems hard to believe i actually went to the AmRen conference in Washington DC around this time period, something that could never, ever, EVER happen today, nor will it ever happen again.

  5. J.Ross says: • Website
    @prime noticer

    Wrong focus. I’m not following this to be rich, I’m following this because it’s real. You can temporarily ignore what’s real, but it’ll come back, and then you won’t be able to ignore it.
    Are you saying you want steak?

  6. Cato says:

    Gentrification is usually led by gays. Richard Florida is usually applauded as the person who “noticed”, but almost anyone involved in urban planning noticed. Example newsy thing for corroboration: https://www.citylab.com/equity/2014/02/why-gayborhoods-matter/8368/

    • Replies: @Digital Samizdat
    , @al anon
  7. Anonymous[180] • Disclaimer says:
    @prime noticer

    jared taylor in particular has been pretty much obliterated. seems hard to believe i actually went to the AmRen conference in Washington DC around this time period, something that could never, ever, EVER happen today, nor will it ever happen again.

    You can thank Richard Spencer for that.

    • Replies: @prime noticer
  8. All this might almost have something to do with crime

    Nope, chimichangas.

  9. Everybody knows blacks got redlined out of the really booming places like Dubuque.

    Which is why Dubuque went GOP for the first time since Eisenhower. White supremacism, If you catch my driftless.

  10. Don’t you mean turn them into pseudo-academic papers, Steve? I have it on no less an authority than the SPLC that you are a pseudo-academic:

    Yiannopoulos’s article relies heavily on the pseudo-academics that have coalesced around Richard Spencer at Radix Journal, including Steve Sailer and Jack Donovan, to legitimize the Alt-Right.

    That was from their first article on the Alt-right, “Whose Alt-Right Is It Anyway?”, August 15, 2016, in which they seemed to be just throwing out names. Then the full-on demonization began. Not even three years later, they have 228 articles in their “Alt-right” hate category and alt-right hate, outpacing much older and more established kinds of hate like neo-Nazi hate (135), anti-immigrant hate (167), Antigovernment Movement hate (190), and Holocaust denial hate (9). The only kind of hate that still garners more entries on their hate blog than Alt-right hate is the understandably popular General Hate (1034).

    But think what they did there. They identified a budding movement that could have ended immigration, ended the wars against Israel’s neighbors, even provided political protection for American whites as people with group interests in common. This nascent movement, still going through its birthing pains, had just named itself when the SPLC set to work. 228 articles later, the average white American would die of a heart attack if someone called him “alt-right”. It’s as toxic as white nationalist.

    And all they are doing in those 228 articles is repeating over and over the term “alt-right” and “racist” together, they same way the neocons repeated 9-11 and Saddam Hussein in the same sentence over and over until people believed the 2003 invasion was retribution. In their second article on the alt-right, a couple of weeks later, Mark Potok set the template, which remains in place, “The people who run the National Policy Institute (NPI) — a key institution of the Alternative-Right that Hillary Clinton will pillory today in a speech attacking its connections to Donald Trump — have always been suit-and-tie racists.” Name-call. Repeat. They supply the “underlying fact” that makes the word defamatory. The fact disappears, but the defaming power of the word remains.

    Democracy by demonization. The SPLC has created this charged word (like the New York Times did the first time they put “N-word” in a headline) that they can wield with lethal effect.

    I agree with Ron Unz. The shocking thing is how easy it is for them. We can’t have a democracy like this.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Desiderius
  11. @Craig Nelsen

    Whatever happened to Mark Potok anyway? Probably a story there …

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  12. @Craig Nelsen

    Don’t you mean turn them into pseudo-academic papers, Steve?

    No, it is the function of the Sujata Guptas of the world to transmute them into academic gold with her vibrance.

    • Replies: @al anon
  13. @J.Ross

    That scene from “The Matrix” series is the rationalist’s explanation for why Tom Friedman, David Brooks, Bill Kristol, Paul Krugman and their ilk, do what they do.

    It’s literally the highest-value use of their time: whether or not they believe in the schlock they sling is irrelevant. If someone offered me mid-6-figures a year to sling bullshit that ran diametrically opposite to my class’ (or nation’s) interests, you best believe I would do it: never gonna happen, sadly – I have zero parentheses (as far as I’m aware – and I have no interest in finding out anyhow).

    Selling out is the rational thing to do – the people on whose behalf HBDers think they’re fighting, don’t give a flying fuck (and let’s be frank, most HBDers would not piss on a trailer-park cracker if the cracker was on fire, even if he had been set on fire by a left-handed LGBTQZZFG+ retarded black cripple illegal-immigrant Mexican Muslim.

    That said… the scene itself is typical Yank failure to stick to the narrative constraints: Morpheus said very explicitly that once you took the red pill you couldn’t go back.

    How often I have wished for the blue pill: I would down that motherfucker in a heartbeat and live the life of a 2-year-old labrador puppy.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @J.Ross
  14. @Steve Sailer

    He is named as an individual defendant in Baltimore attorney Glen Allen’s suit against the SPLC and appears to be still living in Montgomery less than a mile from his co-defendant, Heidi Beirich.

    Heidi, by the way, wins the Defendant Derby, being named in three of the four suits against the SPLC. Richard Cohen comes in second with two. Potok snagged just one Defendy. Which is exactly how I would have ranked them.

  15. @Cato

    Hell, my own father noticed it 30 years ago. He used to say, ‘If you want to invest in real-estate, then follow the fags.’

  16. al anon says:
    @Cato

    Blow up by Antonioni in 1965 has a reference to the Gays moving in to raise neighborhood values, plus an even more culturally significant event.

  17. I believe I’ve said it here before, there are dozens of dissertations to be written on the ethnic cleansing of America’s cities, a Sailerian topic if ever there was one. I’m no expert on the subject, but the only book I’m aware of that takes this tack is E. Michael Jones’s The Slaughter of Cities: Urban Renewal as Ethnic Cleansing (2002).

  18. al anon says:
    @Desiderius

    Seeing how Indians are adapting to methodology of the Critique that had been purely the domain of the Jews has been an amazing thing to watch. Like a new infection massively invading a collapsing biosystem already riven by parasites. Is there a way to mitigate the damage by examining the methodology? or is it too late?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  19. We found that, in the 1990s, an influx of immigrants decreased the odds of gentrification in nonblack neighborhoods, but slightly increased those odds in predominantly black neighborhoods.

    Another way to put it: All-Black neighborhoods can’t possibly get any worse, so the smart money says they eventually have to get better by getting less black.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
  20. @J.Ross

    it was sarcasm. i expect nothing.

    what grates on you is how hostile people are to these ideas for decades. right up until it’s obvious even to the people of average brainpower, that the left is setting them up for replacement. but by then, it’s too late.

    most conservative blogs and forums on the internet now sound exactly like sam francis in the 90s. daily outrage at how the government allows invaders and protected classes to get away with murder, but goes directly after law abiding, tax paying core american citizens if they so much as jaywalk.

    but we noticed that over 20 years ago – the most astute leaders in the altosphere noticed it 30 to 40 years ago. trying to warn normals about it typically resulted in social ostracism.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  21. @Anonymous

    jared taylor was pushed out of washington DC permanently years before anybody ever heard of richard spencer.

  22. @Hypnotoad666

    There’s only two ways for them to end: gentrification or depredation.

  23. drawbacks says:

    ‘Broken down by race.’ There’s a lot of that about.

  24. @al anon

    It’s* never been purely or even primarily the domain of the Jews, although there was a generation where they took to it extraordinarily well, they’re now getting sucked into the same abyss as everyone else who went down that road.

    Worst case we’ll do as we always have: lie low until the storm passes then get to work building something new and old from scratch if necessary.

    * – intra-aryan warfare, so it should be no surprise that the original Brahmins are so adept at it.

  25. @Kratoklastes

    If someone offered me mid-6-figures a year to sling bullshit that ran diametrically opposite to my class’ (or nation’s) interests, you best believe I would do it

    So now that you’ve established that you’re a whore all that remains is negotiating your price. Ever consider that you’re so desperate exactly because you’ve decided to be a whore? Dime a dozen.

  26. J.Ross says: • Website
    @prime noticer

    Who was it who boiled down Socrates with the formula that most people are unthinking sleepwalkers, going through the motions, and if you try to show them what they’re missing, they’ll kill you?

  27. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Kratoklastes

    David Brooks, as horrible as he always is, was almost a voice of reason on the Russian hackers insanity, actually pointing out that there was nothing here and top Democrats were saying they wouldn’t impeach anyway. When the Mueller report came out, he acted like he had just discovered the duct tape on the door at the Watergate hotel. The fact that this was a total contradiction of his previous statements didn’t matter and was not noticed by his fellow talking heads. Nobody said anything about investigations requiring a basis or presumption of innocence, or how none of the various odious actions (like SWATting Stone) had anything to do with the original charge. Or about Paul Manafort’s business partner John Podesta taunting Manafort about getting “caught” doing things that Podesta did with Manafort at the same time, and all long before Manafort was associated with Trump. Or about what Joe Biden’s son is doing in the Ukrainian government.

  28. @prime noticer

    the result is actually that you are punished severely for correctly predicting what the future will be like.

    There’s an old German saying, which refers to that social fact:

    People don’t like those who get up early in the morning – but they drink their milk anyway.

    (Philosopher Habermas put it this way: Intellectuals get on the nerves of the others).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  29. @Dieter Kief

    Intellectuals are up too late reading and arguing to get up early in the morning.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  30. @Desiderius

    Intellectuals are up too late reading and arguing to get up early in the morning.

    Yeah, true, but on the other hand, you can be too early late at night quite easily – as long as you are an intellectual. – But that’s what puzzles people even more. –

    – Or if you think of this smelly grammar-school-teacher in the Alpine hinterlands, who, rumor had it, was from a wealthy family in Vienna, which was true, actually, he did stem from one of the wealthiest families that there were, at this time in Europe. And he never dressed appropriately, in the eyes of the locals, and never looked like he had slept enough when he arrived at school in the morning – often times, only to beat up some of the kids there quite severely – – – and what became of him, after he had turned down the wealth of his family almost completely (he kept a shabby hut in Norway for himself) – – – one of those rare men, who would, during the twentieth century, help their contemporaries to understand, that there was no reason in language, or no absolute reason in other means of reasoning – no matter how abstract they were – but that it*** would always depend on the way, in which people made a proper use of certain kinds of formal systems, such as sentences, or, geometrical, or mathematical or logical formulas, etc. …

    ***it meaning here: The degree up to which a certain formal way of reasoning represents reason indeed (or is reasonable).

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Desiderius
  31. Anonymous[313] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dieter Kief

    that there was no reason in language

    What does this sentence even mean? Who said it?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  32. @Dieter Kief

    Yes, that is what I was arguing was Trump’s approach. Entirely intuitive of course.

    The plague is the abstract divorced from the concrete and Trump was a rough stab at a corrective.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  33. @Anonymous

    that there was no reason in language

    What does this sentence even mean? Who said it?

    Wittgenstein – the late Wittgenstein of the Notebooks, developed the “Gebrauchstheorie der Bedeutung” – the idea, that what a word or a sentence means depends on the way, in which it is used – much more so than on formal criteria.

    Nobody who just follows formal criteria will ever be able to understand, what people are talking about. This insight implies, that there is no use in looking out for a proper formula to explain the (social) world (or to think about ways to simulate a person by a computer (a machine which runs on formal systems) etc….).

    If you want to understand people – listen to them and try to fígure out, what they tried to express (you can only be sure about what people actually mean, by talking/thinking things over/through with them (which is not the same as agreeing with one another).

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  34. @Desiderius

    This blog reminds me at times of cruising in the universe – and making contact every once in a while – ten thousand light-years from home (Jagger/Richards)… Funky!

  35. @Dieter Kief

    If you want to understand people – listen to them and try to fígure out, what they tried to express (you can only be sure about what people actually mean, by talking/thinking things over/through with them (which is not the same as agreeing with one another).

    You can see this in action with the utterly incompetent contemporary media. Not just with Trump, altough he’s the most obvious. They don’t start out with understanding as their first objective (the hermeneutic of suspicion precludes that) so they never do get an accurate sense of what the speaker is trying to say. If they were able to do that then even when they chose to gaslight the gaslighting would be much more effective and non-obvious.

    You see that with the Biden announcement. They would never have chosen to predicate that whole thing on a lie even if it were a very effective lie. They aren’t aware it is a lie because they never were interested in what Trump had to say in the first place. That makes them, thankfully for us, very ineffective liars.

  36. They aren’t aware it is a lie because they never were interested in what Trump had to say in the first place. That makes them, thankfully for us, very ineffective liars.

    The basket of deplorables contains not only all this quite ordinarily dressed and mostly overweight and – – – white – – – regulars, but some insight, too – – – against all odds, almost. And against lots of the most brainy people that there are. – This reminds me of Le Clocher de Notre Dame (and The Beauty and the Beast) and of Peter Turchin’s Ages of Dischord, which I did not know; Anatoly Karlin referred to this book yesterday, and it looks very promising, in that Turchin points out interesting ways, in which societies become dysfunctional.

    And now i feel the Interstellar Overdrive in the realm of the spirit, one oft those really striking (and I hope: Insightful indeed) coincidences: The women who put forward the idea, that what makes the US suffer is in the Basket of Deplorables, mainly, is a lawyer – and Turchin (a new friend of mine, really!) notices indeed and explicitly, that it can be a sign of societal decline, if there are too many lawyers.

    – An idea, I have come up with every once in a while – not least here on unz.com on various occasions without even the slightest answer, result, echo – not even disagreement – and now I have a prominent companion in arguing that way, which – – – -felt very good – – – ten thousand lightyears from home – to realize, that there actually is “somebody out there” (Pink Floyd, The Wall

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